Featherstone Cash in the Attic


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Featherstone

Wendy Featherstone wants to repair her B&B in the Welsh borders and hopes to pay for it by selling off some unused mementos. Angela Rippon and John Cameron do their best to help.


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Welcome to the programme that helps you hunt for antiques and collectables in your home

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and then sells them with you at auction.

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I'm sure that all of us have got things in our homes

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that we look at with fond memories

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when we remember where they were bought, or who gave them to us,

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or things that were left as a legacy,

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but there always comes a time when you have to have a bit of a clear out.

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And that's the situation facing the family that we're meeting today

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who clearly hope that when they go to auction,

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they'll be able to turn those things into real cash in the attic.

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'Coming up on Cash In The Attic,

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'why is our expert, John, encouraging the lady of the house to impersonate Big Ben?'

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Ding-dong, ding-dong. Ding-dong, ding-dong.

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'And her granddaughter obviously has all the makings of a great antiques expert.'

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-Do you know what it is?

-A weird thing?

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'Come auction day, John keeps our spirits high after the sale of a glass bird.'

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-It went "cheep."

-Oh, dear!

-Sorry. I promise I won't do any more.

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'Find out what happens when the hammer finally falls.

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'Meet Wendy Featherstone and her lovely granddaughters, Nerise and Alex.

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'Nerise is going to be lending a helping hand with today's rummage.

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'Wendy lives in this three-bedroomed bungalow and runs a B&B here with the help of her daughter, Karen.

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'The business keeps our host busy, as do her hobbies, making greeting cards and jewellery and knitting.

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'A little extra cash is going to come in handy for Wendy's renovation plans,

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'and that's why we've been called in.

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'Our expert, John Cameron, is a qualified surveyor

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'and a graduate in fine art valuation,

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'so he's just the man to help us search for collectables to sell.'

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Now, that's what I call a real hive of activity. Hello, Wendy.

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And who's that down the end in that gorgeous pink T-shirt?

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-I'm Alex.

-How old are you?

-I'm seven.

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-And who are you?

-I'm Nerise.

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-And how old are you?

-I'm nine.

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So what made you call in Cash In The Attic?

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Erm, I need some help with maintenance

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-and, firstly, I need to have new patio doors.

-Mm.

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So you think it's a good idea, Nerise, for Granny to get rid of some of these things?

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There's a clock that I think we should get rid of, cos I don't really like it.

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-THEY LAUGH

-So it's got to go.

-Yeah.

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What sort of things are we going to see today?

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Well, I've got quite a few things that have got to go, and there was a legacy left to me, as well.

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-So it's a bit crowded, really.

-Nerise, of course, is going to help you

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-sort out the things we're going to send to auction. She's got her eyes on the clock. That's got to go.

-Yes.

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Definitely! I wonder what else we'll find.

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'Wendy's target today is £500,

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'so let's hope that there are plenty of interesting items here.

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'Two of the three bedrooms in this bungalow are for guests

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'and with the beautiful Welsh countryside on their doorstep, it's a real hot spot.

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'Well, it may be pouring outside, but inside it's warm and welcoming.

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'Just in need of a clear out, with John already on the case.'

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-John!

-Hello!

-Hello!

-Nerise and Wendy to see you.

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And, I have to warn you, Nerise has got some pretty good ideas of what's got to go.

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-Right, good. I'm sticking with you, then.

-THEY LAUGH

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-Is this one of the things you think should go, Nerise?

-Yeah.

-Do you know what it is?

-Not really.

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-What do you think it is?

-A weird thing?

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Well, it is certainly a weird machine, but John is going to tell us exactly what it is.

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It's a barograph and they're used to predict weather.

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It actually records fluctuations in atmospheric pressure.

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How it work is, you have these little metallic bellows here

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and as they contract and expand with the changes in atmospheric pressure,

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they resist against this little arm here,

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so that moves up and down the graph.

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So those fluctuations can be changed and recorded quite accurately.

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This one was made by Richard Frere, a Parisian maker, in around about 1920.

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If we took it to auction, what do you think it might make?

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It's a nice example, appears to be working

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and should make about £100 to £150.

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-Nerise, should we take John off and have a look at some other things in the house?

-Yes.

-Come on.

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'With £400 still to raise, it's all systems go.

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'Wendy has a pretty good idea of where to look,

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'digging out this collection of Japanese Noritake porcelain.

