19/03/2017 Saturday Kitchen Best Bites


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19/03/2017

Matt Tebbutt takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen.


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Good morning. We have a whole host of chefs cooking up some real treats

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for you this morning, from red wine souffle to lamb cooked on hay.

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So please sit back and enjoy today's line-up

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of Saturday Kitchen Best Bites.

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Welcome to the show. Now, over the next 90 minutes,

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we have some of the country's top chefs cooking mind-blowing food

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for a whole host of celebrities,

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ready and waiting, with their knives and forks at the ready.

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Coming up on today's show, James Martin cooks up a tamarind and

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coconut lamb and vegetable stir-fry for the vivacious Vic Reeves.

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Will Holland dangerously attempts a souffle on live television.

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The souffle is flavoured with a full-bodied red wine to pack in

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the flavour, and he makes a mixed berry salad to accompany it.

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Stay tuned to see if it works.

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James Tanner knocks up a gnocchi dish

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that you're bound to go quackers for.

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The gnocchi is flavoured with fragrant wild garlic

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and served up with a sweet honeyed duck breast - delicious.

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And taking up the omelette challenge this week is

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the amazing Rachel Allen and the masterful Michel Roux.

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And then it's over to Tom Kitchin, who is cooking a lamb dish

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that makes use of an old-fashioned way of cooking, with hay.

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He places a rack of lamb on to a bed of hay, covers and bakes

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in the oven, which gives a lovely earthy, smoky flavour.

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Trust me, it's a great dish.

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And finally, singer Liz McClarnon faces her food heaven or food hell.

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Did she get her food heaven?

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Seared tuna with a panzanella-style salad, or her food hell,

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glazed grapefruit salad with salmon and sea bream?

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You can find out what she got at the end of the show.

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But first, it's over to Sabrina Ghayour,

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who's here and celebrated our 400th show.

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Renowned for her Persian and Middle Eastern flavour dishes,

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she didn't disappoint with this tasty citrus-spiced salmon.

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-Right, let's get cooking and kicking things off...

-Don't go!

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It's a celebration dish from Sabrina Ghayour.

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What are you going to be cooking, then, Sabrina?

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What are we going to be making?

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-OK, so we've got a classic dish of Persian New Year.

-Yeah?

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It's all about spring, so there's going to be lots of herbs,

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it's called sabzi polo, which is a herb aromatic rice.

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That? And you want me to put it in there?

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Yeah, the salmon, if you can put that in the oven,

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-we're going to try and cook that to real time.

-Yes.

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We're going to serve it with a really lovely citrus

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and spiced-perfumed salmon, which is dead simple.

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-We've got some rose petals...

-Rose petals?

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Rose petals, that's all about, you know, Persia, aromatic, romantic...

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My granny used to have these in her bath.

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LAUGHTER

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She did. It was in a little dish, next to a toilet roll warmer.

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-Your granny was clearly bang on trend.

-Yeah.

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-Do you know what a toilet roll warmer was?

-Yeah.

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-Did you have those in Persia?

-No.

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SHE LAUGHS

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-Oh...

-You know the toilet roll warmer?

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With the Barbie doll that was cut in half, stuck on top?

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-Stop about your toilet...

-You mean the crocheted one?

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Yeah, the crocheted one. Have you had one, as well?

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Well, no, we had the Spanish one. Way-hey! Fancy.

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LAUGHTER

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-And you haven't been to Butlins.

-No, the furthest she got...

-Oh, no!

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-Right...

-So, that was kind of part and parcel of the...

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SHE LAUGHS

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-You need it to stop first.

-It's perfume, yeah, fantastic.

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So get the rose petals in, need to grind them up.

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If you can kindly chop all of those and slice the spring onions...

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-All of this?

-All of that.

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We're literally going to get it into the water that we cook the rice in.

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-Right.

-Which sounds a bit of a shame, but that's how we do it,

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Iranian-style. We get the herbs in with the rice as it parboils.

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So, we've got... What have we got in here?

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Parsley, chives, coriander, dill?

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Parsley, chives, coriander, dill, spring onions. Very...

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-There's a lot of herbs in here.

-Where is the strainer?

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Here we go, lovely.

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Just strain off this rice that's been soaking.

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-So this is for... This is for the New Year that you celebrate.

-Yes.

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-When exactly was it?

-It was actually last night at 10.45.

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Sounds a weird time,

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-but it coincides with the spring equinox.

-Right.

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And we work with a solar calendar, so it's...

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-I was up quite late last night, basically!

-Right.

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But it's a really lovely time.

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It's all about family and feasting and celebration, and it's...

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-It's all about a lot of herbs, by the looks of all this lot.

-Yeah!

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Well, it's because they signify spring,

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so it's the green that really kind of ties in

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with the spring beautifully, and in some regions they use this

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beautiful spring garlic, which is really lovely.

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And then we have this little area here,

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that is... This is our classic table for... It's called the haft seen,

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-which translated...

-What?

-..haft seen, which means it's seven S.

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And you have to have different things that in Persian

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language actually start with S.

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So you got hyacinths, apple, garlic, sumac, coins, wheatgrass, eggs,

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something called senjed, I don't know what it is in English, and a...

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-What's that?

-Senjed.

-What does that mean? What is it?

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-I couldn't tell you, actually!

-SHE LAUGHS

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It's some kind of dry berry. And then you have saman,

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which is a flour-based paste.

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And they all signify, like, new life and rebirth and fortune,

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so it's a nice time of year.

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-That reminds me, my grass needs cutting at home.

-Yeah!

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You're going to have a wheatgrass shot at the end of it, as well.

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So, in here I've got rose petals and then I'm going to put in

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some dried lime powder, which is lovely, gives you a bit of pucker.

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-Dried lime powder?

-Yeah, so the little dried limes,

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kind of like the preserved lemons, but the dried version.

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I've got sumac, which is also quite citrussy, cumin and cinnamon.

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Sumac, you'll be able to get that in the supermarket,

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but I don't know about the dried lime powder.

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You can just use a little bit of a squeeze of lime or you can use

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dried mango powder, which you get in Asian shops.

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But most Middle Eastern shops now, you know, stock everything you need

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-and even big supermarkets have import sections now.

-Right.

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OK, you want to get zest in so you can give everything

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a really nice citrussy flavour without the acid.

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This behemoth of an orange, it's the size of a melon.

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-Right, so this is not a paste?

-No, it's not a paste.

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-You just want an abundance of herbs.

-OK.

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It just really gives it a lovely flavour and normally I do

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stuff with spicing, and this is really gentle,

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-and traditionally goes with a smoked fish.

-This goes in here with...

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It does, it does.

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Sounds a bit weird, cos of course you do lose some of the oils,

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that Western-style cooking say would be a good thing to hold on,

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but it's how you do it.

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I don't want to mess with Iranian people and change tradition.

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So what rice have you got? What rice is that?

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Basmati. We only ever cook basmati rice...only.

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Do you wash it or not? You don't need to wash it?

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-Yeah, you don't, I don't.

-For this...

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-For this we've soaked it, basically. Which is traditional.

-Yeah.

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But you don't have to. In a pinch, you don't have to.

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It certainly does improve it a little bit but, you know,

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life isn't like that today, so you do what you can.

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-Spring onions go in there, as well.

-Yeah. Spring onions in, as well.

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Gives it a nice little oniony flavour.

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-On the table, or do you want me to move it?

-No, you can move it now.

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And these are the berries that... We don't know what they are?

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Yeah, you should eat one.

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SHE LAUGHS

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-Go on.

-It's a laugh!

-Right.

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What do they taste of? Are they dry?

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Yeah, they're very dry, they're very, very dry. They all...

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Everything has a different meaning.

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-Please don't ask me what all of the meanings represent.

-Right.

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-Oh, God, this is going to be funny.

-Do you put these in dishes, or...

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-No, they're only ever used for this, as far as I'm...

-Is it?

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It's a little bit similar to jojoba.

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It is like a date, isn't it?

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-SHE LAUGHS

-Well.

-Well.

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SHE LAUGHS

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-I can see why you've put it in.

-It's better off on the table.

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I've got my sieve over here. You want me to drain this?

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Yes, please. Drain it, you need to rinse it off cold.

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You want to take all the starch off, cos we don't want the rice

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to clump together, we want it to cook to be beautiful singular grains.

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-Right.

-And then all I'm doing is literally slapping that marinade...

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straight onto the fish.

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Like that.

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Sabrina, have you tried one of these?

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-Sorry?

-Have you tried one of these?

-Have I tried one of those?

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-Yeah.

-No!

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Has... You said the word moreish. ..ever been used in a sentence?

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SHE LAUGHS

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-Powdery, maybe?

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

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Dry, a little bit. What do these signify?

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Um... Yeah, I was hoping you wouldn't ask me that.

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-You're not welcome in this house.

-LAUGHTER

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-Have one of these and get out.

-It's actually a laxative. Yeah?

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Yeah, sorry, did we not mention that?

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-He's...

-Exactly!

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I won't be with you for most of the show.

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-Can I...

-Right.

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So I'm moving this out the way.

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Going to get some oil into a pan.

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Yeah. So you rinse in cold water.

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Yes, you rinse it in cold water and then I'm going to layer it back

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into a pan, going to put your favourite ingredient in there.

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-Butter, butter.

-Right.

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So you cook this in... All you do is bring this to the

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-boil, you don't need to do anything with it?

-No, no, you do.

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What we want to do is, normally we're going to rinse it off cold.

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-So it would be cold...

-Yeah. Yeah.

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Rinse it off cold and you want to strain it really, really well.

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-OK.

-OK?

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And then you're going to...

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-Can you season this for me, just with salt, please?

-Yeah.

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Want to make a crust and usually in

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-a deeper pan, but we're...

-Do it when you put it in.

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-Go for it.

-Season that?

-Yeah.

-OK.

-Great. Thank you.

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Then we're going to pile it, we want to steam-cook it,

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-so we're not going to use tonnes for this, obviously.

-Right.

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And then we're going to pile it back in there and then we have

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a lid to cover it.

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Cos that's really what creates the steam.

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What's the idea of all the butter?

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It's going to give you a beautiful crust, called tah-dig,

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-which means bottom of the pan and it's the bit you fight over.

-OK.

-OK?

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Most important thing is not to compress this.

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Nonstick pan, I take it, is quite crucial?

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Nonstick pan is ideal. If not, you can just scrunch up

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some oven paper and stick it on the bottom.

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And then I'm going to stick

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holes in it, just to give it more of an opportunity to steam.

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And I'm going to transfer a lid on,

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wrap a cloth around a lid, just to kind of preserve the steam.

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So how long would you cook that for?

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You've got to be quite careful with this.

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Yeah, you've got to be quite careful and be quite gentle with the cooking time,

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so aggressive gas heat doesn't really work.

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Ideally, if you have a diffuser, those perforated metal plates

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with a wooden handle, to break the tension between the heated...

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-A diffuser?

-Yeah. Much like hair dryer, like...

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-Aah!

-SHE LAUGHS

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-You've lost me.

-You don't have to worry...

-You've lost me, go on.

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Basically we're going to flip it, that's the most important thing,

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and there's, like, prayer usually involved in this element of it.

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-OK, we're ready with the fish, anyway.

-Yes, fantastic.

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OK, so...

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One, two, three...

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Aah!

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-Well, the tah-dig turned out well(!)

-That worked, didn't it?!

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-It's all right, don't worry.

-Well, the tah-dig turned out well,

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so I'm happy about that.

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-OK, so, this is the crusty bit.

-Right.

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You can tell this is live...

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There's quite a bit of the crusty bit on the floor, as well.

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I know, I just thought...

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I just thought I'd do what I do in the omelette challenge, normally.

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-Right.

-I normally trash the place with eggs!

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But I'm actually really impressed about the crust.

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-Are you?

-It's really, really well done!

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A little bit more practice in turning it out,

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it probably needs, more than anything!

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Yeah, well - deeper pan, deeper pan. My habit.

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We only do massive portions -

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so, we do, like, two kilos of rice for four people. There you go.

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-Well, that was just timed perfect, that broken bit, wasn't it?

-Yes!

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Yeah, it's just the perfect place for the salmon.

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-No, that's perfect - it serves four people and a dog.

-Yeah!

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LAUGHTER

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-Brilliant.

-So, give us the name of this, then.

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OK, this WAS sabzi polo mahi, which is a herbed rice

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with citrus spice-perfumed salmon.

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400 shows and we're still practising.

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Apparently you need a wedge of lemon, as well, to go with it.

0:11:290:11:31

-There you go.

-Actually, this is probably...

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Before, it was the full-fat version and now it's got less.

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It's, like, essentially, a low-fat version of it!

0:11:360:11:38

-You get to dive into that.

-There you go.

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Tell us what you think of that.

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This is what everyone, every Iranian, is eating around the world.

0:11:410:11:44

-Yeah.

-I had it last night.

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-I can see that you guys are not partial on this.

-Have one, James.

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-I've eaten one.

-Did you?

-Yeah.

-I never saw you.

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There's not... There's not a great...

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Not that! I'm not... I'm discussing this, not that.

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There's not a great deal to it, is there?

0:11:550:11:58

That'd also work for the rice, wouldn't it?

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There's not a great deal to it that's not on the floor!

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That's just had about seven minutes, that's all you want, yeah?

0:12:020:12:05

Er, yeah - you can give it a little bit longer.

0:12:050:12:07

-Yeah.

-Yeah. It depends on the size of the fillet.

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-That salmon's beautiful.

-Yeah?

-Mm!

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That rice looks so delicious

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I would have quite happily eaten it off the floor. Maybe not.

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Anyway, coming up,

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James cooks tamarind and coconut lamb and vegetable stir-fry

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for Vic Reeves - but first it's over to Rick Stein,

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who is in a race against the tide -

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and watch out, Rick, your feet are getting wet.

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It's a bit frustrating, staying in hotels on holiday

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in places like Italy, India or Thailand.

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I mean, you go to markets

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and you see all the beautiful fresh fish and vegetables

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and you just want to take them back and cook with them -

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but at least you can learn so much just walking around the market

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and talking to the traders.

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Well, you probably don't know what this is -

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it's actually morning glory, and it's used for stir-fries,

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just like we use spinach or pak choi,

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but, here, morning glory - brilliant.

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Look at these! I love these.

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These are called snake beans,

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and I think you're starting to get these in England now.

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I was quite interested, because there's this really good dish I did

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in the last book called Thai fishcakes,

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and I had this letter from Australia saying,

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"You don't know your Thai fishcakes -

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"they don't have beans in them."

0:13:160:13:18

Well, I've just had some in the market, and they do. Hah!

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So, here, look. Look at these.

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Again, we're just beginning to get those in England.

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Now, these are pea aubergines,

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and they're a vital ingredient of a green curry -

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either a chicken or a fish green curry.

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They're slightly bitter.

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I thought they were peas, of course, when I first tasted them,

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but they're not. They're absolutely ideal for any Thai curries.

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Here. There's no English name for these.

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They're like garlic chives.

0:13:450:13:46

They're called cha um - excuse my pronunciation -

0:13:460:13:50

and they use them in little omelettes,

0:13:500:13:52

and they've just got a faintly onion, faintly garlicky taste.

0:13:520:13:56

I think the Australians call these yellow chives -

0:13:560:13:59

but we need these in England. We really do!

0:13:590:14:02

I'm sure you'll know what these are.

0:14:020:14:04

They're kaffir lime leaves - or in Thai - bai makrut.

0:14:040:14:10

How's that?

0:14:100:14:11

Bai means "leaves" and makrut means "kaffir lime".

0:14:110:14:15

No, look at that. I bet you don't know what that is.

