Episode 24 University Challenge


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Episode 24

In the last of the second round matches students representing two more universities battle it out for a place in the quarter-finals. Jeremy Paxman asks the questions.


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APPLAUSE

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University Challenge.

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Asking the questions, Jeremy Paxman.

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Hello. 28 teams qualified to appear in this series,

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12 left with prudent haste after the first round, and so far,

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seven have fallen by the wayside in round two, which ends tonight.

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Whichever team wins this match

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will take the last of the quarterfinal places.

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The team from Peterhouse, Cambridge beat Queens' College, Cambridge

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in the first round, but only by the skin of their teeth.

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They had a comfortable lead for most of the match,

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but then fell strangely silent for the final third,

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allowing Queens' to come within ten points of them,

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and they were doubtless relieved to hear the gong

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silence their opponents during a bonus set on recent fiction.

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With an average age of 19

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and representing the reigning University Challenge champions,

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let's meet the Peterhouse team again.

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Hello, my name's Ephraim Jacob Jacobus Levinson.

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I'm from North London and I'm reading English.

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Hello, my name's Oliver Sweetenham.

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I'm from Hinksey in Oxfordshire and I'm also reading English Literature.

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-And this is their captain.

-Hello, I'm Natasha Voake.

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I'm originally from New York and I'm reading Linguistics.

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And I'm Xiao Lin. I grew up in Newcastle upon Tyne and Belfast,

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and I'm reading Chemical Engineering.

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APPLAUSE

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Now, the team representing Corpus Christi College, Oxford,

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had a close first-round match against Jesus College, Cambridge,

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and were neck and neck until the final minutes

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when they finally managed to pull into the lead

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and keep it until the gong, winning by 200 points to 175.

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With an average age of 21, let's meet the Corpus Christi team again.

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Hello, I'm Tom Fleet.

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I'm from Pendoggett in Cornwall and I study English.

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Hi, I'm Emma Johnson. I'm from North London and I study Medicine.

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-And this is their captain.

-Hi, I'm Nikhil Venkatesh.

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I'm from Derby and I study Philosophy, Politics and Economics.

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Hi, I'm Adam Wright from Winnersh in Berkshire

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and I'm studying for a DPhil in Physics.

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APPLAUSE

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Shall we skip the recitation of the rules? Fingers on the buzzers.

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Here's your first starter for ten.

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"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world.

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"The unreasonable one persists

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"in trying to adapt the world to himself.

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"Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man."

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Those words appear in a work of 1903 by which literary figure?

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-George Bernard Shaw.

-Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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Maxims For Revolutionists.

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You get the first set of bonuses, then, Corpus Christi.

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They're on an animal.

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In the monologue by Marriott Edgar recorded by Stanley Holloway,

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Albert Ramsbottom falls foul of Wallace

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after pushing his stick with its "'orse's 'ead 'andle"

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into Wallace's ear. What species of animal is Wallace?

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This is the lion, isn't it?

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-Albert and the lion?

-I have...

-Go for it.

-Yeah, sounds plausible.

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-A lion.

-Correct.

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"If all evil were prevented,

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"much good would be absent from the universe.

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"A lion would cease to live if there were no slaying of animals."

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Who wrote that in the 13th-century work Summa Theologica?

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-Is that Aquinas?

-Aquinas sounds possible.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

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-Aquinas.

-Correct.

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In a work of 1513, who wrote that a ruler must be a fox

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"to recognise the traps, and a lion to frighten the wolves"?

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-Machiavelli.

-Yeah?

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-Machiavelli.

-Correct.

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APPLAUSE Ten points for this.

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After Russia and Iran,

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which country has the third largest natural gas reserves in the world?

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In 2015, Swiss federal prosecutors implicated it in an investigation

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relating to irregularities in the allocation of the 20...

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-Qatar.

-Qatar is correct.

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APPLAUSE

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These bonuses are on ancient Greek scientists.

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Firstly, for five points, born around 310 BC,

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Aristarchus of Samos was an early proponent

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of what astronomical theory

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later upheld by the models of Copernicus, Kepler and Galileo?

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-Heliocentrism.

-Correct - the earth orbiting the sun.

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Secondly, using correct geometry but inaccurate data,

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Aristarchus said that the sun was about 18 to 20 times

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further away from earth than the moon.

