10/01/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


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10/01/2017

Actress Nicole Kidman speaks to Victoria Derbyshire about Hollywood, family and Donald Trump.


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I'm Victoria Derbyshire, welcome to the programme.

:00:00.:00:08.

This morning, strikes, delays and cancellations.

:00:09.:00:11.

Southern rail commuters tell us their view on the operator

:00:12.:00:14.

I get up early to get the overground or the bus, it takes a lot longer.

:00:15.:00:29.

Today marks the first of six days of strikes

:00:30.:00:31.

by Southern rail this month, so what's the solution?

:00:32.:00:33.

Do get in touch with us throughout the programme.

:00:34.:00:35.

Also today, in an exclusive interview Nicole Kidman tells us why

:00:36.:00:38.

she wants more children at the age of 49, but her husband

:00:39.:00:41.

When people talk about regrets, do I have regrets? I wish I had more

:00:42.:00:54.

children. My husband tells me to shut it down. I would have liked to

:00:55.:00:56.

or three more. I love children. And, her film Lion has just received

:00:57.:01:01.

five Bafta nominations, but La La Land, a film

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about a Hollywood musical, What? Come on! The TV show, the one

:01:05.:01:21.

I was telling you about. Congratulations, that's a credible!

:01:22.:01:26.

I feel like I said negative stuff about it before. It is like Rebel

:01:27.:01:33.

without a cause. I got the bullets! As you'd expect, we'll bring

:01:34.:01:37.

you the latest breaking news Stay tuned for some fascinating

:01:38.:01:41.

footage of chimpanzees which appears to show them developing tools

:01:42.:01:46.

to help them drink water. If you're getting in touch,

:01:47.:01:50.

use the hashtag #VictoriaLIVE. Jeremy Corbyn is to explain Labour's

:01:51.:01:55.

approach to Brexit and immigration. In a speech later, he'll say

:01:56.:02:00.

for the first time that he's not "wedded" to the principle of free

:02:01.:02:03.

movement of people, and he'll argue that the UK can't afford to lose

:02:04.:02:07.

full access to the single market, as many British jobs

:02:08.:02:11.

and businesses depend on it. Why the change of heart from Jeremy

:02:12.:02:26.

Corbyn? What we get today is the Jeremy Corbyn reboot, relaunch, at

:02:27.:02:32.

the start of the year, trying to present a different sort of

:02:33.:02:34.

leadership and a different approach to Brexit. He has been out and about

:02:35.:02:40.

this morning, doing a round of media interviews, something which he has

:02:41.:02:45.

been conspicuously avoiding to date, and it has been an attempt to put

:02:46.:02:49.

him on the front foot and on Brexit he says that Brexit could be good

:02:50.:02:55.

for Britain, we could be better off if we left the EU, and on freedom of

:02:56.:03:03.

movement, that issue which he is conspicuously defending to date, he

:03:04.:03:07.

says they are not wedded to it, and there may have to be restrictions as

:03:08.:03:12.

part of the negotiations. And that Labour is open-minded about that.

:03:13.:03:18.

But more than that, from a clear blue sky, he has also announced this

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morning that he is in favour of a maximum earnings cap. In other

:03:25.:03:29.

words, people can only earn so much money, and that is it. This is his

:03:30.:03:36.

attempt to present himself as the populist leader, willing to take on

:03:37.:03:41.

the wealthy, the establishment, the bankers, saying you can earn so much

:03:42.:03:45.

and no more. This is what he said on Radio 4.

:03:46.:03:49.

We have the worst levels of income disparity of most of the OECD

:03:50.:03:55.

countries in this country. It is getting worse. Corporate taxation is

:03:56.:04:02.

a part of it. If we want to live in a more it at every and society and

:04:03.:04:06.

fund our public services, we cannot go on creating worst levels of

:04:07.:04:11.

inequality. There should be a law to limit income? I think let's look at

:04:12.:04:17.

it. You have got a view on it. Tell us what it is. What I want to see...

:04:18.:04:25.

To get the figure, a law to limit maximum earnings? I would like to

:04:26.:04:31.

see it, I think it would be a fairer thing to do. We cannot set ourselves

:04:32.:04:38.

up as being a grossly unequal, bargain basement economy on the

:04:39.:04:41.

shores of Europe. We have to be something that is more a gal at

:04:42.:04:46.

every, gives real opportunities to everybody, and properly funds our

:04:47.:04:50.

services. Look at the crisis in the NHS as an example.

:04:51.:04:55.

That is massive. Any reaction so far? I rang one of his press people.

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I said, what is that? There was a silence on the other end of the

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phone. She said, I will get back to you. I think Jeremy Corbyn has

:05:09.:05:12.

caught his own party, his own people, off-guard, nobody knew he

:05:13.:05:19.

would stay that. I cannot think of any other Labour politician ever

:05:20.:05:23.

calling for a maximum earnings cap. That says that you can earn so much,

:05:24.:05:28.

and that is it. The state is taking the lot. How would that work? I

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presume in the City of London, if there was a cap, presumably half the

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banks, half the bankers would just disappear. It is an extraordinary

:05:39.:05:47.

policy. But maybe his calculation is, never mind the froth in the

:05:48.:05:50.

Westminster village, never mind the outrage, it could be popular, people

:05:51.:05:54.

might think, why should people earn more than ?1 million? Why should

:05:55.:06:01.

there not be a cap? That is what he is trying to do, to present himself,

:06:02.:06:05.

like Donald Trump, of the anti-establishment politician, the

:06:06.:06:10.

person prepared to tell it as it is, even if, within the Westminster

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village, it seemed like an extraordinary idea.

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More reaction to come. Wherever you are, let me know. Would you back a

:06:21.:06:25.

maximum earnings cap? What would be cap the? A million? Half a million?

:06:26.:06:33.

Is it popular with you? We will talk to some Labour MPs later, we will

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feed your thoughts into that conversation. You can e-mail us or

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send me a tweet. Joanna is in the BBC

:06:40.:06:41.

Newsroom with a summary Commuters on Southern rail

:06:42.:06:44.

are facing the first of three days of strikes by train

:06:45.:06:48.

drivers this week. The dispute about the role

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of the guard on trains has been It is a dispute which has been

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crippling London's train You have to get up early to go

:06:53.:06:59.

underground or get a bus. I am abandoning going

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into town tomorrow. We will see how things

:07:17.:07:19.

go later in the week. I have managed to get a train

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but it is not good at all. It seems talks between the two

:07:23.:07:25.

sides have turned nasty. The tactics they have used

:07:26.:07:29.

have been malicious. At best they have been dishonest,

:07:30.:07:31.

disingenuous, deceitful, Our reality is that we are now

:07:32.:07:34.

experiencing a new type of industrial relations

:07:35.:07:40.

in our industry that we have It's a row over the role

:07:41.:07:43.

of the on-board guard. Southern wants drivers to take over

:07:44.:07:46.

the safety-critical job But the union says

:07:47.:07:49.

the guard should do it. A report by the regulator says

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Southern's plans were safe as long as they provided the right

:07:56.:07:58.

equipment and training. All of the 2,000-plus

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services in the company will be cancelled today,

:08:02.:08:04.

tomorrow and Friday. There'll be huge disruption

:08:05.:08:07.

on Thursday too because the trains And that's on top of an overtime ban

:08:08.:08:10.

which is cutting services daily. Another three-day strike

:08:11.:08:18.

is planned later this month. The issue of driver-controlled

:08:19.:08:21.

trains is affecting Southern today, but it could easily spread to other

:08:22.:08:24.

franchises through Britain. Our correspondent Duncan Kennedy

:08:25.:08:32.

is at Horsham station in West Sussex How are things their? Terrible, as

:08:33.:08:48.

right across the region, Kent, Sussex, Surrey and parts of

:08:49.:08:53.

Hampshire, 300,000 travel journeys should be made today, it is zero at

:08:54.:08:57.

the moment. Normally we would have five or 10,000 commuters coming

:08:58.:09:01.

through here in the rush hour. I will show you what is going on

:09:02.:09:06.

inside. A completely empty concourse. It is like that across

:09:07.:09:10.

all the stations on Southern railways. The different from last

:09:11.:09:17.

month's strikes, Southern and National Express are putting on

:09:18.:09:20.

coaches and buses to get a few people around, but it is very

:09:21.:09:25.

patchy, only 200 buses. Just to get people a few miles down the track.

:09:26.:09:30.

To recap, it is all about who opened the doors. Is it these drivers? They

:09:31.:09:36.

say it should not be them. It is just not safe for them to do so.

:09:37.:09:41.

They say it should be the guard. But Southern say it is proven that it is

:09:42.:09:47.

OK for the drivers to do it, there is a lot of evidence to say it is

:09:48.:09:51.

safe, and that the guards can be better used on the train, looking

:09:52.:09:54.

after passengers. I cannot come together. No talks planned. Onwards

:09:55.:10:00.

and upwards for the misery for these tens of thousands of commuters.

:10:01.:10:03.

And in a few minutes' time Victoria will be talking to commuters

:10:04.:10:05.

who use the service, both supporting and against

:10:06.:10:07.

the strikes, about how the dispute can be resolved.

:10:08.:10:10.

A 15-year-old girl is being questioned by police

:10:11.:10:12.

in York after the death of a seven-year-old girl.

:10:13.:10:15.

The younger girl was found with life-threatening injuries

:10:16.:10:18.

in the Woodthorpe area of the city yesterday afternoon.

:10:19.:10:21.

She was taken to hospital but died a short time later.

:10:22.:10:24.

The teenager remains in police custody.

:10:25.:10:28.

The British and Irish Governments say they're going to work

:10:29.:10:30.

to try to find a solution to the most-serious political crisis

:10:31.:10:33.

Yesterday, the Deputy First Minister, Sinn Fein's Martin

:10:34.:10:38.

It came after weeks of tension between his party and its partners

:10:39.:10:43.

in the power-sharing Government, the Democratic Unionists.

:10:44.:10:46.

Northern Ireland Secretary James Brokenshire is expected to make

:10:47.:10:49.

Boris Johnson, who's visiting Washington,

:10:50.:10:55.

says he's confident Britain will be first in line for a trade deal

:10:56.:10:58.

The Foreign Secretary has been meeting senior

:10:59.:11:03.

Republican politicians, who've promised to make a US-UK

:11:04.:11:06.

Barack Obama warned in April that the UK would be at the back

:11:07.:11:12.

Concerns have been raised about the care of transgender

:11:13.:11:18.

prisoners, following four deaths in just over a year at jails

:11:19.:11:21.

A report from the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman says prison

:11:22.:11:26.

staff and managers need to be more proactive and flexible in the way

:11:27.:11:29.

they deal with inmates who've changed their birth gender,

:11:30.:11:31.

The Ministry of Justice says it has revised its guidance so prisoners

:11:32.:11:42.

are dealt with according to the gender they identify with.

:11:43.:11:48.

Drivers caught offending on so-called "smart motorways"

:11:49.:11:50.

could be offered re-education lessons by the police.

:11:51.:11:52.

Smart motorways operate variable speed limits and can open the hard

:11:53.:11:55.

But the national police lead for roads says many motorists

:11:56.:11:58.

are becoming confused about when they're allowed to drive

:11:59.:12:00.

Figures obtained by the BBC suggest an 18% rise in the number of people

:12:01.:12:04.

caught using the hard shoulder illegally over the last two years.

:12:05.:12:07.

The US owners of the messaging app Snapchat are to set up

:12:08.:12:10.

a new international headquarters in the UK.

:12:11.:12:12.

Snap Inc currently has 75 staff at its office in London

:12:13.:12:14.

It says the UK's strong creative industries made it "a great place

:12:15.:12:19.

The move is seen as a positive in the technology sector,

:12:20.:12:23.

as the likes of Facebook and Google have based themselves in Ireland,

:12:24.:12:27.

The Hollywood musical La La Land leads nominations

:12:28.:12:33.

for this year's Baftas, with 11 nods, including Best Film.

:12:34.:12:37.

Its stars Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone are also up

:12:38.:12:39.

for Best Actor and Actress, just a day after winning

:12:40.:12:42.

British actors Andrew Garfield, Emily Blunt and Hugh Grant are also

:12:43.:12:47.

nominated, as is British state-welfare drama I, Daniel Blake.

:12:48.:12:52.

The ceremony takes place on February 12th in London.

:12:53.:12:56.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News, more at 9:30am.

:12:57.:13:03.

We are hoping to talk to Ken Loach in the next hour. We will also talk

:13:04.:13:11.

to the chair of BAFTA. And we have an exclusive interview with Nicole

:13:12.:13:17.

Kidman, her film has been nominated for five awards, including herself

:13:18.:13:20.

for best supporting actress. To get in touch.

:13:21.:13:22.

If you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

:13:23.:13:27.

Jackie says, it is about time the RMT and Aslef will help to account

:13:28.:13:36.

for the radical restriction -- disruption for the passages. They

:13:37.:13:45.

would then think again before calling strike action. We will talk

:13:46.:13:48.

to commuters and people with a point of view on this latest strike

:13:49.:13:54.

action. We will talk to them in the next five minutes or so.

:13:55.:13:57.

Let's get some sport now with Jessica.

:13:58.:13:58.

Fifa are voting on whether to expand the number of teams

:13:59.:14:01.