0:14:150:14:17

You certainly wouldn't until you tried it.

0:14:170:14:20

It tastes like coriander,

0:14:200:14:21

and it's called bai chi pharong,

0:14:210:14:23

which means "foreign".

0:14:230:14:25

Now, over here...

0:14:250:14:26

I expect you know what that is,

0:14:280:14:29

cos that is turning up in England now -

0:14:290:14:31

it's called kha in Thai, or galangal,

0:14:310:14:34

and it used to be very popular in England, in medieval England,

0:14:340:14:37

but it's died out, but it's coming back now,

0:14:370:14:39

and this is another rhizome called lesser ginger,

0:14:390:14:43

and over here we've got some shredded,

0:14:430:14:45

and you can just go and buy ginger all shredded,

0:14:450:14:48

or this, which is the lesser ginger.

0:14:480:14:50

Tastes like ginger, but much more lemony and not quite so strong.

0:14:520:14:55

Very, very popular in lots of dishes over here.

0:14:550:14:58

Look at these.

0:14:580:14:59

They're called rat's ears, rat ears.

0:14:590:15:02

See? Squeak, squeak, squeak!

0:15:020:15:04

Again, very useful in stir-fries.

0:15:060:15:08

Look at this odd-looking purple paste.

0:15:080:15:10

Now, that's shrimp paste, that's made from dried shrimps.

0:15:100:15:13

Oh, I don't think I can actually tell you what it SMELLS like -

0:15:140:15:18

you wouldn't want to know! And this is red curry paste.

0:15:180:15:21

If you're making a red curry,

0:15:210:15:22

you come to the market, you buy your paste dead easy.

0:15:220:15:25

Now, in the days before chillies arrived in Thailand -

0:15:250:15:29

cos, in fact, chillies came from Mexico,

0:15:290:15:31

via Portugal, to South-East Asia,

0:15:310:15:33

this is what they used for heat - just peppercorns.

0:15:330:15:36

But, of course, what they use now...

0:15:360:15:39

are these. Now, these are bird's eye chillies,

0:15:390:15:41

and these are right up...

0:15:410:15:43

number nine or ten on the heat scale,

0:15:430:15:45

called the Scoville scale.

0:15:450:15:47

Really, really hot.

0:15:470:15:48

You get little bowls of those

0:15:480:15:50

just in a little bit of fish sauce and lime juice

0:15:500:15:53

to eat with all your food. Great.

0:15:530:15:55

I love the heat and tropical scents of Thailand,

0:15:560:15:59

but I must say it's great to get back

0:15:590:16:02

to the purity of light and the quietness of Cornwall...

0:16:020:16:05

..but I still like to cook Thai food in Cornwall.

0:16:070:16:10

I wonder if they'd like to cook Cornish pasties in Thailand.

0:16:100:16:14

I don't think so, somehow.

0:16:140:16:15

But we're dead lucky in England.

0:16:170:16:19

I mean, you can buy the ingredients for most Thai dishes

0:16:190:16:22

in any supermarket.

0:16:220:16:24

Well, this is a John Dory.

0:16:240:16:25

Pretty impressive-looking beast, don't you think?

0:16:250:16:27

Some people say it's ugly.

0:16:270:16:28

I think it just... Well, it may look a bit glum,

0:16:280:16:31

but not ugly.

0:16:310:16:32

Amazingly, a lot of people call it...

0:16:320:16:35

In a lot of countries, it's called the St Peter fish,

0:16:350:16:37

and that's supposed to be the thumbprint of St Peter.

0:16:370:16:41

In fact, they're actually a round fish -

0:16:410:16:43

but look more like a flat fish,

0:16:430:16:46

but they swim towards their prey like that...

0:16:460:16:48

..and they can't be seen.

0:16:500:16:51

God, imagine if that was sort of coming at you,

0:16:510:16:54

you'd know about it pretty...

0:16:540:16:56

Weurgh! OK.

0:16:560:16:57

Anyway, the great thing about John Dory

0:16:570:16:59

is that they're very firm, it makes really good steaks.

0:16:590:17:02

A good, firm, meaty fish.

0:17:020:17:04

Very dense fish, so you'd really have to cook it

0:17:040:17:06

for quite a long time to get the heat through it.

0:17:060:17:08

And ideal for this dish, which I'm now going to cook,

0:17:080:17:11

which we got from Thailand again, from Hua Hin,

0:17:110:17:14

and it's hard fried fish with a red curry sauce.

0:17:140:17:20

First of all, get my pan nice and hot,

0:17:200:17:23

and while I get that hot,

0:17:230:17:25

I just want to talk about the red curry paste

0:17:250:17:27

I'm going to make the sauce with.

0:17:270:17:28

Now, they're all - red curry pastes, they're all from Thailand,

0:17:280:17:31

and all subtly different.

0:17:310:17:33

In this case, we've got turmeric, we've got cumin,

0:17:330:17:36

we've got coriander, shallots, garlic, a little bit of paprika,

0:17:360:17:41

ginger, red chillies,

0:17:410:17:44

Chalky's favourite fish paste, called belacan, that smells so much,

0:17:440:17:48

and lemon grass.

0:17:480:17:49

So, I've wazzed that all up in a mortar and pestle

0:17:490:17:52

to produce that lovely red curry paste,

0:17:520:17:55

and I'll just put a little bit of oil in this pan,

0:17:550:17:58

and fry the curry paste hard.

0:17:580:18:00

Just let that fry till quite a lot of the moisture's been driven off.

0:18:020:18:06

And now some coconut milk.

0:18:070:18:09

About... Just under half a pint, I suppose.

0:18:090:18:11

Stir that around.

0:18:130:18:15

Now, some brown sugar

0:18:150:18:17

and some fish sauce - couple of tablespoons of fish sauce,

0:18:170:18:22

and just leave that to simmer away gently.

0:18:220:18:25

There's only one more ingredient to add at the end of that,

0:18:250:18:28

fresh lime juice.

0:18:280:18:29

It's much better if you can just put freshly squeezed lime juice

0:18:290:18:31

in a sauce like that -

0:18:310:18:32

right at the end, it really lifts the flavour. Fantastic.

0:18:320:18:36

OK, that's nice and thickened up.

0:18:360:18:38

Now, I've only got the one burner,

0:18:380:18:39

so I've got to put the wok with the oil on the top of there.

0:18:390:18:43

Just take my stands over.

0:18:430:18:45

There we go. And on with the wok.

0:18:450:18:47

I don't know if you've noticed, behind me,

0:18:470:18:49

but it happened in another programme I did before, but...

0:18:490:18:52

actually, it takes quite a long time doing these sort of things outdoors,

0:18:520:18:55

because what happens is, you get helicopters coming over,

0:18:550:18:58

then you get a little sort of biplane, you know, whizzing across,

0:18:580:19:02

then somebody starts a strimmer in the lawn over there,

0:19:020:19:05

and you have to go and say, "Look, please cut it off,"

0:19:050:19:07

and then there's an outdoor... you know, little motorboat

0:19:070:19:10

with an outboard motor,

0:19:100:19:11

and all these times you have to stop and wait,

0:19:110:19:13

and meanwhile the blinking tide's coming in,

0:19:130:19:15

and I'm just beginning to get my feet wet, but here we go.

0:19:150:19:18

First one...

0:19:180:19:20

then the other...and that's going to take about two minutes,

0:19:200:19:22

so while they're cooking,

0:19:220:19:24

I'm just going to finish off the sauce,

0:19:240:19:25

which is now nicely reduced,

0:19:250:19:28

and just going to add a little bit of lime juice, there,

0:19:280:19:32

fresh lime juice, as I said.

0:19:320:19:33

That'll give it a real zing.

0:19:330:19:36

OK, I think we're just about there with the fish.

0:19:360:19:39

See, it's all nice and crisped up now, so that's good.

0:19:390:19:43

Nicely fried -

0:19:430:19:44

and there's the other one, butterflied out.

0:19:440:19:48

That looks great.

0:19:480:19:51

And now just to finish the dish.

0:19:510:19:53

If you can't get John Dory like that,

0:19:550:19:57

a steak of cod or monkfish would do.

0:19:570:19:59

And now some sauce - it's lovely and fragrant and sour and hot,

0:19:590:20:04

but, above all, fresh-tasting,

0:20:040:20:06

and a good sprinkle of chopped coriander - just roughly chopped.

0:20:060:20:10

And that's it. OK?

0:20:110:20:13

Do you mind if I go now?

0:20:130:20:15

-WATER SPLASHES

-Thanks!

0:20:150:20:17

"Twas brillig and the slithy toves

0:20:220:20:26

"Did gyre and gimble in the wabe."

0:20:260:20:28

That always makes me think of that time between dreaming and waking

0:20:280:20:32

when you're never quite sure where you are.

0:20:320:20:34

When we're making these programmes, we're always thinking about recipes.

0:20:340:20:39

Poor old Dave, he has these dreams where food is all tumbled together

0:20:390:20:43

in strange foreign places.

0:20:430:20:45

Well, it's only a dream, but I was in the walled city in Hong Kong,

0:20:450:20:48

and there was wires...

0:20:480:20:49

You know, there's something about other people's dreams,

0:20:490:20:52

-they're so boring, Dave.

-There were wires everywhere,

0:20:520:20:54

rats running around the place,

0:20:540:20:56

and I was undercover, cooking for these gangsters.

0:20:560:20:59

I was doing these fish balls, you know?

0:20:590:21:01

Fish balls with the flavour of basil and lemon zest.

0:21:010:21:05

-What, in Hong Kong?

-Yeah.

0:21:050:21:08

What, basil and lemon zest?

0:21:080:21:10

Well, yeah - I mean, I know it doesn't sound like Hong Kong, but...

0:21:100:21:13

-Dream, innit, I suppose?

-It was a dream.

0:21:130:21:15

-You want me to cook it?

-Yeah.

0:21:150:21:16

-See what it tastes like.

-Ugh!

0:21:160:21:18

Anything for a quiet life.

0:21:180:21:20

Well, there's one thing you CAN say about dreams -

0:21:200:21:23

if you've got something on your mind,

0:21:230:21:25

you know, inevitably, you're going to dream about it.

0:21:250:21:27

When we're making these programmes, food is seriously on our mind,

0:21:270:21:31

all the time we're thinking about food,

0:21:310:21:33

so I can sort of understand Dave,

0:21:330:21:36

so I just thought, what a good idea

0:21:360:21:38

to try out what he was dreaming about,

0:21:380:21:41

and see if dreams can bring out the most wonderful dishes,

0:21:410:21:44

the most wonderful stories.

0:21:440:21:45

So, first of all, he said some fish,

0:21:450:21:48

so we'll start off with a bit of cod, I think.

0:21:480:21:50

Just cut that up a little bit.

0:21:500:21:52

And now prawns. Now, he said they should go in with the fish.

0:21:550:21:58

I'm a bit disappointed about that,

0:21:580:22:00

because, you know, I like the texture of prawns -

0:22:000:22:02

but in the spirit of science, we'll do exactly what he said.

0:22:020:22:07

Now an egg.

0:22:090:22:10

The eggs that bind.

0:22:100:22:12

That'll do. Just a little bit of a blend with the fish and the prawns.

0:22:120:22:17

So, one egg, I think, will do. In that goes.

0:22:170:22:20

That'll be great.

0:22:220:22:23

So I'll just empty that out into this bowl -

0:22:230:22:27

and in goes the crab meat,

0:22:270:22:29

and just fold that in nicely.

0:22:290:22:31

Now, he said a bit of breadcrumbs,

0:22:310:22:32

so we'll just put about a couple of handfuls of that in,

0:22:320:22:35

just to bind it up, to make it easy to mould out.

0:22:350:22:38

And now for the flavourings.

0:22:380:22:40

What was it? Lemon. Lemon zest first of all.

0:22:400:22:43

This is obviously a bit of an Italian-cum-Chinese dish.

0:22:430:22:46

The Italian - the lemon zest and the basil,

0:22:460:22:49

the Chinese - well, the balls,

0:22:490:22:50

cos they go in for lots of sort of fish balls.

0:22:500:22:52

So he must've been in a right old turmoil in his bed.

0:22:520:22:55

Poor old Dave!

0:22:550:22:57

So, mix those in. OK.

0:22:570:22:59

That looks about right.

0:22:590:23:00

Just try a little bit...

0:23:000:23:01

Don't do that if you don't like raw fish - but I do.

0:23:030:23:06

Actually, that's tasting pretty good.

0:23:060:23:08

Maybe this has got some potential.

0:23:080:23:10

I mean, you know what dreams are like normally. Forget it.

0:23:100:23:13

You know, sort of "in-your-dreams" pasta.

0:23:140:23:17

OK, I'll just do about six of these.

0:23:170:23:18

I can't be bothered, cos I just want to get on and cook this

0:23:180:23:21

and see what it's like.

0:23:210:23:23

So, we can start making the sauce now.

0:23:230:23:25

First of all, some olive oil...

0:23:250:23:27

and then some garlic.

0:23:270:23:29

There we are. Nice lot of garlic -

0:23:290:23:31

and some onion.

0:23:310:23:32

Plenty of onion...

0:23:330:23:35

and just stir that around a bit, just to get it nice and...

0:23:350:23:39

Translucent's the word.

0:23:390:23:41

And then some nice chopped tomato,

0:23:420:23:44

and we'll use fresh tomatoes here.

0:23:440:23:47

About 15, 20 of them. Stir them round.

0:23:470:23:50

And now some herbs. Now, we'll have some bay leaves.

0:23:500:23:53

Nice, fresh bay leaves - about four of them, I suppose...

0:23:530:23:57

and some fresh thyme.

0:23:570:23:59

Couple of sprigs. That's good.

0:23:590:24:02

Now I think we'll have some vinegar.

0:24:020:24:04

I like a good slug of red wine vinegar in something like this.

0:24:040:24:07

Did he say wine? No, I don't think he did.

0:24:070:24:10

Bit of salt...

0:24:100:24:12

and plenty of pepper...

0:24:120:24:13

..and we just leave that to simmer away.

0:24:160:24:18

So, that's been going for about 20 minutes now

0:24:190:24:22

and, look, it's nice and reduced, and looking absolutely lovely.

0:24:220:24:26

So, I'm just going to force this sauce through the conical strainer

0:24:260:24:29

with the back of a ladle, pushing everything through.

0:24:290:24:32

Quite nice big holes in this conical strainer,

0:24:320:24:34

so a lot of it goes through.

0:24:340:24:36

Only this sort of really rough debris stays behind.

0:24:360:24:39

Just put that back on the heat now

0:24:390:24:41

and just poach off these balls in it.

0:24:410:24:44

Look at that - look at the lovely coating on them, there.

0:24:440:24:46

They'll poach in about three, four, five minutes.

0:24:460:24:49

Not much longer.

0:24:490:24:50

I've just got a big pot of water here.

0:24:500:24:52

Remember, lots and lots of water when you cook pasta.

0:24:520:24:55

This time, tagliatelle. Cooked it for 9 to 10 minutes.

0:24:550:24:58

Well-salted water.

0:24:580:25:00

Then just take that colander

0:25:000:25:01

and pour all the pasta into a nice big bowl,

0:25:010:25:04

ready to put on the fish balls and the sauce...

0:25:040:25:07

and now I think we'll just put four balls on this one.

0:25:070:25:10

It's not a six-ball dish, this.

0:25:100:25:12

I'll just finish this off with a little...

0:25:120:25:14

what we call a chiffonade of basil.

0:25:140:25:17

Look at that - lovely green basil,

0:25:170:25:19

and a good, generous pinch of Parmesan.

0:25:190:25:22

I'm getting quite excited, I really am, about this.