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What is the actual multiple? You can have 10% either way.

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The sun's 93 million miles away,

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but I don't how far away the moon is.

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-Cheers, mate.

-I'd guess, like, ten. Something like ten.

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-Ten? I thought it would be more.

-Oh.

-OK? No?

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Try it. Try it.

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OK, ten.

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What a very odd world you live in.

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LAUGHTER No, it's 390.

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The main source for Aristarchus's heliocentric theory

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is The Sand Reckoner,

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a work by which Greek mathematician born in Sicily around 290 BC?

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Who was born in Sicily? Was that...?

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-Was Archimedes?

-Yeah. I think so, yeah.

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-Archimedes.

-It was Archimedes, yes.

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APPLAUSE Ten points for this.

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Which three letters begin the names of an island

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lying between North and South Uist,

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a city in the Australian state of Victoria

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that grew rapidly during the 1850s gold rush,

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a region in the north-east of the Indian subcontinent,

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and a tourist resort on the Costa Blanca?

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-B-E-N.

-Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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These bonuses are on World War II propaganda posters.

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Firstly, for five, what three words appear on a poster

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depicting a booted foot pushing a spade into the earth?

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-Dig for Victory?

-Dig for Victory.

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-Dig for Victory.

-Correct.

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According to numerous posters,

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the influence of which maligned creature

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could be averted by buying war savings?

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He's often depicted as an imp-like being covered with swastikas.

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-HE SIGHS

-Is it like...?

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-It's the something bug.

-I don't know.

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-Squander Bug - have I made that up?

-Try it.

-Oh, yes!

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-Yeah? Is that a thing?

-I think that sounds right.

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Is that from Dad's Army or...?

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-The Squander Bug.

-That's correct. LAUGHTER

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Give the two words that complete this inscription

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on a public information poster.

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"Hitler will send no warning, so always carry your..."

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-Gas mask.

-Gas mask.

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-Gas mask.

-Correct.

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APPLAUSE Right, ten points for this

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starter question.

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"Only boys accepting feminism get kissed meaningfully",

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is a mnemonic representing the seven letters

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in the so-called Harvard system used in the classification of what?

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-Stars.

-Stars is correct, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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Your first bonuses, Peterhouse,

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are on the French Revolutionary Wars.

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Firstly, for five, following the Treaty of Tolentino in 1796,

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a work known as The Transfiguration by which Renaissance artist

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was taken from Pope Pius VI and exhibited in the Louvre?

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It was returned after 1815.

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I have no idea.

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Oh, maybe della Francesca might have done The Transfiguration.

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-Do you think?

-Piero della Francesca, maybe.

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-Piero della Francesca.

-No, it was by Raphael.

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Removed to Paris during the French occupation of Venice

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and now displayed in the Louvre,

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The Wedding Feast At Cana is a painting by which artist?

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-Veronese.

-Correct.

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Four bronze horses taken from St Mark's Basilica

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were used in the design of a triumphal arch in Paris.

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The Venetians had earlier stolen them

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during a sack of which city in 1204?

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-Constantinople.

-Correct.

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APPLAUSE We're going to take a picture round.

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For your picture starter, you're going to see a word cloud

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with a selection of the most common words

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in the speech of one of Shakespeare's characters,

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with all proper nouns and their adjectival forms removed.

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For ten points, I want you to identify the character.

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-Shylock.

-Shylock is right, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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So, for your picture bonuses, I want you to identify

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three more Shakespearean characters

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from some of their most commonly used words.

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All are title characters, and again,

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names and place names have been largely omitted.

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Firstly, for five...

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THEY WHISPER

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-Cheek...

-Eyes would make it Romeo, not Juliet.

-No...

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Who talks about poisoning? Who's the one who does the poisoning?

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-Isn't that Juliet?

-Um, yeah.

-You may be right.

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-Actually, is there a female...?

-And "man". I think Juliet, maybe.

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-I think...

-OK, yes, go for Juliet.

-Romeo or Juliet, but I'm not sure.

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OK. Juliet.

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No, it was Romeo. Bad luck. Secondly...

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-Oh, it's Othello.

-Oh, yes, of course.

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-Othello.

-Othello is right.

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The handkerchief's the giveaway, of course. And finally...

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-Could be Hamlet.