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'Noritake grew out of a Japanese trading company

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'set up to export ceramics to the West.

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'This set should fetch £40 to £70 in the saleroom.

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-Look what I found.

-Hello. That's interesting. Where did this come from?

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In the cupboard in the living room. It's a glass bird.

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If we turn it upside down, we should find a name.

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Look. See what it says? It says Wedgwood, England. That's who made it.

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And throughout the late '60s and '70s and into the early 1980s,

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they were making little ornaments like this,

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so we know this has got to be made in between those two periods.

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So probably some time in the '70s or early '80s this would've been made.

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When you look at it, it's quite pretty. Do you like that mottled glass inside?

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-It's like a turtle shell, isn't it? Do you think Nan would mind us selling this?

-Yeah.

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I think it'd be a good thing to sell. What do you think it's worth?

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Hm. I'm not sure, really.

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You'd probably get £10 or £20 for it. Do you think that'd be good?

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-Yeah.

-That's excellent. This bird has flown the nest

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and I think we ought to go and just make sure with Gran that we can sell this. Come on.

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'Well done, Nerise.

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'We all continue the search and John's eye is distracted by an oak-panelled sideboard

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'in 1930s Art Deco style. He values it at £40 to £60.'

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Wendy, you've had some very interesting jobs in your life. You've moved around a bit.

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My first job was in the Jaeger knitwear factory.

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That was in Godalming in Surrey. Then I went to another knitwear factory

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and this is how it went until I actually finished up in Chantry Court.

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That's a retirement home.

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I didn't realise you could have so much fun with elderly people until I went there!

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It was there that you met Louie.

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-Tell me about him.

-Louie was one of the first residents in with his wife

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and they'd been in there about a year

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and his wife tragically died.

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Not long after that, he said to me, "Wendy, if I die on the street,

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"you will claim my body, won't you?"

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"I'll leave you enough to bury me

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"and a small party in the lounge for all the residents."

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I said, "I can do that, Louie, that's fine. Don't let's talk about it again."

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And we didn't. But when he died, he left me his flat

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-and all the contents.

-Oh, bless.

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You do have a lovely relationship with your grandchildren,

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but with Nerise particularly, and I know that she is busy with John

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finding some other things we might take to auction,

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-so shall we go and join them?

-Why not?

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'Louie obviously had a soft spot for Wendy

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'and it's touching that he left her so many collectables,

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'so it's unfortunate that now she doesn't really have room for them any more.

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'This Japanese Satsuma vase is the first of his objects destined for the saleroom. It's one of three.

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'Satsuma porcelain has been traced back to the 17th century.

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'John values them at £100 to £150.

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'He also spots this impressive Arts and Crafts dresser.

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'Wendy bought it for £715, 15 years ago. Its auction estimate today

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'would be more like 200 to 300, so she's not sure yet

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'if she'll part with it.'

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Hello, girls.

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-Hi, John.

-Ah!

-We've got lots of Christmas pressies here. What have you got?

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Something that would suit a flapper girl. How do you fancy rising to the challenge?

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ANGELA LAUGHS I fancy being a flapper.

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-Oh, what a lovely watch!

-It's a rather nice cocktail watch.

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-I'm wondering if you can shed some light on it for me.

-Yes, it's part of the inheritance from Louie.

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It was his wife's and I believe he bought it very early in their marriage,

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so it's got a bit of age to it, but not a lot.

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They were called cocktail watches because they emerged in the 1920s,

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the great age of jazz, the cocktail parties,

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and women were becoming more liberated then. They were wearing less clothes

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and the slender, bony frame became quite fashionable, made fashionable by people like Coco Chanel.

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And so the size of these watches reflected that. They were dainty.

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They reflected the slenderness of women at the time.

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I've had the back off, had the movement out and I can tell you it is 18-carat white gold

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and it says "weiss gold", so we know it's a German case.

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The bezel is quite nice, as cocktail watches go.

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It's been set with two rows of rose-cut diamonds

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and sandwiched right in the middle are two little lines of square table-cut sapphires.

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So, of its type, it's quite an elegant watch.

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The thing we really want to know is, if we took it to auction, what's it likely to make?

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Because it's a nice example of its type, good quality materials,

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it should make around about £100, possibly a bit more, but I would suggest an estimate

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of £80 to £120 to tempt those bidders.