0:25:230:25:25

It looks good. I mean, you know, why not?

0:25:250:25:28

You have meatballs and pasta.

0:25:280:25:29

If they're well made, like these are, of course,

0:25:290:25:32

and pasta perfectly cooked, al dente, why not fish balls?

0:25:320:25:36

Well, this came out of a conversation about a dream,

0:25:360:25:39

and, well, I think you've heard what I think about people's dreams -

0:25:390:25:43

boring!

0:25:430:25:44

But I've never tasted this before.

0:25:440:25:46

Let's just see.

0:25:460:25:47

Excuse this - there's bits of pasta hanging everywhere.

0:25:470:25:50

Hey!

0:25:530:25:54

It's all right.

0:25:540:25:56

Well, that's one way to create new recipes.

0:26:010:26:03

There are so many great Eastern dishes that you can try at home,

0:26:030:26:05

and I've got another one to show you right now

0:26:050:26:08

from my recent trip - it's a coconut tamarind lamb stir-fry.

0:26:080:26:12

It uses...basically this lovely loin of lamb that we have here,

0:26:120:26:16

which is kind of the same as a sirloin of beef, really.

0:26:160:26:19

Obviously it's a smaller piece -

0:26:190:26:21

but I'm going to stir-fry that with tamarind,

0:26:210:26:22

which we've got in there, coconut milk,

0:26:220:26:24

some mizuna leaves, which is different -

0:26:240:26:26

you can get these from supermarkets now,

0:26:260:26:27

these little mizuna leaves.

0:26:270:26:29

Different... Try it

0:26:290:26:30

Grow it at home, Vic, as well.

0:26:300:26:32

Very different to rocket -

0:26:320:26:33

not as peppery, but a different sort of taste, I think, really good.

0:26:330:26:36

-It's a weak rocket?

-Yes, it is like a weak rocket,

0:26:360:26:39

but I think it's a great, great herb, that.

0:26:390:26:41

Then we've got some cabbage,

0:26:410:26:42

all manner of things to put into a stir-fry.

0:26:420:26:44

Basically, thinly slice our lamb and stir-fry that together,

0:26:440:26:48

and then take it out and let it rest,

0:26:480:26:50

and then stir-fry the rest of the stuff.

0:26:500:26:52

I think that I cooked this this week.

0:26:520:26:54

-Did you?

-Yeah. On Monday or Tuesday, I think.

0:26:540:26:56

Cos you do all of the cooking at home, don't you?

0:26:560:26:58

Yeah. Well, not all of it.

0:26:580:27:00

No, Nancy cooked last night.

0:27:000:27:01

-Right.

-She made a cowboy pie, which was very good.

0:27:010:27:03

Right!

0:27:030:27:04

A cowboy pie?

0:27:040:27:06

-Minced beef.

-Minced beef, OK.

-Beans, haricot beans.

0:27:060:27:09

All right, OK.

0:27:090:27:11

Bit of that in there,

0:27:110:27:12

and we throw all that lot in.

0:27:120:27:14

We stir-fry this very, very hot.

0:27:140:27:16

That's probably a bit too hot!

0:27:160:27:19

We just get a bit of colour on that...

0:27:190:27:22

and that's off.

0:27:220:27:23

-So, Vic Reeves, this is your life.

-Yes, please.

0:27:240:27:28

-Born James Moir.

-Yeah.

0:27:280:27:30

Father, grandfather, same name, same birthday.

0:27:300:27:34

-Yes.

-How weird is that?

0:27:340:27:35

-Yes, I know. All from Leeds.

-All from Leeds.

0:27:350:27:37

-Failed all exams at school, apart from art.

-That's right,

0:27:370:27:41

but that was in 1975, and the whole nation failed.

0:27:410:27:45

-It was...

-What do you mean...

-No, it was!

0:27:450:27:47

I mean, the amount of work I put into my history, geography,

0:27:470:27:51

and I should have won. I should have been...

0:27:510:27:54

A crown should have been awarded to me,

0:27:540:27:56

the amount of work I put into that.

0:27:560:27:57

-I got a grade 5.

-Fast-forward ten years,

0:27:570:28:00

the same thing was happening -

0:28:000:28:01

-in 1988 I failed cookery at school...

-Yeah.

0:28:010:28:04

..and the only exam that I passed was art -

0:28:040:28:06

but passing just art was enough qualification

0:28:060:28:09

to get you in an art college, be a mechanic or be a chef.

0:28:090:28:11

Yeah, that's all I wanted to do.

0:28:110:28:13

-Yeah!

-I ended up being a mechanic.

0:28:130:28:15

I wanted to go to art school -

0:28:150:28:16

but questions were raised that year,

0:28:160:28:18

-let me tell you, in Parliament.

-In Parliament!

0:28:180:28:22

-That's nicely done.

-So, why did you pursue art as a career, then?

0:28:220:28:25

-Cos you're doing it now.

-Well, I'm doing it now...

0:28:250:28:28

-You've had all these exhibitions.

-..but, like, when I grew up,

0:28:280:28:31

the thing to do was to get a job,

0:28:310:28:33

and get something that was going to last for a while.

0:28:330:28:36

-So, my dad said to go and work in a factory.

-Yeah.

0:28:360:28:39

So, I did for about four years,

0:28:390:28:41

and decided that this isn't what I want to do,

0:28:410:28:44

I'm not going to spend the rest of my life doing this, so I fled.

0:28:440:28:47

-Right.

-Without finishing the apprenticeship.

0:28:470:28:49

We might have come from the same sort of area in Yorkshire,

0:28:490:28:52

cos I was told when I was a kid that you couldn't pursue art as a career,

0:28:520:28:55

that was the only exam that I passed,

0:28:550:28:57

cos all the wealthy artists were all dead.

0:28:570:28:59

-Well, my dad said...

-You had to get a proper job.

0:28:590:29:02

-Yeah, exactly.

-Yeah.

0:29:020:29:03

He said, "Do you know any artists who have been successful?"

0:29:030:29:06

So, I said "Well, Andy Warhol,"

0:29:060:29:08

he said, "Pfft, look at him!"

0:29:080:29:10

-David Hockney.

-Yeah!

0:29:100:29:12

So, it wasn't really the done thing. It was, "Go and get a job,"

0:29:120:29:15

but my dad did say later on,

0:29:150:29:17

he wished he'd said, "Yeah, go to art school."

0:29:170:29:20

Which I did do eventually.

0:29:200:29:21

But comedy came about - you were a group of kids messing around.

0:29:210:29:25

-Is that where you fell in love with it?

-Yeah.

0:29:250:29:28

Yes, we messed about.

0:29:280:29:30

There were five of us, five mates, called the Fashionable Five.

0:29:300:29:33

We were a kind of a musical group, but more of an, um...

0:29:330:29:37

an adventure group!

0:29:370:29:38

-Adventure group!

-We used to have fun.

0:29:380:29:41

-Right.

-That's what it was all about.

0:29:410:29:43

-Right.

-You know, having fun as a teen.

0:29:430:29:46

How did you break away from that and then go into stand-up?

0:29:460:29:49

Cos you started off with a one-man tour, didn't you?

0:29:490:29:52

Well, it wasn't a tour - it wasn't really stand-up, either.

0:29:520:29:55

I left art school,

0:29:550:29:56

I kind of put on what I considered to be a bit of performance art

0:29:560:30:01

-on a stage in a pub in south London.

-Right!

0:30:010:30:04

The Goldsmiths Tavern - and it was...

0:30:040:30:06

-I called it Vic Reeves' Big Night Out.

-Right.

0:30:060:30:10

So... It was different every week. It wasn't really stand-up -

0:30:100:30:14

-it wasn't a routine.

-Yeah.

0:30:140:30:16

It was just like, "Let's have fun."

0:30:160:30:18

Wasn't that where you met Bob?

0:30:180:30:20

Yeah, he was in the audience. People say he was heckling,

0:30:200:30:22

but I don't think Bob's ever heckled in his life.

0:30:220:30:24

He was just there, as a mate - a mate of a mate,

0:30:240:30:27

and I said to him,

0:30:270:30:28

"Here, do you fancy coming on the stage next week

0:30:280:30:31

"and saying these lines?"

0:30:310:30:33

I think he had to give me a cheque

0:30:330:30:36

for all the marvellous work I'd done for some charity,

0:30:360:30:39

which was a big con.

0:30:390:30:40

That was all... I said, "Here, you bring this massive cheque on,

0:30:420:30:45

"and I'll boast about it."

0:30:450:30:47

How did TV come about from that, then? Putting the two together?

0:30:470:30:50

Well, we went from there to the Albany Empire,

0:30:500:30:54

which is a bigger theatre, which held about 350 people,

0:30:540:30:56

and we did the same thing.

0:30:560:30:58

-We had a show which was about three hours long...

-Right.

0:30:580:31:01

-..of very...mixed content...

-Right!

0:31:010:31:05

..and it was different every week.

0:31:050:31:07

So, I put on six, and then a lot of people turned up,

0:31:070:31:10

and then there was a gap,

0:31:100:31:11

and then another series of six of these live shows,

0:31:110:31:14

and word got out, and people were coming from all around the country,

0:31:140:31:17

-so word got out...

-Yeah.

0:31:170:31:19

..and then Jonathan Ross was down,

0:31:190:31:22

-and then Jools Holland, you know.

-Yeah.

0:31:220:31:25

It was kind of... You know, word got about,

0:31:250:31:27

and then eventually there was Channel 4 and Alan Yentob...

0:31:270:31:31

So, Michael Grade and Alan Yentob

0:31:310:31:33

were in the audience one night,

0:31:330:31:35

and they both wanted us to do a...

0:31:350:31:37

That's sort of the total mix of stuff,

0:31:370:31:40

that you never know what's going to happen,

0:31:400:31:42

has followed you - you know, Shooting Stars,

0:31:420:31:45

-Vic and Bob...

-It was unbounded enthusiasm.

0:31:450:31:48

As a guest, you really haven't got a clue what's about to happen.

0:31:480:31:52

Well, you've been a guest,

0:31:520:31:54

and we don't let anyone know what's happening.

0:31:540:31:56

A lot of these panel shows, they let people know what's up,

0:31:560:31:59

-and give them, almost, lines to read...

-Yeah.

0:31:590:32:02

but on our show you haven't a clue what's going to happen.

0:32:020:32:05

You definitely haven't got a clue -

0:32:050:32:06

but that spirit's still there with the new thing you're doing now...

0:32:060:32:09

-The...

-..and the kids, but adults can watch it, as well.

0:32:090:32:12

The Ministry Of Curious Stuff.

0:32:120:32:13

Tell us how that came about, then.

0:32:130:32:15

I did a book about two years ago

0:32:150:32:18

called Vic Reeves' Vast Encyclopaedia Of World Knowledge,

0:32:180:32:22

which was full of semi-truths, and it kind of...

0:32:220:32:24

So, someone at the Beeb said,

0:32:240:32:27

"Shall we make a TV show out of this for kids?"

0:32:270:32:31

-Yeah.

-That's how it started.

0:32:310:32:33

Then it developed into what it is now,

0:32:330:32:35

which is...I'm the minister of this government department

0:32:350:32:41

who finds out information from the kids

0:32:410:32:45

and then explains it via the gift of sketches and nonsense.

0:32:450:32:51

With the help of other people - cos you've got Dan Skinner, as well.

0:32:510:32:54

Yeah. Dan Skinner, who's Angelos in Shooting Stars.

0:32:540:32:56

-Yeah.

-He's playing Captain Length-Width.

0:32:560:32:58

He's brilliant in it, I have to say.

0:32:580:33:00

He's great. We've got a good kind of rapport thing.

0:33:000:33:03

-It's quite an old-fashioned type of comedy...

-Yeah.

0:33:030:33:06

..that we do in it. I mean, it's good for adults -

0:33:060:33:08

it's good for kids, but it's good for adults.

0:33:080:33:10

It's quite an old-fashioned cross-talk, '50s radio style.

0:33:100:33:15

This is for CBBC, is it?

0:33:150:33:17

-CBBC?

-It's CBBC, yeah. On, um...

0:33:170:33:20

Well, actually, it's repeated, it's on Sundays at nine o'clock.

0:33:200:33:24

So, tomorrow morning, just after now.

0:33:240:33:27

Just after now, there you go!

0:33:270:33:29

Right, I've got everything in there.

0:33:290:33:30

The lamb's gone back in, we've got the tamarind,

0:33:300:33:32

the coconut milk, everything's gone back in there.

0:33:320:33:36

Now, as well as all that, like I said, you're an author,

0:33:360:33:38

the artist, with all of your shows, and doing your bits and pieces -

0:33:380:33:42

but you're starting your comedy show. Tell us about that.

0:33:420:33:46

-Is it one-man stand-up, or...

-Well, we're going to do...

0:33:460:33:49

We haven't done a live tour for, I think, 15 years,

0:33:490:33:54

probably more than 15 years,

0:33:540:33:55

so we're going to try some stuff out in Leeds

0:33:550:33:59

at the Leeds City Varieties in March.

0:33:590:34:04

-We're going to do three days there and try some stuff out.

-Right.

0:34:040:34:08

I was thinking we would try different - old characters...

0:34:080:34:11

something old, something new -

0:34:110:34:13

but I was thinking for merchandise,

0:34:130:34:15

I've been doing quite a bit of pottery recently,

0:34:150:34:18

-I might...

-You're making your own range?

-..make some mugs,

0:34:180:34:22

and instead of merchandise selling T-shirts and that,

0:34:220:34:25

I fancy having a craft stall.

0:34:250:34:26

-So, like, have handmade mugs.

-Yeah, that's a good idea.

0:34:270:34:31

-Macrame hats.

-Yeah!

0:34:310:34:34

You could sell some of your chutneys.

0:34:340:34:36

Yeah, that'd be quite good!

0:34:360:34:38

There we go.

0:34:380:34:39

There we go, we've got the lamb there,

0:34:390:34:41

-and best of luck with that.

-That looks good.

0:34:410:34:43

What's that you've put it on?

0:34:430:34:45

Banana leaf.

0:34:450:34:46

That local ingredient to Yorkshire(!)

0:34:460:34:49

Could you eat that?

0:34:510:34:52

No. I wouldn't eat it.

0:34:520:34:54

They normally wrap it up and cook fish in it.

0:34:540:34:56

This looks like one I made earlier this week,

0:34:560:34:58

but let's see if you can do any better.

0:34:580:35:00

-Oh, look at that. That's nice.

-Lamb's still pink, see?

0:35:000:35:02

I'll have a bit of that, and that..

0:35:020:35:03

You cook it and literally put it back in after...

0:35:030:35:06

I love tamarind.

0:35:060:35:07

It's quite minty.

0:35:110:35:13

Yep.

0:35:130:35:14

It's got quite an English thing going on about it as well,

0:35:140:35:19

-with that mint...

-It is cooked by a Yorkshireman, yeah.

0:35:190:35:21

The only thing English in there's the lamb and the mint,

0:35:210:35:24

but other than that it's not far off.

0:35:240:35:26

So there you go.

0:35:290:35:30

A GCSE in art will get you into cooking or comedy apparently -

0:35:300:35:33

why wouldn't it?

0:35:330:35:34

Now, today we're taking a look back at some of the tastiest recipes

0:35:340:35:37

from the Saturday Kitchen archives,

0:35:370:35:39

and we have barely scratched the surface, so don't go anywhere.

0:35:390:35:42

Up next, Will Holland, who decided to keep it simple

0:35:420:35:45

and cook a souffle.

0:35:450:35:46

Welcome back, Mr Will Holland.

0:35:460:35:48

-Hello, hello.

-Now, souffle - this is the souffle,

0:35:480:35:50

you've just made these two minutes ago.