Yes, it looks as though it will be voted in by football's world

:14:02.:14:06.

So, from 2026, there'll be a bigger World Cup.

:14:07.:14:13.

Some have raised their eyebrows, though.

:14:14.:14:16.

There are concerns about whether this will dilute

:14:17.:14:18.

The chief exec of the FA Martin Glenn says they'd prefer

:14:19.:14:22.

Germany, who won the World Cup in 2014, have said that it

:14:23.:14:28.

could create a greater imbalance between teams.

:14:29.:14:32.

There's also questions about increased revenue.

:14:33.:14:35.

From their own research, Fifa say they'll potentially make

:14:36.:14:37.

an extra ?520 million from this expansion, how much has that

:14:38.:14:42.

This isn't lost on Fifa president Gianni Infantino,

:14:43.:14:47.

who's acknowledged the financial benefits of the expansion,

:14:48.:14:51.

but he insists that football needs to be more inclusive,

:14:52.:14:54.

and this will develop football around the world.

:14:55.:14:57.

Indeed, for smaller nations it could lead to the incredible

:14:58.:15:00.

scenes we witnessed at the European

:15:01.:15:02.

The likes of Wales, who went on a run all the way

:15:03.:15:06.

And Iceland, a nation of just over 300,000,

:15:07.:15:17.

beating England on their way to the quarter-finals.

:15:18.:15:20.

That's exactly what an expansion could provide, the chance to dream.

:15:21.:15:24.

Particularly for African and Asian countries,

:15:25.:15:27.

who are expected to get the bulk of the 16 extra places.

:15:28.:15:40.

Let me ask you about cycling's governing body because they have

:15:41.:15:46.

given athletes seven weeks to prepare for the schooling World

:15:47.:15:50.

Championships? Just under two months for a World Championships. It gets

:15:51.:15:56.

underway on 2nd March in Los Angeles and it is the second time they will

:15:57.:16:04.

be held in the season following a Paralympics. The president of the

:16:05.:16:10.

governing body says the move signifies notable progress and

:16:11.:16:15.

believes it will enrich the para-cycling calendar as the UCI

:16:16.:16:19.

plan on organising this event every year, but a strong reaction from

:16:20.:16:28.

British para cyclist, Yeoedy Cundy. He wrote on Twitter, "Why do the UCI

:16:29.:16:36.

think it is acceptable to give seven weeks official notice of a

:16:37.:16:40.

championships?" Are they expecting anyone to turn up.

:16:41.:16:52.

Strong reaction there, Victoria. I will have more at 10am. Thank you

:16:53.:16:59.

very much, Jess. Jess will be back later. This is the reaction from you

:17:00.:17:04.

to the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, suggestion on the radio this morning

:17:05.:17:08.

of a maximum salary cap, legislation to introduce a maximum salary. Puck

:17:09.:17:16.

e-mails, "We, I would support the introduction of a maximum limit of

:17:17.:17:22.

say ?1 million. Another viewer tweets, "Hearing Jeremy Corbyn's

:17:23.:17:26.

new-found views on Brexit, I was worried he had become voteable and

:17:27.:17:31.

then I heard about his maximum earnings cap." Another viewer says,

:17:32.:17:40.

"Just tax accordingly." A another tweet says, "It is a great idea."

:17:41.:17:44.

More reaction to come on the programme as you would expect.

:17:45.:17:48.

Another day of strike action is affecting hundreds

:17:49.:17:50.

Today it's the turn of Southern Rail to strike again.

:17:51.:17:54.

Drivers belonging to the ASLEF union have begun their first

:17:55.:17:56.

of six day-long stoppages planned for January.

:17:57.:17:58.

It follows previous strikes in the run up to Christmas.

:17:59.:18:01.

Only 16 trains will run today instead of the usual 2,242.

:18:02.:18:06.

They're striking in a row over who should push the button to open

:18:07.:18:09.

and close the train doors - drivers or guards.

:18:10.:18:13.

Separately, British Airways cabin crew are also striking

:18:14.:18:15.

today in a row over pay, although BA say the effects

:18:16.:18:17.

So this morning, if you're a commuter affected by the latest

:18:18.:18:22.

Or is it time for tougher legislation to make it harder

:18:23.:18:31.

With us a group of Southern Rail commuters who say they're

:18:32.:18:40.

constantly met with delays, cancellations and

:18:41.:18:42.

Becky Wright is the Director of Unions21 who feels

:18:43.:18:51.

strike legislation is more than robust enough and Conservative

:18:52.:18:54.

MP for Havant, Alan Mak who feels there is room to strengthen the law

:18:55.:18:57.

Welcome all of you. I want to hear your commuter stories first of all.

:18:58.:19:09.

Why don't you begin, Alison. Good morning. I travel in from Crawley

:19:10.:19:15.

into Victoria and then up to Green Park. I work just opposite the Ritz.

:19:16.:19:22.

Southern, it was a nightmare before the strikes. Now, it's just

:19:23.:19:27.

fundamentally worse. I'm quite fortunate in the fact that I work

:19:28.:19:33.

for a company that is very understanding and accommodating so

:19:34.:19:39.

at the moment, you know, they are quite understand the problems that

:19:40.:19:42.

we face, but how much longer that will be the case? My job is in

:19:43.:19:47.

London. So, you know, there is only so much they will accommodate before

:19:48.:19:51.

they will start kind of thinking well, maybe we should consider...

:19:52.:19:55.

Find someone who lives nearer or doesn't have to use Southern Rail to

:19:56.:19:59.

get to work. Emma, what about your experience? Mine is different. I

:20:00.:20:07.

travel south into Victoria, all into London Bridge and I'm freelance and

:20:08.:20:15.

I teach ballet. I have to be there. The doors open for students and they

:20:16.:20:18.

need to be able to access. There is a priority to get there and I have

:20:19.:20:22.

family at home. I have a five-year-old and a seven-year-old.

:20:23.:20:25.

What I'm upset with the fact that this is affecting them. In what way?

:20:26.:20:31.

They are noticing my absence. Normally I would leave briefly

:20:32.:20:35.

before they go to school and I'm back afterwards, that precious time

:20:36.:20:38.

that you have with them in the morning and the evening is getting

:20:39.:20:42.

shorter and shorter and they are starting to get upset. That's

:20:43.:20:47.

because you're late back? Yes, I get in and they are already ready for

:20:48.:20:50.

bed and we've lost that time together and I worry, I have to pay

:20:51.:20:54.

for so many taxis just to ensure that I'll get to their show or a

:20:55.:20:59.

parents evening and for my work, because I'm freelance, if I'm not

:21:00.:21:04.

there then they will hire somebody else next time and I'm paying out to

:21:05.:21:07.

make sure I get there. Absolutely. So it is a catch 22. I come in from

:21:08.:21:14.

East Croydon. The reason I moved there because the journey to

:21:15.:21:18.

Victoria should take 16 minutes, but my journey is taking an hour and 20

:21:19.:21:23.

or an hour-and-a-half. It is not necessarily the cancelled trains or

:21:24.:21:26.

the delays that are the problem, it is the fact that if one train gets

:21:27.:21:30.

cancelled you have got a platform of thousands of people so you're having

:21:31.:21:35.

to let two or three go because of overcrowding. I work somewhere

:21:36.:21:40.

that's flexible, buttant don't know how much longer the flexibility will

:21:41.:21:43.

last really. People are cross about the disruption. And perhaps, think

:21:44.:21:48.

maybe the strike legislation should be toughened even further. The

:21:49.:21:52.

Conservatives have already raised the threshold when it comes to

:21:53.:21:58.

public sector industrial ballots. What's your view on that? I think we

:21:59.:22:02.

have some of the toughest legislation in any kind of western

:22:03.:22:06.

democracy. We're not France, we can't just decide one moment we're

:22:07.:22:10.

going to walk out. There was a lengthy legislative procedure before

:22:11.:22:15.

the Government decided to enact the Trade Union Bill. It costs money. No

:22:16.:22:21.

union goes into, no workers go into a strike without due consideration

:22:22.:22:26.

because it takes a lot of effort, it takes people's pay. It affects

:22:27.:22:30.

customers. It affects passengers. And so if you're going to go through

:22:31.:22:34.

this process, there has to be a really good reason why that happens

:22:35.:22:38.

and because we already have strong legislation, we had strong

:22:39.:22:41.

legislation before, I don't see the need for us to continue to change.

:22:42.:22:45.

As a Conservative MP, is the legislation strong enough? Do you

:22:46.:22:50.

look at this ongoing strike action and think maybe there is more we can

:22:51.:22:55.

do? The strikes are causing massive disruption to people's working lives

:22:56.:22:59.

and their family lives. The priority is to get the unions to call off the

:23:00.:23:03.

strikes and get people back to work and to their families and then we

:23:04.:23:07.

will look at how we can protect the infrastructure and accept the trains

:23:08.:23:10.

are safe. No one is losing their jobs. No one is taking a pay cut and

:23:11.:23:15.

get our trains running again. I mean there is a big dispute over whether

:23:16.:23:20.

a train is safer if a driver, using big mirrors, can actually see

:23:21.:23:24.

properly down a very long platform, sometimes with ten or 11 carriages,

:23:25.:23:27.

whether he or she is in the right position to be able to close the

:23:28.:23:30.

doors and know that customers are safe? Yeah, well safety is very

:23:31.:23:34.

important and the independent Office of Rail Regulation has said on

:23:35.:23:37.

Thursday that it is safe. It is not just mirrors, it is using CCTV so

:23:38.:23:41.

they can see the whole length of the train. We can make sure that the

:23:42.:23:44.

driver is seeing the length of the train. It is common sense. If

:23:45.:23:47.

someone is stuck in the doors or there is a problem, the driver can

:23:48.:23:50.

stop the train and do something about it, the conductors can't do

:23:51.:23:54.

anything about it. What we want is the driver to take control of the

:23:55.:23:58.

safety... The point is the conductor would be on the platform and would

:23:59.:24:02.

have a perfect view of whether anybody is trying to get on at the

:24:03.:24:06.

last minute? The independent regulator made sure it is safe. The

:24:07.:24:09.

driver has a good view and where there is recommendations for

:24:10.:24:12.

lighting at stations we have asked the operator to make sure that's

:24:13.:24:14.

implemented. What is important is the driver has control of the train

:24:15.:24:17.

and if there are any problems they can stop it. The on board

:24:18.:24:21.

supervisor, the guard, can help passengers with luggage and journey

:24:22.:24:24.

times and travel with tickets and all that stuff, really Passenger

:24:25.:24:27.

Focussed. No one is losing their job. No one is getting a pay cut and

:24:28.:24:32.

it is safe. It is really unsafe, isn't it? There is a new form of

:24:33.:24:36.

train rage out there and I have seen, there was an 11-year-old boy

:24:37.:24:40.

trying to get to school and he couldn't get on. Everyone is out for

:24:41.:24:44.

themselves because nobody wants to lose their job because you can hear

:24:45.:24:48.

the desperateness in people's voice. It is no longer please move down. It

:24:49.:24:52.

is, "Please let me get on the train." This poor lad is running up

:24:53.:24:56.

and down and he probably only needed to go two stops. He knew his journey

:24:57.:25:00.

and he is there by himself. It is not safe.

:25:01.:25:05.

If that kid was actually stuck in the door, the conductor can't do

:25:06.:25:07.

anything about it and the train could drive. Under the new system,

:25:08.:25:10.

the driver can see that kid, stop the train and sort out the problem.

:25:11.:25:17.

That's why it is safe. As someone who uses the trains all the time

:25:18.:25:22.

with young kids, if I'm at the end of the train, how long does it take

:25:23.:25:27.

the train driver to do that and the disruption... He could stop the

:25:28.:25:33.

doors closing. Nick says, "I am a train driver. There can be no doubt

:25:34.:25:38.

that 12 carriage driver-only operated trains are not safe. I fear

:25:39.:25:42.

the day people die at my hands because I have to carry out other

:25:43.:25:47.

duties so as to not go to prison for manslaughter and on that day, I

:25:48.:25:52.

shall be wishing that we had a guard on every single train whether one or

:25:53.:25:56.

12 carriages. The Government's stance is an outrage and they hide

:25:57.:26:04.

behind Govia. The fact that they do that is disgusting. We should be

:26:05.:26:07.

supporting railways when the time of modernising is a lie. The on board

:26:08.:26:15.

supervisors will be likely made redundant in 2021." The guards are

:26:16.:26:18.

dealing with passengers and the driver takes control of safety. We

:26:19.:26:21.

have to remember the trains are operating on 30% of trains across

:26:22.:26:24.

the whole of the k and they have been used in the UK for the last 30

:26:25.:26:31.

years. They are on the Underground and the Thames Docklands Light

:26:32.:26:36.

Railway. I trust the views of a train driver, somebody who does the

:26:37.:26:41.

job every day. There is an element of theory and practise and I think

:26:42.:26:45.

comparing the Tube trains with something like Southern Rail or even

:26:46.:26:51.

comparing it with Virgin East Coast is like comparing apples and

:26:52.:26:55.

oranges. Yes, they are all fruit, but different trains and there are

:26:56.:26:59.

different ways of doing things. You can't do that. Martin has just

:27:00.:27:03.

arrived. He is another commuter. Hi Martin, welcome. Better late than

:27:04.:27:06.

neverment thank you for making the effort. There is a lot of traffic on

:27:07.:27:10.

the road. I understand there is a rail strike! Tell our audience where

:27:11.:27:14.

you stand on the strike as a commuter? I live in west Sussex. My

:27:15.:27:22.

line is Southern cap rail. I am self-employed so I can choose. I'm

:27:23.:27:26.

not risk my job, but I'm certainly missing a lot of appointments. Do

:27:27.:27:30.

you back the strikes? I do. Do you? Yes. When I used to work in Local

:27:31.:27:40.