-It could probably.

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Actually, "mother", so it's definitely Hamlet.

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-Hamlet.

-Correct.

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APPLAUSE Right, ten points for this.

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What intense form of self-regard

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derives its name from that of a Greek youth?

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-Narcissism.

-Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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Your bonuses, Corpus Christi, this time are on scientific units.

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In each case, identify the unit from the description.

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All three begin with the same letter.

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Firstly, a unit of distance defined as the average distance

0:09:560:09:59

between the centre of the earth and the centre of the sun.

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-Is that an astronomical unit?

-OK.

0:10:030:10:06

-An astronomical unit.

-That's correct.

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Secondly, a unit of length equal to 0.1 nanometres

0:10:080:10:12

or ten to the minus 10m.

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It's named after a 19th-century Swedish physicist.

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-Angstrom.

-Correct.

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Finally, give the two-word term for the unit of angular measurement

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equivalent to 1/60th of a degree.

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-Arcsecond.

-Oh, yeah.

-Oh, yeah, arcminute.

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Yeah, say arcminute.

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-Arcminute.

-Correct.

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APPLAUSE Ten points for this.

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Truth as subjectivity and the knight of faith

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are among concepts associated with which Northern European philosopher

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born in 1813? His works...

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-Kierkegaard.

-Kierkegaard is correct.

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APPLAUSE

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Your bonuses, Peterhouse,

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this time are on people buried in Highgate Cemetery.

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In each case, name the person from the description.

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Firstly, a Marxist historian who died in 2012.

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His works include Industry And Empire

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and The Age Of Extremes - The Short 20th Century, 1914-1991.

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-Eric Hobsbawm.

-Correct.

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Secondly, a novelist who died in 1882.

0:11:140:11:16

Her works include Daniel Deronda and Felix Holt, the Radical.

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-George Eliot.

-Correct.

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And finally, an English scientist who died in 1867.

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He invented the first electric motor and discovered diamagnetism.

0:11:250:11:29

-Faraday?

-Maybe Faraday.

-OK.

0:11:320:11:33

-Faraday.

-Faraday is right.

0:11:330:11:35

APPLAUSE Ten points for this.

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The French marquis Marie-Joseph Gilbert du Motier

0:11:390:11:42

is commonly known by what single-word name?

0:11:420:11:45

He fought in the American War of Independence,

0:11:450:11:48

commanded the national...

0:11:480:11:49

-Is it Lafayette?

-It is Lafayette, yes.

0:11:500:11:52

APPLAUSE

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Your bonuses are on ships in literature, Peterhouse.

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The experiences of the crew of HMS Compass Rose

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and HMS Saltash during the Second World War

0:12:020:12:05

are the subject of which novel by Nicholas Monsarrat?

0:12:050:12:09

Um...

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-Do we even know who Nicholas Monsarrat is?

-I've no idea.

0:12:110:12:13

-I don't know who he is, no. Just pass.

-Pass.

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That's The Cruel Sea, first published in 1951.

0:12:150:12:19

And secondly, in a poem of 1841 by Longfellow,

0:12:190:12:22

which schooner is wrecked in a storm with the captain's daughter

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tied to the mast to prevent her from being swept overboard?

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-The Hesperus?

-I think so.

-I think the Hesperus, isn't it?

0:12:290:12:33

-The Hesperus.

-Correct.

0:12:330:12:35

HMS Bellipotent, Rights of Man, the Jeroboam and the Pequod

0:12:350:12:39

are ships in the fiction of which American novelist?

0:12:390:12:42

-Herman Melville.

-Herman Melville.

-Correct.

0:12:420:12:44

APPLAUSE Ten points for this. In physics,

0:12:440:12:46

which curve forms the solution

0:12:460:12:48

to the so-called brachistochrone problem

0:12:480:12:50

as the trajectory of a point of mass

0:12:500:12:52

moving between two fixed points under the influence of gravity?

0:12:520:12:56

It's also the curve...

0:12:560:12:57

-Parabola.

-No, I'm afraid you lose five points.

0:12:580:13:01

It's also the curve traced out

0:13:010:13:03

by a point on a wheel rolling on a flat surface.

0:13:030:13:06

-A circle.

-A cycloid. Ten points for this.