0:35:500:35:51

I've just made those. We're going to put them straight in

0:35:510:35:54

and then do the whole process so there's not any sort of...

0:35:540:35:56

In the oven. 350 centigrade, 170 Fahrenheit,

0:35:560:35:59

gas mark 4, eight minutes.

0:35:590:36:01

-Eight minutes.

-And I'm going to put the timer on.

-Get the timer on.

0:36:010:36:05

-And don't open the oven door.

-That's it.

0:36:050:36:07

Don't keep going over there and checking if they're all right.

0:36:070:36:09

Right, what I'm doing first of all, cos I need to get this going,

0:36:090:36:12

is sugar and water.

0:36:120:36:13

We're just going to make a syrup.

0:36:130:36:15

So you're quite confident in these sort of souffles?

0:36:150:36:18

I think the thing is there's a lot of kind of...

0:36:180:36:21

You know, people at home

0:36:210:36:22

are a little bit scared about it, basically,

0:36:220:36:24

and there's no need to be scared,

0:36:240:36:26

and that's what I'm going to show you today.

0:36:260:36:28

Why are you looking nervous? JAMES LAUGHS

0:36:280:36:30

-Famous last words.

-Right, we're going to use the softened butter.

0:36:300:36:33

-Explain to us what the syrup is, then.

-The syrup's in here.

0:36:330:36:37

We're going to get that to...

0:36:370:36:38

-If we're getting technical, we're going to take it to 121.

-Yeah.

0:36:380:36:41

-Which is soft ball on the sugar thermometer.

-Which is soft ball.

0:36:410:36:44

But to you, me, and everyone at home,

0:36:440:36:46

we're going to boil it until it's syrupy.

0:36:460:36:48

On a sugar thermometer, you'll have 121 degrees.

0:36:480:36:50

-Sugar and water boils more than boiling water.

-Right.

0:36:500:36:53

Boiling water stops at 100 - you put sugar in it,

0:36:530:36:55

it'll continue to heat up to 160, 170 degrees.

0:36:550:36:59

-OK.

-And it's 121. On the sugar thermometer it's soft ball.

0:36:590:37:02

So that's one part of the base

0:37:020:37:03

that's going there, the syrup, James,

0:37:030:37:05

and then in here, I've got cornflour...

0:37:050:37:06

-Yep.

-..and red wine.

0:37:060:37:08

Often when you're making souffles, you'd make it out of a custard base,

0:37:080:37:11

but this is the first time I've seen it with...

0:37:110:37:14

Well, cornflour, you can do it with creme pat, or creme patissiere.

0:37:140:37:17

Yeah, there's two ways, as you said,

0:37:170:37:19

the custard base and then there's this version,

0:37:190:37:22

which is cornflour.

0:37:220:37:23

So all I've done is mixed cornflour and red wine.

0:37:230:37:25

And because I want it to be

0:37:250:37:27

a really, really intense red wine flavour,

0:37:270:37:29

-I've gone for a red wine with plenty of oomph.

-Oomph.

0:37:290:37:32

So, something big. Rioja, Merlot.

0:37:320:37:37

-Shiraz...

-Like a good Saint Emilion, something like that?

0:37:370:37:39

Saint Emilion, something that's just...

0:37:390:37:41

Something that's big and plenty of... Packs a good punch.

0:37:410:37:45

Right, when you're doing the souffle moulds for Will here,

0:37:450:37:49

what you do is you basically take the butter

0:37:490:37:52

and you make the lines up the side of the dish.

0:37:520:37:55

They're supposed to make the souffle rise up the side of the dish.

0:37:550:37:59

Yeah. Onwards and upwards.

0:37:590:38:01

-So...

-Rather than just rub butter...

0:38:010:38:03

I really, really think it's mumbo-jumbo, that kind of thing.

0:38:030:38:06

Mumbo-jumbo? Why don't you make one upwards, one downwards,

0:38:060:38:09

see which one is going to rise more, you know, because...

0:38:090:38:12

It's a Michelin belief. They want you to believe that kind of thing,

0:38:120:38:16

-Michelin-star establishments.

-Oh, I see.

-Anyway...

0:38:160:38:20

I've done it how you wanted it.

0:38:200:38:22

-Up the side.

-That's it. Do it my way.

0:38:220:38:24

You can do it how you want.

0:38:240:38:26

So when the sugar gets to that kind of nice syrupy consistency,

0:38:260:38:29

I'm going to take it out the pan to stop it at that temperature.

0:38:290:38:33

I've got our egg whites here.

0:38:330:38:34

These again are the packet, pasteurised egg whites.

0:38:340:38:37

Yeah, we're going to use pasteurised so that Jodie can enjoy the souffle.

0:38:370:38:41

-I don't want to give you...

-How exciting. Thank you.

0:38:410:38:43

..partially cooked eggs.

0:38:430:38:45

Whip these up, no sugar yet,

0:38:450:38:46

I'm going to add those a little bit later.

0:38:460:38:48

-What have we got going on in there?

-The cornflour and the red wine mix.

0:38:480:38:52

Just need to bring it to the boil,

0:38:520:38:54

and you can see how thick it comes, very, very quickly.

0:38:540:38:57

It's only been on there for a minute and a half, two minutes.

0:38:570:38:59

You need to keep whisking this,

0:38:590:39:00

particularly with the cornflour in it.

0:39:000:39:02

Yeah, we don't want it to be lumpy.

0:39:020:39:04

As soon as it's...

0:39:040:39:05

-This is Rioja we've used in there.

-OK.

0:39:060:39:08

-Going to pour that in.

-Soon as it comes to the boil,

0:39:080:39:12

out it comes, you can see how thick it is.

0:39:120:39:16

Get all of that out,

0:39:160:39:17

and then get the whisk in there again

0:39:170:39:19

and just whisk the syrup and the red wine mix together.

0:39:190:39:22

That's it, that's the finished base, it's as simple as that.

0:39:220:39:24

Now, tell us about Ludlow - amazing place,

0:39:240:39:27

famous for wonderful antique shops, great food...

0:39:270:39:30

Of course. The foodie hotspot.

0:39:300:39:33

It's a very, very famous place for food.

0:39:330:39:35

I'm just going to pop this in the fridge.

0:39:350:39:37

I'm going to throw in my sugar.

0:39:370:39:39

Get this done as quick as possible.

0:39:400:39:42

Because when we make the souffle, it needs to be cold.

0:39:430:39:46

But, yeah, Ludlow, it's a fantastic food destination.

0:39:460:39:49

There's great restaurants,

0:39:490:39:51

but it's also the kind of... The culture and town of food,

0:39:510:39:54

you know, the butcher's and the baker's,

0:39:540:39:56

and we've got a fantastic food festival

0:39:560:39:58

that happens every year in September.

0:39:580:40:00

-Yeah, which you're doing, of course.

-Well, I'm not doing it.

0:40:000:40:03

It's been going for a lot longer than I've been in town, but it's...

0:40:030:40:06

I think it's its 17th year this year, which is just incredible.

0:40:060:40:11

So, for each souffle... I'm just going to give that a quick whisk.

0:40:110:40:14

-Have you got another whisk?

-Yeah, I've got a whisk.

-I'll use this one.

0:40:140:40:17

Another one.

0:40:170:40:18

It's really important that the base is cold when you make the souffle.

0:40:180:40:23

Would you like a Kenny Atkinson whisk or a normal whisk?

0:40:230:40:26

You said that, not me.

0:40:260:40:27

Kenny won't be watching anyway.

0:40:270:40:29

Right.

0:40:290:40:30

Cos it sets up, it's basically turned into a jelly.

0:40:320:40:34

-So that's what we want. So, a couple of tablespoons per souffle.

-Yeah.

0:40:340:40:38

-Ludlow, it's famous for, obviously, Shaun Hill.

-Shaun Hill.

0:40:410:40:44

Merchant House, that kind of thing.

0:40:440:40:46

Shaun Hill was the pioneer,

0:40:460:40:48

he was the original,

0:40:480:40:49

and I'm just there to...

0:40:490:40:51

fly the flag.

0:40:510:40:53

But it is great.

0:40:530:40:54

So many great produce, or so many great suppliers of great produce,

0:40:540:40:58

literally within the area.

0:40:580:40:59

Yeah, it's a rich area

0:40:590:41:02

for all things lovely.

0:41:020:41:04

At the moment someone's actually rearing suckling pigs for me,

0:41:040:41:09

so I've got a farmer that's actually...

0:41:090:41:11

I go and the pigs have already got my name on them

0:41:110:41:14

as they're running around the yard.

0:41:140:41:16

I don't think they know it!

0:41:160:41:18

-They're all called Will.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:41:180:41:20

They've got a tag on there.

0:41:200:41:21

So you're whisking this with a whisk.

0:41:210:41:23

I always do souffle like this,

0:41:230:41:24

but often a lot of people mainly use the spatula and fold it in.

0:41:240:41:27

-It's much quicker this way.

-Listen, this is... This is...

0:41:270:41:30

I don't want to say it's a foolproof recipe - yet.

0:41:300:41:35

-Right. Yet.

-But you can be...

0:41:350:41:37

-Doesn't look like at the moment it is.

-But you can be pretty...

0:41:370:41:41

-Pretty...brutal with it.

-Robust with it.

0:41:410:41:44

-So use the whisk.

-It's the cornflour that's...

0:41:440:41:46

Yeah, the cornflour's nice and hard. Did you sugar those as well?

0:41:460:41:49

Yes, they've been sugared.

0:41:490:41:50

Excellent. So I'm just going to grab a spoon.

0:41:500:41:53

But, yeah, instead of using...

0:41:530:41:54

Don't be afraid about getting your arm in there

0:41:540:41:57

and just really, really incorporating

0:41:570:41:59

the meringue, essentially, and the base.

0:41:590:42:01

Now, you make these before service, don't you?

0:42:010:42:04

So if you're doing a dinner party...

0:42:040:42:05

Yeah, these are brilliant for at home.

0:42:050:42:07

Because of the cornflour it's quite a sturdy mix,

0:42:070:42:09

so you don't have to make it and cook them straightaway.

0:42:090:42:12

You can make them a good couple of hours before.

0:42:120:42:15

And just pop them in the fridge?

0:42:150:42:17

Yeah, put them in the fridge.

0:42:170:42:18

So you've got your dessert ready to go, basically.

0:42:180:42:22

And soon as it's pudding time, pop them in the oven,

0:42:220:42:26

eight minutes or so.

0:42:260:42:28

Now, you've got to be careful not to...

0:42:290:42:31

You press it round the edges with a palette knife, don't you, really?

0:42:310:42:34

Yeah, I'll show you. I'll just get this other one in there as well.

0:42:340:42:37

But that's the one key bit with it, is not to...

0:42:370:42:41

Any area of the ramekin that's not got butter and sugar on it,

0:42:410:42:43

that's where it'll stick.

0:42:430:42:45

-That's why you got me to do it, and blame me.

-Yeah, that's it.

0:42:450:42:47

It was the poorly buttered moulds, wasn't it?

0:42:470:42:50

That'll the one!

0:42:500:42:51

But use a palette knife

0:42:510:42:53

and just smooth it off like that.

0:42:530:42:58

Now, I know you're a keen cook, Jodie.

0:42:590:43:01

Ever tried making a souffle for a dinner party?

0:43:010:43:03

Erm...

0:43:030:43:05

Oh, God, it's very dangerous, isn't it, souffle for a dinner party?

0:43:050:43:09

And especially with the old AGA.

0:43:090:43:10

But I've got someone at home that's a fantastic cook,

0:43:100:43:14

called Rachael, and she did a cheese souffle the other day

0:43:140:43:18

-and it was brilliant.

-Was it?

0:43:180:43:21

Yeah. So I do love them. But I'm a roast girl.

0:43:210:43:24

-I can do a roast for a dinner party.

-Sounds good to me.

0:43:240:43:27

But, yeah, souffle - I'd get a bit nervous.

0:43:270:43:29

You've got 30 seconds left, Will,

0:43:290:43:31

so you can show us how to finish those off.

0:43:310:43:33

You've just gone round the edge.

0:43:330:43:35

All I've done is wipe my thumb around the edge,

0:43:350:43:37

and the temptation is not to...

0:43:370:43:39

Not to lick your thumb at that stage.

0:43:390:43:40

-And that just stops the souffle mix from sticking to the edge.

-Right.

0:43:400:43:44

Now, you just pop them in the fridge as they are now?

0:43:440:43:46

In the fridge as they are,

0:43:460:43:48

and then they can go in the oven when you're ready.

0:43:480:43:50

And what you've done for me, James,

0:43:500:43:51

is just make this small berry salad.

0:43:510:43:53

It's really nice, like you said,

0:43:530:43:55

with all the fruits coming out of your garden.

0:43:550:43:58

-Yep.

-Yeah, we've just got a bit of creme fraiche,

0:43:580:44:01

some mint chopped through it,

0:44:010:44:03

and I put a little squeeze of lemon in there as well,

0:44:030:44:05

the lemon really brings out the flavour. And then...

0:44:050:44:07

-Do you want to get them out?

-And a little bit of basil as well.

0:44:070:44:10

-You get them out and I'll lift it onto the plate.

-Dun-dun-dun!

0:44:100:44:12

-Yeah!

-The moment of truth.

-So there you go.

0:44:120:44:14

-Right, that's it, bang on.

-I heard the eight minutes.

0:44:140:44:17

-Eight minutes.

-They look good.

0:44:170:44:19

They look pretty good to me, don't they, those?

0:44:190:44:21

-They look pretty, pretty good.

-Look at those.

-Look at that.

0:44:210:44:24

-There you go.

-Going to just burn our little fingers...

-Hot hands!

0:44:240:44:27

There we go. I'm happy with that.

0:44:270:44:30

So it's a good job they did work,

0:44:300:44:32

because you've brought something with you

0:44:320:44:34

that's very special this morning, whose birthday it is.

0:44:340:44:36

Yeah. It's my mum's birthday today, I've brought her as a special guest,

0:44:360:44:39

so not only have I made a souffle live on telly,

0:44:390:44:42

I've also brought my mum because it's her birthday.

0:44:420:44:44

Happy birthday, Mum!

0:44:440:44:45

She didn't want to be on camera, but happy birthday.

0:44:450:44:48

Your boy did good. Remind us what that is again.

0:44:480:44:50

Red wine souffle with berries and creme fraiche.

0:44:500:44:52

How chuffed do you look. Look at that. You lucky thing.

0:44:520:44:56

That one's for Galton!

0:44:560:44:57

He's pretty good at this game. There you go.

0:45:010:45:03

-I'll bring this other one over.

-They're all works of art.

0:45:030:45:06

-I feel ashamed to... Both of us.

-You can dive in, it's pasteurised eggs.

0:45:060:45:12

-Silvena, there you go. Dive into that one.

-This is gorgeous.

0:45:120:45:16

Someone tried it yesterday and they said it was like eating

0:45:160:45:20

-hot red wine marshmallow. So, if you imagine that...

-Oh, my word!

0:45:200:45:24

-Beautiful.

-It's not as good as the meringue, though, really.

0:45:240:45:27

-Of course, never, never.

-Come on, Jodie, which one?

0:45:270:45:29

-20 quid, give me a drink with that.

-Do you know what I mean?

0:45:290:45:32

That is seriously good.

0:45:320:45:33

I was wondering what the wine is going to be like,

0:45:330:45:36

-but it has a delicious sourness to it.

-Yes, because...

0:45:360:45:38

It's incredible, the acidity,

0:45:380:45:39

and how beautifully it works with the egg white.

0:45:390:45:42

It's not as good as the meringue, but it's all right.