Government we had a customer focus policy and the point was you didn't

:27:41.:27:44.

think what the customer might want. You actually found out what the

:27:45.:27:49.

customer might want and what I want from trains is reliability and

:27:50.:27:54.

safety. And I want my train driver to drive the train. I don't want him

:27:55.:27:58.

worrying about what's going on 12 coaches behind. Let's ask all of you

:27:59.:28:02.

that. First of all, do you back the strikes? I do back them. I

:28:03.:28:05.

understand why they're doing it, but it has been going on, I haven't got

:28:06.:28:10.

on a train on time since last Christmas. Christmas 2015? You're

:28:11.:28:17.

kidding me. I live only eight miles outside of London. That's to do with

:28:18.:28:22.

Southern... That's general. I agree with the safety end of it. You

:28:23.:28:26.

Alison? The safety aspect, yes. What about the strike? I'm 50/50. I used

:28:27.:28:35.

to, I was 100% behind the strike and I understood the reasons for it.

:28:36.:28:39.

Now, being a commuter and being at the kind of front end of that, on a

:28:40.:28:44.

daily basis, and knowing that some days my journey, I can stand at

:28:45.:28:47.

Victoria and just think oh my god how am I going to get home? Because

:28:48.:28:52.

there are no trains because they've cancelled god knows how many

:28:53.:28:55.

beforehand. There are thousands of people trying to get on to one train

:28:56.:29:00.

and it is dangerous. Now, when you talk about safety, that for me, is a

:29:01.:29:06.

major concern that the strikes are causing huge safety issues on

:29:07.:29:08.

platforms. That's really interesting. Emma, do you back the

:29:09.:29:12.

strikes? No. I just think there should be another way. So now, let's

:29:13.:29:16.

try and come up with a solution. Clearly, we're not going to achieve

:29:17.:29:22.

that in two or three minutes on national television continue o

:29:23.:29:25.

Tuesday morning, but let's have a goment you said we need to get the

:29:26.:29:28.

two sides around the table. Clearly, everybody knows that. What else

:29:29.:29:32.

needs to happen? Well, we need to get them around the table. Yes. Yes.

:29:33.:29:37.

Yes. But for the unions to accept that the trains are safe and their

:29:38.:29:40.

members are working in a highly paid environment. Is that not an

:29:41.:29:48.

adversarial way to go about it? That's why we are not proposing to

:29:49.:29:53.

change the strike laws and trying to get Alison and Emma and Martin and

:29:54.:29:57.

other colleagues back to work. Negotiations don't work like that in

:29:58.:30:00.

the real world. The two sides don't come together and say, "I'm giving

:30:01.:30:05.

in." That's how negotiations work. We have had negotiations... No, it

:30:06.:30:08.

is about compromise, isn't it? That is not how a relationship

:30:09.:30:21.

works. People come together, they try to find common ground. Sometimes

:30:22.:30:25.

they disagree, sometimes they agree. What would you suggest? There has

:30:26.:30:32.

got to be a third way somewhere. The obvious thing is people, round the

:30:33.:30:35.

table and converts and listen more than talk. But in the end, there

:30:36.:30:43.

needs to be a third suggestion. Something that does a bit for both

:30:44.:30:47.

sides, so that neither gives away totally, but they both give a

:30:48.:30:53.

little. What might that be? I have just got out of a traffic jam! You

:30:54.:30:58.

have done very well. They could trial it on quieter services, to get

:30:59.:31:04.

the drivers who backing. If they drove on a quieter service and they

:31:05.:31:08.

were still scared and did not feel they had the safety of the train,

:31:09.:31:12.

pull it, but if they could give it a go, just to see if there was a happy

:31:13.:31:17.

ground... Could they keep the guard on the 12 carriage train in rush

:31:18.:31:22.

hour? In the middle of the day, there is often not 12 carriages,

:31:23.:31:29.

very often four, you do not need it on four, surely. I would go with

:31:30.:31:35.

that as well, I would be happy to see them trial it on quieter

:31:36.:31:39.

services, not at peak rush-hour. I went to the BBC debate in East

:31:40.:31:51.

Grinstead on Sunday. I watched the CEO of Govia and the RMT die. 'S the

:31:52.:32:05.

RMT guy. There is a lot of trust that has gone between those two.

:32:06.:32:10.

There needs to be a relationship, and they need to be able to trust

:32:11.:32:14.

each other to compromise, and at the moment they are poles apart. Let me

:32:15.:32:19.

read some more comment. Ethan says, keep the guard, who else will keep

:32:20.:32:23.

the drunks at bay when you are travelling with your young children?

:32:24.:32:28.

Michael says, it is unclear, what do both sides want? Every report you

:32:29.:32:32.

run gives a different view from both sides, and your reporters. Duncan

:32:33.:32:38.

Kennedy says there will be two people on the train, but why is that

:32:39.:32:42.

not acceptable? Why can't the second person work the doors, as is

:32:43.:32:45.

currently the situation? I am confused. Thank you. Good luck.

:32:46.:32:53.

Still to come, in the past hour, the nominations for this year's

:32:54.:32:56.

Andrew Garfield and Emily Blunt are up for Best Acting awards,

:32:57.:33:04.

as are the stars of La La Land, Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone.

:33:05.:33:10.

Nicole Kidman has just been nominated for a Best Supporting

:33:11.:33:13.

Actress Bafta for her role in the film Lion.

:33:14.:33:15.

We speak to her about her film and a range of other topics.

:33:16.:33:20.

She says she wants more children, even though she is 49.

:33:21.:33:25.

Here's Joanna in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:33:26.:33:29.

Jeremy Corbyn has good size of the gap between high income earners and

:33:30.:33:35.

the lowest paid, saying that a cap on earnings might produce a more

:33:36.:33:36.

eager let Aryan society. Speaking to BBC Radio

:33:37.:33:45.

4's Today programme, Mr Corbyn said he thought

:33:46.:33:48.

introducing the limit would be There should be a law

:33:49.:33:51.

to limit income? Forget a figure, a law

:33:52.:34:03.

to limit maximum earnings? I would like to see it, I think it

:34:04.:34:10.

would be a fairer thing to do. Commuters on Southern rail

:34:11.:34:14.

are facing the first of three days of strikes by train

:34:15.:34:17.

drivers this week. It's the latest industrial action

:34:18.:34:18.

in the dispute over plans for drivers to open and close doors,

:34:19.:34:21.

which has been going Drivers will walk out today,

:34:22.:34:24.

tomorrow and on Friday. Southern has urged the Aslef

:34:25.:34:27.

union to get back around A 15-year-old girl is being

:34:28.:34:36.

questioned by police in York after the death of a seven-year-old girl.

:34:37.:34:40.

The younger girl had life-threatening injuries is today

:34:41.:34:44.

afternoon. She was taken to hospital but died a short time later.

:34:45.:34:48.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News, more at 10am.

:34:49.:34:50.

It looks as though we'll be seeing more teams involved

:34:51.:34:55.

Fifa are expected to agree plans later to expand the finals

:34:56.:35:00.

from 32 teams to 48 teams, starting from the 2026 World Cup.

:35:01.:35:06.

There'd be 16 groups of three, and then a straight knockout stage.

:35:07.:35:10.

Claudio Ranieri has won Fifa's first Coach of the Year award.

:35:11.:35:14.

The Leicester City manager was in Zurich to pick up the title,

:35:15.:35:17.

recognition of his achievement in leading the 5,000-1 shots

:35:18.:35:20.

to the Premier League title last season.

:35:21.:35:24.

Championship side Leeds United came from behind to beat

:35:25.:35:27.

League Two Cambridge United to reach the fourth round of

:35:28.:35:29.

They'll go to either non-league Sutton United or AFC Wimbledon next.

:35:30.:35:35.

League Two Wycombe have a dream tie away

:35:36.:35:37.

And, Johanna Konta's preparations for the Australian Open

:35:38.:35:43.

The British number one has reached the third

:35:44.:35:47.

round of the Sydney International with a comfortable straight-sets win

:35:48.:35:50.

This morning, in an exclusive interview with this programme,

:35:51.:36:03.

Nicole Kidman tells this programme she'd like more kids

:36:04.:36:06.

at the age of 49, but her husband won't let her.

:36:07.:36:08.

She's just been nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Bafta

:36:09.:36:11.

for her role in the film Lion, which tells the true story

:36:12.:36:14.

of a young boy who gets lost in India and ends up being adopted

:36:15.:36:17.

The film also gets four other nominations.

:36:18.:36:20.

In a wide-ranging interview, Nicole Kidman also talks

:36:21.:36:23.

about ageism and US President-elect Donald Trump.

:36:24.:36:27.

But we start by talking about her film.

:36:28.:36:30.

It is a true story, which I think is always important to say,

:36:31.:36:57.

because it's about an Indian boy who gets lost in India

:36:58.:37:04.

from his mother and his brother, and then it's about an Australian

:37:05.:37:10.

family who adopts him and his journey, which is extraordinary,

:37:11.:37:16.

to then finding his biological mother back in India.

:37:17.:37:22.

How every day my real brother screams my name?

:37:23.:37:31.

I always thought that I could keep this family together.

:37:32.:37:34.

What if you do find home and they are not even there?

:37:35.:37:38.

It's deeply emotional, as people will tell you,

:37:39.:37:43.

as you know, but it's also really uplifting, because what he does

:37:44.:37:49.

and what he overcomes and what even Sue, the character I play,

:37:50.:37:54.

does, through sheer determination, all of the stories are about

:37:55.:37:58.

It shows you some of the truths of adoption.

:37:59.:38:23.

But it also shows you the strength of good parenting.

:38:24.:38:25.

And it shows you that when you really set your sights

:38:26.:38:28.

on something, you can sometimes overcome enormous odds

:38:29.:38:29.

And you spent time with the real Sue Brierley, didn't you?

:38:30.:38:33.

How important was that in playing her?

:38:34.:38:36.

I mean, I just said to Garth Davis, who is the director, I said,

:38:37.:38:40.

when he asked me to play the role and she wanted me to play her,

:38:41.:38:44.

I said, "Would she be open to me meeting her?"

:38:45.:38:46.

And he went, "No, she wants to meet you and share her story."

:38:47.:38:50.

First of all, I sent a friend of mine who'd

:38:51.:38:54.

interviewed her for two days, because I didn't want her to feel

:38:55.:38:57.

too strange with me asking a load of questions,

:38:58.:39:01.

And then she came to Sydney and sat in my apartment

:39:02.:39:07.

and we just kind of went, "Phew."

:39:08.:39:09.

She's deeply maternal, as you can see in the film,

:39:10.:39:14.

and I'm deeply maternal, too, so I think we come together.

:39:15.:39:23.

As I understand it, she wanted you to play her.

:39:24.:39:27.

Presumably because you have four children, two of whom are adopted?

:39:28.:39:31.

Yeah, and also I think being Australian, you know,

:39:32.:39:35.

She sort of knew me in a much deeper way than probably people

:39:36.:39:44.

And I think she just felt close to me, which is a very unusual

:39:45.:39:50.

thing, and it's unusual when you meet the person you're

:39:51.:39:53.

playing and you do have that sort of connection when you go,

:39:54.:39:57.

"Gosh, I want you to stay in my life for as long as you're willing."

:39:58.:40:03.

I think what's really clear from the film for anybody

:40:04.:40:06.

who didn't realise it already, is that an adoptive mother's love

:40:07.:40:10.

for a child and a birth mother's love for that same child

:40:11.:40:15.

And I think when it's shown in a film with such warmth

:40:16.:40:25.

and openness and compassion, I think that's a beautiful

:40:26.:40:30.

Probably because I'm so connected to it.

:40:31.:40:38.

And I think it's so succinctly put by the writer, Luke Davies,

:40:39.:40:43.

when she holds his face in the film when he's about to go

:40:44.:40:46.

And Sue, my character, says, "I just can't wait for her to see

:40:47.:40:52.

And she sends him on his way with that, which is the truth.

:40:53.:40:57.

She wanted his biological mother to know she'd kept him safe.

:40:58.:41:01.

That he was a beautiful human being, and here he is,

:41:02.:41:06.

You describe the film as they love letter to Bella and Connor,

:41:07.:41:16.

It's a love letter in terms of me as a mother to my children,

:41:17.:41:24.

but then to other mothers and children, too, because it's

:41:25.:41:28.

meant to connect on that level, because it's rare that we get

:41:29.:41:32.

The unconditional love, that no matter where you go,

:41:33.:41:38.

what you do, what your journey is, I'm always here, come,

:41:39.:41:42.

You have two younger ones and two older ones in their 20s.

:41:43.:41:47.

As young adults, how proud are you of the way

:41:48.:41:50.

I find it attached to success or ego or anything.

:41:51.:42:04.

Because I think the loveliest thing you can say to a child is,

:42:05.:42:13.

"I'm just happy you're in the world."

:42:14.:42:18.

"Because you're in the world, I'm happy."

:42:19.:42:20.

When I look at some of your other films,

:42:21.:42:27.

Dead Calm, Moulin Rouge, The Hours, and the countless

:42:28.:42:29.

awards you have won, you still say you don't think you've

:42:30.:42:34.

I mean the word great, you know, I'm talking

:42:35.:42:43.

about the performances that are up here.

:42:44.:42:47.

I think I've given really good performances.

:42:48.:42:50.

I still don't think I've given my best performance,

:42:51.:42:53.

But do you think you've got that in you, it still to come?

:42:54.:42:58.

I think I've got an enormous amount still to say and do and be.

:42:59.:43:02.

Which is a wonderful thing at my age, to still feel that.

:43:03.:43:05.

Because I think sometimes that wanes as you get older

:43:06.:43:09.

I read something recently that Isabel Huppert had said.

:43:10.:43:21.

Where she said, "I'm an actress in my fingernails, in my toes."

:43:22.:43:24.

Do you think Hollywood has got a problem with decent roles

:43:25.:43:31.

Female actors in their 40s and upwards?

:43:32.:43:39.

I mean, that's such a loaded question.

:43:40.:43:41.

Probably not, but now there is so much more available

:43:42.:43:47.

to us in terms of globally - working in TV, working in film.

:43:48.:43:54.

I think we are in a position where we can create our own shows.

:43:55.:43:58.

I just did that with Reese Witherspoon, where we have

:43:59.:44:00.

done a show called Big Little Lies and five of the roles

:44:01.:44:03.

are for women and three of them are for women over 40.

:44:04.:44:06.

I'm in a very fortunate position where I have really

:44:07.:44:10.

interesting directors offering me different things.

:44:11.:44:16.

But, you know, our job now as females in this industry

:44:17.:44:19.

is to push through and try to blur those boundaries.

:44:20.:44:21.

We've got incredible trailblazers in terms of Huppert and Meryl Streep

:44:22.:44:25.

and Sarandon and Jessica Lange and all of these women who...

:44:26.:44:29.

All of these women who, before us, have carved paths that

:44:30.:44:35.

are defying the norm, from what it was, say, 30 years ago.

:44:36.:44:39.

You said, "We need to create more opportunities, it is not

:44:40.:44:51.

But from what you've said, you haven't experienced

:44:52.:44:54.

I think I'm in the position now where it's kind

:44:55.:45:00.

And there are so many more roles available,

:45:01.:45:03.

partly because of the way in which the industry's

:45:04.:45:07.

We have HBO and Netflix and Amazon and all of these mediums that

:45:08.:45:13.

are now very different to just going to the theatre

:45:14.:45:16.

Later in the programme we'll bring you the second

:45:17.:45:23.

part of that interview, where she talks about her desire

:45:24.:45:25.

for more babies, aged 49, the secret to her successful

:45:26.:45:28.

marriage and why she thinks America should be getting

:45:29.:45:30.

And Lion, which has just received five Bafta nominations,

:45:31.:45:34.

Other Bafta nominees include British stars Andrew Garfield

:45:35.:45:42.

and Emily Blunt in the Best Actor category, but La La Land,

:45:43.:45:47.

a musical set in Los Angeles, leads the field with 11 nominations.

:45:48.:45:52.

Alien drama Arrival and dark thriller Nocturnal Animals get

:45:53.:45:54.

nine nominations each, and Ken Loach's British social

:45:55.:45:58.

drama I, Daniel Blake gets five nominations.

:45:59.:46:06.

Let's look at some of the nominations.

:46:07.:46:10.

# City of stars, are you shining just for me?

:46:11.:46:12.

# City of stars, there's so much that I can't see.

:46:13.:46:21.

# Who knows, is this the start of something wonderful?

:46:22.:46:30.

If you've been deemed fit for work, your only option

:46:31.:46:32.

I've never been anywhere near a computer.

:46:33.:46:42.

You need to run the mouse up the screen.

:46:43.:46:45.

I'm going to have to ask you to leave.

:46:46.:46:53.

I'm trying to explain to you a situation,

:46:54.:46:55.

Do you know what - you've created a scene.

:46:56.:47:02.

What was I supposed to do? Jesus Christ!

:47:03.:47:04.

Who's first in this queue? I am.

:47:05.:47:06.

Do you mind if this young lass signs on first?

:47:07.:47:08.

This isn't your concern. I want you to get out as well.

:47:09.:47:12.

Let's talk to Jane Lush, she's the new chair of Bafta.

:47:13.:47:18.

What it is about La La Land that has meant it's captured

:47:19.:47:21.

It is the members of BAFTA that vote, it is not judges, it is a vote

:47:22.:47:33.

by industry peers if you like, but I think it's a joyous film and these

:47:34.:47:37.

are quite grim times and we've got a lot of gritty films in the line up,

:47:38.:47:41.

but I Thailand land stands out because it's a musical. A proper

:47:42.:47:48.

musical where people sing and dance. The opening sequence famously on a

:47:49.:47:53.

motorway. Ryan Gosling learnt to play the piano. And pretty well. I

:47:54.:48:00.

gather pretty well. It is a love story and it's about Los Angeles and

:48:01.:48:05.

it is La La Land. So it is about the madness of Los Angeles. So it makes

:48:06.:48:09.

you smile. It is a very heart warming film. It is also a very

:48:10.:48:15.

beautiful film. It makes Los Angeles look gorgeous which obviously the

:48:16.:48:18.

voters over in America love that too, don't they? Yes. British stars

:48:19.:48:27.

Andrew Garfield, Emily Blunt and Hugh Grant have been nominated for

:48:28.:48:34.

Best Acting Award. It sounds parochial when we talk about British

:48:35.:48:38.

talent, but that's great news? Andrew Garfield, that's not a

:48:39.:48:45.

British film and in the supporting nominations, Aaron Taylor-Johnson

:48:46.:48:48.

playing an American, a very grim part. So, of course, it is great

:48:49.:48:54.

news. We're the British Academy, we want to celebrate British success.

:48:55.:48:59.

BAFTA promised better diversity. There are no nominations for Best

:49:00.:49:07.

Actor. Why? There are four nominations for nonwhite actors in

:49:08.:49:12.

Best Supporting Actor and actress. I'm talking about the leading actor

:49:13.:49:16.

categories? There is a lot of competition. Who knows what number

:49:17.:49:22.

six would have been, maybe Denzil Washington. There is a lot of

:49:23.:49:24.

competition, but we're making progress. Nobody would say the

:49:25.:49:29.

situation is perfect on diversity, it is not. But it is something

:49:30.:49:31.

that's important to BAFTA and important to me. Is it? Is that your

:49:32.:49:37.

explanation then - there is a lot of competition? There is and inevitably

:49:38.:49:42.

in any category there are going to be people, performers or crafts

:49:43.:49:46.

people or whoever it is, but there is a positive story. Moonlight which

:49:47.:49:52.

is a film about gay, young black men in Miami, that's, you know, that's

:49:53.:49:58.

quite quite a tough subject. That is up there, nominated for Best Film.

:49:59.:50:05.

As is, if you're talking, we're interested in diversity in the

:50:06.:50:11.

broadest sense, you have got Notes On Blindness. A film about a blind

:50:12.:50:17.

man. I think we should focus on the achievements and recognise that

:50:18.:50:22.

there is a way to go. Yes. Again, a look at the directors list. No

:50:23.:50:25.

female directors have been nominated. Is that because they're

:50:26.:50:29.

not producing enough films? There is no question there are not enough

:50:30.:50:36.

female directors. Kathryn Bigelow is the only female director to have won

:50:37.:50:40.

an Oscar. That's pretty shabby. What is the reason why there are not more

:50:41.:50:43.

female detectivors in the industry? But I think it will change. You have

:50:44.:50:48.

got to be optimistic and I think it will change because there is an

:50:49.:50:52.

awareness and until there is an awareness and people out there who

:50:53.:50:55.

are actively trying to change things, things will change and they

:50:56.:51:01.

are changing. A quick thought on the spat between Meryl and Donald Trump?

:51:02.:51:08.

Well, it's kept us all full of column inches. Meryl had a platform

:51:09.:51:11.

and she wanted to use it. That's her right. He has got a platform... He

:51:12.:51:23.

is clearly not shy. Fifa has approved the expansion of

:51:24.:51:36.

the World Cup from 32 to 48 teams in time for 2026 competition. The extra

:51:37.:51:40.

places could see African and Asian nations benefiting the most. But

:51:41.:51:43.

critics say whilst it will help make the World Cup larger and richer, the

:51:44.:51:47.

price is going to be lower quality football.

:51:48.:51:52.

Let's get reaction from former England captain, Terry Butcher.

:51:53.:51:59.

Paul Goodwin is the co-founder of the Scottish football

:52:00.:52:01.

Supporters Association - a bigger World Cup could mean it'll

:52:02.:52:03.

Garford Beck is the manager of England Fans FC.

:52:04.:52:07.

Gina West, the founder of Women's Soccer United.

:52:08.:52:08.

Welcome all of you. Terry Butcher, you were sceptical about this. Now

:52:09.:52:16.

it is happening, what do you say? Well, I think what they've done Fifa

:52:17.:52:24.

s have a look at Uefa and had a look at the European Championships when

:52:25.:52:29.

every became a must win game. What they have had in the past in World

:52:30.:52:33.

Cups they have had groups of four and in the last couple of games,

:52:34.:52:39.

look at England's game, England were out of the World Cup. So they are

:52:40.:52:42.

trying to avoid that, you think and trying to make it more expansive and

:52:43.:52:45.

trying to get more teams in, but my worry is if they go to groups of

:52:46.:52:50.

three, I played in 1982 and there was a group of three and it was

:52:51.:52:55.

really weird and it may introduce more penalty shoot-outs in the

:52:56.:52:59.

qualifying shainltion rather than the knock-out -- stages rather than

:53:00.:53:08.

the knock-out stages. The rounds that would have ensured that other

:53:09.:53:12.

countries progressed. So that might be all right? Well, it is good TV

:53:13.:53:19.

and not good for the countries and the players. I find it bizarre that

:53:20.:53:26.

a country will qualify and play two matches and pack their bags and go

:53:27.:53:30.

home. It is a great event and what they are trying to do is make it

:53:31.:53:33.

more interesting, but there are certain ways where you can do that

:53:34.:53:37.

and have groups of four and try and make sure that countries go there

:53:38.:53:40.

and have at least three matches. Paul, as a Scotland supporter, tell

:53:41.:53:46.

Terry Butcher what you think about an expanded World Cup. I think it is

:53:47.:53:49.

good for Scotland because there is more places and there is more chance

:53:50.:53:53.

that we might qualify, but as Terry knows, there is a lot more other

:53:54.:53:57.

things that need to happen in Scotland before we will qualify. I

:53:58.:54:01.

mean, I think the big picture this is all about Fifa getting more money

:54:02.:54:05.

into the system. Where that money goes and how it is attributed to the

:54:06.:54:09.

smaller nations would be the interest that we would have in it,

:54:10.:54:13.

but undoubtedly, it is a bigger political game here that's going on

:54:14.:54:18.

here at Fifa. Gina the Women's World Cup expanded from 16 to 24 teams.

:54:19.:54:22.

What do you think about expanding the men's World Cup to 48? I can see

:54:23.:54:31.

both sides of the argument. I think that it is a positive thing if there

:54:32.:54:36.

is an incentive to get more people involved in the World Cup, to

:54:37.:54:43.

develop the game worldwide. That's a positive. I am concerned about how

:54:44.:54:47.

the format will work. Whether there will be a lot of one-sided fixtures

:54:48.:54:56.

which happens in the women's game when you get different standards

:54:57.:55:00.

qualifying. I mean, there will be, sorry to bring Terry back in, there

:55:01.:55:04.

will be more one-sided fixtures, won't there? Yeah, there will be and

:55:05.:55:08.

having played before in the format with three teams especially, it

:55:09.:55:12.

depends what your sequence of games are. You could sit out the last game

:55:13.:55:16.

and watch your fate be decided by other teams. It is quite bizarre in

:55:17.:55:20.

many aspects. When you look at the amount of teams that Europe has in

:55:21.:55:23.

the World Cup, it is 13 at the moment, they try and expand it to

:55:24.:55:26.

16, it doesn't mean that Scotland will find it easier to qualify.

:55:27.:55:33.

Sorry, back to Gina... For me, it is mainly about the money side. That's

:55:34.:55:38.

all I can really point it down to. Sorry Gina, carry on. No, I was

:55:39.:55:43.

going to say, if that's the motive and it isn't financially motivated

:55:44.:55:48.

then obviously that's better. I mean, I've got the women's

:55:49.:55:53.

prospective. Our funding is absolutely on a different level. I

:55:54.:55:58.

think, actually, increasing the team would be more beneficial to the

:55:59.:56:01.

women's game at the moment rather than the machine's game. Like you

:56:02.:56:05.

said we've only just increased to 24 from 16 so we're still below what

:56:06.:56:10.

the standard men's was and the women's team would benefit more from

:56:11.:56:15.

the global stage. They get moreks posure. It is so hard for women's

:56:16.:56:20.

football. So the World Cup is important. So the more teams that

:56:21.:56:27.

can get involved in it. Let me bring in an England supporter. How would a

:56:28.:56:31.

bigger World Cup affect England's chances of qualifying? It won't

:56:32.:56:37.

affect it because the qualification process normally a piece of cake. It

:56:38.:56:40.

is normally a walk in the park, but desite what has been said and our

:56:41.:56:43.

friend from Scotland, they would welcome this because it gives them a

:56:44.:56:46.

good chance of qualifying, but there is a lot of things that need to

:56:47.:56:49.

change in Scottish football before they can even think about

:56:50.:56:53.

qualification. But as Terry said, it is about money, but it is all about

:56:54.:56:57.

money and politics. This is all about Fifa swelling their coffers

:56:58.:57:02.

and it is about Infantino shoring up his vote. He is the new president.

:57:03.:57:08.

It is about him shoring up his votes in Africa and Asia for the next time

:57:09.:57:12.

he stands for election. From a fans point of view, how would an expanded

:57:13.:57:16.

World Cup, what would it be like for you? World Cups are great to attend.

:57:17.:57:21.

They're fantastic, but they are hard work as well for supporters, but

:57:22.:57:25.

they're saying they're not going to expand the time. It will be done

:57:26.:57:30.

within the six-week period, but an expanded World Cup, it will be

:57:31.:57:34.

bloated and with that you lose the prestige and the sense of occasion.

:57:35.:57:39.

I think that the quality of football will suffer. Right. For sure. We

:57:40.:57:47.

will see. It is 2026. We might not be around by then! Hopefully

:57:48.:57:52.

Scotland will qualify. By then, it is 20 years. We're lot laughing at

:57:53.:57:57.

the expanse of Scottish football, absolutely not. Thank you for coming

:57:58.:57:59.

on the programme. Next, we're going to show you some

:58:00.:58:10.

absolutely fascinating footage which shows chimpanzees

:58:11.:58:13.

in the Ivory Coast effectively entering the stone age -

:58:14.:58:14.

by making unique tools to help Now the weather. Here is Carol, it

:58:15.:58:17.

is getting colder. It is getting colder, Victoria is

:58:18.:58:33.

right. Some of us will see some snow. Even at lower levels, but the

:58:34.:58:37.

snow is not going to be everywhere. So let's take a look first of all at

:58:38.:58:41.

today's weather forecast. What we have is a bright start in the east

:58:42.:58:45.

with sunshine. Variable amounts of cloud. Some showers, but a weather

:58:46.:58:50.

front coming in from the west will introduce rain. The rain is not

:58:51.:58:54.

particularly heavy and as the whole system drifts towards the east, if

:58:55.:58:58.

anything, the rain will become patchier and more drizzly. By the

:58:59.:59:01.

afternoon it will well and truly have cleared Northern Ireland.

:59:02.:59:03.

Bright skies and variable amounts of cloud and still a few showers across

:59:04.:59:07.

Western Scotland, but a lot of dry weather across Scotland, although in

:59:08.:59:10.

the Northern Isles, under the influence of the weather front,

:59:11.:59:13.

there will be patchy rain. We're looking at some of that rain across

:59:14.:59:16.

north-west England, getting into the Pennines, the cloud building ahead

:59:17.:59:20.

of it, but as we come into Lincolnshire, much of East Anglia,

:59:21.:59:23.

down into the South East, although yes, there will be cloud around,

:59:24.:59:26.

equally some of us will see sunshine. Drifting further westwards

:59:27.:59:31.

under the influence of the weather front once again, we're back into

:59:32.:59:35.

the cloud and some spots of rain and into Wales, very similar story.

:59:36.:59:38.

Again, a fair amount of cloud at times with the remnants of that

:59:39.:59:41.

weather front. Now, through the course of the evening and overnight,

:59:42.:59:44.

that clears altogether. We will see snow coming in on the mountains and

:59:45.:59:48.

hills of Scotland. But the wind will be a notable feature of the weather.

:59:49.:59:54.

Anywhere from North Wales, the North Midlands and the Wash, severe across

:59:55.:59:58.

the far north of Scotland, but across the southern uplands and the

:59:59.:00:03.

Pennines, we could have gusts up to 70mph. That could affect the higher

:00:04.:00:09.

routes on the M62. Not just tonight, but tomorrow. If you're travelling

:00:10.:00:13.

bear that in mind. Now, tomorrow, another very windy day. The same

:00:14.:00:19.

areas looking at gusty conditions. It will be atrocious on the

:00:20.:00:22.

mountains of Scotland because we will be seeing snow falling, but at

:00:23.:00:35.

lower levels we could wintriness. It will feel cold if you're exposed to

:00:36.:00:39.

the wind. Thursday, as you can tell from the squeeze in the isobars

:00:40.:00:42.

further north, it will be a windy day. We've got this next system

:00:43.:00:46.

coming in from the south-west. This really has been giving us a headache

:00:47.:00:51.

as to how far north it does travel and that's a salient point of the

:00:52.:00:55.

forecast because as it engages with the cold air, some of it will fall

:00:56.:00:59.

as sleet or snow. At the moment, we think it's South Wales and parts of

:01:00.:01:02.

Southern England and it is just on the leading edge that we will see

:01:03.:01:05.

some of that sleet and snow. North of that, a lot of dry weather, but

:01:06.:01:09.

snow showers at low levels across parts of Scotland and it will feel

:01:10.:01:11.

cold. This morning, train delays

:01:12.:01:16.

and cancellations again. There was an 11-year-old boy trying

:01:17.:01:35.

to get to school, he could not get on. Everybody is out for themselves,

:01:36.:01:41.

nobody wants to lose their job, you can hear the desperation in people's

:01:42.:01:45.

voice. It is, please let me get on the train.

:01:46.:01:49.

Barack Obama makes a speech today to mark the end of his presidency. What

:01:50.:01:56.

will his legacy be? Slowdown! My goodness! I want to be

:01:57.:02:10.

like you! Come on! What is the secret to still be dancing at 106?

:02:11.:02:16.

We will look back at his eight years in the White House.

:02:17.:02:18.

Also today, in an exclusive interview Nicole Kidman tells us why

:02:19.:02:23.

she wants more children at the age of 49, but her husband

:02:24.:02:24.

When people talk about regrets, do I have regrets?

:02:25.:02:28.

I would have liked two or three more.

:02:29.:02:39.

Here's Joanna in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:02:40.:02:59.

Commuters on Southern rail are facing the first of three

:03:00.:03:33.

days of strikes by train drivers this week.

:03:34.:03:36.

It's the latest industrial action in the dispute over plans

:03:37.:03:38.

for drivers to open and close doors, which has been going

:03:39.:03:40.

Drivers will walk out today, tomorrow and on Friday.

:03:41.:03:44.

Southern has urged the Aslef union to get back around

:03:45.:03:46.

Chris Grayling says the strike is not right and not fair.

:03:47.:03:54.

A 15-year-old girl is being questioned by police

:03:55.:03:56.

in York after the death of a seven-year-old girl.

:03:57.:04:00.

The younger girl was found with life-threatening injuries

:04:01.:04:00.

in the Woodthorpe area of the city yesterday afternoon.

:04:01.:04:03.

She was taken to hospital but died a short time later.

:04:04.:04:05.

Boris Johnson, who's visiting Washington,

:04:06.:04:06.

says he's confident Britain will be first in line for a trade deal

:04:07.:04:10.

The Foreign Secretary has been meeting senior

:04:11.:04:14.

Republican politicians, who've promised to make a US-UK

:04:15.:04:17.

President Obama warned in April that the UK would be at the back

:04:18.:04:22.

The US owners of the messaging app Snapchat are to set up

:04:23.:04:29.

a new international headquarters in the UK.

:04:30.:04:31.

The company currently has 75 staff at its office in London

:04:32.:04:34.

It says the UK's strong creative industries made it "a great place

:04:35.:04:39.

The move is seen as positive for the technology sector,

:04:40.:04:44.

as other companies such as Facebook and Google have based

:04:45.:04:47.

themselves in Ireland, which offers lower tax breaks.

:04:48.:05:00.

La La Land has had 11 nominators -- nominations for afters. British

:05:01.:05:10.

actors Andrew Garfield, Emily Bunte and Hugh Grant are also nominated,

:05:11.:05:17.

as is the British state welfare drama I Daniel Blake.

:05:18.:05:19.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News.

:05:20.:05:21.

In the past quarter of an hour, Fifa has unanimously voted

:05:22.:05:27.

to increase the number of teams in the World Cup, from 32 to 48,

:05:28.:05:31.

There'll be 16 groups of three teams, and the number of tournament

:05:32.:05:37.

But the eventual winners will still play only seven games.

:05:38.:05:43.

We can talk now to our Sports News Correspondent Alex Capstick,

:05:44.:05:46.

who's live at Fifa headquarters in Zurich, where

:05:47.:05:48.

Alex, we've been expecting this decision, despite concerns about it

:05:49.:05:53.

diluting the quality of the tournament, so what's

:05:54.:05:56.

It was always favoured to go through. They were offered five

:05:57.:06:11.

different options, including the existing structure, but the

:06:12.:06:13.

favourite one was always this structure, which you mentioned,

:06:14.:06:18.

which will involve 16 groups of preteens, then a knockout stage of

:06:19.:06:22.

32. The President knew he had lots of support throughout the world,

:06:23.:06:29.

continents like Africa, Asia, the Americans, they all wanted greater

:06:30.:06:32.

representation. They knew they could not get it in the existing system,

:06:33.:06:37.

so they had to go for a bigger World Cup, and 48 seemed to work. It

:06:38.:06:41.

involves the same number of matches for the finalists as in the 32 team

:06:42.:06:49.

format, and the same duration, around 32 days. That alleviate fears

:06:50.:06:54.

from the big clubs in Europe that it would place extra demands on the

:06:55.:06:58.

players. It means a lot more money for Fifa, they will expect to earn

:06:59.:07:03.

an extra $1 billion, 800 million pounds, in the tournament, with

:07:04.:07:12.

profits around 4.2 billion. More money, and it'll make the president

:07:13.:07:15.

very popular across the political landscape in football. Not everybody

:07:16.:07:23.

has look on this so favourably, especially Germany and England, they

:07:24.:07:30.

have been against this. A lot of the Europeans have objected to an

:07:31.:07:35.

increase, they said the existing structure of 32 worked perfectly

:07:36.:07:39.

well, it is a very good format. It has been in place since 1998, so why

:07:40.:07:44.

bother changing something that works? Why fiddle with it? They are

:07:45.:07:51.

concerned about a possible violation of the tournament. 16 extra teams,

:07:52.:07:56.

but some of the games will be meaningless, they are also worried

:07:57.:08:00.

about the third game in the group stage, where teams could manufacture

:08:01.:08:04.

a result, which would be mutually beneficial. One of the ideas on the

:08:05.:08:08.

table to counter that is to have a penalty shoot out when such matches

:08:09.:08:14.

in the group stage are drawn, which would get rid of that potential

:08:15.:08:22.

problem. I am back at 10:30am.

:08:23.:08:25.

It's a new year, is it a new Jeremy Corbyn?

:08:26.:08:27.

The Labour leader, who voted to remain in the EU,

:08:28.:08:30.

now says the UK can be better off when Britain leaves,

:08:31.:08:33.

but that continued full access to the single market is key.

:08:34.:08:37.

He would like a cap placed on the highest earners to reduce

:08:38.:08:39.

inequality. We have the worst levels of income

:08:40.:08:42.

disparity of most of the OECD If we want to live in a more

:08:43.:08:45.

egalitarian society and fund our public services,

:08:46.:08:55.

we cannot go on creating worse There should be a law

:08:56.:08:59.

to limit income? Forget a figure, a law

:09:00.:09:04.

to limit maximum earnings? I would like to see it, I think it

:09:05.:09:17.

would be a fairer thing to do. We cannot set ourselves up

:09:18.:09:24.

as being a grossly-unequal, bargain-basement economy

:09:25.:09:28.

on the shores of Europe. We have to be something

:09:29.:09:31.

that is more egalitarian, gives real opportunities

:09:32.:09:35.

to everybody, and properly Look at the crisis in

:09:36.:09:37.

the NHS as an example. He later clarified that the pay cap

:09:38.:09:45.

would be "somewhat higher" than the ?138,000 he earns as an MP

:09:46.:09:49.

and Leader of the Opposition. The Labour leader who voted

:09:50.:09:55.

to remain in the EU, also says the UK can be better off

:09:56.:09:57.

when Britain leaves but that continued full access to the single

:09:58.:10:00.

market is key So how will Mr Corbyn's ideas go down

:10:01.:10:04.

with Labour supporters and MPs? We can speak now to Emma Reynolds,

:10:05.:10:07.

a Labour MP who published her own proposals on how the party should

:10:08.:10:11.

approach immigration I will talk to you about the pay

:10:12.:10:25.

cap, because that was not trailed in advance, it came out of nowhere, it

:10:26.:10:30.

took a few people by surprise. I have not seen the details. There are

:10:31.:10:35.

no details. He is right to highlight the issue. The gap between the

:10:36.:10:39.

lowest earners and highest earners is too wide. He is right to say that

:10:40.:10:44.

we should not let the Conservatives and the right use Brexit is a chance

:10:45.:10:49.

to turn Britain into a bargain basement economy on the shores of

:10:50.:10:54.