0:13:100:13:14

On January the 1st, 1876,

0:13:140:13:16

the registration of trademarks began at the UK Patent Office.

0:13:160:13:20

Which company's trademark was the first to be registered?

0:13:200:13:24

It appears on Edouard Manet's A Bar At The Folies-Bergere

0:13:240:13:27

on a beer bottle in the bottom right-hand corner.

0:13:270:13:30

-Is it Guinness?

-No.

0:13:380:13:40

One of you can have a punt.

0:13:430:13:44

Stella Artois.

0:13:450:13:47

No, it's the Bass red triangle from the Bass Brewery.

0:13:470:13:50

Ten points for this.

0:13:500:13:51

"If she had nothing more than her voice,

0:13:510:13:54

"she could break your heart with it."

0:13:540:13:56

Those words of Ernest Hemingway refer to which actress born in 1901?

0:13:560:14:00

She said of herself, "America took me into her bosom

0:14:000:14:04

"when I no longer had a native country worthy of the name."

0:14:040:14:06

-Marlene Dietrich.

-Correct.

0:14:080:14:10

APPLAUSE

0:14:100:14:13

Your bonuses are on matriarchs, Corpus Christi.

0:14:130:14:16

The Dictionary Of National Biography gives the designation

0:14:160:14:19

Yorkist matriarch to two women.

0:14:190:14:21

One is Cecily Neville, the mother of which two kings?

0:14:210:14:25

Yorkists? It's Edward IV and V?

0:14:280:14:33

-Yeah, go for it.

-Yeah?

-I don't know, so...

0:14:330:14:36

Edward IV and V.

0:14:360:14:38

No, it's Edward IV and Richard III.

0:14:380:14:41

The second Yorkist matriarch is Margaret Tudor,

0:14:410:14:44

the daughter of Cecily Neville.

0:14:440:14:46

She's also known as Margaret of Burgundy,

0:14:460:14:48

after her marriage in 1468 to which duke?

0:14:480:14:52

The Duke of Burgundy, but I think he wants more than that. Er...

0:14:530:14:58

-I don't know.

-I've got no clue.

-I have absolutely nothing.

0:14:580:15:01

You're on your own. Say anything.

0:15:010:15:03

Henri of Burgundy.

0:15:030:15:05

No, it's Charles the Bold.

0:15:050:15:07

And finally, the DNB describes Margaret Beaufort

0:15:070:15:10

as a royal matriarch.

0:15:100:15:12

Born in 1443, she was the mother of which king of England?

0:15:120:15:16

-Henry the...

-Henry VII?

-Could be, yeah.

-Yeah?

-Yeah, go for it.

0:15:160:15:20

-Yeah, possible.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:15:200:15:22

-Henry VII.

-Correct. APPLAUSE

0:15:220:15:24

Right, we're going to take a music round now.

0:15:240:15:26

For your music starter, you'll hear a piece

0:15:260:15:28

of orchestral music by an American composer.

0:15:280:15:30

Ten points if you can identify the composer.

0:15:300:15:33

ORCHESTRAL MUSIC PLAYS

0:15:330:15:35

Philip Glass.

0:15:360:15:37

No. You can hear a little more, Peterhouse.

0:15:370:15:39

MUSIC CONTINUES

0:15:390:15:41

Adams. John Adams.

0:15:410:15:43

No, it's not. It's Steve Reich,

0:15:430:15:46

so we'll get the music bonuses in a moment or two,

0:15:460:15:48

when someone's got a starter question right.

0:15:480:15:50

Fingers on the buzzers. Ten points for this.

0:15:500:15:53

Give the three precise words that complete this quotation

0:15:530:15:56

from St Matthew's Gospel in the King James Bible.

0:15:560:15:59

"It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle

0:15:590:16:03

"than for a rich man to enter into the..."

0:16:030:16:05

-Kingdom of God.

-Correct.

0:16:060:16:08

APPLAUSE

0:16:080:16:12

OK, you'll recall, a moment ago, that we heard a piece

0:16:120:16:15

from Steve Reich's Different Trains,

0:16:150:16:18

a reflection on his travels across the US during World War II,

0:16:180:16:22

and on very different and enforced train journeys

0:16:220:16:24

being made in Europe at the same time.

0:16:240:16:26

Your music bonuses are three more classical pieces

0:16:260:16:30

inspired by railway travel.