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That's sad when you talk about all those beautiful diamonds and the lovely stones and the white gold.

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It certainly is, but as we say, value these days is linked to demand

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and there's little demand for these cocktail watches. Bring back the swinging 20s and cocktail parties!

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'Hear, hear, John! We miss those days of elegance.

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'I wonder if your cautious estimate will be tempting enough for the bidders on auction day.'

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At £65 I have. Any advance on 65? 70 is there? £70 on the phone. 75, new bidder. 80.

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'Hm, this could be tense.'

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'The rummage in Wendy's house continues,

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'and I spot this pair of 20th century still-life oil paintings that were also once Louie's.

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'Hopefully they'll catch a bidder's eye on sale day.

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'And John reckons, if they do, they'll make £40 to £60.

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OK, Wendy, all day you've been asking me to have a look at the longcase clock.

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I'm getting the feeling you don't have an affinity with this clock and you want it out of the house.

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-Tell me why.

-The grandchildren don't like it.

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-Why don't they like it?

-They think there's a ghost in it.

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-And who put that in their heads?

-I have no idea.

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-But when it used to chime, when it was on chime, they wouldn't come near it.

-Really?

-Mm.

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-So where did it come from?

-It was Louie's

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and he made it from a kit

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and really that's all I know about it.

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The actual form of the clock, typical late-17th, early 18th century with a little dome top,

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in mahogany, but it's very much 20th century.

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And these were sold in kit form, and it doesn't take a huge amount of knowledge in horology

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to put one of these together. And there's nice features here,

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an applied silver chapter ring with the Roman numerals.

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Love that moon phase. Did that used to work, too?

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-Yes.

-You set it at the beginning of the month and it tells you the phases of the moon.

-Yes.

-Wonderful.

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And the glass door was typically a late-19th century thing. You don't see that on longcase clocks

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until the 20th century in any great quantity.

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They don't make huge sums. Probably around £120 to £180.

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-Would you be OK with that?

-The girls will be.

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-What was the chime?

-Westminster.

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-The finest.

-Yeah. It's a beautiful chime.

-How does it go?

-You really want me to do it?

-Yeah.

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Ding-dong ding-dong, ding-dong ding-dong. That one.

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-We'll make a Pompey supporter out of you yet.

-Oh, what?

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'Poor Wendy! She's after an expert opinion and she's made to sing the anthem of Portsmouth Football Club!

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'As we keep up our hunt for more treasures,

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'John finds a cut-glass decanter still with some sherry in it.

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'It may not be quite to John's taste, but lotted up with these six sherry glasses,

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'let's hope that the bidders are keen. The collection should fetch £30 to £40.

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'Wendy spots something else that belonged to Louie, this cut-glass lamp in the shape of a mushroom

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'dating from the 1930s. John gives it a gleaming valuation of £30 to £50.'

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Wendy! John! Got a minute?

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Look at what your lovely granddaughter has found for us.

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She's just got this beautiful charm bracelet.

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-Where did that come from?

-It was part of Louie's legacy.

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-It belonged to his wife?

-Yeah.

-Have you ever worn it?

-No.

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This is the sort of thing I saw a lot of when I was growing up in the 70s, they were very fashionable,

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then they completely died out, but they've been making a comeback.

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Each charm tends to have some sort of particular good luck.

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If it was a lock, that means that your dreams are soon to be unlocked.

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A car or an aeroplane means you're going to have travel.

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And so on. They're wonderful things. I really like that.

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-Are you going to send that to auction, Wendy?

-Oh, don't, Angela.

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I've been tearing myself apart about it.

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But it's so beautiful, are there perhaps any of the charms you might like to keep?

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Yes, there are a couple I'd like to keep.

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Every one you take off, the value goes down.

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If we took it to auction, what might it make?

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As it is, I've got to guestimate that because I can't weigh it,

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but there's over a couple of ounces of gold there.

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So I think you should have no problem reaching about £400 to £600.

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If we add that to everything else John has looked at today,

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and bearing in mind that you might take a couple of charms off there

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and you may not take that rather beautiful sideboard,

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but if you leave everything in, Wendy,

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then we should be able to make £1,190.

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-Ooh, wow!

-If we... Madam's come alive at that, haven't you?

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If we take out the sideboard, then you still should make £990.

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Are you going to come to the auction, Nerise?

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-Yeah.

-You are! Oh!

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And just remember that we're buying Granny's doors for the patio,

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-we're not buying clothes for Nerise.

-THEY LAUGH

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-But let's get to auction and see what happens!

-Well, yes!

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'What a terrific result.

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'Wendy just has to decide what she really cannot bear to part with now.

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'But some of the things she's definitely taking to auction are

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'the early 20th century French barograph.

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'John valued it at £100 to £150.

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'Then there's the longcase clock that Louie made from a kit.

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'We hope it'll strike a chord with the bidders

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'at £120 to £180.

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'And she's parting with that very attractive 1930s

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'white gold cocktail watch with diamonds and sapphires

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'which belonged to Louie's wife. It should dazzle in the auction room

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'at £80 to £120.

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'Still to come on Cash In The Attic, I'm getting concerned about the quality of John's jokes.'

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For a minute, I thought there were going to be no-ie take-ies for our Noritake.

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'And granddaughter Nerise is flabbergasted at the starting price of the barograph.'

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-Oh, wow!

-Bang on middle, we're starting.

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Hang in there, Nerise.

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'Find out how high the sales go when the gavel finally falls.'

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Thanks to Louie's legacy of the house and its contents,

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plus some of Wendy's own items,

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we've got some really interesting things to sell at auction here today

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at Burns Auctioneers in Chester.

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Wendy's ambition is to put some new patio doors in her house.

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It's going to cost £500, so we're looking for some really serious bidding

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when her items go under the hammer today.

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'Located in Chester, an antiques hot spot of the north west,

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'this auction regularly attracts specialist dealers from all over the world

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'thanks to the online catalogue. And that means we could be in for some competitive bidding today.'

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-Hi, Wendy and Nerise.

-Hello!

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-Wendy, you've got some lovely things here, but we notice you didn't bring the wardrobe.

-Mm.

-Why's that?

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I couldn't get it in the Micra. THEY LAUGH

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But whatever's in it, where am I going to put it?

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Now, when we saw you originally, £500 was for the patio doors.

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-Is that still the case?

-No.

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Things have changed and now I really need new flooring in the kitchen.

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-We're optimistic we're going to make it.

-You've got some nice items,

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so we've got a puncher's chance.

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Let's go and take our places. Follow me!

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'Nerise has had permission to be off school today to support her gran

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'Let's see what happens with Wendy's first lot, which has just come up.

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'It's the Wedgwood glass bird paperweight that Nerise found.'

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£2 is the opening bid. At £2. Any advance on 2?

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-Oh.

-At £2 I have. 4.

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6. 8. £8 I'm bid. Any advance on 8?

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Straight ahead at £8. Are we all done? Watching closely.

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-You quite sure? Finished and selling at £8.

-HAMMER BANGS

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-Oh, not quite our lowest estimate.

-I thought I couldn't get any lower than that.

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-That went "cheep".

-Oh, dear!

-Sorry. I promise I won't do any more.

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'I'll hold you to that! At least it made Wendy and Nerise laugh.

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'as it was a little disappointing.

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'What will the bidders make of the unusual cut-glass mushroom lamp

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'up for £30 to £50?'

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40. £40. The lady's bid at £40.

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Any advance on £40? At £40 I have.

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All done? At £40, we're quite sure? Selling at 40.

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-Great!

-£40!

-Wow!

-Lovely!

0:18:240:18:28

-We had 30 to 50, so bang in the middle there.

-Yeah!

0:18:280:18:32

'Well, the bidders obviously liked it,

0:18:320:18:35

'and Nerise is impressed with the speed of that sale.

0:18:350:18:40

'There's another addition when the decanter and sherry glasses go under the hammer.

0:18:400:18:45

Selling at 25.

0:18:450:18:47

'Selling just short of John's £30 estimate.

0:18:470:18:50

'Up next, Wendy's collection of Noritake valued at £40 to £70.'

0:18:500:18:55

Bidding starts with me at £25.

0:18:550:18:58

£25 I have. Any advance on £25 for the Noritake?

0:18:580:19:02

At £25 I'm bid. 28. 30 here.

0:19:020:19:06

32. 35.

0:19:060:19:08

38. Your bid at 38. Commissions are gone at 38.

0:19:080:19:12

Bid is in the room at £38.

0:19:120:19:14

Any advance on 38? Are we all done?

0:19:140:19:16

-At £38. I'm selling at 38.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:19:160:19:20

-Oh, we're just under again!

-Just shy of it.

0:19:200:19:23

For a minute, I thought we were going to be no-ie take-ies for our Noritake.

0:19:230:19:27

Yes. You promised you wouldn't do that again. THEY LAUGH

0:19:270:19:32

'You tell him, Wendy! But that wasn't a bad result.

0:19:320:19:36

'Now it's time for the French barograph.'

0:19:360:19:39

-Did you look at it every day to try and work out what the weather was going to do?

-No, too complicated.

0:19:430:19:49

Nice condition and lots of interest. I have to start the bidding

0:19:490:19:53

-against commission bids at £130.

-Oh, wow!

-Right in the middle we're starting.

0:19:530:19:59

-Hang in there, Nerise!

-Any advance on 130?

0:20:010:20:04

At £130 I'm bid. £130 I have. Any advance on 130?

0:20:040:20:09

140. 150. No?

0:20:090:20:13

It's against you. It's on commission at £150. Are we all done?

0:20:130:20:16

At £150. I shall sell at 150.

0:20:160:20:21

-Well, is that a terrific result!

-Better, better.

0:20:210:20:24

NERISE LAUGHS

0:20:240:20:26

Have you ever sold anything for £150, Nerise?

0:20:260:20:29

Do you know what £150 looks like?

0:20:290:20:32

THEY LAUGH

0:20:330:20:35

'I'm sure she'll soon find out. A great price for the barograph

0:20:350:20:40

'Will the pair of 20th century oil paintings have similar luck?

0:20:400:20:44

'We're looking for £40 to £60.'

0:20:440:20:46

£20 for them?

0:20:460:20:49

Who'll start me at 10?

0:20:490:20:51

-£10 I'm bid. Thank you.

-10? Hm.

-12.

0:20:510:20:55

15. 15 standing. 18.

0:20:550:20:58

20. 22.

0:20:580:21:01

-Creeping up.

-Seated at 22.

0:21:010:21:04

28. 28 I'm bid now.

0:21:040:21:08

At £28. I'm selling at 28.

0:21:080:21:11

That's a disappointing figure considering we hoped that 40 would be our lowest bid.

0:21:120:21:17

Yes, but it does just go to show how much that sort of thing has gone out of fashion.

0:21:170:21:21

'But I don't think we should be too downbeat

0:21:210:21:24

'because with half our lot sold, we're halfway to our target

0:21:240:21:27

'with £289 in the pot.'

0:21:270:21:31

'If you'd like to try your hand at the auction game, do bear in mind that there are charges to be paid,

0:21:320:21:38

'including commission, and they vary from one saleroom to another, so always enquire in advance.

0:21:380:21:43

'Wendy has five lots left, nearly all with three-figure values.

0:21:450:21:50

'The first of these is the trio of Japanese Satsuma vases

0:21:500:21:53

'for £100 to £150.'

0:21:530:21:55

Bidding starts with me at £45.

0:21:550:21:58

At £45 I have.

0:21:580:22:00

At £45. Any advance on 45? 50.

0:22:000:22:03

55. 60.

0:22:030:22:05

65.

0:22:050:22:07

£65 I'm bid.

0:22:070:22:09

At £65 I have. Any advance on 65?

0:22:090:22:12

-We really want them to nudge up a bit more, don't we?

-Yes.

0:22:120:22:16

-70, new bidding. 75.

-Going up.

0:22:160:22:20

At £75 standing. At 75. Are we all done?

0:22:200:22:23

All done at 75?

0:22:230:22:26

Considering you didn't like them, I suppose £75 is a good price.

0:22:260:22:29

It certainly is! THEY LAUGH

0:22:290:22:32

'Well, that's great news and the right attitude to have.

0:22:320:22:36

'The longcase clock that Louie made from a kit is up next.

0:22:360:22:39

'Its estimate is £120 to £180.'

0:22:390:22:44

-You don't have this going any more, do you?

-No, Nerise doesn't like it.

0:22:440:22:47

Oh. You don't like the ding-dong?

0:22:470:22:50

-When she was a baby, she was frightened of it.

-Aww.

0:22:500:22:53

Bidding starts with me at £85.

0:22:530:22:56

-£85 already!

-Yes, good.

-Somebody likes it, Nerise.

0:22:560:22:59

90. £90 I'm bid at the back.

0:22:590:23:02

At £90. 95. 100.

0:23:020:23:04

110. 120.

0:23:040:23:08

£120 I'm bid. At £120. Any advance on 120?

0:23:080:23:12

At £120 I have. Are we all done?

0:23:120:23:15

-At £120. I'm selling at 120.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:23:150:23:19

-There you are! You don't have to listen to it any more!

-THEY LAUGH

0:23:190:23:23

'And it means that Nerise and her sister Alex

0:23:230:23:26

'can play in their grandma's hall without worrying about spooks.

0:23:260:23:31

'The Art Deco sideboard quickly follows suit.'

0:23:310:23:34

-I shall sell at £40.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:23:340:23:37

Selling bang on the lower estimate.

0:23:370:23:40

'Now it's the turn of the Art Deco cocktail watch which belonged to Louie's wife.

0:23:400:23:45

'It's valued here at £80 to £120.'

0:23:450:23:47

Of the period, a very nice example,

0:23:480:23:51

and hopefully we'll do our estimate at least.

0:23:510:23:54

Bidding starts with me, against commissions, at £65.

0:23:540:23:58

-£65 to start.

-Good start.

0:23:580:24:01

And he likes it, obviously.

0:24:010:24:03

Any advance on 65? 70 is there? £70 on the phone.

0:24:030:24:06

Good. Ooh, on the phone, £70.

0:24:060:24:09

90. 95. 100.

0:24:090:24:12

110. 120.

0:24:120:24:15

-120!

-120 on the phone.

-We're onto our top estimate.

-I like it when there's phones about.

0:24:150:24:20

At £120. Are we all done? At £120. Bid's on the phone at 120.

0:24:200:24:26

-Isn't that fantastic?

-Wonderful, isn't it?

0:24:270:24:30

'A terrific result.

0:24:300:24:33

'The final lot of the day is that other treasure which belonged to Louie's wife,

0:24:330:24:37

'the gold charm bracelet.

0:24:370:24:38

'Not all the trinkets have made it here today,

0:24:380:24:42

'but the price is still the same, £400 to £600.'

0:24:420:24:44

Bidding starts with me here at £380.

0:24:440:24:49

-£380 we've started at.

-Ooh!

0:24:490:24:52

450. 480. 500. 520.

0:24:520:24:55

520 here.

0:24:550:24:57

-At £520.

-£520.

0:24:570:25:00

At £520. Any advance on 520?

0:25:000:25:03

At £520. Are we all done?

0:25:030:25:06

At £520. I shall sell. 520.

0:25:060:25:09

HAMMER BANGS

0:25:090:25:11

Ooh! Wow!

0:25:110:25:13

I've no doubt that excellent final sale has made all the difference

0:25:130:25:18

'to Wendy's total. I can't wait to break the good news.'

0:25:180:25:21

What would you think if I told you that Granny has made more than £500,

0:25:210:25:24

she's made, in fact, more than double £500?

0:25:240:25:29

Granny has made...

0:25:290:25:31

£1,164!

0:25:310:25:35

-Oh!

-Ohh! I don't believe it!

0:25:350:25:38

-Oh, John, thank you!

-You're welcome.

0:25:380:25:41

'And Wendy has wasted no time and is already choosing her new flooring.'

0:25:450:25:51

I'm looking forward to having the new flooring,

0:25:510:25:53

cos the old one is very tatty

0:25:530:25:55

and if I get B&Bers coming into the kitchen, it doesn't look too good.

0:25:550:26:00

So this new one will look great.

0:26:000:26:02

'She still has over £500 in the kitty.

0:26:020:26:06

'So what's she going to do with the rest of the money?'

0:26:060:26:08

I might buy myself a telly,

0:26:080:26:10

I might buy a SatNav, or I might just take the kids out for the day.

0:26:100:26:15

'And it's all systems go on delivery day.

0:26:150:26:18

'And doesn't the end result look fantastic?'

0:26:180:26:21

Wendy Featherstone would like to carry out some repairs on her B&B in the Welsh borders and hopes to pay for it by selling off some unused mementos - including a long case clock which gives her granddaughter Nerisse the creeps. Angela Rippon and John Cameron do their best to help.