0:45:420:45:45

There you go. A foolproof souffle recipe but don't hold me to that.

0:45:500:45:53

Now over to the man, the myth, the legend.

0:45:530:45:56

Of course, there's only one man we could be talking about.

0:45:560:45:59

It's the fantastic Keith Floyd. Take it away, Keith.

0:45:590:46:01

Despite global critical acclaim and financial success

0:46:070:46:10

of our little programme, the BBC still adopt

0:46:100:46:13

a very parsimonious attitude towards our budget.

0:46:130:46:15

And I still have to beg,

0:46:150:46:17

borrow or even steal a kitchen for my little cooking sketches.

0:46:170:46:21

So, I sent one of my researchers out, and I said, "Get me a typical

0:46:210:46:25

"Texan home, you know, something modest, something quite ordinary."

0:46:250:46:28

Well, he was a Texan, so he came up with this.

0:46:280:46:30

He thought this was quite ordinary.

0:46:300:46:32

The chap who owns it is only a multimillionaire.

0:46:320:46:34

But what is Texas all about?

0:46:340:46:36

It's about Apaches, vigilantes, longhorn cattle,

0:46:360:46:39

Lone Ranger, Rin Tin Tin,

0:46:390:46:41

politics slightly to the right of Vlad the Impaler.

0:46:410:46:44

Also, it's about chandeliers, dining tables, and clothes.

0:46:440:46:47

As you see, I haven't changed my image a jot.

0:46:470:46:50

America hasn't affected me one little bit.

0:46:500:46:53

I mean, note the pigskin jacket, note the snakeskin boots,

0:46:530:46:56

note the little medallion. But it's only rock and roll.

0:46:560:46:58

Anyway, we're in the kitchen, so let's go and do some business.

0:46:580:47:01

Here what we're going to do is what they all do in Texas,

0:47:010:47:04

is grill some steak and make a barbecue sauce.

0:47:040:47:06

And have a little slurp.

0:47:060:47:08

First of all, straight to business on the ingredients for

0:47:080:47:11

a Texan barbecue sauce.

0:47:110:47:12

Butter, pepper, onions,

0:47:120:47:16

Worcester-CESTER-SHIRE sauce,

0:47:160:47:18

malt vinegar, lemon juice, Tabasco,

0:47:180:47:21

sugar, water, garlic, and catsup.

0:47:210:47:25

All I have to do, cos it is terribly simple,

0:47:250:47:27

although very, very important because they don't take

0:47:270:47:29

any prisoners here in Texas - if they want a steak,

0:47:290:47:31

they want it tasting really good.

0:47:310:47:33

And, because of the Mexican influence,

0:47:330:47:34

they like things a little bit spicy. Right.

0:47:340:47:36

So, first things first, in with the tomato catsup, as we call it here.

0:47:360:47:40

As I say, America hasn't affected me in any way whatsoever, y'all.

0:47:400:47:43

It's all going perfectly well.

0:47:430:47:45

Quite a dash of Worcester-CESTER-SHIRE sauce.

0:47:450:47:48

Stir that in.

0:47:480:47:49

I can see some of you gastronauts at home wondering

0:47:490:47:52

what has happened to our dear Floyd? Tomato ketchup? Worcester sauce?

0:47:520:47:55

And now wine vinegar into all of this?

0:47:550:47:57

Anyway, this is Texas and we're going for it.

0:47:570:47:59

Right, a load of chopped onions into there.

0:47:590:48:03

Like that. No problems.

0:48:030:48:05

A cup of lemon juice, freshly squeezed, of course.

0:48:050:48:08

Dash of Tabasco. There we are.

0:48:100:48:12

You could use this for stripping the paint off things,

0:48:120:48:15

I wouldn't be surprised. And a load of sugar. Put in there.

0:48:150:48:18

And some garlic into there, like that. A knob of butter.

0:48:180:48:23

Did I put the pepper in? We put some butter in, then the pepper.

0:48:230:48:28

Say, half a teaspoonful. Like that.

0:48:290:48:32

Stir it around, whack it on the gas, and wasn't that a brilliant thing.

0:48:320:48:35

Do you know, that was a whole take right from the top of those

0:48:350:48:38

stairs right into the kitchen. It's the sort of thing that most

0:48:380:48:40

television cookery programmes don't do, and even quite a lot of

0:48:400:48:43

feature films can't get right. Anyway, what I deserve

0:48:430:48:45

is a little drinkette

0:48:450:48:46

So, what do you drink when you're in Texas? You drink margaritas.

0:48:460:48:50

Margaritas are demon little things.

0:48:500:48:53

And when you've been walking up and down stairs like I have

0:48:530:48:55

all morning trying to get one take right, you deserve one.

0:48:550:48:57

It's very simple. You take some triple sec,

0:48:570:48:59

and you pour quite a lot of it, as much as you feel like, into...

0:48:590:49:03

Goodness me, this is Texas,

0:49:030:49:04

and they've got these mean little pourers on the top.

0:49:040:49:06

Right, you poor triple sec into your little hand-blown jug, like that.

0:49:060:49:13

And equal quantities of tequila, which is made from the...

0:49:130:49:18

agave plant. I always thought it came from cactus, but never mind.

0:49:180:49:21

So, equal quantities of that.

0:49:210:49:23

This is looking good. Ha-ha!

0:49:230:49:25

Yes, that smells quite good. Then...

0:49:250:49:28

limes.

0:49:280:49:29

Real, real limes, painstakingly and lovingly crushed,

0:49:290:49:32

so you have them like that. Limes into there.

0:49:320:49:36

And, then, icicles and icicles. Twice as nice as ricicles.

0:49:360:49:40

A load of ice goes into that.

0:49:400:49:42

Now, we've got an expert in the crew here on these margaritas.

0:49:420:49:45

She, in fact, is the world champion drinker of them,

0:49:450:49:48

and she says there should be no sugar in them.

0:49:480:49:50

Some people say there should be a little.

0:49:500:49:52

So, you know, Tex-Mex, let's whack... Is that the salt or sugar?

0:49:520:49:55

That's the sugar. A little bit of sugar in there.

0:49:550:49:58

A little stir around. OK.

0:49:580:50:02

Then, have you ever wondered, and here's a useful thing

0:50:020:50:04

for entertaining at home, and I know you all have these dinner parties

0:50:040:50:07

on Saturday night, how do they get

0:50:070:50:08

the salt around the top of the glass for a perfect Margarita?

0:50:080:50:11

Do you know how they do? Over here, Clive.

0:50:110:50:13

They dip the glass into some lime juice like that,

0:50:130:50:15

then they whack it over to where the salt is,

0:50:150:50:17

carefully placed on the thing there, twiddle it around,

0:50:170:50:20

and it's full of salt,

0:50:200:50:22

which is essential for a Margarita.

0:50:220:50:24

Another essential thing...

0:50:240:50:26

..is to taste it. Because if it ain't good enough to cook with,

0:50:270:50:30

it ain't good enough to drink.

0:50:300:50:31

Welcome to Texas.

0:50:340:50:35

COW MOOS

0:50:350:50:37

# I feel tears wellin' up Cold and deep inside

0:50:370:50:39

# Like my heart's sprung a big break

0:50:390:50:41

# And a stab of loneliness is sharp and painful

0:50:410:50:44

# That I may never shake

0:50:440:50:47

# You might say that I was takin' it harder

0:50:470:50:49

# Oh, she wrote me off with a call

0:50:490:50:52

# But don't you wager that I'll hide the sorrow

0:50:520:50:55

# I might break right down and bawl

0:50:550:50:57

# Now the race is on

0:50:590:51:00

# And here comes pride up the backstretch

0:51:000:51:03

# Heartaches... #

0:51:030:51:04

I don't want your lonely mansion with a tear in every room,

0:51:040:51:07

all I want is the love you promised beneath the haloed moon.

0:51:070:51:10

So the song goes.

0:51:100:51:12

Before I visited the Lone Star State,

0:51:120:51:14

my only experience of Texas came in a bottle.

0:51:140:51:16

And I thought of millionaires by the yard, long-legged women,

0:51:160:51:19

and gold-plated Cadillacs.

0:51:190:51:21

In fact, after the fall in the price of oil,

0:51:210:51:23

Texas looks a little ragged, sort of unfinished.

0:51:230:51:26

OK, so it's too easy to criticise.

0:51:260:51:29

Nevertheless, the countryside is barren and in stark contrast

0:51:290:51:32

to its tremendous international image of wealth.

0:51:320:51:34

These derelict shacks are all that remain of somebody's dreams,

0:51:340:51:37

people who came to find their fortune in God's little acre.

0:51:370:51:41

Steinbeck, curious, of course,

0:51:410:51:42

would now have just shifted a few states.

0:51:420:51:45

# Now the race is on

0:51:450:51:46

# And here comes pride up the backstretch

0:51:460:51:49

# Heartaches are goin' to the inside... #

0:51:490:51:52

There is tremendous pride in this state.

0:51:520:51:55

Texans think of it as another country.

0:51:550:51:57

And these dancers aren't wearing fancy dress -

0:51:570:51:59

high-heeled cowboy boots and Stetsons are worn with honour,

0:51:590:52:02

like a knight's sword,

0:52:020:52:03

only to be taken off in the sanctuary of your own home.

0:52:030:52:06

# I guess it looks like heartache

0:52:090:52:12

# And the winner loses all. #

0:52:120:52:14

So, just to recap on the sauce, it's tomato ketchup,

0:52:250:52:27

Worcester sauce, lemon juice, drop of water, garlic, onions, butter,

0:52:270:52:31

Tabasco sauce, and a bit of pepper bubbling away there very nicely.

0:52:310:52:35

The sort of thing Americans really like on their steaks.

0:52:350:52:37

But the other thing Americans like, they have a thought for the day.

0:52:370:52:40

And I was wandering around the kitchen waiting to do this take

0:52:400:52:43

and I found it. February 11th, which it is, 1989, it says,

0:52:430:52:46

"Oh, great father, never let me judge another man

0:52:460:52:49

"until I have walked in his moccasins for two weeks."

0:52:490:52:51

It's an Indian prayer, it's to think about, isn't it? Anyway, steaks.

0:52:510:52:54

This is a cookery programme, after all, not the morning prayer.

0:52:540:52:57

There is a Texas steak.

0:52:570:52:58

It probably only weighs about, I don't know, 16-20 ounces,

0:52:580:53:01

something like that. They like them big around here.

0:53:010:53:03

It just goes whack onto the grill. One...

0:53:030:53:06

..two...

0:53:080:53:10

..and...three.

0:53:110:53:14

It's a very good thing. You'll have read, all of you who are

0:53:140:53:16

interested in those kinds of things,

0:53:160:53:17

the problems in the paper about American beef,

0:53:170:53:19

where they inject it with steroids and all kinds of things, there's

0:53:190:53:22

all kinds of battles going on, you know, agricultural wars and stuff.

0:53:220:53:26

Texas would like to point out,

0:53:260:53:27

through me, that they are not part of that.

0:53:270:53:29

They do not do these funny things to their beef.

0:53:290:53:31

And their beef, they reckon, is pretty good.

0:53:310:53:33

And wouldn't the Ministry of Agriculture in America

0:53:330:53:36

pay heed to that. So, anyway, there we are.

0:53:360:53:38

That's the political lecture for today, over we go. There.

0:53:380:53:41

If only I could get some stars on those stripes,

0:53:430:53:45

I'd have a real American steak.

0:53:450:53:47

Well, I suppose it should be ladies first, but a man wearing

0:53:500:53:52

a hat at a dinner table has a certain authority, doesn't he?

0:53:520:53:56

Larry and Shelley Beard lost handmade shirts

0:53:560:53:58

in the property crash just two years ago.

0:53:580:54:00

But, unlike Britain, there's no great stigma in going bankrupt.

0:54:000:54:03

You just pick yourself up,

0:54:030:54:04

dust yourself off, and start all over again.

0:54:040:54:07

It's always too soon to give up.

0:54:070:54:09

You know, you may be flat on your back, but, hey, you know...

0:54:090:54:12

Thomas Edison only...

0:54:120:54:14

..I think tried 900 something times to get electricity,

0:54:150:54:18

and his motto was he never had any fighters,

0:54:180:54:21

he just had a bunch of process of elimination.

0:54:210:54:24

And... You know, I didn't feel like...

0:54:240:54:27

I had a good wife that supported me through all these...

0:54:270:54:29

I had depression, like anybody else, but...

0:54:290:54:32

But there is a certain amount of Texas pride that comes out

0:54:320:54:35

when you say, "Look, when the going gets tough, the tough get going."

0:54:350:54:38

And let's just see what we can do.

0:54:380:54:40

We did it once, and we can do it again.

0:54:400:54:42

And I'm not saying I won't fail again but... Hey, we can do it.

0:54:420:54:46

Anybody that's down can get up. Just try. Keep it up.

0:54:460:54:50

-So how's the sauce, Larry?

-Well, this is excellent.

0:54:500:54:53

I mean, if my wife doesn't put ketchup on it and drown it,

0:54:530:54:56

literally, well, then it's good and...

0:54:560:54:58

I'm not near as picky as she is but this is excellent.

0:54:580:55:00

In fact, I want a copy of this

0:55:000:55:02

because this stuff is going

0:55:020:55:03

to come home to me

0:55:030:55:04

and I'm going to use it.

0:55:040:55:05

I don't know what your specialty is,

0:55:050:55:07

but it's obviously very good.

0:55:070:55:08

We're big beef-eaters down here

0:55:080:55:10

and we're real particular

0:55:100:55:12

about our steaks

0:55:120:55:14

and these are good steaks.

0:55:140:55:15

The sauce is... Like you said,

0:55:150:55:17

we like things

0:55:170:55:18

a little spicy down here

0:55:180:55:19

because of the Mexican influence.

0:55:190:55:21

This is great.

0:55:210:55:23

I especially like things spicy.

0:55:230:55:26

I'm a hot sauce connoisseur, aren't I?

0:55:260:55:28

THEY LAUGH

0:55:280:55:29

Say that to me again - it was wonderful.

0:55:290:55:31

Look at me and say it.

0:55:310:55:33

Say it with that lovely accent - it was beautiful.

0:55:350:55:37

I am a hot sauce connoisseur.

0:55:370:55:39

I'll drink to that.

0:55:430:55:44

Keith once again showing us how it's done. Great stuff.

0:55:500:55:52

Now, as ever on Best Bites, we're looking back at some of our

0:55:520:55:55

favourite recipes from the Saturday Kitchen archives.

0:55:550:55:57

Still to come on today's show,

0:55:570:55:59

Michel Roux and Rachel Allen go head-to-head in the

0:55:590:56:02

Omelette Challenge and Michel's taking it on the first time,

0:56:020:56:05

but surely, with his pedigree, he'll have it in the bag, right?

0:56:050:56:08

Tom Kitchin shows us an unusual way to cook a rack of lamb.

0:56:080:56:11

The lamb is sealed in a pan and then baked off on a bed of hay

0:56:110:56:15

and then served with a delicious potato boulangere.

0:56:150:56:17

Liz McLarnon faces her food heaven or her food hell.

0:56:170:56:20

Did she get food heaven - seared tuna with panzanella style salad -

0:56:200:56:24

or her food hell - glazed grapefruit salad with salmon and sea bream?

0:56:240:56:28

You're gonna have to find out what she got at the end of the show.

0:56:280:56:30

Next up is the ever jovial James Tanner, who is making use of

0:56:300:56:33

wild garlic, a fantastic ingredient that's coming into season right now,

0:56:330:56:37

so seek it out and take note of this fantastic duck dish.

0:56:370:56:41

-Hiya, how're you doing?