0:16:300:16:32

Five points for each composer you can identify.

0:16:320:16:34

Firstly, for five, this French composer.

0:16:340:16:38

# C'est le grand jour, le jour de fete

0:16:380:16:42

# Jour du triomphe et des lauriers

0:16:420:16:46

# Pour vous ouvriers La couronne est prete

0:16:460:16:49

# La couronne est prete Soldats de la paix

0:16:490:16:53

# C'est votre victoire C'est a vous la gloire... #

0:16:530:16:56

-Bizet.

-No, that's Berlioz.

0:16:560:16:58

That was written for the opening of the line

0:16:580:17:01

from Paris to Lille and Brussels.

0:17:010:17:03

Secondly, this American composer.

0:17:030:17:06

DISCORDANT CLASSICAL MUSIC PLAYS

0:17:060:17:10

THEY WHISPER

0:17:140:17:20

Copland.

0:17:240:17:26

It is Aaron Copland, his celebration of John Henry,

0:17:260:17:28

the Steel Drivin' Man.

0:17:280:17:30

And finally, this Austrian composer...

0:17:300:17:32

ORCHESTRAL MUSIC PLAYS

0:17:320:17:36

THEY WHISPER

0:17:360:17:39

-Mozart.

-No.

0:17:480:17:50

That's Strauss the Elder. That was his Railway Delight Waltz.

0:17:500:17:53

Right, ten points for this. Which decade saw the start

0:17:530:17:56

of the shipment of the Elgin Marbles from Greece to the UK,

0:17:560:18:00

the failure of Robert Emmet's rebellion in Ireland,

0:18:000:18:03

and the Louisiana Purchase in the United States?

0:18:030:18:06

-The 1800s.

-Correct.

0:18:070:18:09

APPLAUSE

0:18:090:18:12

Your bonuses are on flowering plants, Peterhouse.

0:18:120:18:15

In each case, give me the common or the scientific name

0:18:150:18:19

of the family described.

0:18:190:18:21

Firstly, which family of shrubs and trees includes the poplars?

0:18:210:18:25

It's named after a tree whose British species include crack,

0:18:250:18:29

white, goat, grey and osier.

0:18:290:18:32

-Could it be...?

-Poplars?

-No, poplars are, like, bigger.

0:18:320:18:37

-Could it be hawthorn? No.

-Obviously not.

0:18:370:18:39

Could be. Shall we just go with that?

0:18:390:18:41

-Hawthorn.

-No, it's willow.

0:18:410:18:44

Secondly, which family includes the ashes and lilacs?

0:18:440:18:47

It's named after an important commercial tree

0:18:470:18:49

of the Mediterranean region.

0:18:490:18:51

-Olive trees?

-The cedar?

0:18:520:18:54

-Is that commercial?

-Oh, I've no idea.

-Palm?

0:18:550:18:59

It could be something that...

0:18:590:19:00

Cedar's more likely.

0:19:000:19:02

-Cedar.

-No, it's olive.

0:19:020:19:04

And finally, which family includes the alders and hazels?

0:19:040:19:07

It's named after a common tree

0:19:070:19:09

with light-coloured bark that sheds tissue-like layers.

0:19:090:19:12

-Birch. Silver birch.

-OK.

0:19:120:19:14

-Birch.

-Birch is correct, yes.

0:19:140:19:16

APPLAUSE Right, ten points for this.

0:19:160:19:18

What title was given to the work

0:19:180:19:19

first published in 1927

0:19:190:19:21

and compiled from a series of literary lectures by E M Forster?

0:19:210:19:25

The lectures covered seven...

0:19:250:19:26

-Aspects Of The Novel.

-Correct.

0:19:280:19:29

APPLAUSE

0:19:290:19:31

These bonuses could give you the lead if you get them.

0:19:310:19:34

They're on films depicting artists.

0:19:340:19:37

Firstly, for five, the title of the 2008 film Little Ashes

0:19:370:19:40

is a translation of the title Cenicitas,

0:19:400:19:43

a painting by which Spanish artist

0:19:430:19:46

played in the film by Robert Pattinson?

0:19:460:19:48

-Oh, it's, um...

-It's not Goya?

0:19:480:19:50

I don't know who it is, so it could be...