Europe. We need to look at how best to do that. One of the proposals we

:10:55.:10:57.

put forward and that the Conservatives took on temporarily

:10:58.:11:03.

lost to put workers on board. The Prime Minister promised it but then

:11:04.:11:06.

withdrew it. That is one way to ensure we have greater equality in

:11:07.:11:11.

income. But we need to look at what people own, not just what they earn.

:11:12.:11:16.

There is still a long way to go. Would you support your leader's

:11:17.:11:20.

suggestion that legislation should be introduced for a maximum limit of

:11:21.:11:24.

what you can earn, and after that it either goes to the Treasury or

:11:25.:11:29.

whatever? I am not sure, I would like to see the details. I think

:11:30.:11:33.

there are other ways you can go about tackling income inequality,

:11:34.:11:36.

and he is right to highlight the issue. But not a maximum cap? Lets

:11:37.:11:43.

see the detail, but I instinctively don't think it is the best way to

:11:44.:11:50.

go. In terms of Labour's position now on immigration after the vote to

:11:51.:11:57.

leave the EU, do you feel it is any clearer? Jeremy Corbyn has insisted

:11:58.:12:02.

he is not wedded to the free movement of people. He would not put

:12:03.:12:07.

a figure on what the ideal number of immigrants was, but he still wants

:12:08.:12:11.

full access to the single market. How do you reconcile the two? I

:12:12.:12:16.

welcome what he has said on free movement. There has to be change.

:12:17.:12:21.

Kia Starmer has also said that in a speech before Christmas, that the

:12:22.:12:26.

status quo is not an option. I would like to see more detail a game, we

:12:27.:12:30.

will see the speech later today, about what managed migration really

:12:31.:12:36.

means, what Jeremy is talking about. I think that just tackling

:12:37.:12:43.

exportation is not go far enough. Stephen Kinnock and I proposed a two

:12:44.:12:48.

tier system, whereby you can buy preference for EU workers over

:12:49.:12:51.

non-EU workers but you do restrict the numbers in low skilled and

:12:52.:12:57.

semiskilled repressions. I do think people want to see a fairer system

:12:58.:13:00.

and they want to sue the Government have control over who comes in to

:13:01.:13:06.

the country to work. If you did your proposal, how much would it bring

:13:07.:13:10.

net immigration down by? Last year it was pre-30,000. I agree with

:13:11.:13:16.

Jeremy, the Conservatives made a big mess on this, because by promising

:13:17.:13:19.

to reduce the numbers... From your proposals, which you have worked on

:13:20.:13:26.

family... It depends on the economy. The Tories have been wrong in the

:13:27.:13:30.

last six years to try to say that they are going to bring immigration

:13:31.:13:34.

down to the tens of thousands of. You are not going to fall into that

:13:35.:13:38.

trap of putting a number on it. Our party leader is right to say we

:13:39.:13:42.

should not do that. Under your proposals, net immigration could go

:13:43.:13:44.

I would like to see the numbers come down, but I am not going to be...

:13:45.:13:52.

Under your proposals, theoretically net immigration could go up, if you

:13:53.:13:57.

say it is dependent on the economy. You have quotas. The emphasis is

:13:58.:14:03.

that employers must train local people and give local young people

:14:04.:14:09.

opportunities in these low skilled and semiskilled professions, and

:14:10.:14:15.

there would be considered proposals in consultation with business and

:14:16.:14:19.

trade unions, but there would be restrictions are numbers in certain

:14:20.:14:24.

professions of. You know from Angela Merkel and other European leaders

:14:25.:14:27.

that they say it is impossible for Britain to have full access to the

:14:28.:14:31.

single market and to have some kind of control over net migration.

:14:32.:14:38.

Jeremy Corbyn knows that. That is their starting point, but what we

:14:39.:14:42.

said at the weekend was our position is different from the Conservatives'

:14:43.:14:45.

and the Prime Minister. We think we should keep an element of preference

:14:46.:14:50.

for EU workers over non-EU workers, and we are not the only country that

:14:51.:14:53.

is having a conversation about immigration. Jeremy Corbyn's

:14:54.:14:58.

position is not that different from some Conservatives, they want full

:14:59.:15:01.

access to the single market and to patrol net migration. We want the

:15:02.:15:06.

best possible access. You now sound like the Prime Minister. She has put

:15:07.:15:11.

immigration above the economy, I think there has to be a balance

:15:12.:15:16.

between the two. That me ask you about the reboot for Jeremy Corbyn.

:15:17.:15:20.

Is it going to help him reach out to the wider electorate? I had so. He

:15:21.:15:26.

said this morning that it is not a reboot as such. Whenever a party

:15:27.:15:30.

leader does a speech in the New Year, people try to brand it as

:15:31.:15:35.

something like a reboot or a relaunch. We do need to talk to

:15:36.:15:38.

people who have turned away from Labour. That is critical.

:15:39.:15:44.

Is that not happening yet? If we are just going to talk to people who are

:15:45.:15:51.

going to vote Labour, that will not change anything. We need to reach

:15:52.:15:54.

out to the people who lost confidence in the last election and

:15:55.:15:57.

the one before that and we need it start reaching ot and if we don't,

:15:58.:16:01.

we're not going to do very well. What sort of success are you looking

:16:02.:16:05.

for from Jeremy Corbyn in the next cull of years? How will you measure

:16:06.:16:09.

whether he's doing a good job or not? Well, today is a start. I think

:16:10.:16:13.

it is right that our party talks about immigration. I think for too

:16:14.:16:17.

long, under various leaders actually, we have been seen as a

:16:18.:16:20.

party that doesn't want to talks about what is a very difficult and

:16:21.:16:25.

sensitive issue and we need to take a balanced approach to it based on

:16:26.:16:30.

our values, but Jeremy is right to talk about Brexit and about

:16:31.:16:33.

immigration today and that's a good start. Household incomes, typical

:16:34.:16:40.

household incomes rose ?600 to ?26300 after tax between 2015 and

:16:41.:16:46.

2016. Figures just in from the Office for National Statistics. Any

:16:47.:16:51.

thought on that? Gone up a little bit. I would like to see people

:16:52.:16:54.

everywhere in the country do better than they're doing. I would like to

:16:55.:16:58.

see a break in the sense that somehow the next generation won't do

:16:59.:17:02.

better than this generation and I think it is not just about earnings,

:17:03.:17:05.

I think it is about housing. There is a huge housing crisis in the

:17:06.:17:08.

country and there are people who are sitting on assets worth billions of

:17:09.:17:11.

pounds and people who can't get on the housing lad are and that can't

:17:12.:17:14.

be right. There are young people here in London for example who are

:17:15.:17:17.

really, really struggling to get on the housing ladderment they have to

:17:18.:17:20.

move out of London to own their own home, to have the security of home

:17:21.:17:25.

ownership. I don't think that's right. We have got to look more

:17:26.:17:30.

broadly not just at income, but tax rates on capital and the

:17:31.:17:33.

Conservatives have reduced inheritance tax and I think they

:17:34.:17:37.

were wrong to do that and you know, the Labour Party doesn't need to

:17:38.:17:40.

just look at the income disparity because there are many people,

:17:41.:17:44.

entrepreneurs who earn a lot of money, but they have created a lot

:17:45.:17:48.

of jobs so I think we need to not have a tax on aspiration, but we

:17:49.:17:53.

need to look at the capital that people are sitting on as well. A

:17:54.:17:56.

couple of comments from people watching. Great idea coming from

:17:57.:18:01.

Jeremy Corbyn on maximum salaries. No public sector worker should be

:18:02.:18:03.

earning some of the incredible amounts this they do. The private

:18:04.:18:08.

sector incomes are much bigger than some of the public sector incomes.

:18:09.:18:12.

There are Chief Executives of certain public sector bodies that

:18:13.:18:15.

are on hundreds of thousands of pounds which this viewer is not

:18:16.:18:20.

into. Paul e-mails, "Yet another Corbyn classic. Companies must offer

:18:21.:18:28.

the global rate otherwise they will get inferior candidates. Such a move

:18:29.:18:30.

restricts candidates." In the second part of our chat

:18:31.:18:33.

with Nicole Kidman, she tells me the secret to her long happy

:18:34.:18:37.

marriage and why she thinks we Can you believe it's a year

:18:38.:18:40.

since David Bowie died? He had cancer and died two days

:18:41.:18:44.

after his 69th birthday, having kept his illness hidden

:18:45.:18:47.

from everyone except his family He'd only just released his 25th

:18:48.:18:49.

album, Blackstar, which came to be seen as his "parting gift" to fans,

:18:50.:18:54.

reflecting as it did on themes Tribute events are due to take

:18:55.:18:57.

place around the world. His death left a hole in many

:18:58.:19:03.

people's lives including our next I was learning about how to play

:19:04.:19:24.

rhythm 'n' blues and learning how to write and finding out everything

:19:25.:19:28.

that I read and any film that I saw, in a theatre, everything went into

:19:29.:19:33.

mid-mind as being an influence. # Star man waiting in the sky. High

:19:34.:19:39.

pressure he told us not to blow it. # Because it is all worthwhile. #

:19:40.:19:49.

# Let's dance, put on your red shoes and dance the blues. #

:19:50.:20:00.

I felt really comfortable going on stage as somebody else and it seemed

:20:01.:20:06.

a rational decision to keep on doing that.

:20:07.:20:12.

So I got quite besotted with the idea of just creating character

:20:13.:20:13.

after character. # Put on your red shoes and dance

:20:14.:20:43.

the blues.# # And Ziggy played

:20:44.:20:46.

guitar.# So, George, you knew David

:20:47.:20:50.

since you were kids? What are you thinking? I still can't

:20:51.:21:05.

really get used to it. It is a tough one because he was a big part of my

:21:06.:21:11.

life. You met at age nine... Yes, enrolling for the Cubs. OK. Kyoto

:21:12.:21:16.

Treaties what nine-year-old David Bowie was like? -- can you tell us

:21:17.:21:22.

what nine-year-old David Bowie was like? He was enthusiastic. The first

:21:23.:21:34.

thing we started talking about was music and the music that was of the

:21:35.:21:46.

time in 1956, you know, there was everything. Music was starting to

:21:47.:21:52.

change drastically. We were in a good place. We wanted to get a group

:21:53.:21:57.

together straightaway even though we were only nine years old! But we

:21:58.:22:04.

did, while we were in the Cubs we did go around the cap fire singing a

:22:05.:22:09.

few songs. Probably David's first public performance. Maybe. Maybe.

:22:10.:22:14.

You cemented that friendship, I think, through your teenage years

:22:15.:22:18.

and obviously he's grog up and then he starts to become incredibly

:22:19.:22:27.

famous. Yeah. We were at the same secondary school together and while

:22:28.:22:33.

I was at school, I was in a band and David, it was called the Conrads and

:22:34.:22:41.

I told the guys that I had a friend who was learning to play the sax. I

:22:42.:22:51.

managed to get him to join the band. That was the first hint. He did say

:22:52.:22:56.

to me, you know, many times that this is what I want to do, you know,

:22:57.:23:02.

this is it. I had my art because that's really what I wanted to do

:23:03.:23:09.

was to be an artist in some way or another, but we did, we were in

:23:10.:23:19.

bands together. David's first single was with the King Bees, we didn't

:23:20.:23:25.

make any success out of it, but I could see then that David was

:23:26.:23:33.

striving for star Dom was starting to, you know, become to fruition.

:23:34.:23:37.

Yes. He invited you on tour and actually, there were times when he

:23:38.:23:40.

just wanted you to stay on the whole tour and you thought, "I can't get

:23:41.:23:44.

away with this. It looks like I'm doing nothing." You were just

:23:45.:23:48.

married. That was the other complication. I got married in 1971

:23:49.:23:56.

and David was at the wedding and the change from then to 1972 was

:23:57.:24:02.

amazing. In one short year, one short time, you know, in that year

:24:03.:24:10.

he changed from sort of a long hair hippie-type to this new persona he

:24:11.:24:15.

found as Ziggy Stardust and he wanted me to go on the tour with him

:24:16.:24:21.

to America which my wife and I, you couldn't turn that down. It was only

:24:22.:24:25.

going to be for a couple weeks and he wanted me to do an album cover

:24:26.:24:31.

for him, the man who travelled the world. We went on the QE2 first

:24:32.:24:42.

class... Which he paid for? I was ready to do what - he wanted to take

:24:43.:24:47.

me with him and that was great. Did you have a lot of laughs with him?

:24:48.:24:54.

Well, I mean, he was hilarious. Absolutely hilarious, just on the

:24:55.:25:00.

QE2, he went to dinner the first night in one of his stage outfits.

:25:01.:25:06.

It was a big white Ziggy outfit with endlets on it and everything. --

:25:07.:25:18.

endlilets and old ladies had their mouths open! He said I don't like

:25:19.:25:26.

going down there. I said, "Why not?" He said, "Everybody is staring at

:25:27.:25:31.

me." I said when you're wearing clothes like that. He stayed in bed

:25:32.:25:35.

for the five-day-trip. He stayed in his room a lot. While we were there

:25:36.:25:40.

with him, he put on a show for us. My wife and I would sit there just

:25:41.:25:44.

being entertained. Are you thinking at this point, oh my god, David

:25:45.:25:50.

Bowie is entertaining or are you thinking David, old mate since the

:25:51.:25:55.

age of nine when we met at Cubs stop messing about? I tell you something,

:25:56.:25:59.

when David got into a character, you couldn't take your eyes off him, he

:26:00.:26:05.

was in that zone and that was fine. Afterwards, you would say, "Blimey,

:26:06.:26:12.

that was good, Dave." With me and him it was always a down-to-earth

:26:13.:26:16.

relationship. He wanted me as a companion really as well. And he

:26:17.:26:22.

asked me after a couple of weeks, I took my own money with him and I had

:26:23.:26:27.

spent it all. I would say we're going back now and I said well, I

:26:28.:26:30.

have got things to do, I've got stuff. , "Why don't you come on the

:26:31.:26:38.

rest of the tour?" "What three months all around America?" "Yes.

:26:39.:26:43.

Yths I did do some work for him while I was there. I didn't want to

:26:44.:26:48.

be hanging on all the time. No. I did that. He said, "Do you want to

:26:49.:26:54.

come to Japan with us?" I thought, "Oh no, this is ridiculous." What

:26:55.:26:59.

did your new wife say? She was Danish and it was all a bit strange,

:27:00.:27:04.

well it would be strange for anyone being on a tour like that because it

:27:05.:27:10.

was like a craze crisis circus as you can imagine, but I turned it

:27:11.:27:17.

down. I said no. I had a career I wanted to pursue and he understood

:27:18.:27:22.

that, but I often think back, I wonder, if I was such a good friend

:27:23.:27:27.

to him as he was to me, you know? Do you? Sometimes. Thank you very much,

:27:28.:27:35.

George. It's all right. Thank you for sharing your memories. You're

:27:36.:27:40.

welcome. Don't get emotional, but I understand why. Thank you very much

:27:41.:27:43.

for coming on the programme. Thank you.

:27:44.:27:49.

Stay there a second. Thank you. News about the Post Office. I will

:27:50.:27:57.

have to go into - yes. The Post Office is to close and franchise a

:27:58.:28:02.

further 37 Crown Offices and that means 300 people will lose their

:28:03.:28:08.

jobs and 127 financial specialist roles will also go. That's in from

:28:09.:28:12.

the Communication Workers Union. And also this news just in, this is from

:28:13.:28:17.

the police in Cumbria, north council buryia university Hospitals trust

:28:18.:28:21.

called in the police after a small number of saline bags appear to have

:28:22.:28:25.

been tampered. This was discovered on 4th January by a member of staff

:28:26.:28:29.

who alerted senior clinicians straightaway. The trust implemented

:28:30.:28:33.

its serious incident procedures and there is no indication that any

:28:34.:28:37.

patients have been adversely affected, but the situation is being

:28:38.:28:41.

monitored and the trust, as I said, have now called in Cumbria Police,

:28:42.:28:46.

after a small number of saline bags appear to have been tampered with.

:28:47.:28:52.

A 15-year-old girl has been arrested after the death

:28:53.:28:54.

Fill us in Phil. Well, Victoria, beyond these police vans, the

:28:55.:29:05.

scientific support vans lies a white forensics tent and that's where the

:29:06.:29:08.

focus of this investigation is centring this morning. As you

:29:09.:29:12.

mentioned a seven-year-old girl died in this area of York at around

:29:13.:29:18.

4.30pm to 5pm last night. A 15-year-old girl has been arrested.

:29:19.:29:23.

Now we have been talking to local people who say there was intense

:29:24.:29:27.

police activity last night at 4.30pm to 5pm when this incident happened.

:29:28.:29:34.

Detectives have been making door-to-door inquiries as they try

:29:35.:29:36.

to build up a picture of what happened. We know the seven-year-old

:29:37.:29:41.

was taken to York Hospital, but died a short time later. Now, North

:29:42.:29:45.

Yorkshire Police are not saying too much at the moment, but they did

:29:46.:29:51.

tweet last night, "A difficult late shift for all York staff with the

:29:52.:29:55.

tragic death of a seven-year-old. Thoughts go out to all the family."

:29:56.:29:59.

Beyond the white tent which you can perhaps see is an area of open land,

:30:00.:30:09.

it is often used by dog walkers and people who indulge in recreation.

:30:10.:30:14.

This is where the incident happened. The police are trying to build up a

:30:15.:30:18.

picture to establish the circumstances of this event last

:30:19.:30:19.

night. Victoria. Thank you. Snapchat is moving its international

:30:20.:30:24.

headquarters to the UK. Snapchat is one of the

:30:25.:30:33.

fastest-growing of the social media platforms. In America, Snapchat

:30:34.:30:41.

launched quite a long time ago, but it is now booming, over 150 million

:30:42.:30:47.

people worldwide that use it, and 10 million of them are in Britain. If

:30:48.:30:53.

you have a teenage kid in Britain, they will be on Snapchat. The fact

:30:54.:30:57.

they are moving to London is a thumbs up for London's post Brexit

:30:58.:31:04.

economy, and it is surprising, because most companies move to low

:31:05.:31:07.

tax havens, like Luxembourg, Ireland and the Netherlands.

:31:08.:31:18.

Still to come, Nicole Kidman tells us about her happy marriage and the

:31:19.:31:22.

pressure to look good in Hollywood. And at a macro closes the book on

:31:23.:31:26.

his presidency with a farewell speech -- Barack Obama. We look at

:31:27.:31:30.

his legacy. Here's Joanna in the BBC Newsroom

:31:31.:31:33.

with a summary of today's news. North Cumbria hospitals trust has

:31:34.:31:42.

called the police after a small number of saline bags appeared to

:31:43.:31:46.

have been tampered with. The problem was discovered last Wednesday by a

:31:47.:31:50.

member of staff, who alerted senior doctors. The trust says it

:31:51.:31:55.

implemented its serious incident procedures and there is no

:31:56.:31:57.

indication that any Haitians have been adversely affected. 'S any

:31:58.:32:01.

patience. The Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn

:32:02.:32:03.

has criticised the gap between high-income earners

:32:04.:32:05.

and the lowest paid, saying that a cap on earnings might produce

:32:06.:32:07.

"a more-egalitarian society". Speaking to BBC Radio

:32:08.:32:09.

4's Today programme, Mr Corbyn said he thought

:32:10.:32:11.

introducing the limit would be If we want to live in a more

:32:12.:32:13.

egalitarian society and fund our public services,

:32:14.:32:22.

we cannot go on creating worse There should be a law

:32:23.:32:24.

to limit income? Forget a figure, a law

:32:25.:32:27.

to limit maximum earnings? I would like to see it, I think it

:32:28.:32:35.

would be a fairer thing to do. As we've been hearing,

:32:36.:32:39.

commuters on Southern rail are facing the first of three days

:32:40.:32:41.

of strikes by train It's the latest industrial action

:32:42.:32:44.

in a dispute over plans for drivers to open and close doors,

:32:45.:32:48.

which has been going Drivers will also walk out

:32:49.:32:50.

tomorrow and on Friday. Virtually no services

:32:51.:32:54.

are now running. The Transport Secretary Chris

:32:55.:32:56.

Grayling has condemned the strike on Southern rail,

:32:57.:32:58.

saying it is "simply not The Hollywood musical

:32:59.:33:01.

La La Land leads nominations for this year's Baftas,

:33:02.:33:09.

with 11 nods, including Best Film. Its stars Ryan Gosling

:33:10.:33:11.

and Emma Stone are also up for Best Actor and Actress,

:33:12.:33:14.

just a day after winning British actors Andrew Garfield,

:33:15.:33:16.

Emily Blunt and Hugh Grant are also nominated, as is British state

:33:17.:33:20.

welfare drama I, Daniel Blake. The ceremony takes place

:33:21.:33:24.

in London on February 12th. Join me for BBC

:33:25.:33:29.

Newsroom Live at 11am. More on the news that para-cyclists

:33:30.:33:34.

have been given just seven weeks to prepare for their Track World

:33:35.:33:40.

Championship. Jody Cundy is with me, you won two

:33:41.:33:43.

gold medals at the Rio Games. And I've seen your tweets,

:33:44.:33:47.

will you be competing? I am ever professional, if I did not

:33:48.:34:02.

go, I would be a hypocrite, but for it to be such last-minute, it is

:34:03.:34:07.

seven weeks, for athletes preparing it is not time to do it. For

:34:08.:34:13.

organisations and teams to sort out logistics, visas, transport, Hotel

:34:14.:34:19.

is, it is a bit crazy. I don't know if there is an all too real motive,

:34:20.:34:23.

but it seems a bit strange that it has become so late in the day. A lot

:34:24.:34:27.

of the athletes after September have not gone into full-time training

:34:28.:34:31.

yet, so how will this affect the quality of the event? By our

:34:32.:34:36.

standards, a lot of us have only just started going back on our

:34:37.:34:42.

bikes. I started in December, I saw a couple of others for the first

:34:43.:34:47.

time this week. In seven weeks, we have a World Championship, and we

:34:48.:34:51.

have to be in prime condition, it is a bit crazy. I cannot imagine some

:34:52.:34:57.

of the nations even have the money to do it, because most of the

:34:58.:35:01.

funding is a four-year cycle, and the Paralympics would have been the

:35:02.:35:05.

end of the cycle, and I do not think the cycle for the Tokyo cycle -- the

:35:06.:35:11.

money for the Tokyo cycle has come through yet. If we are going to be

:35:12.:35:16.

struggling, we are the best funded, so I do not know what will happen.

:35:17.:35:22.

Why you think it has been so rushed? I don't know. I ashamed there must

:35:23.:35:29.

be some hidden agenda somewhere. I would like to guess,... Have you

:35:30.:35:36.

speaking to them about this? I spoke to Sarah Storey, who is on the

:35:37.:35:40.

commission, about what was going on behind the scenes, and she seemed

:35:41.:35:43.

just as angry as what I am. It is one of those things, it should be an

:35:44.:35:53.

annual event, it should be up there for them to move towards it being a

:35:54.:35:59.

sustainable event in the future, but doing it this way is not going to

:36:00.:36:03.

give us the best president that we needed.

:36:04.:36:17.

Next, chimpanzees, creating tools to help them drink water, like the

:36:18.:36:24.

Stone Age. I told you it was good. If you think

:36:25.:37:11.

that was good, you will want to watch the BBC's new documentary on

:37:12.:37:15.

Thursday night. Cameras are concealed within lifelike robots,

:37:16.:37:18.

tracking how animals interact with them in the wild. The first

:37:19.:37:22.

programme features a robust monkeys which mistake a robot is one of

:37:23.:37:26.

their own and go into a state of grief when the robot is dropped from

:37:27.:37:31.

a height. A team of spy creatures is on a

:37:32.:37:36.

mission. To uncover the secret lives of wild animals. They're hidden

:37:37.:37:40.

cameras capture extraordinary behaviour. What they reveal will

:37:41.:37:50.

surprise, amaze and make you smile. Maybe they are more like us than we

:37:51.:37:52.

ever thought possible. This morning we've been bringing

:37:53.:38:00.

you an exclusive interview with Nicole Kidman about her role

:38:01.:38:04.

in today's Bafta-nominated Here, in the second part

:38:05.:38:06.

of our chat, she opens up about her desire to become a mother

:38:07.:38:10.

again at 49, the secret to her long happy marriage and why she thinks

:38:11.:38:14.

we should all be getting behind I started by asking

:38:15.:38:16.

her about the pressure I'm primarily concerned

:38:17.:38:19.

with creating a character, so the look that has nothing

:38:20.:38:25.

to do with it. Do I want to go to a red carpet,

:38:26.:38:28.

put on a beautiful dress, do my make-up and, you know,

:38:29.:38:31.

as though I'm going to a nice party? But that's what that

:38:32.:38:34.

is, that's a party. This is, when you're doing the work,

:38:35.:38:38.

it's what's required for the role. I just did Top Of The Lake

:38:39.:38:43.

with Jane Campion, and I wore the most beautiful grey hair,

:38:44.:38:46.

thick grey hair. Plenty of our audience will have

:38:47.:38:49.

seen the publicity shots, actually, That's what I'm interested in now,

:38:50.:38:52.

is the way in which we've been given, as women,

:38:53.:39:07.

so many things, we can wear hair extensions,

:39:08.:39:10.

we can wear make-up, There are so many different ways

:39:11.:39:13.

in which we can blur the lines now, and therefore blur our ages,

:39:14.:39:19.

blur who we are and how we are seen, and that's fantastic,

:39:20.:39:25.

because that's choice. Ultimately, that's what we want

:39:26.:39:28.

as women, is choice, our choice. Although, I interviewed

:39:29.:39:31.

Julie Walters earlier this year, and she said if she went

:39:32.:39:34.

to Hollywood now, she would be regarded as a freak, she thought,

:39:35.:39:37.

because she looks like a woman I'd be grateful to

:39:38.:39:40.

cast her in something. You've spoken before about hoping,

:39:41.:39:56.

quote, hoping every month that you might be pregnant,

:39:57.:40:04.

and your grandmother, I read, When people talk about regrets,

:40:05.:40:06.

do I have regrets, I wish My husband says, "That

:40:07.:40:17.

is the wanting mind, How many more children

:40:18.:40:22.

would you have liked? I would have liked probably two

:40:23.:40:26.

or three more children. And I love being around and I love

:40:27.:40:29.

the ups and downs and I love watching them grow and the things

:40:30.:40:46.

they say and teach. And that is the one

:40:47.:40:52.

regret in your life? I hate to use the word regret,

:40:53.:40:54.

because I have no regrets in terms of I'm so blessed,

:40:55.:40:57.

but would I enjoy giving two And I used to be far more

:40:58.:41:06.

comfortable with children You said you would

:41:07.:41:22.

consider adopting again. He's like, "I'm done, baby,

:41:23.:41:30.