-Good, thanks, yourself?

-And on the menu is?

0:56:410:56:44

We've got honey and five spice glazed duck breast...

0:56:440:56:47

-Yep.

-..wild garlic gnocchi, with an orange caramel sauce.

0:56:470:56:51

OK, now I know you want to get started on this one.

0:56:510:56:53

Yes, please, yeah.

0:56:530:56:54

I'm going to give the jobs to Mark and Frances over there.

0:56:540:56:58

Broad beans, guys, can you pop my broad beans?

0:56:580:57:00

No such thing as a free lunch, Frances, on this show.

0:57:000:57:03

-You've got to do something.

-Do I...?

-I'll show you.

0:57:030:57:05

You want me to make the gnocchi, yeah?

0:57:050:57:07

Yeah, so we've got some King Edward potatoes.

0:57:070:57:09

They've been baked in their skin for about 45 minutes to an hour,

0:57:090:57:13

obviously depending on the size.

0:57:130:57:15

The idea is they have got a wonderful fluffiness to them,

0:57:150:57:18

they're not too waxy, that's why I'm using them.

0:57:180:57:20

OK. And then you need one of these ricers, don't you, really?

0:57:200:57:23

It's key to mashed potato as well as this, to get it nice and fine.

0:57:230:57:27

Exactly, you get a nice thin grain.

0:57:270:57:28

While you're doing that, you're going to add an egg yolk to it,

0:57:280:57:31

a touch of flour as well. There you go.

0:57:310:57:34

And I'm going to saute you off a touch of wild garlic.

0:57:340:57:39

Wild garlic - the season's running for about another three weeks now.

0:57:390:57:42

Yes. Very, very good, in abundance. It's got a wonderful subtle flavour.

0:57:420:57:46

If you don't like garlic, you don't like that strong flavour,

0:57:460:57:49

it hasn't got that really harsh taste.

0:57:490:57:51

I just think it is lovely and subtle.

0:57:510:57:53

I'm treating it like spinach here.

0:57:530:57:55

A touch of unsalted butter in the pan, a pinch of sea salt,

0:57:550:58:01

-wilt it down.

-We saw Rick going foraging for food.

0:58:010:58:04

This is kind of the ultimate foraging food, I reckon.

0:58:040:58:06

-Very much so.

-You don't have to do much with it...

-Not at all.

0:58:060:58:09

..just put it in butter, as well.

0:58:090:58:10

-It freezes well.

-So those are for you.

0:58:100:58:12

I'm just draining off the excess fat,

0:58:120:58:14

that's why I am putting it on this clean towel, obviously.

0:58:140:58:17

Now, while you're mixing all of that for me, which is fantastic,

0:58:170:58:20

let's talk about this. We've got some duck breast here, OK?

0:58:200:58:24

I like to use Creedy Carver ducks, very nice, North Devon,

0:58:240:58:26

my part of the world, it's really good.

0:58:260:58:28

Gresingham's good, Aylesbury, that kind of thing.

0:58:280:58:31

The sinew's been removed from the duck underneath from the

0:58:310:58:33

small fillet. There's usually a small fillet that runs along here.

0:58:330:58:36

We've got the flesh of the duck underneath and obviously the skin -

0:58:360:58:40

we're just going to score very, very lightly.

0:58:400:58:42

It's a good tip to remove that little sinew, because it shrinks.

0:58:420:58:45

If you don't, when you cook it,

0:58:450:58:47

it'll curl up on you and you don't want that.

0:58:470:58:49

No oil, straight into a nonstick pan.

0:58:490:58:52

Now, obviously, get rid of the board and the knife I used

0:58:520:58:55

for the raw meat, wash my hands off.

0:58:550:58:57

This is the gnocchi - we've got an egg yolk going in there.

0:58:570:59:00

The wild garlic and the flour.

0:59:000:59:03

-Bit of salt and pepper.

-Great stuff.

0:59:040:59:07

That's that one.

0:59:070:59:08

OK, cool, so I'm just going to wipe out the pan -

0:59:080:59:09

this is what we are going to use for the gnocchi in a moment.

0:59:090:59:12

Like I cooked that fish earlier, the sea bass earlier,

0:59:120:59:14

you're going to cook that one side, rendering the fat, really.

0:59:140:59:17

Indeed, so the idea is, there are lots of ways to cook duck but

0:59:170:59:20

you render the fat so it is not too greasy and you can cook it in a pan

0:59:200:59:25

and you can cook it, basically, three-quarters of the way through

0:59:250:59:29

in the pan and then flip it and turn it.

0:59:290:59:31

If you don't want to do that, then all you can do is, at home,

0:59:310:59:33

do what I'm doing now - we're just gonna render it down,

0:59:330:59:36

take off some of the excess fats and then we are going to use the oven

0:59:360:59:40

to roast it for around about eight to ten minutes

0:59:400:59:42

and then it is very important, with all your meats,

0:59:420:59:44

obviously as we know, you guys were talking about this, let it rest up.

0:59:440:59:47

OK, so we are going to serve this with an orange caramel sauce.

0:59:470:59:51

It's got a touch of lime in there as well.

0:59:510:59:53

I'm removing the zest,

0:59:530:59:55

the skin off half of the orange and half of the lime.

0:59:550:59:59

And I know it sounds a bit weird, but this is a bittersweet sauce.

0:59:591:00:03

It's a classic. Sauce citronelle is the old saying for it.

1:00:031:00:08

but I'm just getting the pan to a high heat.

1:00:081:00:10

-It's another classic French sauce, isn't it?

-Very much so.

1:00:101:00:13

I'm just going to grab... Have we got a set of tongs kicking around?

1:00:131:00:16

Right, so let's have a quick look at this duck.

1:00:161:00:18

-How are we doing with the beans?

-Nearly done.

-Nearly done.

1:00:181:00:21

So I'm just taking off the excess fat.

1:00:211:00:23

Keep the duck on the skin and, on this occasion,

1:00:231:00:25

as I said before, straight into a nice hot oven, OK?

1:00:251:00:29

Skin-side down, cook it all the way on the skin side, turn it,

1:00:291:00:33

-rest it and it's good to go.

-Right.

1:00:331:00:35

Right, so here we've got a duck rested, this is at room temperature.

1:00:351:00:39

-How long's that had, then?

-Eight to ten minutes. OK.

1:00:391:00:42

-How's your gnocchi looking, chef?

-Getting there.

1:00:421:00:44

Come on, tiger, we got to get it in that boiling water now as well.

1:00:441:00:47

While you're doing that, I have deliberately got

1:00:471:00:51

a hot pan ready to go and we are going to do this wonderful sauce,

1:00:511:00:55

which is one of my favourites, OK, and works so well

1:00:551:00:58

with duck and also the subtleness of the garlic.

1:00:581:01:00

And it's as simple as this.

1:01:001:01:02

Now, your restaurant has been running for, what, 13 years?

1:01:021:01:06

Uh, Tanners? 13 years this year.

1:01:061:01:08

I just think it's the best it's ever been in the 13 years.

1:01:081:01:12

It had a lovely refit myself and Chris came up with -

1:01:121:01:16

I love that design thing.

1:01:161:01:17

Here's the sugar that we've got going in there.

1:01:171:01:19

We get the oil from the citrus in the pan and then, straightaway,

1:01:191:01:23

deglaze.

1:01:231:01:25

With orange,

1:01:251:01:28

half a lime,

1:01:281:01:30

a touch of red wine...

1:01:301:01:31

And we just let this cook down but you get this bittersweet taste -

1:01:341:01:37

it's gorgeous. And then, on to that, we've got to get some stock.

1:01:371:01:40

Can you pass me a spoon for that? That'd be fantastic.

1:01:401:01:42

-Spoon.

-Thank you very much.

1:01:421:01:44

OK, now, yeah, so, anyway, with Tanners, yeah, 13 years

1:01:441:01:47

and we've got the Barbican Kitchen Brasserie,

1:01:471:01:49

which is six years old this year as well, so brilliant stuff.

1:01:491:01:53

OK, right, with the sauce, James, keep that heat high, let it reduce.

1:01:541:01:58

You've got some butter in a pan

1:01:581:02:00

and you've got the gnocchi, which we just blanch.

1:02:001:02:02

When it comes up to the top, that's when you know it's ready.

1:02:021:02:05

Straight in there and also,

1:02:051:02:06

some of the rendered duck fat, yeah? In that goes, as well.

1:02:061:02:09

Just a tiny bit of colour

1:02:091:02:10

and then we're going to season it up, obviously.

1:02:101:02:13

The sauce, we just keep bubbling, let it reduce, OK?

1:02:131:02:17

Now, also, we've got here, with our old duck pan, a touch of honey.

1:02:171:02:21

Not too much. Literally, that's a tablespoon full.

1:02:211:02:23

-Where do you want the beans? Do what the beans in a pan?

-The beans?

1:02:231:02:26

The broad beans? Yeah, drop them in, thanks.

1:02:261:02:29

OK, a touch of five spice, a touch of honey.

1:02:291:02:33

Not too much. And I know you're thinking

1:02:331:02:35

it's going to be really over-sweet,

1:02:351:02:36

but because this is more bittersweet,

1:02:361:02:38

it really works well, I think, with the garlic and everything else. OK.

1:02:381:02:41

So you just cook the spice out in the pan,

1:02:411:02:44

which has a bit of the duck fat in it.

1:02:441:02:46

A touch of the honey, let it bubble, bubble, bubble. OK?

1:02:461:02:48

Now the duck, this is at room temp at the moment.

1:02:481:02:51

-We get that hot glaze.

-There's your little gnocchi.

1:02:511:02:55

Lovely. Thank you very much.

1:02:551:02:56

Now, as well as celebrating the restaurant,

1:02:561:02:58

you're also celebrating... Ten years this year in television, is it?

1:02:581:03:01

-Yeah, ten years, I'm quite proud of that.

-I remember you.

1:03:011:03:04

-I can't believe it. Where's that time gone, James?

-Ten years.

1:03:041:03:07

Well, you know, back in the day, when I started, yeah,

1:03:071:03:11

you were one of the guys we used to cook against

1:03:111:03:14

-on Ready Steady Cook.

-I was an old man by then.

1:03:141:03:16

Do you remember the first time, the first words you said on television?

1:03:181:03:21

-Honestly, no.

-Mine are so embarrassing.

1:03:211:03:24

It was with Zig and Zag. You don't remember Zig and Zag, do you?

1:03:241:03:26

Of course I remember Zig and Zag.

1:03:261:03:28

Zig and Zag and they asked me how old I was and I went,

1:03:281:03:30

"22 and a half."

1:03:301:03:32

Embarrassment. I just wanted to... Yeah, not good.

1:03:321:03:35

-Shall we move onto the sauce?

-Yes, moving on.

1:03:351:03:37

What do I do with these beans?

1:03:371:03:38

-In a moment. Calm down, chef.

-They're ready, chef.

1:03:381:03:40

If you could just hold them, get them out.

1:03:401:03:43

Now, with the sauce, this is optional,

1:03:431:03:45

I'm going to monte it with a bit of butter.

1:03:451:03:48

This just adds a gloss richness to it as well. Really nice.

1:03:481:03:54

OK, so you just use the heat of the pan to let the butter melt in.

1:03:541:03:59

Can you pour some of the duck juices? Yeah, over that.

1:04:011:04:05

-There you go.

-Great stuff.

-30 seconds.

1:04:051:04:07

Now, the beans go into that sauce.

1:04:071:04:09

Here we go with the gnocchis. A few pieces of that.

1:04:121:04:16

I'm going to carve the duck.

1:04:181:04:19

I've got a few orange pieces, which are cold orange

1:04:211:04:25

but a lovely flavour, because you get that lovely fresh orange zing.

1:04:251:04:28

Nice thin slices of duck and we've got a bit

1:04:281:04:30

of that creaminess of the fat but it's still very crisp on the top

1:04:301:04:33

and created a wonderful glaze.

1:04:331:04:35

James, if you can pick off some of your watercress pieces.

1:04:351:04:39

Some of my watercress. This was picked yesterday. I picked this.

1:04:391:04:43

I think that's brilliant.

1:04:431:04:44

Get it on the plate, then, chef, it'll be even better.

1:04:441:04:46

OK. Some orange pieces and then a touch...

1:04:461:04:50

Oh, no, don't ruin it now, man.

1:04:511:04:54

OK, one more. One more bit, thanks.

1:04:541:04:56

Broad beans... And wild garlic flowers have got a very, very strong

1:04:571:05:01

flavour to them, but we're not just going to put the whole flowers on.

1:05:011:05:04

A little scattering of the petals, a tiny bit of this sauce,

1:05:041:05:07

because it is strong, guys, it's meant to be.

1:05:071:05:10

A little flicker of these lovely, pungent flowers

1:05:101:05:12

and there you have it, that's roast duck breast

1:05:121:05:15

with a lovely glaze, wild garlic gnocchi and caramel orange.

1:05:151:05:20

Done.

1:05:201:05:21

Here we go. And the food just keeps coming, you see?

1:05:261:05:28

Have a seat over here. There you go.

1:05:301:05:32

I'll be whizzing round on that new...

1:05:321:05:34

You mentioned your local produce.

1:05:341:05:36

Both of you are doing food festivals.

1:05:361:05:37

You got one this month, is it?

1:05:371:05:39

Yeah, this month, we are doing producer tours

1:05:391:05:42

and demonstrations, chocolate, this, that and the other.

1:05:421:05:44

Yours is the one down in Plymouth.

1:05:441:05:46

Yeah, the Plymouth Flavour Fest, which is coming up this summer.

1:05:461:05:49

Massive event, fantastic for the city. Really looking forward to it.

1:05:491:05:53

-There you go.

-That's delicious.

1:05:531:05:55

-It's absolutely...

-The sauce really does make it, yeah.

-..fantastic.

1:05:551:05:58

And you use the rind in that, there you go.

1:05:581:06:00

Surely I'm not the only one who wants to see that Zig and Zag clip.

1:06:051:06:08

There has to be somebody out there who can find it.

1:06:081:06:10

Anyway, thanks, James, great dish.

1:06:101:06:12

Now it's Omelette Challenge time and, this week,

1:06:121:06:14

Michel Roux and Rachel Allen go head to head.

1:06:141:06:16

And as Michel has written a book on eggs, my money's on him.

1:06:161:06:20

Right, let's get down to business.

1:06:201:06:21

Rachel and Michel, ready to take up the Omelette Challenge?

1:06:211:06:24

-What are you talking about now?

-Exactly.

1:06:241:06:26

All the chefs that come onto the show battle it out against the clock

1:06:261:06:29

and each other to see how fast they can make

1:06:291:06:31

a simple three-egg omelette.

1:06:311:06:32

Now, Rachel has got to beat 52 seconds.

1:06:321:06:34

Michel, it's your first time on the show.

1:06:341:06:36

It must be a three-egg, folded omelette. Time starts when I say.

1:06:361:06:38

I just happen to be on with someone who

1:06:381:06:40

has six Michelin stars and who's written a book on eggs.

1:06:401:06:42

There's no pressure there. I'm not cooking it, you are.

1:06:421:06:46

It will take me 45 seconds to one minute, normally.

1:06:461:06:49

I will see if I can do better.

1:06:491:06:50

-I think you'll beat Mr Blanc down there at one minute 40 seconds - do you think?

-I can.

1:06:501:06:54

We've got buttercream, milk, a bit of cheese.

1:06:541:06:57

It must be a three-egg omelette. Time starts when I say.

1:06:571:07:00

-Are you ready?

-Yes.

-Three, two, one, go.

-Good.

1:07:001:07:02

There you go.

1:07:041:07:06

Starting off with three knobs of butter, there you go.