0:19:500:19:52

-Maybe Goya. He's not going to be Velazquez, so it may be Goya.

-OK.

0:19:520:19:56

-Goya.

-No, it's Dali.

-Oh.

0:19:560:19:58

In the 1956 film Lust For Life based on the novel by Irving Stone,

0:19:580:20:03

Kirk Douglas and Anthony Quinn play which two artists?

0:20:030:20:07

Lust For Life. What would that be?

0:20:070:20:09

HE WHISPERS

0:20:090:20:13

God! A pair of artists? That might be...

0:20:130:20:16

Maybe Gauguin and van Gogh or something.

0:20:160:20:18

-Go for it.

-Maybe Gauguin and van Gogh.

0:20:180:20:20

-Gauguin and van Gogh.

-Correct.

0:20:200:20:21

And finally, the role of which artist

0:20:210:20:24

is played by Jose Ferrer and John Leguizamo respectively

0:20:240:20:27

in the 1952 and 2001 film versions of Moulin Rouge?

0:20:270:20:32

-Oh, God, Toulouse...

-Yeah, it's Toulouse-Lautrec.

0:20:320:20:34

-Toulouse-Lautrec.

-Correct.

0:20:340:20:35

APPLAUSE Ten points for this. In physics,

0:20:350:20:38

what six-letter term denotes a rotating vector

0:20:380:20:41

that represents a sinusoidally varying quantity, such as...

0:20:410:20:45

-Cork.

-No, I'm afraid you lose five points.

0:20:460:20:49

..such as the electric field of a photon?

0:20:490:20:52

The term is a homophone of a device used

0:20:520:20:54

on the television series Star Trek.

0:20:540:20:56

-Phaser.

-Phaser is right, yes.

0:20:580:21:00

APPLAUSE

0:21:000:21:04

So, you've retaken the lead and your bonuses

0:21:040:21:07

are on German prepositions, Corpus Christi.

0:21:070:21:10

Adding the letter O to the end of the German word for after

0:21:100:21:14

gives the name of which Mexican food item?

0:21:140:21:18

-Nacho.

-Correct.

0:21:180:21:20

Adding the letter T to the end of the German word for at or to

0:21:200:21:25

gives which mild French expletive?

0:21:250:21:29

-It's zu, so zut - is that a French...?

-Zut, yeah.

0:21:290:21:32

Zut, definitely.

0:21:320:21:34

-Zut.

-Zut is right. And finally, adding the letter O

0:21:340:21:38

to the beginning of the German word for with

0:21:380:21:41

gives what English verb?

0:21:410:21:43

-Omit.

-Correct.

0:21:430:21:45

APPLAUSE We're going to take another

0:21:450:21:49

picture round. For your picture starter,

0:21:490:21:51

you'll see a portrait of a painter and writer.

0:21:510:21:53

Ten points if you can identify him.

0:21:530:21:55

-John Ruskin.

-It is John Ruskin, painted by Millais.

0:21:580:22:01

APPLAUSE He was involved

0:22:010:22:03

in the foundation of the Working Men's College,

0:22:030:22:06

still in operation today in Camden.

0:22:060:22:08

It's one of Britain's earliest adult

0:22:080:22:10

or continuing education institutions.

0:22:100:22:12

For your picture bonuses,

0:22:120:22:14

works by three artists who gave classes there.

0:22:140:22:17

I want the artist's name in each case. Firstly, for five...

0:22:170:22:20

-Is it one of the Pre-Raphaelites?

-This is Pre-Raphaelite, so...

0:22:220:22:26

-Holman Hunt?

-Ford Madox Brown?

0:22:260:22:29

We're just guessing Pre-Raphaelites.

0:22:290:22:32

Ford Madox Brown.

0:22:320:22:34

No, that is... You were in the right area.

0:22:340:22:36

It's Rossetti. It's Dante's Dream. Secondly...

0:22:360:22:39

Oh, this is another one. OK.

0:22:410:22:43

Yeah, that's not... No, it's not Waterhouse.

0:22:430:22:45

I thought it was, but I don't think so.

0:22:450:22:47

-Shall we try Brown?

-Do you want to go Brown?

0:22:470:22:50

-Really? Again?

-Yeah.

0:22:500:22:51

It might be a Waterhouse, but I don't think so.