I'm done, let's just But, you know, that's the balance

:41:31.:41:40.

of a relationship, isn't it? I would never go against what he

:41:41.:41:45.

wanted in terms of our family. He's right in the way,

:41:46.:41:51.

there's only a certain amount of time and you want to be able

:41:52.:41:54.

to give the time to You're now in the middle of a

:41:55.:41:57.

relationship discussion, may I add! From your own experience,

:41:58.:42:03.

what is the key to that Because I think humility in that

:42:04.:42:18.

regard is probably the biggest thing you can have in a relationship,

:42:19.:42:27.

which is grateful to have it, contributing to it, prioritising it,

:42:28.:42:32.

and never sort of preaching Because I think everyone's

:42:33.:42:37.

relationship is their own. We all know what goes

:42:38.:42:44.

on behind closed doors What works for us doesn't

:42:45.:42:47.

work for other people. I met somebody...I always

:42:48.:42:54.

say I love and I like. You have joint US-Australian

:42:55.:43:00.

citizenship and you voted in the US What do you think of

:43:01.:43:08.

President-elect Trump? I'm always reticent to start

:43:09.:43:13.

commenting politically. I've never done it

:43:14.:43:16.

in terms of America. So, I just say we as a country

:43:17.:43:21.

needs to support whoever is the President, because that's

:43:22.:43:32.

what the country's based on. And whatever, however that happened,

:43:33.:43:35.

he's there and let's go. Let's go and, for me,

:43:36.:43:42.

I'm very committed to women's issues in terms of I do a lot

:43:43.:43:45.

of fundraising for UN Women and I do I also do an enormous

:43:46.:43:50.

amount of fundraising for breast and ovarian cancer,

:43:51.:43:55.

because that's something that's They are my issues that

:43:56.:44:01.

I'm very attached to. Can I ask you about another issue

:44:02.:44:06.

in Australia, the big debate Kylie Minogue saying

:44:07.:44:10.

she will not get married What do you say to Australian

:44:11.:44:13.

politicians who do not support it? I believe in allowing

:44:14.:44:22.

people who love each other to share their lives together

:44:23.:44:26.

and to honour it. I really believe that we should stay

:44:27.:44:28.

out of people's business I laugh when people love each

:44:29.:44:30.

other and want that to be acknowledged legally,

:44:31.:44:36.

because that's protection, as well, but it's also a way

:44:37.:44:42.

in which you sound committed. Thank you very much

:44:43.:44:46.

for talking to us. Thank you for having me and thanks

:44:47.:44:49.

for asking such great questions. Lion is released on 20th January

:44:50.:44:59.

in cinemas nationwide. And you can watch our interview

:45:00.:45:05.

with Nicole in full on our programme In ten days' time Donald Trump

:45:06.:45:08.

will officially be inaugurated as the 45th President

:45:09.:45:17.

of the United States. Tonight, after eight

:45:18.:45:19.

years in the White House, Barack Obama will give

:45:20.:45:21.

a farewell speech. During his time in office,

:45:22.:45:23.

Obama's contended with a global financial crisis and Syria's decent

:45:24.:45:25.

into war, and been frustrated He's also introduced Obamacare,

:45:26.:45:29.

which makes it easier for Americans Here he is eight years ago,

:45:30.:45:38.

when as the United States' first black President his election offered

:45:39.:45:41.

many new hope. Since then he's been accused

:45:42.:45:49.

of failing to do enough to tackle issues of racism

:45:50.:45:51.

and police brutality. So what does Barack Obama

:45:52.:45:55.

think his own legacy will be? Eight years in office

:45:56.:45:58.

and lots of decisions. Does President Obama

:45:59.:46:04.

have any regrets? Well, we couldn't ask him

:46:05.:46:06.

directly, but he has spoken Libya, last year, a Fox News host

:46:07.:46:09.

asked Obama a simple question. Probably failing to plan for the day

:46:10.:46:17.

after when I think was the right Obama told the Atlantic magazine

:46:18.:46:26.

he misjudged two things. First, how much tribal

:46:27.:46:32.

divisions would play a role in post-Gaddafi Libya and second,

:46:33.:46:34.

how little he would be able to rely on France and the UK to help

:46:35.:46:38.

rebuild the country. Of course, those governments didn't

:46:39.:46:41.

quite see it that way. Guns, a lot of mass shootings

:46:42.:46:45.

happened on Obama's watch. Here he is in 2015

:46:46.:46:48.

talking to the BBC. The one area where I feel that I've

:46:49.:46:52.

been most frustrated and most stymied, we don't have sufficient

:46:53.:46:56.

common sense gun safety laws. Even in the face of

:46:57.:47:03.

repeated mass killings. Here is the President a year ago

:47:04.:47:06.

giving his last State It is one of the few regrets

:47:07.:47:13.

of my presidency that the rancour and the suspicion

:47:14.:47:18.

between the parties has gotten I have no doubt a President

:47:19.:47:20.

with the gifts of Eisenhower or Roosevelt might have

:47:21.:47:26.

better bridged the divide. On this issue, Obama really

:47:27.:47:28.

seems to compare himself The President later told Vanity Fair

:47:29.:47:30.

that maybe he could have got more done in he had the genius

:47:31.:47:34.

of Abraham, the charm of FDR, the energy of Teddy Roosevelt

:47:35.:47:37.

or the legislative Guantanamo Bay, Obama campaigned

:47:38.:47:44.

on a promise to close And President-elect Trump wants

:47:45.:47:47.

to keep it that way. We're going to load it up

:47:48.:47:53.

with some bad dudes. So when a seventh grader in Ohio

:47:54.:47:56.

asked Obama what he wished he had done differently on his

:47:57.:48:02.

first day in office... Close Guantanamo Bay

:48:03.:48:04.

on the first day. I didn't because at that time

:48:05.:48:06.

as you will recall we had a by-partisan agreement that it

:48:07.:48:09.

should be closed and I thought we had enough consensus

:48:10.:48:12.

that we could do in a more Finally, Syria, Syria Obama has said

:48:13.:48:14.

haunts him constantly, but he told Vanity Fair

:48:15.:48:22.

that he doesn't necessarily regret how he has handled the conflict,

:48:23.:48:26.

still he said, "I do ask myself was there something

:48:27.:48:32.

that we hadn't thought of? Was there some move that's

:48:33.:48:34.

beyond what is being presented to me that maybe a Churchill

:48:35.:48:41.

could have seen? No doubt President Obama

:48:42.:48:53.

will reflect on his decisions Politics and his regrets aside,

:48:54.:48:56.

he's created some memorable moments at the White House,

:48:57.:49:01.

dancing and singing like no other Then to know that the reverend

:49:02.:49:04.

Al Green was here. Last week, Prince George showed up

:49:05.:49:08.

to our meeting in his bath robe. I want to be like

:49:09.:49:26.

you when I grow up. So what's the secret

:49:27.:49:48.

to still dancing at 106? # And when I knew I had

:49:49.:50:01.

to face another day. # Lord, it made me

:50:02.:50:20.

feel so tired.# That's the most persistent

:50:21.:50:25.

fly I've ever seen. # Amazing Grace,

:50:26.:50:40.

how sweet the sound. # I once was lost,

:50:41.:51:10.

but now I'm found.# # But now I'm found. #

:51:11.:52:07.

He has got to be the coolest president ever.

:52:08.:52:14.

We can speak now to Mara Rudman, a former national-security official

:52:15.:52:18.

for both Barack Obama and Bill Clinton's administrations.

:52:19.:52:20.

She also studied at law school with Obama.

:52:21.:52:22.

Robert George, an editorial writer for the New York Daily News.

:52:23.:52:27.

Let's start with you Robert George. What will his legacy be? You have to

:52:28.:52:37.

put it in two categories, a historical cultural legacy which I

:52:38.:52:42.

think some of those last, some of the last couple of clips showed the

:52:43.:52:46.

impact he had there and then, of course, like any other president, he

:52:47.:52:53.

has got a political and a policy legacy and that one is a little bit

:52:54.:52:58.

more, that's a little bit more mixed in the context of the economy,

:52:59.:53:04.

foreign policy, etcetera. What would be a success? What would be a

:53:05.:53:13.

failure Robert George? I think as a success from his terms in the

:53:14.:53:17.

context of something that Democrats in the United States have been

:53:18.:53:22.

wanting for a long time is getting closer to a national healthcare

:53:23.:53:27.

system. Now, obviously, many Republicans pushed back at that and

:53:28.:53:32.

in fact, one of the very first policy choices that the Republicans

:53:33.:53:37.

and the incoming president Donald Trump will work on is repealing what

:53:38.:53:43.

is known as Obamacare, but it is definitely rooted in and whatever

:53:44.:53:47.

replacement that the Republicans come up with, it will be a lot

:53:48.:53:52.

further along towards what they see as a national healthcare system than

:53:53.:53:59.

they would have liked. I give him sort of a B or a B minus in the

:54:00.:54:05.

context of the economy given where the country was when he came in.

:54:06.:54:18.

However, the country in terms of the gross economic increases year to

:54:19.:54:24.

year has been a lot further behind where similar recoveries were after

:54:25.:54:28.

president's Reagan and presidents Clinton. So that's not so great.

:54:29.:54:35.

Failures I think are foreign policy has been unfortunately, I think, the

:54:36.:54:39.

Middle East in particular is much messier than it was when he came in

:54:40.:54:47.

eight years ago. Let me bring in our other guest. What would be give him

:54:48.:54:52.

an A for and B minus for? Thanks. Well, first of all, you need to look

:54:53.:54:58.

broadly at what he has brought in his presidency and particularly when

:54:59.:55:04.

we look at what's coming next. And he has, he embodies American values

:55:05.:55:08.

and constitutional values in just his very being and in his essence

:55:09.:55:12.

and in his presence, his intelligence and decency and his

:55:13.:55:17.

charisma and he is a president that we can be proud of and that the

:55:18.:55:21.

country can be proud of and I think that that should not be sold short.

:55:22.:55:28.

In terms of what he gets nailed for, the economy and his healthcare

:55:29.:55:33.

system. I think history will judge him well. You would give him an A

:55:34.:55:37.

for the economy, would you? Absolutely. I worked for plinth. I

:55:38.:55:43.

saw the tremendous benefits that the economy that plinth left for

:55:44.:55:48.

President Bush. I saw what President Obama inherited. Robert George, do

:55:49.:55:53.

you want to come back in there? Sorry, and where we are in

:55:54.:55:56.

comparison to the rest of the world, the United States economy is doing

:55:57.:56:01.

incredibly well. I understand where people feel that they have lost when

:56:02.:56:08.

you look at relative basis. He has done a tremendous job. Well, I think

:56:09.:56:12.

one of the controversies or disputes they have in the United States is

:56:13.:56:20.

how much of the current economy is from President Obama's policies and

:56:21.:56:25.

how much of it has been from say the Central Bank, the Federal Reserve.

:56:26.:56:30.

They've kept interest rates basically at zero for most of his

:56:31.:56:35.

administration and that maybe one of the reasons why we have a better job

:56:36.:56:42.

creation than say Europe and the rest of the world.

:56:43.:56:50.

Sure I think history will look back and look at the eight year period of

:56:51.:56:57.

his presidency and history judges presidents and has his leadership

:56:58.:57:02.

and how the economy fared under him as they judged President Reagan and

:57:03.:57:07.

plinth. I think right now, it is not exactly a quibble. I'm kernel, I

:57:08.:57:13.

know a number of my Republican friends would give President Obama

:57:14.:57:17.

something more like a D or worse on the economy. I mean I think it's

:57:18.:57:23.

good. It is just I wouldn't quite give it an A given some of the other

:57:24.:57:30.

factors as I've just referenced. Briefly, how as a Democrat, how

:57:31.:57:35.

worried are you about incoming Donald Trump as president repealing,

:57:36.:57:38.

reversing much of what President Obama has tried to do in the last

:57:39.:57:45.

eight years? Listen, I'm concerned, but what I'm as concerned about is

:57:46.:57:51.

just the fundamental institutions of our Government and our democracy,

:57:52.:57:55.

that's not an issue of Democrat or Republican. That goes to being an

:57:56.:58:00.

American. So what I will hope for is that Americans come together and

:58:01.:58:05.

recognise what's most important for our country and that is what I

:58:06.:58:09.

started with is what President Obama embodies and I hope we will come

:58:10.:58:14.

together as a country and ensure that those qualities stay. Thank you

:58:15.:58:15.

very much. A viewer says, "Watching your piece

:58:16.:58:25.

on President Obama, I wish we had a Prime Minister as charmy, funny and

:58:26.:58:27.

thoughtful as him." On the programme tomorrow,

:58:28.:58:29.

secondary ticketing.

:58:30.:58:31.