1:07:071:07:10

One pan off the heat.

1:07:101:07:12

A little bit of flat butter there. That's all right.

1:07:141:07:17

Purposely, of course.

1:07:171:07:18

Michel's off.

1:07:181:07:20

There you go.

1:07:201:07:21

You, of course, have got a new book out on eggs, haven't you?

1:07:211:07:23

-Uh, yeah.

-Yeah.

1:07:231:07:25

-Look at this.

-Oh. Oh!

1:07:261:07:28

-No pressure, Rachel.

-What are you doing?

1:07:281:07:31

-No pressure.

-Oh, I like your technique.

1:07:311:07:33

This is a quick one. This is quick. This is quick.

1:07:331:07:35

-Oh!

-Seriously quick.

1:07:351:07:37

GONG Done! One done!

1:07:371:07:39

What are you doing?

1:07:431:07:45

-Just get it on the plate.

-I am making an Irish omelette.

1:07:451:07:47

Can I taste it?

1:07:471:07:49

I have got... Could you open this, please?

1:07:491:07:50

-Can I taste my omelette?

-I've got some Irish smoked salmon.

1:07:501:07:53

-I've done better.

-It's green, white and orange, it's the Irish flag.

1:07:531:07:56

It doesn't matter, I've got to taste it first.

1:07:561:07:58

All the way from Ireland!

1:07:581:08:00

I've got to taste this one. Let me taste this here.

1:08:001:08:03

It's perfect.

1:08:081:08:10

LAUGHTER

1:08:101:08:11

I would have loved to hear something else than that.

1:08:111:08:14

As if it needs more salt. As if I'm going to ask!

1:08:151:08:18

I didn't put any pepper, because I don't like pepper in my omelette.

1:08:201:08:23

Doesn't need it, chef, they're peppery eggs.

1:08:231:08:25

Peppery eggs!

1:08:251:08:26

Yes, you brought me the right one.

1:08:261:08:28

Garnish fantastic, Rach, but...

1:08:281:08:30

still pointless,

1:08:301:08:32

because you weren't quick enough.

1:08:321:08:34

Rachel, how do you think you've done?

1:08:341:08:35

I'd say about one minute, 20.

1:08:351:08:38

No!

1:08:381:08:39

I think you've... Do you think you've beaten your other time?

1:08:391:08:43

-No.

-52 seconds?

-No.

1:08:431:08:44

Where are you? Down there, 52 seconds.

1:08:441:08:47

You have.

1:08:481:08:49

You've done it in 44 seconds.

1:08:491:08:53

Absolutely fantastic.

1:08:541:08:56

-Well, thank you.

-There you go.

1:08:561:08:58

APPLAUSE

1:08:581:09:00

One of the fastest women on the show.

1:09:001:09:02

However, Michel...

1:09:021:09:03

I think I did 43, 44.

1:09:031:09:06

-Oh! 30....3.

-Have you been practising?

1:09:061:09:09

-Say it again?

-Have you been practising, chef?

1:09:091:09:11

I cook a couple of them.

1:09:111:09:12

LAUGHTER

1:09:121:09:14

-Good for you.

-Because, unbelievably,

1:09:141:09:16

first time on the show - without a doubt, we're having him back -

1:09:161:09:19

he's going right level with a couple of other Michelin-starred chefs

1:09:191:09:22

at 35 seconds dead.

1:09:221:09:25

APPLAUSE Fantastic.

1:09:251:09:28

-Thank you.

-The Godfather does it again.

1:09:281:09:30

Even a legendary chef like Michel puts in a bit of practice

1:09:351:09:38

before taking on the Omelette Challenge -

1:09:381:09:39

the evidence is there to see. Well done, Mr Roux, great work.

1:09:391:09:42

Up next, it's Tom Kitchin,

1:09:421:09:44

who is showing us a way of cooking with hay that makes a great entree.

1:09:441:09:47

Take it away.

1:09:471:09:48

-Great to have you on the show again.

-Thanks very much.

1:09:481:09:50

You can imagine at school, having a name like Kitchin,

1:09:501:09:53

then you go to do the home economics and you're the only boy.

1:09:531:09:56

Tell us about this dish then,

1:09:561:09:58

-because it is a classic way of cooking, isn't it?

-It is.

1:09:581:10:00

It's like one of those old-fashioned,

1:10:001:10:02

country recipes that was in the old cookbooks.

1:10:021:10:05

In Scotland, we'll smoke anything, you know what I mean?

1:10:051:10:09

-So...

-Eh?!

1:10:091:10:10

LAUGHTER

1:10:101:10:12

-Not like you south Londoners!

-I'm a bit worried.

1:10:121:10:15

So, yeah, to get flavour into the food, before ovens, etc.

1:10:151:10:20

So that's what the hay does, and it certainly gets flavour into it.

1:10:201:10:23

Now, you want me to chop this lot up as well.

1:10:231:10:26

This is for the boulangere potatoes.

1:10:261:10:28

Yeah, if you slice that up for the boulangere.

1:10:281:10:30

Tell us about the rack of lamb.

1:10:301:10:31

OK, so we've got a rack of lamb, a nice piece of fat on there as well.

1:10:311:10:34

Eh?!

1:10:341:10:35

LAUGHTER

1:10:351:10:37

How long am I going to keep this up for? 20 minutes, I reckon.

1:10:371:10:41

Very hot pan there. Maybe slightly too hot.

1:10:421:10:45

Very hot!

1:10:451:10:46

This is very hot.

1:10:461:10:48

OK. So we season the meat all over.

1:10:481:10:52

If anybody's looking for this in a supermarket or a butchers,

1:10:521:10:54

French trim, best end of lamb, that's what you want for this one.

1:10:541:10:57

Oh, I thought you were talking about the cake, James.

1:10:571:10:59

French trim cake.

1:10:591:11:01

-Bit of butter. That is hot...

-French trim!

1:11:011:11:03

Shouldn't have been talking too much there.

1:11:061:11:08

Anyway, what we're looking for is a nice colour on the...

1:11:081:11:11

You're going to get it in that pan!

1:11:111:11:12

..on the lamb. Yeah!

1:11:121:11:13

Now, other meats you could use, you could use a rump of lamb,

1:11:151:11:17

-which is very good for this as well.

-Rump of lamb.

1:11:171:11:19

Or you could use the old Barnsley chop end, you know,

1:11:191:11:22

the short saddle, that'd be great.

1:11:221:11:24

If I went into a butchers and asked for a French trim,

1:11:241:11:26

do you think they'd serve me or throw me out?

1:11:261:11:29

-Seriously?

-Probably throw you out, unless you say...

1:11:291:11:32

Unless you say... The old... That's what it is!

1:11:321:11:35

"Can I have a French trim, phwoar!"

1:11:351:11:37

-"Get out."

-LAUGHTER

1:11:371:11:39

Might throw you out at that point.

1:11:391:11:42

So, you've sliced up the onions, the leeks,

1:11:421:11:44

and we need a wee bit of fennel in there as well, please, chef.

1:11:441:11:47

I just love the way the Scottish say "a wee bit."

1:11:471:11:49

-"A wee bit of fennel."

-A wee bit.

1:11:491:11:51

And this is going to go in between the potatoes, when we layer it

1:11:511:11:55

in the dish, and then we're going to cover it in the lamb stock.

1:11:551:12:00

Now, traditionally, of course,

1:12:001:12:01

boulangere potatoes would be just potatoes, that's it for me.

1:12:011:12:04

-Yeah, potatoes and onions, I think, no?

-Yeah, potatoes and onions.

1:12:041:12:08

And... Yeah.

1:12:081:12:09

Do you know where all this lot comes from?

1:12:091:12:12

It comes from France, this, boulangere potatoes,

1:12:121:12:14

which obviously means the bread-maker.

1:12:141:12:17

And they used to have bakers' ovens in all the villages and towns

1:12:171:12:20

around France, they used to have these old, wood-fired ovens.

1:12:201:12:23

And they've still got them running,

1:12:231:12:24

and the idea is the baker would then fire up the oven in the

1:12:241:12:27

morning for everybody, for the bread for the village, it would then

1:12:271:12:30

be baked in this wood-burning oven, and the embers, as they die down,

1:12:301:12:33

everybody in the village would come up and bring their potatoes -

1:12:331:12:36

because it used to be a cheap dish - potatoes and... Often just

1:12:361:12:39

potatoes and water, potatoes and a little bit of butter - pop them

1:12:391:12:42

in the oven, and that's where the boulangere potatoes came from.

1:12:421:12:45

-The baker's oven potatoes.

-Not just a pretty face then, eh?

1:12:451:12:48

-Right, we're going to get the hay in now.

-Right.

-So there we have it.

1:12:481:12:50

-Eh?!

-Eh?!

-Eh?!

1:12:501:12:52

-Ugh...

-This has come from where?

-I'm getting a battering here today.

1:12:521:12:55

Sorry!

1:12:551:12:56

-It's Paul's fault.

-Now, where's this come from?

-Erm...

1:12:561:13:01

It's come from the pet shop down the road.

1:13:011:13:03

LAUGHTER

1:13:031:13:05

It's nice, clean hay.

1:13:051:13:08

Right, in we go.

1:13:081:13:09

And I love your recipe, on your recipe it just says "clean hay."

1:13:091:13:12

Yeah!

1:13:121:13:14

There's no romantic story of a nice little farm,

1:13:141:13:18

just off of Kennington Road.

1:13:181:13:20

-Just from a pet shop, right.

-So we get that smoking.

1:13:201:13:23

We can put a little bit more oil in there.

1:13:231:13:25

And you preferably need a pan with a lid for this one?

1:13:271:13:29

Yeah, exactly, because we want to create that inferno of heat.

1:13:291:13:35

So we get that smoking.

1:13:351:13:36

Can you cook any other type of meat in there, other than lamb?

1:13:361:13:39

Of course, you could do lamb, you could do beef,

1:13:391:13:41

chicken would be nice.

1:13:411:13:42

Or even a whole piece of fish, fish on the bone, would be lovely.

1:13:421:13:45

But the idea is to use meat that's got... Like cutlets...

1:13:451:13:49

That require no longevity in cooking.

1:13:491:13:51

-It's quite a quick way of cooking.

-Exactly.

1:13:511:13:53

-Because there's no moisture in there, so it dry-cooks.

-In she goes.

1:13:531:13:58

-Lid on.

-What do you call it, the lamb?

1:13:581:14:00

Does it have a name, doing it this way?

1:14:001:14:03

Or just lamb and hay?

1:14:031:14:04

Lamb and hay!

1:14:041:14:05

-Listen, you've been to Heston's...

-Yeah, well, you know.

1:14:071:14:11

So, slice the old potatoes.

1:14:111:14:13

-OK, in she goes.

-And then we're going to layer up the potatoes.

1:14:131:14:15

So explain to us how you make a boulangere then?

1:14:151:14:18

OK.

1:14:181:14:20

So there we've sweated down in butter

1:14:201:14:22

all the onions, the garlic, etc.

1:14:221:14:24

We take our dish.

1:14:241:14:26

Rub a little bit of butter on the bottom, so it doesn't stick.

1:14:261:14:30

If you're using one of these at home, be very, very, very careful.

1:14:301:14:32

-The mandoline?

-Yeah.

-Oh, God, you're not using the protector?

-Has someone cut themselves before?

1:14:321:14:36

Well, if this could tell a story, this one in this studio...

1:14:361:14:39

-How many people have died as a result of that?

-Quite a lot!

1:14:391:14:43

Lawrence Keogh, about two weeks ago...

1:14:431:14:46

What is the name it has, mandoline? It sounds romantic and inviting.

1:14:461:14:49

-"Come to my mandoline."

-It's not guillotine, is it?

1:14:491:14:52

"Slice your finger now."

1:14:541:14:55

I'm watching what I do, because I know I'm going to cut myself!

1:14:551:14:59

-I'm going to stop at this point.

-Right, chef.

1:14:591:15:01

So, I've buttered the bottom of the dish,

1:15:011:15:04

rubbed it again with garlic clove.

1:15:041:15:06

We put a layer of potatoes at the bottom.

1:15:061:15:09

OK.

1:15:091:15:10

Meanwhile, I've taken my lamb stock -

1:15:101:15:12

you could use chicken stock at home, if you don't have lamb stock.

1:15:121:15:16

-And I've put that to boil...

-James, I think that's enough.

1:15:161:15:19

That's enough, I'm not going to need...

1:15:191:15:22

Just getting his Sunday lunch boxed off.

1:15:221:15:24

-OK. So we've got our first layer there.

-Yep.

1:15:251:15:29

There we go. Use this one.

1:15:291:15:31

Now, normally, we'd literally be just raw onions and potatoes

1:15:311:15:34

layered up with some stock.

1:15:341:15:35

But I've put fennel in there as well,

1:15:351:15:37

because fennel goes really well with lamb. So we put a layer.

1:15:371:15:41

You've done this before, chef.

1:15:411:15:43

There we go.

1:15:431:15:45

OK. And another bit of seasoning.

1:15:451:15:47

Couple of fingernails...

1:15:471:15:49

Now, what you want to be careful of, when you're doing this,

1:15:501:15:53

make sure you put it in the oven quite high.

1:15:531:15:54

We're going to put this above the dish, because when it cooks,

1:15:541:15:57

-it'll literally come down by about 50%, won't it?

-Exactly.

1:15:571:16:00

-So, piling it all up like that.

-OK.

1:16:001:16:04

And it can be fancy on the top.

1:16:041:16:06

I just like it rustic-y, don't you? There you go, just like that.

1:16:061:16:10

This is proper Sunday lunch.

1:16:101:16:12

That's the most rustic dish I've ever seen.

1:16:121:16:15

No, but people could do this at home, you know.

1:16:151:16:17

If you've got a good pet shop locally...

1:16:171:16:20

Clean pet shop is necessary!

1:16:201:16:22

But you can take this, and then you can cook the lamb

1:16:221:16:24

just on the griddle, in the oven, without a tray,

1:16:241:16:27

-and it'll drip the meat onto there.

-Oh, yeah, that'd be lovely, yeah.

1:16:271:16:30

Wait a minute, are pet shops open on a Sunday?

1:16:301:16:32

What if you need an emergency bit of hay on a Sunday,

1:16:321:16:35

-then a stable...

-There is one.

-Where?

1:16:351:16:38

-You know...

-There is one.

1:16:381:16:39

There is one that's open on a Sunday.

1:16:391:16:42

-It's a very famous one.

-I can see them stocking up,

1:16:421:16:44

calling their hay supplier - if there is such a thing...

1:16:441:16:47

-So I've covered it in the stock there.

-Right. In the oven?

1:16:471:16:50

-No, we need the aluminium first, chef.

-Aluminium foil.

1:16:501:16:52

Where is the aluminium? There, chef.

1:16:521:16:54

OK, so we're going to put that aluminium over,

1:16:541:16:56

otherwise it'll reduce really fast,

1:16:561:16:58

and the potatoes won't be cooked in time.

1:16:581:17:00

-Right.

-So put that on for three quarters of the process,

1:17:001:17:04

and then, for the last quarter, take the aluminium off,

1:17:041:17:06

and let the potatoes crispen up.

1:17:061:17:09

-It takes a good, what, hour and a half?

-Definitely, yep.

1:17:091:17:12

There you go.

1:17:121:17:14

We've got, over here, look at this.

1:17:141:17:17

-Look at that.

-Pommes boulangere.

1:17:171:17:19

-Lovely.

-That's lovely.

1:17:191:17:20

And that crispiness on top, that's what we're looking for.

1:17:201:17:23

Excuse me, I'm going to get some butter,

1:17:231:17:25

because we've got time to do this.