0:22:510:22:54

-Ford Madox Brown.

-No, it's Burne-Jones,

0:22:540:22:56

The Beguiling Of Merlin. And finally...

0:22:560:22:58

-That looks like William Morris.

-Yeah.

0:23:000:23:03

-William Morris.

-It is.

0:23:030:23:04

His Acanthus design. Ten points for this.

0:23:040:23:07

Differing only in that the latter has a three-letter prefix,

0:23:070:23:10

which two words mean knowledge of spiritual mystery

0:23:100:23:15

and the likely course of a medical condition? Both can...

0:23:150:23:18

-Noesis and prognosis.

-Correct.

0:23:200:23:22

APPLAUSE

0:23:220:23:26

Right, these bonuses, Corpus Christi,

0:23:260:23:28

are on ancient Mexico.

0:23:280:23:30

Located around 40 miles outside Mexico City,

0:23:300:23:34

the city of Tula was built by which civilisation

0:23:340:23:37

which flourished from around 900AD?

0:23:370:23:40

-It's not the Aztecs.

-Olmecs?

-Olmec? Olmec? Olmec?

0:23:410:23:44

All I know is it's not the Aztecs.

0:23:440:23:46

-The Olmec.

-No, it's the Toltec.

-Oh.

0:23:460:23:48

Thought to have been occupied by settlers from Tula,

0:23:480:23:51

Chichen Itza was originally constructed

0:23:510:23:53

by a subgroup of which pre-Columbian civilisation?

0:23:530:23:57

-Do you want to go Olmec?

-That could be it.

0:23:590:24:01

-I don't know.

-Yeah?

-Don't know.

0:24:010:24:03

-Olmec.

-No, it was the Mayas.

0:24:030:24:05

Toltec buildings at both Tula and Chichen Itza

0:24:050:24:08

were dedicated to the deity Quetzalcoatl,

0:24:080:24:11

usually depicted as a feathered manifestation of which animal?

0:24:110:24:15

-Oh, it's a bird.

-Was he a crocodile?

-I thought he was a bird.

-Oh.

0:24:150:24:18

-But it was feathered.

-Feathered.

0:24:180:24:19

-Like, a feathered crocodile?

-Feathered boa?

-Or snake?

0:24:190:24:24

-A feathered boa - is that a thing?

-A feather boa is a different thing.

0:24:240:24:27

Come on. LAUGHTER

0:24:270:24:29

Yeah, that's a different thing. That's a... Yeah.

0:24:290:24:31

-Is it a crocodile?

-No, it was a snake.

0:24:310:24:33

LAUGHTER Right, ten points for this.

0:24:330:24:35

Recalled To Life, The Golden Thread

0:24:350:24:37

and The Track Of A Storm...?

0:24:370:24:39

-A Tale Of Two Cities.

-Correct.

0:24:390:24:42

APPLAUSE

0:24:420:24:45

Your bonuses are on zoology, Peterhouse.

0:24:450:24:48

Squids, octopuses and cuttlefish belong to which class of molluscs?

0:24:480:24:52

-Is it bivalves maybe?

-No, no, it's further up.

0:24:520:24:56

It's the other one. Begins with a C, I think.

0:24:560:24:58

-It's a class of mollusc?

-Cephalopods.

-Cephalopods.

-OK.

0:24:580:25:00

-Cephalopods.

-Correct.

0:25:000:25:02

In cephalopods, the structure known as the hectocotylised arm

0:25:020:25:07

is used for the transfer of what?

0:25:070:25:09

-Um...

-It could be sperm or something.

-Hectocotylised?

0:25:100:25:14

-I just don't know.

-Hectocotylised? Yeah, well, cotyl, yeah...

0:25:140:25:17

-The transfer of sperm, I suppose.

-OK. Do you think?

-Let's use it.

0:25:170:25:21

-Sperm.

-Correct.

0:25:210:25:23

In cephalopods, a statocyst is an organ that detects what force?

0:25:230:25:27

-Um...

-Thrust or something? Water pressure? Water pressure?

0:25:270:25:31

Well, stato could be electricity. Electric charge?

0:25:310:25:34

-Come on.

-What's the thing...?

-Water pressure.

0:25:340:25:36

-Water pressure.

-No, it's gravity. Ten points

0:25:360:25:38

for this. For what do the letters

0:25:380:25:40

LBJ stand when used...

0:25:400:25:43

-Lyndon Baines Johnson.

-No, I'm afraid you lose five points.

0:25:440:25:48

..LBJ stand when used by bird-watchers

0:25:480:25:50

to refer to small, non-descript, usually passerine species?

0:25:500:25:55

-Come on.

-Lark before June.

-No, they're little brown jobs.

0:25:570:26:02

Ten points for this.

0:26:020:26:03

Which Germanic people migrated to Northern Italy in the late...?

0:26:030:26:07

-The Lombards.

-Correct. APPLAUSE

0:26:070:26:09

So, you get a set of bonuses now on Burns Night.

0:26:090:26:12

The centrepiece of a Burns supper is the haggis,

0:26:120:26:14

or as Robert Burns described it, the great chieftain of what?

0:26:140:26:19

The pudding race. The pudding race.

0:26:190:26:21

-The pudding race.

-Correct.

0:26:210:26:22

Which town in the Scottish Borders gives its name to the grace

0:26:220:26:25

traditionally recited at a Burns supper,

0:26:250:26:27

as well as to a variety of bannock or fruitcake?

0:26:270:26:31

-No idea.

-Oh, Eccles.

-Eccles.

0:26:310:26:33

-No, Eccles isn't in Scotland.

-Just go for it.

-Come on.

0:26:330:26:36

-Eccles.

-No, it's Selkirk. Eccles is in Lancashire.

0:26:360:26:39

Taking its name from the cloth in which it is boiled,

0:26:390:26:41

according to the traditional recipe,

0:26:410:26:43

which dried fruit pudding often concludes a Burns Night supper?

0:26:430:26:47

I think we should pass.

0:26:470:26:49

-What's it called?

-Just pass. I don't know.

0:26:490:26:51

-Come on.

-Pass.

0:26:510:26:53

It's a clootie dumpling. Ten points for this.

0:26:530:26:55

Listen carefully. Which two distinct

0:26:550:26:57

square numbers between 100 and 500

0:26:570:27:00

have the property that the digits of one,

0:27:000:27:03

when read backwards, form the digits of the other?

0:27:030:27:06

-343.

-No.

0:27:140:27:16

169 and 196.

0:27:180:27:21

No, it's 144 and 441. Ten points for this.

0:27:210:27:24

What structure within some churches is often placed on top of a predella

0:27:240:27:29

in front of a reredos and beneath a baldachin?

0:27:290:27:33

-Tabernacle.

-No.

0:27:340:27:36

Anyone want to buzz from Corpus Christi?

0:27:360:27:39

-Pulpit.

-No, it's the altar. Ten points for this.

0:27:410:27:44

Answer promptly.

0:27:440:27:46

Give the two seven-letter anagrams that mean regard or consideration

0:27:460:27:51

and a ceremonial staff carried by a monarch.

0:27:510:27:54

-Respect and sceptre.

-Correct.

0:27:570:27:59

APPLAUSE

0:27:590:28:01

Your bonuses now are on science, Corpus Christi.

0:28:010:28:04

What is the predominant geometric...?

0:28:040:28:06

GONG

0:28:060:28:08

APPLAUSE And at the gong,

0:28:080:28:11

Peterhouse have 150, Corpus Christi have 175.

0:28:110:28:14

Well, it was pretty close.

0:28:160:28:18

We shall have to say goodbye to you, Peterhouse,

0:28:180:28:20

but thank you very much for being with us

0:28:200:28:22

and you certainly leave with a very respectable score.

0:28:220:28:25

Corpus Christi, we'll look forward to seeing you in the quarterfinals. Congratulations.

0:28:250:28:29

I hope you can join us next time for the first of the quarterfinals.

0:28:290:28:32

Until then, though, it's goodbye from Peterhouse, Cambridge.

0:28:320:28:34

-ALL:

-Goodbye.

0:28:340:28:36

It's goodbye from Corpus Christi College, Oxford.

0:28:360:28:38

-ALL:

-Goodbye.

-And it's goodbye from me. Goodbye.

0:28:380:28:40

APPLAUSE

0:28:400:28:42

In the last of the second round matches students representing two more universities battle it out for a place in the quarter-finals.

Jeremy Paxman asks the questions.