1:17:251:17:26

Oh, no more butter!

1:17:261:17:28

You have to put butter on it, it's a must.

1:17:281:17:30

Back on the treadmill, please, viewers.

1:17:301:17:32

The people who watched the cheesecake

1:17:321:17:34

-have finished the treadmill.

-No, no, no, back on it, please.

1:17:341:17:36

Listen, the people who watched the cheesecake,

1:17:361:17:38

if they're still watching this on the treadmill, you know...

1:17:381:17:40

-They're doing very well!

-There you go.

1:17:401:17:42

Right, so you've got this, and I'm going to butter this over the top.

1:17:421:17:45

-You're just taking over the whole dish here.

-No, no, you carry on...

1:17:451:17:48

That's basically it, "Put butter on it."

1:17:481:17:51

I was making it nice and healthy with this stock.

1:17:511:17:53

-Tom, just tell them about they hay.

-OK, so. There we've got our lamb.

1:17:531:17:58

OK, so you can see the hay has completely gone down and smouldered.

1:17:581:18:02

It will give a really lovely, smoky flavour.

1:18:021:18:04

-Came we use the hay again?

-I wouldn't, no.

1:18:041:18:07

It's not that expensive.

1:18:071:18:09

I think it's a bit special though.

1:18:091:18:11

She was looking at me then.

1:18:111:18:12

And know I'm a Yorkshireman, but I'm not that tight!

1:18:121:18:15

LAUGHTER

1:18:151:18:16

Next week's recipe, hay with butter on it.

1:18:161:18:18

LAUGHTER

1:18:181:18:20

Good idea!

1:18:201:18:22

You slice up there. Doesn't that look better, look?

1:18:221:18:24

Yeah, that does look good, I'll give you that.

1:18:241:18:26

That is lovely. So, James Martin's boulangere potatoes, with butter.

1:18:261:18:31

Let me take that... Oh, that is nice, actually.

1:18:311:18:34

See, thanks very much.

1:18:341:18:35

Give you a lovely, nice portion.

1:18:351:18:38

-Nice, good, Scottish Sunday lunch portion there.

-Lovely.

1:18:381:18:43

And then, with the rack of lamb, it's lovely,

1:18:431:18:44

we can just slice the cutlets, with it being French trimmed.

1:18:441:18:49

Look at that, lovely and pink.

1:18:491:18:51

-French trim.

-I know, I resisted the "phwoar" there.

1:18:511:18:55

Wee bit of the old salt and pepper on top.

1:18:551:18:58

And you want a little chef-y drizzle, don't you?

1:18:581:19:00

-Yeah, I think we'll give it a drizzle of olive oil.

-Remind us what this is again?

1:19:001:19:03

So there we have it, a rack of lamb,

1:19:031:19:06

cooked on a bed of smoking hay in the pot, with potato boulangere.

1:19:061:19:10

-With a bit of butter on the top.

-Fantastic.

1:19:101:19:13

-How good do they look?

-Beautiful, beautiful.

1:19:181:19:20

There you go, dive into that one.

1:19:201:19:22

-Shall I let the ladies have a go first?

-No, no.

1:19:221:19:25

-Feed yourself.

-Thank you very much.

-Dive into that.

-Brilliant.

1:19:251:19:28

Now, the boulangere, the secret of that is,

1:19:281:19:30

they need to go in the oven for at least an hour and a half?

1:19:301:19:33

Exactly, and good stock, so don't throw your chicken carcass

1:19:331:19:35

away when you've finished with it - make a nice stock.

1:19:351:19:38

I'm waiting for some kind of decision here.

1:19:381:19:41

-Beautiful.

-Nice?

-Mmm!

1:19:411:19:42

-Are you getting the flavour of the hay?

-Mmm-hmm!

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

1:19:421:19:45

Will you be trying it at home?

1:19:451:19:47

LAUGHTER

1:19:471:19:49

I'll come to your restaurant, get you to do it.

1:19:491:19:52

So there you go,

1:19:561:19:58

if you want to take your French trim to the next level, smoke it in hay.

1:19:581:20:01

Now, when Liz McClarnon came to the studio to face her food heaven

1:20:011:20:04

or food hell, she had a taste for tuna.

1:20:041:20:07

But would she have to give into grapefruit? Let's find out.

1:20:071:20:10

JAMES: If it's not blatantly obvious by now...

1:20:101:20:13

-it's tuna!

-Yeah!

1:20:131:20:15

So we'll lose this out the way, guys.

1:20:151:20:18

Now, panzanella... First of all, 7-0 to tuna.

1:20:181:20:21

So what I'm going to do is take this piece of bread.

1:20:211:20:23

This is for a panzanella, which is originally from Tuscany,

1:20:231:20:26

in Italy. If you could cut these in half, please, chef.

1:20:261:20:29

Place them on a tray.

1:20:291:20:31

Thank you very much.

1:20:311:20:33

This originally comes from Tuscany,

1:20:331:20:35

it's a bread salad with mainly tomatoes.

1:20:351:20:39

But what I'm going to do is roast the tomatoes,

1:20:391:20:41

which the boys are doing over here.

1:20:411:20:43

Because I'm going to take half of them and turn it into a dressing.

1:20:431:20:46

Traditionally, this would be just chopped tomatoes in there as well.

1:20:461:20:49

So take all the bread, which we've got there,

1:20:491:20:51

throw that onto your tray.

1:20:511:20:53

Pinch of salt over the top.

1:20:551:20:57

There you go, and some olive oil.

1:20:571:20:58

We take the whole lot...

1:20:581:21:01

And you know where the oven is by now,

1:21:011:21:03

-because you've been on MasterChef.

-Which one?

-That side.

1:21:031:21:05

Oh, hot, hot, hot!

1:21:051:21:08

-I'll do it.

-I love it, I love it.

1:21:081:21:12

Asbestos fingers!

1:21:121:21:13

That'll do. Right, we've got our tuna.

1:21:131:21:17

So, we've got the tomatoes, olive oil on top.

1:21:171:21:19

That can go in the oven. And you can take the other one out of the oven.

1:21:191:21:23

You can take the other one out of the oven.

1:21:231:21:25

I'm so intimidated right now!

1:21:251:21:27

LAUGHTER

1:21:271:21:28

Anything to do with the basilic?

1:21:281:21:30

-If you can pick the basilic, please, chef.

-A lot of it?

1:21:301:21:33

-Yes, the whole lot, please.

-Shred, or...?

1:21:331:21:35

-Just pick it however you want, chef.

-OK, good.

1:21:351:21:37

What shall I do with these?

1:21:371:21:39

-You can take half of them and place them into a blender.

-OK.

1:21:391:21:42

Well, about a third of them, really.

1:21:421:21:44

Tuna, salt, pepper - nice, hot griddle pan.

1:21:441:21:47

You oil the fish, not the pan. All right?

1:21:471:21:50

Most people when they buy these, they put oil in there.

1:21:501:21:53

You're defeating the object. So you oil the fish, not the pan.

1:21:531:21:56

Seal those. The secret is, don't touch them as well.

1:21:581:22:02

That's the most important thing.

1:22:021:22:04

-Are you cooking more at home now?

-Yeah.

1:22:041:22:07

I have to!

1:22:071:22:08

Everyone goes, you know, "You should be cooking it!"

1:22:081:22:11

And I'm like, "No, I don't mind, you know?"

1:22:111:22:13

-Right, in there. A few more tomatoes.

-OK.

1:22:131:22:16

-They can go in. There you go.

-Some oil?

-Little bit of oil.

1:22:161:22:20

Touch of garlic.

1:22:201:22:22

Always.

1:22:221:22:23

This is the secret, I think, to panzanella. We take the dressing...

1:22:231:22:26

So a tiny bit of garlic, that goes in there. Give it a quick blitz.

1:22:261:22:30

Now, blend it to a dressing, or like a sauce.

1:22:331:22:37

You need some salad chopped as well?

1:22:371:22:38

Little bit more olive oil in there. No, I've got some, thanks.

1:22:381:22:41

We've got our tuna here.

1:22:411:22:43

Quickly turn that.

1:22:431:22:46

There you go, so you're nice and pink in the middle, that'll do.

1:22:461:22:49

Now, this is the secret with this.

1:22:491:22:51

-This stuff. This is Cabernet Sauvignon vinegar.

-Ooh!

1:22:511:22:54

-It's Spanish, although this is Italian...

-Can I smell it?

1:22:541:22:57

..but it is...

1:22:571:22:59

-Smell it. Taste it. Just wonderful.

-Swig it back!

1:22:591:23:03

It is fantastic stuff, Cabernet Sauvignon vinegar.

1:23:031:23:06

But it does make all the difference when you're doing this.

1:23:061:23:08

-If you take that out and place it into a bowl, please.

-Yeah.

1:23:081:23:12

Can you use balsamic?

1:23:121:23:13

-Put it in a little bowl there. Sorry?

-Could you use balsamic?

1:23:131:23:17

You don't get the same flavour as the red wine vinegar,

1:23:171:23:20

that's the secret with this one. If you can place it in that bowl.

1:23:201:23:22

-That bowl there?

-That's fine.

1:23:221:23:24

-Now, anyway, tuna back over here. Flip this over.

-Very nice.

1:23:241:23:28

So you get those nice lines on it.

1:23:281:23:30

Don't need to mess around with it, just leave it as it is.

1:23:301:23:33

Tuna'll cook, probably, three minutes,

1:23:331:23:35

to cook all the way through, like that.

1:23:351:23:36

Don't know why I'm telling you anyway,

1:23:361:23:38

-you should know this by now.

-Well...

1:23:381:23:40

We've got our bread.

1:23:401:23:42

All we're really doing is just drying this bread out.

1:23:421:23:45

-That's the secret.

-That looks nice.

1:23:451:23:48

This is ciabatta. You can, of course, use a bit of stale bread.

1:23:481:23:52

Now, this is just for the dressing, so I'm just going to mix this up

1:23:521:23:54

in a little of mixing bowl.

1:23:541:23:57

We take our bread, which we've got here...

1:23:571:23:59

-You want the basilic?

-Yeah, we're going to use the basil, chef.

1:23:591:24:02

Bit of basil. If you can chop me the peppers as well, that'll be great.

1:24:021:24:06

Thank you very much.

1:24:061:24:07

-Chopped parsley in there?

-Chop chop.

-Chop chop.

1:24:071:24:11

There you go. Now, these are the smoked, wood-roasted smoked peppers.

1:24:111:24:14

-You can smell it, it smells gorgeous.

-Yeah, these are delicious.

1:24:141:24:17

Capers going in. This is not traditionally Italian,

1:24:171:24:21

but I like capers in there as well.

1:24:211:24:23

And that goes in. And, of course, we've got our tuna.

1:24:231:24:26

-Mmm.

-You grab that.

1:24:271:24:29

-I can't grab that!

-There you go.

1:24:291:24:31

I was going to do it as well!

1:24:311:24:32

And then literally just flip this over.

1:24:321:24:35

See that it's cooked in the centre.

1:24:351:24:37

And then, finally, just a little bit of lemon.

1:24:371:24:42

-FRENCH ACCENT:

-Ooh, lemon!

1:24:421:24:43

Often, charred lemon is really, really good

1:24:441:24:46

when you're serving it with fish off a char-grill.

1:24:461:24:48

-And a barbecue.

-Yeah, lovely.

1:24:481:24:50

You put a little bit of lemon, or a little bit of lime on there,

1:24:501:24:52

and actually cook it. It takes on different flavours.

1:24:521:24:55

So we want to grab the rest of our tomatoes here.

1:24:551:24:57

So they've got the dressing.

1:24:571:24:59

You see the idea, you've got the tomatoes, the dressing...

1:24:591:25:02

When do you want the pimentos?

1:25:021:25:04

They can go in here, chef, thank you.

1:25:041:25:06

-In where?

-In there.

-In there.

1:25:061:25:08

And then we need a serving plate from you guys, if you've got one?

1:25:081:25:11

Thank you very much, chef.

1:25:111:25:12

Thank you. Salt.

1:25:121:25:15

There you go. Bit of black pepper.

1:25:151:25:17

Tuna is cooked now.

1:25:191:25:20

A little bouquet of flowers, if he wants to.

1:25:201:25:22

THEY LAUGH

1:25:221:25:24

And then we've got our tuna - don't cook it any more than that.

1:25:241:25:27

And then what we want to do is just quickly mix this together.

1:25:271:25:30

The idea of this salad is that the bread, ideally,

1:25:301:25:34

absorbs all that dressing. That's what you're looking for.

1:25:341:25:37

So you've got the crustiness of the bread, but then it goes soggy,

1:25:371:25:40

because it soaks in everything.

1:25:401:25:42

It acts like a sponge, it just sucks everything all in. Which is nice.

1:25:421:25:46

But that Cabernet Sauvignon vinegar, if you can find it,

1:25:461:25:51

is definitely a good buy.

1:25:511:25:54

And it's great, it you can put it in stews, casseroles,

1:25:541:25:56

all kinds of stuff, as well as dressings.

1:25:561:25:58

It smells absolutely gorgeous. It's like a tad more sharper.

1:25:581:26:02

Yeah, it's slightly more sharper,

1:26:021:26:04

it's almost like the acid's like malt vinegar.

1:26:041:26:07

You've got that red wine flavour to it as well.

1:26:071:26:10

Because Michel's here...

1:26:101:26:11

Aw!

1:26:131:26:14

Ta-da!

1:26:141:26:15

That's what we call heaven, then, isn't it?

1:26:151:26:19

It's what we call £20.50.

1:26:191:26:20

LAUGHTER

1:26:201:26:22

-Little bit of olive oil.

-That's more like it.

1:26:231:26:26

-Bit of that on the top.

-Wow.

-There you have it, dive in.

1:26:281:26:31

Oh, don't mind if I do.

1:26:311:26:33

-Oh, it smells amazing.

-It's all yours, Liz.

-Oh!

1:26:331:26:36

-OK, OK.

-He likes you very much, Liz.

-I know!

1:26:361:26:39

And the lemon can sit on the side, there.

1:26:391:26:43

-Thank you.

-Oh, it's cooked beautifully, oh, it is.

1:26:431:26:47

Do you want to bring over the glasses, guys, please?

1:26:471:26:50

While they dive in.

1:26:501:26:52

Ollie's chosen an Errazuriz.

1:26:521:26:54

It's a 2007 vintage, available from Majestic Wines.

1:26:541:26:58

-Oh, my God.

-What do you think?

1:26:581:26:59

-That's beautiful.

-I think the panzanella really works.

1:26:591:27:02

And the idea is, with this, if you're going to do this at

1:27:021:27:04

home this weekend, is to literally leave that bread in the dressing.

1:27:041:27:07

It literally absorbs like a sponge.

1:27:071:27:09

You can really taste the vinegar as well.

1:27:091:27:11

There you go, chef.

1:27:111:27:13

-Young lady.

-Thank you very much.

1:27:131:27:15

-Mmm!

-Oh, thank you.

1:27:151:27:17

-This is so very pleasant, isn't it?

-There's your heaven.

1:27:171:27:20

A nice Saturday morning! Cheers!

1:27:201:27:22

I think that will go down as one of Atomic Kitten's top TUNE-AS.

1:27:271:27:31

Good, huh?

1:27:311:27:32

I'm afraid that's all we've got time for on this morning's instalment

1:27:321:27:35

of Best Bites. I hope you've enjoyed taking a look back at some of the

1:27:351:27:37

delicious dishes that have featured on Saturday Kitchen over the years.

1:27:371:27:41

Thanks for watching. Have a fantastic week. See you very soon.

1:27:411:27:44

Matt Tebbutt takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen.