09/01/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


09/01/2017

Victoria Derbyshire discusses whether the UK should open its first 'fix room', a safe space where addicts can take illegal narcotics under medical supervision.


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Transcript


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I'm Victoria Derbyshire, welcome to the programme.

:00:10.:00:12.

Our top story - tackling the injustice

:00:13.:00:14.

The Prime Minister promises to help schools and companies in England

:00:15.:00:23.

deal better with mental health issues. This is really Theresa May

:00:24.:00:29.

saying it is a priority, we want to sort this out. It is not acceptable

:00:30.:00:34.

people wait too long and some people do not get the help they need at

:00:35.:00:39.

all. Keen to hear what you think of the plan is particularly if someone

:00:40.:00:42.

close to you has a mental health issues.

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Also on the programme - exclusive access inside

:00:44.:00:45.

Drug addicts can legally take heroin and crack cocaine under medical

:00:46.:00:54.

supervision. This feels like a second home. I don't know. Yes, I

:00:55.:01:03.

mean, it is a safe place to take things in.

:01:04.:01:05.

Glasgow plans to introduce one - and there are calls

:01:06.:01:07.

La La Land and The Night Manager are the big winners at the Golden Globe

:01:08.:01:18.

awards. Meryl Streep lays

:01:19.:01:21.

into US President-elect So Hollywood is crawling

:01:22.:01:22.

with outsiders and foreigners. And if we kick them

:01:23.:01:25.

all out, you'll have nothing to watch but football and

:01:26.:01:27.

mixed martial arts, which are not Welcome to the programme,

:01:28.:01:30.

we're live until 11. Throughout the programme we'll bring

:01:31.:01:42.

you the latest breaking news and developing stories

:01:43.:01:47.

and - as always - On mental health, on drug fix rooms

:01:48.:01:49.

- do get in touch on all the stories Theresa May is going to set out

:01:50.:01:58.

plans which she says will transform In her first major speech on health

:01:59.:02:05.

since becoming Prime Minister, Mrs May will announce a review

:02:06.:02:09.

of services for children and teenagers as well as extra

:02:10.:02:11.

support for schools and businesses. But Labour says people are being let

:02:12.:02:14.

down by a lack of funding. Our correspondent

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Elaine Dunkley reports. There are no words for

:02:19.:02:21.

what it does to a family. It's just your whole

:02:22.:02:23.

reality is blown to pieces. In 2014, Dr Sangeeta Mahajan's son

:02:24.:02:32.

Saga took his own life. He had been diagnosed

:02:33.:02:36.

with bipolar disorder. They don't discharge patients

:02:37.:02:41.

with adequate information. We were told you either go to A

:02:42.:02:46.

or your GP and that's the only way We had no direct access back

:02:47.:02:57.

to the special services. Today, the Prime Minister,

:02:58.:03:01.

Theresa May, is expected to announce plans to reduce the waiting times

:03:02.:03:05.

for patients needing The details also include

:03:06.:03:07.

more help from employers when staff need time off work,

:03:08.:03:13.

and schools will also be expected to play a bigger role in identifying

:03:14.:03:16.

mentally vulnerable pupils. Mental health is still very

:03:17.:03:19.

underfunded compared It generates probably 20%-25%

:03:20.:03:30.

of the total disease burden of all diseases and yet the funding

:03:31.:03:34.

is 10%-12% in this country. Sangeeta says talking

:03:35.:03:37.

about her son's life is so important but today she wants the government

:03:38.:03:46.

to take action that will lead Is this, hearing from Theresa May on

:03:47.:04:09.

a subject other than Brexit, she does not want her premiership just

:04:10.:04:15.

to be about Brexit? It is very much that but also the closest we will

:04:16.:04:19.

get to her vision, what she wants the government to be about beyond

:04:20.:04:26.

Brexit. She says she wants it to be about what she calls wholesale

:04:27.:04:30.

social reform, tackling what she regards hidden or forgotten

:04:31.:04:34.

injustices and one of those is around the stigma attached to people

:04:35.:04:38.

suffering from mental health illnesses. What we are getting today

:04:39.:04:44.

is the first in a series of announcements we will get on issues

:04:45.:04:50.

like racism in the criminal justice system, like housing, a series of

:04:51.:04:55.

areas which she thinks politicians have high and large ignored. I have

:04:56.:04:59.

to say, the announcements we are getting on mental health, they are

:05:00.:05:05.

relatively tentative and timid, trying to provide more support in

:05:06.:05:10.

schools, trying to encourage business to ensure there is best

:05:11.:05:14.

practice in terms of people with mental health difficulties, may be

:05:15.:05:18.

looking at a review of discrimination laws, and only a tiny

:05:19.:05:23.

amount of extra money. When you talk to professionals, they say they like

:05:24.:05:27.

that and are pleased she is talking about it, but it does not get away

:05:28.:05:32.

from the problem which is resources, the fact of mental health provision

:05:33.:05:38.

has been underfunded frankly for years, and when you look at the

:05:39.:05:43.

amount of NHS time taken up now with an full health provision, something

:05:44.:05:50.

like 24% of health needs in the NHS, but only getting 11% of funding so a

:05:51.:05:54.

mismatch between the scale of the challenge we face in terms of mental

:05:55.:05:59.

health, and the amount of extra cash being put in and today, that cash is

:06:00.:06:06.

-- issue is not addressed. We are keen to hear from you on this. What

:06:07.:06:11.

do you think the government needs to do to tackle the stigma surrounding

:06:12.:06:16.

mental health? If you have experiences, or somebody close to

:06:17.:06:22.

you has experiences get in touch. Now the rest of the news.

:06:23.:06:26.

Boris Johnson has held talks with some of Donald Trump's key

:06:27.:06:28.

The Foreign Secretary has become the first British minister to hold

:06:29.:06:33.

face-to-face meetings with members of the president elect's

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The exchanges were described by officials as 'positive but frank'.

:06:36.:06:42.

Thousands of police officers in London are to be asked

:06:43.:06:46.

if they want to be routinely armed with a gun or electric Taser.

:06:47.:06:50.

The Metropolitan Police Federation, which represents 32,000

:06:51.:06:51.

officers in the capital, says that with more officers

:06:52.:06:55.

being armed to counter the threat of terrorism,

:06:56.:07:04.

it was only fair to ask officers what they think.

:07:05.:07:06.

A police spokesman said more than 90 per cent of officers were currently

:07:07.:07:09.

unarmed and there were no plans to change this.

:07:10.:07:11.

Police in Paris say they have arrested more than a dozen people

:07:12.:07:14.

in connection with last October's robbery at gunpoint of the American

:07:15.:07:17.

They say DNA left by the robbers at the scene led to their arrests.

:07:18.:07:22.

At the time, French police said more than seven million pounds' worth

:07:23.:07:25.

Her spokeswoman said masked men entered the room at the luxury

:07:26.:07:30.

residence where Kim Kardashian was staying while attending

:07:31.:07:32.

Up to 4 million commuters in London face disruption because of a strike

:07:33.:07:48.

across the Underground network. Crowds are gathering at bus stops as

:07:49.:07:52.

travellers try to complete their journeys to work in. Members of the

:07:53.:07:57.

unions walked out last night in a row about jobs and ticket office

:07:58.:08:01.

closures. The strike is due to finish at 6pm today.

:08:02.:08:04.

Police in Tyne and Wear have arrested a man suspected of taking

:08:05.:08:07.

hostages at a bookmakers in an armed siege.

:08:08.:08:08.

Northumbria Police were called to a branch of Coral bookmakers

:08:09.:08:11.

in Jarrow on Sunday evening following a report of a man

:08:12.:08:13.

Four people were thought to have been held in the incident,

:08:14.:08:19.

with three being released before police ended the standoff

:08:20.:08:21.

and a 39-year-old man was taken into custody.

:08:22.:08:25.

Thousands of British drivers affected by the Volkswagen diesel

:08:26.:08:28.

emissions scandal are taking legal action against the carmaker.

:08:29.:08:32.

Volkswagen admitted using software that would cheat emissions tests,

:08:33.:08:34.

leading to a recall of millions of cars worldwide.

:08:35.:08:37.

A compensation scheme was approved in the United States last year,

:08:38.:08:39.

and lawyers want British customers to be offered a similar settlement.

:08:40.:08:45.

It's been a big night for the British television spy drama

:08:46.:08:49.

'The Night Manager' which stormed to success at the annual

:08:50.:08:51.

Tom Hiddleston, Olivia Colman and Hugh Laurie all collected

:08:52.:08:55.

Claire Foy was named best actress in a TV drama

:08:56.:08:59.

The night belonged to the Hollywood musical La La Land, which won

:09:00.:09:04.

Our Los Angeles correspondent, James Cook reports.

:09:05.:09:11.

Los Angeles, California, where stories are spun and stars

:09:12.:09:17.

A place of glitz and glamour, of gowns and gossip,

:09:18.:09:22.

This is a film for dreamers, and I think that hope and creativity

:09:23.:09:30.

are two of the most important things in the world, and that's

:09:31.:09:33.

In the television categories, it was a British invasion.

:09:34.:09:39.

Claire Foy was named Best Actress in a TV Drama for playing

:09:40.:09:43.

the Queen in The Crown, while there were three

:09:44.:09:50.

acting awards in the BBC co-production the Night Manager,

:09:51.:09:52.

allowing Hugh Laurie to have a dig at Donald Trump.

:09:53.:09:54.

More amazing to be able say I won this at the last ever Golden Globes.

:09:55.:09:58.

I don't mean to be gloomy, it's just that it has the word Hollywood,

:09:59.:10:01.

foreign and press in the title, I just don't know what...

:10:02.:10:05.

Receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award, Meryl Streep also lambasted

:10:06.:10:07.

the President-elect and his plan to deport millions of immigrants.

:10:08.:10:12.

So, Hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners,

:10:13.:10:18.

and if we kick them all out you'll have nothing to watch but football

:10:19.:10:21.

and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts.

:10:22.:10:24.

Well, Hollywood can be fun and frivolous, but it also prides

:10:25.:10:27.

And many stars here on the red carpet are predicting a surge

:10:28.:10:35.

in political films this year, following the most

:10:36.:10:37.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 9.30.

:10:38.:10:50.

Did you get in a long queue for bus or did you walk in today? I walked

:10:51.:10:59.

in. I waited at the bus stop and they were not stopping so it took me

:11:00.:11:03.

an hour of brisk walking but I got here. The scenes, that is what I saw

:11:04.:11:07.

all the way to work. I know if you are in Glasgow,

:11:08.:11:14.

Manchester, Newcastle, you are saying, it is just a tube strike,

:11:15.:11:19.

get over it, Londoners. But we will talk to transport for London later

:11:20.:11:23.

about the reasons behind the strike and when they think things will get

:11:24.:11:27.

back to normal. Officially it is supposed to finish 6pm but it could

:11:28.:11:31.

have a knock-on effect after that. If you had an heroic walk into work,

:11:32.:11:41.

let me know. Use the hashtag Victoria Live if you get in touch.

:11:42.:11:44.

Let's get some sport now with John Watson.

:11:45.:11:49.

The spirit of the FA Cup played out yesterday. Plymouth Argyle fans had

:11:50.:11:57.

something to celebrate after holding the Premier League giants Liverpool

:11:58.:12:00.

to a goalless draw at Anfield which means they have a lucrative return

:12:01.:12:05.

trip, 9000 fans making the trip yesterday and helped by the decision

:12:06.:12:09.

of the Liverpool manager who made ten changes to the side, fielding

:12:10.:12:14.

Liverpool's youngest ever side in its history. The average age just

:12:15.:12:20.

21. A 17-year-old forward was youngest player. 319-year-old is

:12:21.:12:30.

also in the starting team. Lucas was the oldest player at 29. It ended

:12:31.:12:37.

0-0. With Liverpool making these changes, along with a lot of other

:12:38.:12:42.

top teams, questions are being asked if the big clubs are showing respect

:12:43.:12:46.

the oldest club competition deserves. I think Plymouth will not

:12:47.:12:51.

mind after the incredible result. No such problems for Chelsea who were

:12:52.:12:56.

comfortable winners 4-1 against Peterborough. The first start since

:12:57.:13:00.

October for Captain John Terry, who was sent off. The 36-year-old

:13:01.:13:07.

sliding in and deemed to be the last defender so given a straight red

:13:08.:13:12.

card. You could see how frustrated he was. Chelsea will appeal but with

:13:13.:13:19.

limited gametime after 19 seasons at Stamford Bridge, he was given a year

:13:20.:13:23.

contract at the start of the season, you wonder if it could be the last

:13:24.:13:28.

at Chelsea for him. The chairman of the Football

:13:29.:13:31.

Association gave an interesting interview to the Times, saying he

:13:32.:13:35.

spoke to gay footballers about the possibility of them coming out.

:13:36.:13:39.

This was a wide-ranging interview talking about what chances there are

:13:40.:13:45.

of gay footballers coming out and Greg Clarke said he had met with 15

:13:46.:13:55.

people to get their views on how the FA could support them if they wanted

:13:56.:14:01.

to come out. Of those he spoke to, many said they were happy with their

:14:02.:14:05.

sexuality but were not ready to come out so you wonder if we will see any

:14:06.:14:09.

gay footballers coming out in the future. It comes after he had said

:14:10.:14:14.

he felt there were top professionals who were not ready to come out and

:14:15.:14:19.

he believed fans would be supportive about gay players in their own teams

:14:20.:14:24.

but not supported perhaps about gay players in the team so important to

:14:25.:14:28.

the conversations are being had that we will wait to see if any gay

:14:29.:14:31.

footballers will feel comfortable about coming out any time soon.

:14:32.:14:39.

This morning, exclusive access inside a so-called drugs fix room

:14:40.:14:41.

where addicts can legally take hard drugs like heroin and crack cocaine

:14:42.:14:44.

under medical supervision without the threat of prosecution.

:14:45.:14:48.

Glasgow is currently planning to open the country's first

:14:49.:14:52.

drugs consumption room and officials behind it have looked

:14:53.:14:55.

to countries like Denmark where these facilities already run

:14:56.:15:03.

Our reporter Divya Talwar spent a day inside a fix-room

:15:04.:15:06.

in Copenhagen's seedy red light district.

:15:07.:15:09.

It sees about 500 drug users through its doors each day

:15:10.:15:12.

and many have mental health and other physical problems.

:15:13.:15:14.

This film - which lasts just over 15 minutes -

:15:15.:15:18.

portrays the reality of illegal drug taking.

:15:19.:15:22.

It's graphic, frank and raw - and includes scenes

:15:23.:15:24.

with blood and addicts injecting - which some of you may

:15:25.:15:27.

We're showing it to you this morning to give an insight

:15:28.:15:30.

into the reality of fix rooms which many want to see

:15:31.:15:33.

It's about 150mg of cocaine, about almost 400mls of pure heroin.

:15:34.:16:01.

It's too expensive and it's too much poison in your body.

:16:02.:16:14.

Of course the main thing is to save lives, and to prevent

:16:15.:16:17.

This is Copenhagen's seedy red light district,

:16:18.:16:37.

It's home to one of the city's so-called "fix rooms",

:16:38.:16:48.

a place where addicts can legally take Class A drugs safely,

:16:49.:16:50.

under supervision and without the fear of prosecution.

:16:51.:16:55.

There's calls to introduce them back in the UK,

:16:56.:16:58.

so I'm spending the day here to see how they work.

:16:59.:17:03.

It's 8am and, inside, users have already turned up.

:17:04.:17:15.

My name is Elliott, and I'm 25, almost 26 years old.

:17:16.:17:22.

It's good cocaine, a lot of heroin, and some diazepam benzo,

:17:23.:17:42.

He's homeless and will beg, borrow and steal to buy hard drugs.

:17:43.:18:10.

He injects so often that it's difficult to find a vein.

:18:11.:18:16.

On the other side, the same vein works, I was just trying

:18:17.:18:19.

The same thing every day, at least five times.

:18:20.:18:47.

You do the same thing five times a day?

:18:48.:18:49.

Elliott is one of about 500 users who will come here today.

:18:50.:19:41.

There's two separate areas for people to take drugs.

:19:42.:19:47.

The injecting room, which can seat up to nine people at one time.

:19:48.:19:50.

Right next to it, there's a separate room with eight seats for users

:19:51.:19:53.

She's come to the smoking room this afternoon to take crack cocaine.

:19:54.:20:11.

Anjelea volunteers for a kitchen nearby, giving food

:20:12.:20:12.

Anjelea was in a car accident almost 20 years ago.

:20:13.:20:37.

The drugs and prostitution followed after that.

:20:38.:20:43.

After I was in this car accident, my left foot and left arm there's

:20:44.:20:49.

In my here, and in my shoulder and in my knees.

:20:50.:21:09.

Now I smoke cocaine, but I don't smoke...

:21:10.:21:16.

She tells me two of them don't want any contact

:21:17.:21:22.

It's the same as you drink, or whatever.

:21:23.:21:33.

But it's not like, you cannot run away when you smoke cocaine.

:21:34.:21:44.

And every time I smoke cocaine, I always talk about my babies.

:21:45.:21:47.

This facility, this drug consumption room, do you think it's

:21:48.:21:55.

If you sit outside and smoke, it's too much stress.

:21:56.:22:03.

So the money you make as a prostitute, do

:22:04.:22:05.

Yeah. I think I'm going to stop one day.

:22:06.:22:13.

It's too expensive, and it's too much poison in your body.

:22:14.:22:18.

Could you live my life for, what, one week?

:22:19.:22:26.

No, it's a long time since I've been happy.

:22:27.:22:35.

When was the last time you were happy?

:22:36.:22:37.

This place opened three years ago, funded by

:22:38.:22:58.

Many of the users who come here have mental health or physical problems.

:22:59.:23:05.

There's always a social worker on site if they need

:23:06.:23:08.

There's also a nurse here to supervise the users and be

:23:09.:23:12.

When the users come, the only thing they have to bring

:23:13.:23:20.

themselves is the drugs they are going to consume.

:23:21.:23:22.

Everything else we give to them for free.

:23:23.:23:26.

This is just an example, but we give to them the needles,

:23:27.:23:29.

what they need to cook, we have condoms, we have

:23:30.:23:32.

Of course the main thing is to save lives and to prevent

:23:33.:23:36.

But nobody died yet, so I'm 100% sure that we are preventing people

:23:37.:23:53.

Over here there's a perfect place where there used to be a lot

:23:54.:24:05.

of people who meet to shoot up in the evening...

:24:06.:24:08.

Elliott who we met this morning is back almost four hours later.

:24:09.:24:11.

Before he shoots again, he wants to show us where he would often

:24:12.:24:14.

inject when the drugs room wasn't open.

:24:15.:24:17.

Eliott's homeless, so he would inject in the streets

:24:18.:24:20.

We used to sit by this cage thing over here,

:24:21.:24:28.

used to sit along the sides over here, on these sides,

:24:29.:24:38.

so we could lean back on this after we'd taken our hit, you know?

:24:39.:24:41.

Proper chill out, but without the backpack of course.

:24:42.:24:43.

Well, not as much as I used to, now that we have the fixing rooms.

:24:44.:24:53.

When did you start taking cocaine and heroin?

:24:54.:24:56.

When you were 15? How often do you take heroin?

:24:57.:25:06.

I've had my heart stop a couple of times.

:25:07.:25:17.

So I've been legally dead a couple of times.

:25:18.:25:23.

Have you ever tried to get off the drugs?

:25:24.:25:27.

However, it's not as easy as you think, because, erm...

:25:28.:25:32.

Elliott said he was starting to withdraw and needed

:25:33.:25:53.

Injecting rooms have been around for more than 30 years.

:25:54.:26:15.

Denmark opened its first one in 2012 in Copenhagen.

:26:16.:26:19.

This place is one of six now running in the country.

:26:20.:26:22.

They cost around ?1 million a year to run.

:26:23.:26:27.

Why do you think you need a facility like this here?

:26:28.:26:33.

The situation in this area before was that we had all the drug users

:26:34.:26:37.

sitting around in the streets, in stairwells, in people's

:26:38.:26:41.

And after we opened the drug consumption room, 90%

:26:42.:26:52.

Do you think that the money you spend on this facility could be

:26:53.:26:57.

better spent trying to help people get off the drugs instead?

:26:58.:27:00.

I don't think it's a question of either treatment or either

:27:01.:27:03.

There will always be a group in any drug environment in a city,

:27:04.:27:12.

if it's Glasgow, if it's Copenhagen, if it's London, there will be a part

:27:13.:27:16.

of the group that is not motivated for treatment,

:27:17.:27:21.

and what are we going to do with that group?

:27:22.:27:26.

Are we going to make them shoot up in the streets between cars

:27:27.:27:29.

in the rain, or should we invite them inside in a safe environment?

:27:30.:27:36.

If people want to get into treatment, and come and talk

:27:37.:27:42.

to us about they want to go into treatment, we can help them

:27:43.:27:44.

There's been a constant flow of people in and out of the rooms.

:27:45.:27:57.

Some of them are new faces to the staff, but many are regulars

:27:58.:28:00.

and can come here multiple times a day.

:28:01.:28:04.

I've only been here a short time and can already spot

:28:05.:28:07.

I'm just coming back to go inside and smoke

:28:08.:28:12.

And Elliott is also back for the third time.

:28:13.:28:30.

What I'm going to inject now is this IV solution with heroin in it,

:28:31.:28:36.

and in my pocket I've also got some ritalins, and they will

:28:37.:28:39.

And now I need to get in before all the rooms get taken.

:28:40.:28:43.

You can feel it from your legs, to your head.

:28:44.:29:03.

It already takes, what, 50% of my pain already.

:29:04.:29:19.

As it gets later, the drugs rooms get busier.

:29:20.:29:21.

Both are now full, and there's users hanging out in the waiting area

:29:22.:29:24.

Elliott comes out about 45 minutes later.

:29:25.:29:28.

I feel good, but, damn, my head is everywhere.

:29:29.:29:38.

When do you think you're going to come back here?

:29:39.:29:41.

This is going to sound retarded, but I mean, come on,

:29:42.:29:53.

I mean, like, it's a safe place to take things in.

:29:54.:30:06.

When I take something that is really strong,

:30:07.:30:10.

I turn to the nurse that is sitting by the computer

:30:11.:30:13.

and I tell them, "Hey, listen up, I'm going to take this strong dose,"

:30:14.:30:17.

and then I tell them everything what's inside,

:30:18.:30:20.

so they know what to expect if anything goes south.

:30:21.:30:26.

Do you want help to get off the drugs?

:30:27.:30:29.

The fixing room will stay open through the night.

:30:30.:30:38.

It will only close for an hour tomorrow morning

:30:39.:30:40.

Some people would say that having a facility like this is encouraging

:30:41.:30:48.

people to use drugs, it's giving them a safe place

:30:49.:30:50.

It's a very hard life to be a drug addict in this environment.

:30:51.:31:02.

It's a very busy life, people are working to get

:31:03.:31:05.

drugs 24 hours a day, so it does not make people's lives

:31:06.:31:08.

more easy, but it gives people a place where they can be safe.

:31:09.:31:19.

It does seem there's a demand for this place,

:31:20.:31:21.

even among residents who live nearby.

:31:22.:31:24.

One told me her children don't have to see people injecting

:31:25.:31:27.

But the fix room is clearly not a treatment facility

:31:28.:31:33.

to get addicts off drugs, and many people, like the users

:31:34.:31:35.

I've met here today, will come in and out of the fix room

:31:36.:31:40.

and go back to their difficult and sometimes dangerous lifestyles.

:31:41.:31:51.

Late in the evening, only a few metres from the fixing room,

:31:52.:31:55.

we find Anjelea working on the streets, trying to find

:31:56.:31:58.

I'm going to work, make some money, and go and smoke some cocaine,

:31:59.:32:09.

and then go back to work again, make money and smoke cocaine!

:32:10.:32:13.

How long do you think you'll keep doing this for,

:32:14.:32:22.

drugs during the day, prostitution at night?

:32:23.:32:24.

I have said I will stop work as a prostitute

:32:25.:32:26.

If you've been affected by the issues raised in Divya's

:32:27.:32:47.

report, you can find details of organisations offering

:32:48.:32:51.

information and support with addiction at bbc.co.uk/actionline.

:32:52.:32:54.

Or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded

:32:55.:32:59.

Later in the programme we'll be talking to the people behind

:33:00.:33:09.

the clinic in Denmark and to those in Glasgow who are planning

:33:10.:33:11.

Really keen to hear your thoughts on this throughout the morning.

:33:12.:33:20.

Jane on Facebook says about time and drug use will not go away, what we

:33:21.:33:26.

have been doing for years has not helped all reduced to use in any way

:33:27.:33:30.

and it is still rising. In countries where they have done things like

:33:31.:33:33.

this drug deaths have dropped dramatically. Dave says on

:33:34.:33:38.

Facebook... Michael says it is a good idea

:33:39.:33:55.

because it would reach out to people who would not normally engage with

:33:56.:34:06.

services. Stewart says drugs are still illegal but we need to stop

:34:07.:34:14.

Some of you on my Twitter timeline are saying that you do not want to

:34:15.:34:26.

pay for this, you don't want taxpayers' money to fund something

:34:27.:34:30.

like this. We will talk to people behind this and the plans in Glasgow

:34:31.:34:34.

later and we will talk to a former heroin addict about his views and

:34:35.:34:39.

the mother of twin boys, both of whom were addicted to drugs and one

:34:40.:34:45.

of whom died because of drugs. And the Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is

:34:46.:34:49.

giving a statement to MPs later today. NHS staff tell us what it is

:34:50.:34:55.

like to work in A departments after charity described it as a

:34:56.:35:00.

humanitarian crisis. And as a police officer, would you routinely want to

:35:01.:35:04.

carry a Taser or a gun? We will hear from some of them after 10am.

:35:05.:35:09.

Here's Joanna in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:35:10.:35:14.

Theresa May is to announce a number of measures designed to deal

:35:15.:35:17.

with what she will describe as the "hidden injustice"

:35:18.:35:20.

In a speech, she'll promise to transform attitudes

:35:21.:35:23.

towards mental disorders, through extra training for schools

:35:24.:35:25.

Figures suggest 75 per cent of mental health problems start

:35:26.:35:29.

The day few minutes Victoria will discuss attitudes towards

:35:30.:35:40.

mental-health problems in the workplace and we will speak to two

:35:41.:35:46.

women about their experience. Up to 4 million commuters in London face

:35:47.:35:50.

disruption because of the strike across the underground network. At

:35:51.:35:54.

one point Clapham Junction had to be evacuated because of overcrowding.

:35:55.:35:58.

Crowds have gathered at bus stops as travellers tried to complete their

:35:59.:36:03.

journeys to work. Members of the unions walked out last night in a

:36:04.:36:08.

row about jobs and ticket office closures. The strike is due to

:36:09.:36:09.

finish 6pm. Thousands of police officers

:36:10.:36:10.

in London are to be asked if they want to be routinely armed

:36:11.:36:13.

with a gun or electric Taser. The Metropolitan Police Federation,

:36:14.:36:16.

which represents 32,000 officers in the capital,

:36:17.:36:19.

says that with more officers being armed to counter

:36:20.:36:21.

the threat of terrorism, it was only fair to ask

:36:22.:36:23.

officers what they think. A police spokesman said more than 90

:36:24.:36:26.

per cent of officers were currently unarmed and there were no plans

:36:27.:36:30.

to change this. Police in Paris say they have

:36:31.:36:36.

arrested more than a dozen people in connection with last October's

:36:37.:36:39.

robbery at gunpoint of the American They say DNA left by the robbers

:36:40.:36:41.

at the scene led to their arrests. At the time, French police said more

:36:42.:36:46.

than seven million pounds' worth Her spokeswoman said masked men

:36:47.:36:49.

entered the room at the luxury residence where Kim Kardashian

:36:50.:36:53.

was staying while attending Roger in Walsall surged in Victoria,

:36:54.:37:10.

I have had two sons who suffered total mental breakdowns. We will

:37:11.:37:15.

talk about the mental health story. He said it was horrendously

:37:16.:37:18.

distressing them and those around them. He said his son killed himself

:37:19.:37:24.

age 30 and his second son broke down at the age of 15 and used to beg him

:37:25.:37:29.

in tears to help him. Now aged 19 he is much improved. He said he

:37:30.:37:36.

implored everyone to ensure they take their medication and the best

:37:37.:37:40.

way to remove the stigma around mental health is to have a campaign

:37:41.:37:44.

that makes everyone understand it is an illness and we must all show

:37:45.:37:49.

compassion. We will talk more about mental health and the plans Theresa

:37:50.:37:53.

May house in the next couple of minutes. Your experiences are really

:37:54.:38:03.

welcome. You can tweet or send an e-mail. Sport now. The spirit of the

:38:04.:38:10.

FA Cup was felt at Anfield is 9000 Plymouth fans went to Liverpool to

:38:11.:38:14.

watch their team from the fourth tier of English football play

:38:15.:38:20.

Liverpool. Jurgen Klopp's ten changes helped Plymouth as he

:38:21.:38:23.

fielded the youngest side in club history. Not that the fans who made

:38:24.:38:29.

the trip will mine. Chelsea also made changes, nine in total as they

:38:30.:38:35.

beat Peterborough 4-1. They had club captain John Terry sent off. Fulham

:38:36.:38:40.

FC and Middlesbrough and Tottenham won. As comebacks go, it will go

:38:41.:38:47.

down as one of the shortest. James Haskell lasted 35 seconds after

:38:48.:38:50.

coming off the bench against Leicester after seven months out. He

:38:51.:38:54.

was taken off with a head injury. The club are confident he should be

:38:55.:38:59.

fit to make the start of the Six Nations for England. Johanna Konta

:39:00.:39:05.

beat her opponent in straight sets at the Sydney international. She

:39:06.:39:09.

reached the semifinals of the first grand slam of the year, the

:39:10.:39:14.

Australian Open, last year. Dan Evans is through in men's

:39:15.:39:17.

competition that Kyle Edmund is out. We will have more sport around 10am.

:39:18.:39:21.

Theresa May will outline plans today to reduce suicide rates and improve

:39:22.:39:23.

support for people suffering with mental illness in England.

:39:24.:39:27.

In her first major speech on health since becoming Prime Minister,

:39:28.:39:34.

she'll encourage schools and employers to do more to help -

:39:35.:39:36.

declaring it an historic opportunity to right a wrong and says she wants

:39:37.:39:39.

to tackle the "huge stigma" around mental health.

:39:40.:39:43.

She's expected to announce that every secondary school will be given

:39:44.:39:47.

training to spot pupils who may be suffering from depression,

:39:48.:39:50.

being tightened to give greater protection to stop people

:39:51.:39:55.

with mental health issues losing their job.

:39:56.:39:57.

Employers and organisations will be given additional training

:39:58.:40:05.

in supporting staff who need to take time off.

:40:06.:40:08.

to allow symptom checks before getting a face-to-face appointment -

:40:09.:40:11.

and a review of the "health debt form", under which

:40:12.:40:13.

to ?300 by a GP for documentation to prove they have

:40:14.:40:17.

mental health issues - an issue we highlighted on this

:40:18.:40:21.

mental health problems, let's hear your own experience,

:40:22.:40:26.

what should the Prime Minister to do tackle the stigma?

:40:27.:40:29.

And tell us about the support or lack of support

:40:30.:40:31.

We can talk now to Beth Allan and Lucy Nichol who both had

:40:32.:40:38.

problems with previous employers not dealing with their mental

:40:39.:40:40.

Beth has borderline personality disorder and Lucy

:40:41.:40:44.

Also joining us is Sue Baker from the mental health

:40:45.:40:49.

Welcome. One previous employer sacked you, why? I was working in a

:40:50.:41:04.

small shop. I had started a new course of medication. That the

:41:05.:41:11.

medication gives you brain fog and it takes time to adjust and at the

:41:12.:41:15.

time they were slip-ups in a shop and someone managed to steal

:41:16.:41:18.

something and at the time I was working alone, which is probably not

:41:19.:41:22.

the best idea for someone adjusting to medication but I did not tell my

:41:23.:41:26.

employer because I was worried about what they would say. When this

:41:27.:41:29.

happened he asked me if I was feeling OK and I said that I

:41:30.:41:34.

struggle with this, I have just started new medication and it will

:41:35.:41:38.

not happen again, but can you bear with me. A week later I was taken

:41:39.:41:43.

into a performance review out of the blue and was told I was not

:41:44.:41:49.

performing properly and fired. When you were fired, was there a

:41:50.:41:52.

conversation about your mental health issues and the fact you had

:41:53.:41:57.

started taking medication? He said I liked to make my excuses. What did

:41:58.:42:02.

you think? I did not know how to answer that. I have never had anyone

:42:03.:42:07.

say anything like that to me in my life and I was taken aback and said

:42:08.:42:10.

it was not an excuse, I have explained to you as an employer and

:42:11.:42:15.

as a friend the situation, and if you are not willing to support me,

:42:16.:42:19.

you will not be able to take this further. Lucy, in Newcastle, tell us

:42:20.:42:25.

how anxiety has affected you at work. When you look back over my

:42:26.:42:32.

working career, which spans 20 years, back through to the 90s. I

:42:33.:42:37.

remember sneaking out of the office to have a panic attack in private

:42:38.:42:42.

because I was embarrassed about it. I think as time went on, there was a

:42:43.:42:49.

lack of understanding in certain working environments and it

:42:50.:42:54.

snowballs the situation so when people don't understand, the

:42:55.:42:58.

situation gets really difficult, it makes your illness worse and you end

:42:59.:43:02.

up having more time off work because of it. It is worse for the employer

:43:03.:43:09.

and employee. What about your present employers, what have they

:43:10.:43:14.

done to improve your life at work? I work for Home Group, a charity, and

:43:15.:43:19.

we have mental health services across the country. I think that

:43:20.:43:26.

really helps in that we have mental health expertise within the

:43:27.:43:32.

organisation. Recently, to give an example, in the past I have been off

:43:33.:43:38.

sick for five, six weeks with anxiety disorder, whereas quite

:43:39.:43:42.

recently I felt comfortable talking about it. The only place I have

:43:43.:43:49.

worked where the experience is a positive thing, they promote peer

:43:50.:43:52.

support. They have services and when I went to HR and said I was not

:43:53.:43:58.

feeling well, I was feeling anxious, within 24 hours, they hooked me up

:43:59.:44:02.

with a counsellor and I had professional phone conversation will

:44:03.:44:07.

stop I was able to speak to my line manager and I was back in work

:44:08.:44:13.

within three days. It makes a huge difference to know people are there

:44:14.:44:19.

to support you. One of the things Theresa May will apparently talk

:44:20.:44:23.

about in the speech on mental health is the anti-discrimination laws

:44:24.:44:26.

being tightened so if you have a mental illness you will have greater

:44:27.:44:30.

protection at work. We have legislation in place to protect

:44:31.:44:33.

people when it comes to discrimination and mental health

:44:34.:44:37.

illness under disability legislation. That is clearly

:44:38.:44:43.

failing? It definitely needs tightening up and Mind has called

:44:44.:44:47.

for that for a while. At the moment it covers mental-health problems. It

:44:48.:44:52.

did not when the legislation was drafted in 96. I remember we

:44:53.:44:56.

campaign to have it cover mental health. Typically the stigma meant

:44:57.:45:01.

it was not covered. It was then in you did but at the moment it is a

:45:02.:45:06.

finite definition. You have to have a severe mental-health problem that

:45:07.:45:10.

affects you over a year but the nature of mental-health problems are

:45:11.:45:15.

episodic and a lot will not recovered if you need a few weeks

:45:16.:45:21.

off or experience it a few months. It will be helpful if it covers more

:45:22.:45:26.

people who have mental-health problems. One in six British workers

:45:27.:45:32.

will have a problem and it is a common experience. 18 months ago on

:45:33.:45:36.

the programme we spoke to dozens of people in an audience debate about

:45:37.:45:41.

mental health issues. Two hours on television, never been done before.

:45:42.:45:46.

Ruby wax said this about telling her barks. -- her boss.

:45:47.:45:51.

They're not allowed to discriminate, but the papers said 56%

:45:52.:45:53.

of the bosses still won't hire you so we're not in a position...

:45:54.:45:56.

Do you mean that - don't tell your boss?

:45:57.:46:00.

If I was working at the BBC would I mention that?

:46:01.:46:03.

They're going to trust me to have a series and one day I'm

:46:04.:46:10.

I wouldn't have raised my head and said it.

:46:11.:46:16.

I thought it because I would still be out of a job.

:46:17.:46:19.

What's your, from your own experience, Beth, would you say to

:46:20.:46:24.

people, be upfront with your boss? No. Really? No, I wouldn't. I'd like

:46:25.:46:30.

to be able to, but that's the thing, recently I also had discrimination

:46:31.:46:34.

in another workplace and that was sort of with a physical disorder

:46:35.:46:38.

that I have as well, but the physical disorder was really

:46:39.:46:40.

affecting my anxiety and depression and when I went to see a healthcare

:46:41.:46:46.

professional about taking some time off, she asked whether I would like

:46:47.:46:51.

it taken under the physical illness or the physical and mental. She

:46:52.:46:55.

recommended that we only put the physical because putting the mental

:46:56.:46:58.

would then cause more problems in work. Sue, how do you react? I

:46:59.:47:05.

remember when Ruby covered that. Don't make a blanket judgement on

:47:06.:47:11.

it. Judge it for yourself. For some people they feel safe disclosing it

:47:12.:47:15.

and for many people, sadly too many people, still don't their employer

:47:16.:47:18.

is supportive of mental health issues. We are working with nearly

:47:19.:47:22.

500 employers with time to change from the Bank of England to

:47:23.:47:26.

Barclays, to M to Tesco's, and they're taking more proactive action

:47:27.:47:30.

on mental health in the workplace. But 500 is by no means all employers

:47:31.:47:35.

in land of all shapes or sizes in all sectors. So some employers are

:47:36.:47:40.

doing really good work and it needs leadership and proper support in the

:47:41.:47:43.

workplace, not just relying on the Health Service, but having available

:47:44.:47:46.

services in the health system, but having support in the workplace. It

:47:47.:47:49.

is a vital set to go get this right. And to make it safe for people to

:47:50.:47:53.

disclose because the longer you leave it, the longer your recovery,

:47:54.:47:58.

the greater the cost to business. To do something proactive is really

:47:59.:48:01.

helpful and what's changing the culture in organisations is Beth

:48:02.:48:04.

when people like yourself or Lucy are speaking out and leading their

:48:05.:48:09.

own internal campaigns to break down stigma. Lucy, you have had good

:48:10.:48:12.

experience, bad experience with previous employers, what's your

:48:13.:48:15.

advice to people watching right now, do you tell the boss? I think you do

:48:16.:48:20.

have to judge for yourself. I think as soon as I came to work for Home

:48:21.:48:24.

Group I knew that it was an organisation... You can tell from

:48:25.:48:30.

the environment So I think that it depends. You need to really get a

:48:31.:48:34.

good understanding of how your organisation works and what the

:48:35.:48:38.

culture is and if you feel comfortable enough then I strongly

:48:39.:48:40.

suggest you do because it made the world of difference to me. That's

:48:41.:48:45.

good to hear. Thank you very much. This e-mail from Rachel, "My teenage

:48:46.:48:52.

daughter is being treated for an eating disorder 300 miles away from

:48:53.:48:56.

our home in Nottingham. She has been treated in Birmingham and Cambridge.

:48:57.:49:00.

I feel strongly that while the PM actually speaking about the

:49:01.:49:02.

importance of mental health is very welcome, what is needed is proper

:49:03.:49:07.

investment to include intensive training for all professionals.

:49:08.:49:09.

Unfortunately, we have no idea how long we will have to endure this

:49:10.:49:13.

separation and it makes the long journey every two weeks to visit her

:49:14.:49:17.

bad. I want to know what the PM is doing to help us ordinary families

:49:18.:49:23.

who are suffering because of the crisis in child and adolescent

:49:24.:49:24.

mental health services today." If you experience mental

:49:25.:49:28.

health problems - really keen to hear from you -

:49:29.:49:30.

what should the Prime Minister And tell us your experiences

:49:31.:49:33.

of the support - or lack of support -

:49:34.:49:37.

you've received at work? We'll try and speak

:49:38.:49:39.

to some of you before The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is

:49:40.:49:48.

giving a statement to MPs on the NHS. NHS staff will tell us what it

:49:49.:49:52.

is really like working in A departments right now after one

:49:53.:49:54.

charity described it as a humanitarian crisis.

:49:55.:49:59.

Thousands of commuters have faced severe disruption this morning,

:50:00.:50:01.

because London Underground workers are staging a 24 hour strike.

:50:02.:50:10.

Clapham Junction station has been evacuated due to overcrowding.

:50:11.:50:14.

It's part of a long running dispute between the unions and tube station

:50:15.:50:19.

Our reporter Leanne Brown is at Hammersmith.

:50:20.:50:26.

Right, tell us what the situation is like there. Well, just to put this

:50:27.:50:35.

into context 4.8 million people use the Tube every day. That's a hell of

:50:36.:50:40.

a lot of people trying to use alternative modes of transport. They

:50:41.:50:44.

include, of course, the buses. Here is Hammersmith station. It is fairly

:50:45.:50:50.

quiet here at the moment, but I am told that at Shepherd's Bush there

:50:51.:50:53.

are large crowds of people there and some angry customers indeed. In

:50:54.:50:57.

fact, we're hearing that some fights have broken out there. As you said,

:50:58.:51:03.

Clapham Junction has been evacuated due to overcrowding. Extra services

:51:04.:51:07.

have been put in place to try and help. There are an extra 150 buses.

:51:08.:51:15.

There is also extra bikes available at the cycle hubs around Central

:51:16.:51:21.

London. The river services have also been enhanced, but if you are

:51:22.:51:25.

travelling on the roads, I'm afraid, there are miles and miles of queues

:51:26.:51:30.

heading into London if you are travelling by car or by taxi. I have

:51:31.:51:34.

to say, as I was travelling here today, there were a lot of extra

:51:35.:51:38.

people on the streets as well. People going back to old-fashioned

:51:39.:51:44.

walking or running to work! The mayor, Sadiq Khan, called the strike

:51:45.:51:49.

action pointless and he says it is causing unnecessary suffering to

:51:50.:51:58.

millions of passengers but the unions reiterated that the

:51:59.:52:02.

unacceptable proposals have been put forward and they're concerned about

:52:03.:52:07.

safety and staff. Now the strike action will last until around 6pm

:52:08.:52:13.

tonight. However, we're expecting that services won't resume until

:52:14.:52:19.

around about tomorrow morning. After 10am, we will talk to

:52:20.:52:22.

management from Transport for London.

:52:23.:52:28.

At least 15 people have been arrested in connection

:52:29.:52:31.

with the Kim Kardashian armed robbery in Paris last year.

:52:32.:52:33.

You'll remember she was held at gunpoint and robbed of jewellery

:52:34.:52:36.

worth several million dollars by five masked men.

:52:37.:52:40.

Our entertainment reporter is here. Fill us in. At least 16 people have

:52:41.:52:45.

been arrested in connection with this. Police are saying that they

:52:46.:52:51.

found some jewellery that the masked men dropped when they robbed Kim

:52:52.:52:55.

Kardashian in October. She was in Paris for Paris Fashion Week. It is

:52:56.:53:00.

thought mast ked men dressed as police officers and burst into her

:53:01.:53:04.

private apartment building and held a gun to her head and robbed her of

:53:05.:53:10.

jewellery and then they locked her in the bathroom. Now, when the

:53:11.:53:13.

police found this jewellery, they found traces of DNA on it which they

:53:14.:53:18.

led to a person known to them and this is where all the arrests have

:53:19.:53:24.

come from Normandy and the French Riviera. In terms of the impact the

:53:25.:53:31.

robbery had on her. She came off social media, but now she is back

:53:32.:53:37.

on. Reports o her and her husband's marriage? She has just come back on

:53:38.:53:42.

social media a few days ago and there was the first trailer for the

:53:43.:53:50.

new series of keeping up with the Kardashians'. She said she thought

:53:51.:53:53.

the robbers were going to shoot her in the back of the head. There were

:53:54.:53:57.

reports about marriage disturbances between her and rapper Kanye West.

:53:58.:54:07.

It looks like all family gatherings are back to normal because there

:54:08.:54:12.

will be a new series where we will get to find out more about this

:54:13.:54:19.

report and what's happened with the Paris robbery and Kanye's health

:54:20.:54:21.

from March. Thank you very much. La La Land has become

:54:22.:54:30.

the most successful film in Golden Globes history,

:54:31.:54:32.

winning seven awards. British stars Tom Hiddleston,

:54:33.:54:36.

Hugh Laurie and Olivia Colman picked up awards for BBC drama

:54:37.:54:38.

The Night Manager, and Claire Foy Maybe I'm not good enough. It is

:54:39.:54:54.

like a pipe dream. This is the dream. It is conflict and it is

:54:55.:54:58.

compromise and it is veriks very exciting.

:54:59.:55:29.

That was La La Land as opposed to Tom Hiddleston.

:55:30.:55:39.

But it was the Hollywood star Meryl Streep who drew most headlines

:55:40.:55:42.

when she sharply criticised the US president-elect Donald Trump

:55:43.:55:44.

as she received a lifetime achievement award at the ceremony.

:55:45.:55:46.

It is a terrible situation happening for children. The Night Manager is

:55:47.:55:53.

about arms dealing and there is too many arms going into south Sudan.

:55:54.:55:58.

That was Tom Hiddleston rather than Meryl Streep. Sorry about that!

:55:59.:56:06.

There was criticism of Donald Trump. Donald Trump said he is not

:56:07.:56:09.

surprised he came under attack from liberal movie people and he

:56:10.:56:13.

described Meryl Streep as a Hillary Clinton lover.

:56:14.:56:20.

And Ryan Reynolds and Andrew Garfield snogged as fellow actor

:56:21.:56:22.

Ryan Gosling walked on stage to pick up a gong.

:56:23.:56:30.

And on the programme tomorrow, we'll be speaking to Nicole Kidman.

:56:31.:56:36.

Her film Lion received four Golden Globes nominations.

:56:37.:56:40.

Now the weather. What we have this morning is some rain. The rain is

:56:41.:56:47.

going to continue to spread south-east wards as we head through

:56:48.:56:51.

the rest of the day. Clearing and then behind it, you will find, we

:56:52.:56:54.

will see a return to brighter conditions and showers. The rain is

:56:55.:56:57.

courtesy of this weather front. Behind it, look at this squeeze on

:56:58.:57:01.

the isobars indicating that it is going to be windy. Gusting to gale

:57:02.:57:04.

force across the north-west later on. So we start in the south with a

:57:05.:57:08.

lot of cloud. It has been a damp start to the day. That will be

:57:09.:57:12.

erased by this rain coming southwards. So heavier rain and

:57:13.:57:17.

gusty winds around it. But behind it, look at the difference. Some

:57:18.:57:21.

sunshine and brate spells and also some showers. Above 500 meters in

:57:22.:57:25.

Scotland, some of those will be wintry and the wind is strengthening

:57:26.:57:31.

and gusting to 60mph, 65mph with exposure across the north-westment

:57:32.:57:33.

for Northern Ireland, Northern England and North Wales, we are

:57:34.:57:36.

looking at a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers. The

:57:37.:57:39.

rain continuing to push into the South East, leaving a legacy of

:57:40.:57:43.

cloud behind it, but still fairly mild, looking at temperatures nine

:57:44.:57:48.

to 12 Celsius. Through the evening, that rain pushes away and overnight

:57:49.:57:51.

under clear skies across some central and eastern parts of the UK,

:57:52.:57:55.

we could see just a touch of frost. Meanwhile, the second band of rain

:57:56.:57:58.

moves from the west towards the east. The strongest winds transfer

:57:59.:58:02.

to the north-east and slowly the wind will come down, but it will be

:58:03.:58:07.

fairly windy. So we start tomorrow with the frost in some central and

:58:08.:58:12.

eastern areas. This means we will see sunshine, but out towards the

:58:13.:58:15.

west, another weather front is coming our way, and that's

:58:16.:58:18.

introducing thicker cloud and rain and it is moving from the west

:58:19.:58:22.

towards the east and as that clears the west, it will brighten up behind

:58:23.:58:25.

it. Temperatures tomorrow ranging from about six or seven Celsius in

:58:26.:58:29.

the north to still mild in the south. Nine to 11 Celsius. Now,

:58:30.:58:34.

moving from Tuesday and into Wednesday, again, quite a windy day.

:58:35.:58:39.

Again, a lot of dry weather around with some sunshine, but there will

:58:40.:58:42.

be showers around and as the colder air starts to come in, increasingly,

:58:43.:58:46.

they will be wintry on the hills, but if you're stepping out across

:58:47.:58:49.

the northern half of the k, it will feel cold. Temperatures between

:58:50.:58:53.

three and six Celsius. Further south, the temperature going down,

:58:54.:58:56.

but not quite as low as further north. Just lower than we have seen

:58:57.:58:59.

in the last few days and including today. So as we head towards the

:59:00.:59:05.

latter part of this week what is going to happen is we lose the mild

:59:06.:59:10.

yellows and they are replaced by the colder blues across the land. This

:59:11.:59:14.

air source is the Arctic and the wind direction is coming from the

:59:15.:59:17.

north or the north-west. So that does mean that some of us will see

:59:18.:59:24.

some snow. Now, at this stage, we could see snow almost anywhere.

:59:25.:59:29.

Thursday, Friday and into Saturday. But where we think at the moment is

:59:30.:59:34.

across Northern Scotland, parts of north-west England, North Wales, and

:59:35.:59:38.

the moors and the south-west, but all of that could change. So do keep

:59:39.:59:42.

in touch with the weather forecast and we will keep you up-to-date with

:59:43.:59:45.

what is happening. The cold air remains with us as we go through the

:59:46.:59:49.

weekend, but into next week, well, it looks like we might see something

:59:50.:59:53.

a little bit milder, but that could change too. So the message is keep

:59:54.:59:55.

in touch with the weather forecast. Our top story -

:59:56.:00:02.

tackling the injustice The Prime Minister promises to help

:00:03.:00:07.

schools and companies in England deal better

:00:08.:00:11.

with mental health issues. We have spoken to people about their

:00:12.:00:20.

experiences in the workplace. I was taken aback and said it was not an

:00:21.:00:25.

excuse, I have explained to you as an employer and friend the situation

:00:26.:00:29.

and if you are not willing to support me in it, we will not be

:00:30.:00:33.

able to take this further. When I went to HR and said I was not

:00:34.:00:38.

feeling well, I was feeling anxious, within 24 hours they hooked me up

:00:39.:00:43.

with a professional counsellor and I had a professional phone

:00:44.:00:47.

conversation. I felt able to speak to my line manager and was back in

:00:48.:00:53.

work within three days for that. Really keen to hear your

:00:54.:00:58.

experiences, particularly how your bosses have treated you when you

:00:59.:01:01.

have revealed mental health issues. We would like to talk to you on air

:01:02.:01:03.

before 11am. Also on the programme -

:01:04.:01:05.

exclusive access inside a 'fix room' in Denmark where dug addicts can

:01:06.:01:08.

legally take heroin and crack It is the same as you drink,

:01:09.:01:20.

whatever, losing some feeling, you know? Glasgow plans to introduce one

:01:21.:01:30.

and there are calls for more in the UK. Would you back then?

:01:31.:01:32.

And at the Golden Globes La La Land and the Night Manager

:01:33.:01:35.

are the big winners - Tom Hiddlestone uses his win to send

:01:36.:01:38.

It is a terrible situation happening for children. The Night Manager is

:01:39.:01:46.

about arms dealing and there are too many arms going into South Sudan.

:01:47.:01:52.

Theresa May is to announce a number of measures designed to deal

:01:53.:01:58.

with what she will describe as the "hidden injustice"

:01:59.:02:00.

In a speech, she'll promise to transform attitudes

:02:01.:02:04.

towards mental disorders, through extra training for schools

:02:05.:02:06.

Figures suggest 75 per cent of mental health problems start

:02:07.:02:11.

Up to four million commuters in London are facing significant

:02:12.:02:21.

difficult time this morning because of a strike across

:02:22.:02:23.

At one point one of the capital's busiest stations, Clapham Junction,

:02:24.:02:27.

had to be evacuated because of overcrowding.

:02:28.:02:30.

Huge crowds have gathered at bus stops as travellers try to complete

:02:31.:02:33.

Members of the RMT and TSSA unions walked out last

:02:34.:02:36.

night in a row about jobs and ticket office closures.

:02:37.:02:39.

The 24-hour strike is due to finish at six o'clock tonight.

:02:40.:02:48.

Police are investigating after a woman's body was found in Fife. The

:02:49.:03:00.

death of the 52-year-old is being treated as unexplained while

:03:01.:03:01.

investigations continue. Thousands of police officers

:03:02.:03:02.

in London are to be asked if they want to be routinely armed

:03:03.:03:04.

with a gun or electric Taser. The Metropolitan Police Federation,

:03:05.:03:08.

which represents 32,000 officers in the capital,

:03:09.:03:09.

says that with more officers being armed to counter

:03:10.:03:11.

the threat of terrorism, it was only fair to ask

:03:12.:03:14.

them what they think. A police spokesman said more than 90

:03:15.:03:18.

per cent of officers were currently unarmed and there were no plans

:03:19.:03:21.

to change this. Police in Paris say they have

:03:22.:03:24.

arrested more than a dozen people in connection with last October's

:03:25.:03:27.

robbery at gunpoint of the American They say DNA left by the robbers

:03:28.:03:29.

at the scene led to their arrests. At the time, French police said

:03:30.:03:37.

more than ?7 million Her spokeswoman said masked men

:03:38.:03:40.

entered the room at the luxury residence where Kim Kardashian

:03:41.:03:44.

was staying while attending The comedy "La La Land" -

:03:45.:03:46.

a nostalgic tribute to Hollywood musicals -

:03:47.:03:51.

has won a record seven prizes British actors also enjoyed a golden

:03:52.:03:53.

night in the TV categories. Tom Hiddleston, Olivia Colman

:03:54.:04:00.

and Hugh Laurie won acting prizes Claire Foy, who plays the Queen

:04:01.:04:02.

in Netflix's royal epic The Crown, was named best TV drama actress

:04:03.:04:10.

and the show won best TV drama. is the latest news, more at 10:30am.

:04:11.:04:27.

On Twitter, Esther said regarding the drug fixing rooms, saying they

:04:28.:04:33.

promote health and lower crime rates. She said at the moment we

:04:34.:04:37.

seem to be going backwards in the UK with attitudes towards drug users.

:04:38.:04:42.

She said drug users need protection and that is our responsibility as a

:04:43.:04:46.

member of the human race. Do get in touch.

:04:47.:04:51.

The latest sport now. Plymouth Argyle from the fourth tier of

:04:52.:04:56.

English football earned themselves a lucrative replay with Liverpool

:04:57.:04:59.

after their goalless draw in the third round of the FA Cup. The magic

:05:00.:05:05.

of the FA Cup was felt that Anfield is 9000 Plymouth fans made the ten

:05:06.:05:11.

hour round-trip. Jurgen Klopp made ten changes, fielding the youngest

:05:12.:05:15.

start-up in Liverpool's history and it helps Plymouth, who now prepare

:05:16.:05:20.

for the arrival of Liverpool in the replay. It causes as an extra

:05:21.:05:24.

headache as it does to Liverpool but it is great for the city we have a

:05:25.:05:28.

Premier League team coming. We are still in the next round of the FA

:05:29.:05:38.

Cup, as well. I knew before the game, with another line-up it could

:05:39.:05:43.

have been the same. It is not likely, but possible. It was an

:05:44.:05:47.

important experience with this line-up for the boys. They deserve

:05:48.:05:52.

the game at Plymouth and now we go there and try to do better. Also

:05:53.:05:59.

making the changes were Chelsea, who had no problems against League 1

:06:00.:06:03.

Peterborough United with a comfortable 4-1 win. Chelsea

:06:04.:06:12.

registered 35 shots on goal. Antonio Conte said he is considering

:06:13.:06:16.

appealing this incident. John Terry's red card. Sent off for a

:06:17.:06:22.

last man tackle and now facing a one match ban will stop Tottenham beat

:06:23.:06:26.

Aston Villa after a dreadful first half. It came alive in the second.

:06:27.:06:34.

Middlesbrough and Fulham FC are in tonight's draw. As comebacks go this

:06:35.:06:42.

will go down as one of the shortest. After seven months out, wasps

:06:43.:06:46.

flanker James Haskell lasted 35 seconds after coming off the bench

:06:47.:06:49.

against Leicester, before he was taken off with what looked like a

:06:50.:06:55.

nasty head injury, but the club are confident he will recover and should

:06:56.:06:58.

be fit to make the Six Nations for England. Three British players have

:06:59.:07:04.

been in action in the run-up to the Australian Open. Dan Evans won his

:07:05.:07:08.

match but Kyle Edmund was knocked out. Johanna Konta won in straight

:07:09.:07:16.

sets. She reached the semifinals of the Australian Open last year and

:07:17.:07:20.

has had a pretty good start to the season as she looks to replicate

:07:21.:07:25.

that form in 2017. There is often talk about football giving to

:07:26.:07:30.

supporters but this is an example of fans literally giving back to their

:07:31.:07:35.

club. The Morecambe manager was recently fined ?1000 after being

:07:36.:07:40.

sent from the touchline against Cheltenham, but with the League 2

:07:41.:07:44.

side struggling financially, supporters club together and have

:07:45.:07:50.

given him the cash to pay the fine. He was looking strong and solid but

:07:51.:07:54.

eventually he was moved to tears by the gesture. It is pretty nice, it

:07:55.:08:00.

goes to show in the lower leagues, the fans and manager Felix together

:08:01.:08:02.

and they were helping him out. Cheers.

:08:03.:08:05.

Now when it comes to stopping deaths from drug overdoses,

:08:06.:08:12.

could 'fix-rooms' or 'consumption rooms' be the answer?

:08:13.:08:14.

They're places where users can legally inject hard drugs

:08:15.:08:16.

like cocaine and heroin under medical supervision,

:08:17.:08:19.

There have been repeated calls for them to be

:08:20.:08:24.

Glasgow is planning to open the country's first

:08:25.:08:29.

drugs consumption room and officials behind it have looked

:08:30.:08:32.

to countries like Denmark - where these facilities already run

:08:33.:08:34.

Our reporter Divya Talwar spent a day inside a fix-room

:08:35.:08:43.

About 500 users come through its door each day.

:08:44.:08:47.

We played the full film at 0915 - here's a short extract -

:08:48.:08:56.

it shows scenes with blood and addicts injecting which you may

:08:57.:08:58.

This is Copenhagen's seedy red light district,

:08:59.:09:06.

It's home to one of the city's so-called fix rooms,

:09:07.:09:15.

a place where addicts can legally take Class A drugs safely,

:09:16.:09:19.

under supervision and without the fear of prosecution.

:09:20.:09:24.

There's calls to introduce them back in the UK,

:09:25.:09:26.

so I'm spending the day here to see how they work.

:09:27.:09:33.

It's 8am and, inside, users have already turned up.

:09:34.:09:39.

My name is Elliott, and I'm 25, almost 26 years old.

:09:40.:09:47.

It's good cocaine, a lot of heroin, and some diazepam benzo,

:09:48.:09:56.

He's homeless and will beg, borrow and steal to buy hard drugs.

:09:57.:10:07.

He injects so often that it's difficult to find a vein.

:10:08.:10:13.

This place opened three years ago, funded by the city

:10:14.:10:34.

There's always a nurse here to supervise the users.

:10:35.:10:42.

When the users come, the only thing they have to bring

:10:43.:10:45.

themselves is the drugs they are going to consume.

:10:46.:10:47.

Everything else we give to them for free.

:10:48.:10:49.

This is just an example, but we give to them the needles,

:10:50.:10:53.

Of course, the main thing is to save lives and to prevent

:10:54.:10:58.

Elliott is one of about 500 users who will come here today.

:10:59.:11:09.

And it's a safe place to take things in.

:11:10.:11:16.

When I take something that is really strong,

:11:17.:11:19.

I turn to the nurse that is sitting by the computer and I tell them,

:11:20.:11:25.

"Hey, listen up, I'm going to take this strong dose," so they know

:11:26.:11:28.

what to expect if anything goes south.

:11:29.:11:34.

The fixing room will stay open through the night.

:11:35.:11:38.

Some people would say that having a facility like this is encouraging

:11:39.:11:41.

It's a very hard life to be a drug addict in this environment.

:11:42.:11:51.

It's a very busy life, people are working to get

:11:52.:11:53.

It does not make people's lives more easy, but it gives people a place

:11:54.:12:01.

But the fix room is clearly not a treatment facility

:12:02.:12:06.

to get addicts off drugs, and many people, like the users

:12:07.:12:08.

I've met here today, will come in and out of the fix room

:12:09.:12:11.

and go back to their difficult and sometimes dangerous lifestyles.

:12:12.:12:19.

Let's talk now to Rasmus Koberg Christiansen.

:12:20.:12:22.

He runs and manages the drug consumption room

:12:23.:12:24.

David Liddell is from the Scottish Drugs Forum,

:12:25.:12:35.

which supports plans to introduce consumption rooms in Glasgow.

:12:36.:12:37.

Chip Somers is a former heroin addict, who now runs a charity

:12:38.:12:40.

providing treatment for alcohol and substance misuse.

:12:41.:12:42.

He thinks the centres are a bad idea.

:12:43.:12:44.

Elizabeth Burton-Phillips' son Nick died because

:12:45.:12:45.

She's set up a charity call Drug Fam to help families in need

:12:46.:12:51.

and she thinks consumption rooms potentially encourage addiction.

:12:52.:12:56.

-- drug-taking. Why is a facility like yours necessary? The facility

:12:57.:13:09.

is necessary because it gives drugs users who normally take drugs in the

:13:10.:13:14.

streets in public a safe place where they can take their drugs. If they

:13:15.:13:19.

got an overdose, there are trained staff who can help them so they do

:13:20.:13:25.

not get severe injuries or die from an overdose. Chip Summers, would you

:13:26.:13:32.

have used a consumption room like this in order to stay safe? I don't

:13:33.:13:38.

think so, when I got my drugs I was keen to get somewhere private and I

:13:39.:13:42.

did use and inject in the street. I may have use them, I don't know. I

:13:43.:13:47.

would not have made a habit of it. When I got stoned I wanted to be

:13:48.:13:52.

quiet and listen to music away from everything else. Why are you not in

:13:53.:13:56.

favour of these rooms? Because of the cost. The cost of that must be

:13:57.:14:03.

in the region of up to ?500,000 a year at a time when people are

:14:04.:14:08.

struggling and waiting years to get detox and rehab. It is a vanity

:14:09.:14:12.

project at a time when we should concentrate on getting people who

:14:13.:14:17.

want to get abstinent into rehab, detoxed and clean. Please talk

:14:18.:14:22.

directly to Chip. What would you say to him? Relating to the cost, drugs

:14:23.:14:30.

consumption rooms can benefit because when people get overdoses,

:14:31.:14:38.

maybe they do not die, but they can have severe head injuries, brain

:14:39.:14:42.

damage, things like that. In that case the drugs consumption room cost

:14:43.:14:51.

benefit. I do not say it is either a drug Sumption room or other

:14:52.:14:55.

treatment. Both things are important to get, to get a good programme for

:14:56.:15:03.

drug addicts -- come Sumption. Right now in Glasgow, we have people

:15:04.:15:10.

waiting to go to rehab, all over the UK we have people waiting to go to

:15:11.:15:14.

rehab, and we do not have the money for a project like this. Their

:15:15.:15:19.

families desperate to get their children into treatment, clean, and

:15:20.:15:22.

are not able to because there is no funding to people through treatment.

:15:23.:15:32.

Elizabeth, two sons, one of whom died. What do you think of these

:15:33.:15:38.

rooms? It is encouraging further drug use. I think over the last 13

:15:39.:15:44.

years since my son died, I've worked across UK prisons, UK rehabs, in

:15:45.:15:50.

schools, and what I hear is the biggest thing for family members is

:15:51.:15:55.

the desire for freedom from addiction and not continued

:15:56.:15:59.

addiction. And... The biggest thing for family members, but not

:16:00.:16:03.

necessarily the addict? But the most important thing to understand is

:16:04.:16:07.

that addiction is a family illness. It is not just about the addict.

:16:08.:16:12.

Addiction can make you incredibly selfish and self-centred. It is the

:16:13.:16:15.

fall-out on the family members that is really, really important. But if

:16:16.:16:20.

an addict doesn't want to be helped, an addict won't be helped?

:16:21.:16:23.

Absolutely, but nevertheless, the family members still have the worry

:16:24.:16:26.

and the anxiety and the fear of death and that kind of thing. So

:16:27.:16:31.

that has to be looked at. Let me bring in David from the Scottish

:16:32.:16:35.

Drugs Forum. You are behind, you support the plan to introduce a

:16:36.:16:39.

consumption room, the so-called fixed rooms in Glasgow. How do you

:16:40.:16:42.

respond to the various criticisms, David? Well, I think has has been

:16:43.:16:51.

said in your piece, it is not a question of either or and we

:16:52.:16:54.

shouldn't view it in that way at all. Of course, we need more

:16:55.:16:59.

resources across the whole of the treatment and care sector, but

:17:00.:17:02.

particularly in relation to the Glasgow proposals. We have in the

:17:03.:17:10.

region of 500 very vulnerable, mostly older drug users. That's

:17:11.:17:15.

people over the age of 35 who have very little prospects of recovery

:17:16.:17:23.

and we need to reach out to that group so we can begin to engage with

:17:24.:17:28.

them and the proposals suggest is that we are moving current injecting

:17:29.:17:32.

that's going on in the streets within Glasgow into a safe

:17:33.:17:36.

environment where people can be supported and helped. And through

:17:37.:17:40.

that process we start to engage... At a financial cost, Mr Lidl. If

:17:41.:17:45.

there isn't enough taxpayers money to fund the necessary treatment

:17:46.:17:49.

that's needed right now then you're asking taxpayers to fund this as

:17:50.:17:55.

well? I think there has been described a humanitarian aspect of

:17:56.:18:03.

reaching out to this most vulnerable population engaging more effectively

:18:04.:18:06.

with them. If you look at it in terms of cost, we have an outbreak

:18:07.:18:13.

of HIV infection in Glasgow, that's # 5 individuals. 75 individuals. We

:18:14.:18:25.

need to look at it in the overall picture and the problem with drug

:18:26.:18:31.

users, there is admissions to hospital with multiple health issues

:18:32.:18:39.

that they have. Let's bring in Chip, somebody with HIV spreading it

:18:40.:18:43.

around because the unsafe use of needles. That's going to cost the

:18:44.:18:47.

NHS a lot of money? It will cost the NHS money. I heard David before

:18:48.:18:50.

talking about these people who are over 35 and have been using for a

:18:51.:18:54.

long time, the poor loves can't get better. I was 38 when I got better

:18:55.:18:58.

and I have had a long time in recovery. There is nothing about age

:18:59.:19:01.

or anything that stops people from getting better and I think we should

:19:02.:19:05.

just be encouraging people much more, what is the waiting list for

:19:06.:19:09.

rehab in Glasgow at the moment? But surely... What is the waiting list

:19:10.:19:15.

at the moment for rehab in Glasgow? What sort of rehab are you talking

:19:16.:19:19.

about? How many people in Glasgow are waiting for detox? I think the

:19:20.:19:24.

point is, you know, as has been said, we are looking for a wider

:19:25.:19:27.

range of services, that's the point. I think, you know, what we mead to

:19:28.:19:32.

do is keep people alive until the point they can actually effectively

:19:33.:19:36.

recover. As you say, considerable numbers of people actually recover

:19:37.:19:39.

at a later age and the challenge we have in the Scottish context is that

:19:40.:19:45.

many people sadly don't reach the age, you know, of yourself when you

:19:46.:19:48.

recovered at 38, they are actually dead before then and that is not

:19:49.:19:54.

acceptable in our view. And some people are getting in touch to say,

:19:55.:19:58.

don't these fixed rooms actually encourage further drug taking? There

:19:59.:20:03.

is no sign from the fixed rooms that they encourage people to get clean?

:20:04.:20:08.

I think the point is we're moving currently injecting from the streets

:20:09.:20:12.

into these centres. There is no evidence of any of the centres

:20:13.:20:17.

across the world that actually they've led to increased drug use

:20:18.:20:21.

because what we're talking about is long-term problematic drug users who

:20:22.:20:27.

are not able for various reasons, including issues that you discussed

:20:28.:20:30.

earlier in your programme, around mental health. A considerable

:20:31.:20:34.

proportion of these individuals have significant underlying mental health

:20:35.:20:37.

problems which make engagement with services difficult. It is about

:20:38.:20:42.

being humane and raching out to this population which we have been unable

:20:43.:20:49.

to engage with effectively. Mr Lidl, could I ask you, have you ever had a

:20:50.:20:53.

family member or friend in addiction personally? A family member or

:20:54.:20:58.

friend in addiction? Not a family member, no. So you wouldn't

:20:59.:21:04.

understand possibly the impact of addiction on the family? I don't

:21:05.:21:07.

think that would be fair to be honest. I've worked in the field for

:21:08.:21:12.

30 years. Because I think... I am aware of all the issues and we've

:21:13.:21:17.

campaigned for many years for a full range of services across the

:21:18.:21:21.

spectrum. A full range of services needs to embrace the family. The

:21:22.:21:26.

family are the ones who are directly impacted by someone's addiction. And

:21:27.:21:30.

therefore, it is very, very important that when you're looking

:21:31.:21:34.

at supporting places like fixed rooms, that you understand that even

:21:35.:21:41.

though they maybe safe places, for the addicts to go, there are family

:21:42.:21:45.

members out there who are worried day after day, suffering mental

:21:46.:21:49.

health issues themselves, suffering depression, anxiety themselves,

:21:50.:21:53.

because of fear of the continued drug use. And I have to support Chip

:21:54.:21:57.

here because the most important thing that I hear day after day

:21:58.:22:02.

after day from addicts in recovery and from addicts seeking recovery,

:22:03.:22:06.

from people in prison, is I want freedom from drugs, not continued

:22:07.:22:09.

drug use. I think what you'll find

:22:10.:22:14.

particularly with this population in Glasgow that we're talking about is

:22:15.:22:20.

they are isolated from everybody. That's services and their families

:22:21.:22:26.

and so, in my view, and the view of others who've introduced the centres

:22:27.:22:29.

across Europe and more widely is they are an important step in more

:22:30.:22:33.

effectively engaging with individuals. Do you accept that

:22:34.:22:37.

point? That actually bringing these people into for a start, some kind

:22:38.:22:41.

of safe environment, so if they do overdose, there is someone on hand

:22:42.:22:45.

to help them? As a family member that might be some short-term

:22:46.:22:50.

consolation, but also that as David says, they're isolated at the moment

:22:51.:22:55.

so get them into a fixed room so you have got some conversation starter.

:22:56.:22:58.

That sort of thing is supposed to be happening now... But it is not.

:22:59.:23:04.

They're isolated. Remember your time, taking heroin privately, on

:23:05.:23:07.

your own, you wanted to be away from people. You weren't necessarily

:23:08.:23:11.

engaged with the services on offer. There were few services on offer and

:23:12.:23:15.

the services that are on offer now, are worse than they were then. If I

:23:16.:23:21.

was about to spend ?500,000 on a drug consumption room, the question

:23:22.:23:24.

I would be asking is that's fine, but how many people are waiting to

:23:25.:23:29.

go to rehab before we spend this money? Do you know how many people

:23:30.:23:34.

are on the waiting list for abstinence treatment in Glasgow

:23:35.:23:37.

right now? Well, the waiting times for access to treatment across

:23:38.:23:40.

Scotland is generally less than three weeks. That's the case and we

:23:41.:23:45.

have argued actually that should be certainly shorter than it is, but I

:23:46.:23:51.

go back to my fundamental point, we shouldn't be arguing about the value

:23:52.:23:55.

of one service against another, we need a whole spectrum of services so

:23:56.:23:59.

that people can make that transition from the most chaotic drug use and

:24:00.:24:05.

be more effectively engaged. I think it is an unhelpful thing to view it

:24:06.:24:09.

as one or the other. Some messages from people watching you talk about

:24:10.:24:12.

this. Amy, "So we let people into a fixed room. No questions asked on

:24:13.:24:16.

where they got the drugs from, if they were stolen? It is just

:24:17.:24:22.

encouraging drug use." Pat says, "Drug consumption rooms are a

:24:23.:24:26.

compassionate approach to supporting someone with an addiction." Another

:24:27.:24:30.

viewer says, "Fixed rooms will take away the stigma and the status

:24:31.:24:33.

associated in that it draws people in. It will reduce overdoses and

:24:34.:24:38.

disease." Angela says, "It is a safe environment for drug users and has

:24:39.:24:43.

less negative connotations for wider society. They need help, not

:24:44.:24:46.

victimisation and judging." I'm going to thank you all for your

:24:47.:24:52.

time. Thank you for coming on the programme, thank you for your time

:24:53.:24:53.

this morning. If you've been affected

:24:54.:24:59.

by the issues raised in Divya's report, you can find details

:25:00.:25:01.

of organisations offering information and support with

:25:02.:25:03.

addiction at bbc.co.uk/actionline. Or you can call for free,

:25:04.:25:05.

at any time to hear recorded Coming up, we will hear from three

:25:06.:25:08.

people working in the NHS. Should police officers

:25:09.:25:31.

routinely be armed? Thousands of Met officers

:25:32.:25:33.

are being asked whether they would want to regularly carry

:25:34.:25:36.

a gun or taser. A survey by the Metropolitan Police

:25:37.:25:38.

Federation will consult all its members on their views

:25:39.:25:40.

about equipping Scotland Yard doesn't support

:25:41.:25:42.

officers being armed But with a severe terror threat

:25:43.:25:44.

in this country does Ken Marsh is Chairman of

:25:45.:25:48.

the Metropolitan Police Federation Tony Long is a former specialist

:25:49.:26:02.

firearms officer for 25 years at the Met Police and has written

:26:03.:26:06.

a book about his experiences. Ken, why are you asking your members

:26:07.:26:10.

this? Good morning. We're asking our members this because they haven't

:26:11.:26:14.

been asked it before. Predominantly it is about Taser more than

:26:15.:26:18.

firearms, but the question needs to be asked because should we flip the

:26:19.:26:21.

coin in circumstances change in London where we do see something

:26:22.:26:26.

major take place and there is a clamouring for this to happen, then

:26:27.:26:30.

we've never asked our colleagues ever, would you be prepared to carry

:26:31.:26:35.

a Taser or a firearm because a lot might say, "No way." I wouldn't do

:26:36.:26:39.

the job. So that's why we're asking the question.

:26:40.:26:44.

Tony Long, as a former firearms officer, you have shot five people.

:26:45.:26:50.

Killed three individuals, I wonder if you can give our audience some

:26:51.:26:55.

kind of insight into the circumstances and the decision

:26:56.:26:59.

making when it comes to using a weapon? Yes, the three situations

:27:00.:27:07.

that I was involved in were over a long period time. The first was in

:27:08.:27:11.

1985, it was a domestic siege where I shot a man who was in the process

:27:12.:27:15.

of stabbing a little girl that he had been holding hostage. The

:27:16.:27:20.

decision there was incredibly easy. It was a choice between the life of

:27:21.:27:25.

a little girl and the life of a man who had already brutally murdered

:27:26.:27:28.

the child's mother in front of police. That wasn't a difficult

:27:29.:27:32.

decision to make. He actually survived. So I didn't have to sort

:27:33.:27:38.

of labour on how I would have thought about it had he died. The

:27:39.:27:42.

next situation was two years later. It was an armed robbery. And it was

:27:43.:27:46.

a pre-planned operation where we had intelligence and we were waiting for

:27:47.:27:50.

the robbery to happen. And when we were confronted, the robbers turned

:27:51.:27:54.

to face me and again, it want a difficult decision. The last

:27:55.:27:59.

occasion, it was a very difficult decision because I didn't see a gun.

:28:00.:28:02.

The intelligence was that he had a gun. His manner ychs and his

:28:03.:28:06.

behaviour led me to believe that my colleagues lives were in danger and

:28:07.:28:10.

I opened fire. For me, that was the most difficult decision of my

:28:11.:28:16.

career. And were you... When an officer finds himself in that

:28:17.:28:19.

situation in that split second before firing, the decision to fire

:28:20.:28:22.

probably isn't difficult. It is living with it afterwards that's the

:28:23.:28:24.

difficulty. Have you found it difficult to live

:28:25.:28:28.

afterwards with the decision you made in the latter case? No. Because

:28:29.:28:33.

I was right. The man had a gun. As far as I was concerned he posed a

:28:34.:28:38.

threat to my colleagues and so I was right, but I have not found myself

:28:39.:28:41.

in a situation say for instance of two of my colleagues that were

:28:42.:28:52.

involved in the shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes. They genuinely

:28:53.:28:56.

thought they were confronting a suicide bomber. Unfortunately they

:28:57.:29:00.

were given the wrong suspect. It was a tragic error. Now, I don't know

:29:01.:29:04.

how I would cope with living with that. They have got on with their

:29:05.:29:08.

lives and gone back to firearms duties, but unless you're there, it

:29:09.:29:12.

is very difficult to actually, you know, know how you'll feel. In terms

:29:13.:29:18.

of the circumstances you found yourself in, presumably you were

:29:19.:29:24.

investigated by either other forces or the independent Police Watchdog.

:29:25.:29:27.

What sort of an impact does that have on you? Well, the first

:29:28.:29:32.

situation, I was barely investigated at all believe it or not because the

:29:33.:29:38.

suspect, I suspect we would now call it suicide by cop. He wanted the

:29:39.:29:43.

police to shoot him and forced us into a situation where we had to and

:29:44.:29:49.

he survived. He never made an official complaint therefore, I was

:29:50.:29:52.

never investigated. That was early days. That was in the mid-80s. The

:29:53.:29:57.

second incident, I was investigated by an outside force. Overseen by the

:29:58.:30:03.

Police Complaints Authority. And the last one, I was investigated a very

:30:04.:30:13.

new IPCC and I was treated fairly fairly, but I know for a fact,

:30:14.:30:17.

through speaking to colleagues who are currently under investigation,

:30:18.:30:20.

and who have been investigated, in recent years, there has been a sea

:30:21.:30:25.

change in the way the IPCC deal with police officers. What we used to

:30:26.:30:29.

call principal officers, those who have had to shoot and it is not

:30:30.:30:32.

good. They're treated very much as criminals.

:30:33.:30:38.

The IPCC might reject that description but I am hearing what

:30:39.:30:44.

you are saying. Ken Marshall, it would be fascinating to find out if

:30:45.:30:49.

officers would feel comfortable with this. What you think the public

:30:50.:30:55.

would want? As you say, that is what we are interested in. Let's do it in

:30:56.:31:00.

stages and the first process is to ask colleagues and then put it out

:31:01.:31:06.

to a further field of the community, senior management, to engage with

:31:07.:31:10.

the question. The interesting thing for ours is to ask the question, we

:31:11.:31:15.

have not asked the question up to now, let's see what comes back. It

:31:16.:31:21.

could come back as a damp squib will stop our commissioner recently said

:31:22.:31:25.

600 more firearms officers on the streets of London, a huge number,

:31:26.:31:29.

and everyone accepted it. He could say the same next week stop let's

:31:30.:31:34.

get the balance, see what they are saying, and then we will be able to

:31:35.:31:39.

use the information. We are talking about increasing the numbers of

:31:40.:31:46.

firearms officers up to 2600. When I became an instructor in 1983, we

:31:47.:31:52.

trained 4800. In the last couple of decades we have dramatically reduced

:31:53.:31:58.

the people carrying firearms, officers, and they are arguably

:31:59.:32:03.

better trained, certainly better equipped and everybody who carries a

:32:04.:32:07.

firearm is now pretty much a full-time firearms carrier not a

:32:08.:32:11.

part timer like in the 80s. Ken said the question has not been asked.

:32:12.:32:17.

Maybe by the Metropolitan Federation but it has been asked nationally on

:32:18.:32:21.

four occasions in my service as to whether police officers should be

:32:22.:32:25.

armed and in the past, the wording the federation have used, it has

:32:26.:32:31.

almost been guiding officers into saying they did not want to carry

:32:32.:32:37.

firearms. The issue in this country is that you ask what the public

:32:38.:32:42.

want. We are there to protect the public and I respect their opinion,

:32:43.:32:49.

but I find it insulting. They say we want you to protect us, but we do

:32:50.:32:54.

not want you to be armed. Elsewhere in the world and I'm not talking bad

:32:55.:32:58.

America, I'm talking about France and Holland and Sweden, it would be

:32:59.:33:03.

crazy to call for this system to the police and for them to have no

:33:04.:33:06.

better means of protecting themselves. We will report on the

:33:07.:33:16.

outcome. Thanks. You have been getting in touch with your

:33:17.:33:19.

experiences of mental health services. Theresa May will give a

:33:20.:33:22.

speech after it 11 this morning and that will be live on BBC News. We

:33:23.:33:27.

will hear from some of you in the next half-hour.

:33:28.:33:30.

La La Land danced off with seven Golden Globes last night,

:33:31.:33:32.

but the most dramatic moment of the night went to Meryl Streep.

:33:33.:33:36.

Theresa May is to announce a number of measures designed to deal

:33:37.:33:47.

with what she will describe as the "hidden injustice"

:33:48.:33:50.

In a speech, she'll promise to transform attitudes

:33:51.:33:53.

towards mental disorders, through extra training for schools

:33:54.:33:55.

Figures suggest 75 per cent of mental health problems start

:33:56.:34:01.

difficult time this morning because of a strike across

:34:02.:34:06.

At one point one of the capital's busiest stations, Clapham Junction,

:34:07.:34:14.

had to be evacuated because of overcrowding.

:34:15.:34:17.

Huge crowds have gathered at bus stops as travellers try to complete

:34:18.:34:19.

Members of the RMT and TSSA unions walked out last

:34:20.:34:26.

night in a row about jobs and ticket office closures.

:34:27.:34:29.

The 24-hour strike is due to finish at six o'clock tonight.

:34:30.:34:33.

And in a few minutes time Victoria will be talking

:34:34.:34:35.

to the Chief Operating Officer of London Underground

:34:36.:34:37.

Police are investigating after a woman's body was found

:34:38.:34:41.

Officers were called to the woodland near Aboyne Way yesterday morning.

:34:42.:34:48.

The death of the 52-year-old is being treated as unexplained

:34:49.:34:51.

Join me again at 11. We will bring you the sport in a second. Before

:34:52.:35:10.

that, four hostages being held inside a bookmakers in Jarrow by a

:35:11.:35:15.

man with a firearm had been freed. We can speak to Fiona in Newcastle.

:35:16.:35:22.

Northumbria's Chief Constable said it was a dangerous and difficult

:35:23.:35:26.

operation and you can understand why when you see the footage, a man

:35:27.:35:29.

armed with what is believed to be a sawn off shotgun in a bookmakers in

:35:30.:35:36.

Jarrow, in a busy precinct, and four held inside. Police arrived at 540

:35:37.:35:41.

5p last night and soon afterwards three were released but the last

:35:42.:35:45.

person was released at 840 PM last night. Jarrow people said they could

:35:46.:35:51.

hear shots being fired and police telling us today it would have been

:35:52.:35:56.

from a police issue less lethal weapons so we understand a Taser was

:35:57.:36:01.

used. They tell us know one was injured, including the four

:36:02.:36:06.

hostages. It would have been a terrifying ordeal. A man has been

:36:07.:36:11.

arrested and a firearms seized and that man is being questioned this

:36:12.:36:12.

morning. Cheers. Now the sport. The spirit of the FA Cup was felt

:36:13.:36:16.

at Anfield yesterday as 9,000 Plymouth fans watched their side

:36:17.:36:21.

from the fourth tier of English Football hold

:36:22.:36:23.

Premier League giants Liverpool It earns them a lucrative replay

:36:24.:36:25.

and they are into the draw for the fourth round,

:36:26.:36:32.

although manager Jurgen Klopp's ten changes, helped Plymouth somewhat

:36:33.:36:34.

as he fielded the youngest side No problems for Chelsea though

:36:35.:36:36.

who also made changes, nine in total, as they beat

:36:37.:36:40.

League One Peterborough 4-1 - although they did have club captain

:36:41.:36:42.

John Terry sent off. There were wins too for Fulham ,

:36:43.:36:46.

Middlesbrough and Tottenham. As comebacks go it will go down

:36:47.:36:54.

as one of the shortest . After seven months out Wasps flanker

:36:55.:36:57.

James Haskell lasted 35 seconds after coming off the bench

:36:58.:36:59.

against Leicester yesterday, before he was taken off

:37:00.:37:01.

with a head injury. His club are confident he will make

:37:02.:37:03.

a quick recovery and should be fit to make the start of the six

:37:04.:37:07.

nations for England . Johanna Konta warmed up

:37:08.:37:09.

for the start of the Australian Open by beating Arina Rodionova

:37:10.:37:12.

in straight sets at the Sydney the semi-finals in the first grand

:37:13.:37:17.

slam of the year last year. Dan Evans is through in the men's

:37:18.:37:26.

competition but Kyle Edmund is out. The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt

:37:27.:37:28.

will make a statement to MPs On her the service is coping with

:37:29.:37:44.

winter pressures. The Red Cross described conditions faced by

:37:45.:37:49.

patients in recent weeks as amounting to a humanitarian crisis.

:37:50.:37:53.

Jeremy Hunt denies the accuracy of that description but said the

:37:54.:37:55.

situation is severe. There is a very serious situation

:37:56.:37:57.

in a number of hospitals. They are finding it

:37:58.:37:59.

very, very challenging. It's the most difficult

:38:00.:38:01.

time of year. I think you should listen to

:38:02.:38:03.

what independent people are saying. People like Chris Hobson

:38:04.:38:05.

who represents all the hospitals, no friend of the Government when it

:38:06.:38:08.

comes to NHS policy, who rejected that description

:38:09.:38:13.

because he said that actually the vast majority of hospitals

:38:14.:38:16.

are if anything coping slightly better than a year ago,

:38:17.:38:22.

but you do have some very severe problems in a few hospitals which,

:38:23.:38:25.

you know, no one wants to play down because they are very serious

:38:26.:38:28.

and we're doing everything we can Labour are demanding action. Here

:38:29.:38:42.

are some of the pressures the NHS is England -- in England are facing.

:38:43.:39:01.

This is a wake-up call, a wake-up call to properly

:39:02.:39:04.

fund our NHS and properly fund social care so that those

:39:05.:39:06.

who are in a desperate situation that need care outside of hospital

:39:07.:39:09.

Local authorities don't have the money to do it.

:39:10.:39:41.

Well, the definition of a humanitarian crisis

:39:42.:39:42.

is something that affects large numbers of people,

:39:43.:39:47.

their health and well-being, for a prolonged period of time.

:39:48.:39:50.

The fact is, you just look at the numbers.

:39:51.:39:52.

More than half a million people who used to receive

:39:53.:39:55.

It's probably not a million miles away from the truth.

:39:56.:40:09.

I think we've been predicting that we would face a winter from hell.

:40:10.:40:12.

On an international scale for the Red Cross, is it

:40:13.:40:20.

No, I think that's an overstatement at this stage.

:40:21.:40:25.

Clearly demand is very high and it's higher than it's ever been

:40:26.:40:28.

but we have probably the most comprehensive plans

:40:29.:40:30.

But it is really very difficult at the moment.

:40:31.:41:24.

So here to give us an insight of what it's like working

:41:25.:41:27.

We can speak to Paul Robinson who is an emergency medicine doctor.

:41:28.:41:32.

Hiam Aldroubi a medical student in a geriatric ward.

:41:33.:41:44.

You recently finished assessing night shifts at A Tell the

:41:45.:41:49.

audience what it was like. I am an emergency medicine doctor. The Red

:41:50.:41:58.

Cross described what we're facing as a humanitarian crisis. I am afraid

:41:59.:42:02.

to say that might not go far enough in cases and this is a problem

:42:03.:42:06.

Theresa May needs to address. Jeremy Hunt's statement will be welcome and

:42:07.:42:11.

I'm sure he will have interesting things to say, but the Prime

:42:12.:42:16.

Minister needs to intervene on this. A are under crippling pressure

:42:17.:42:20.

nationwide. We have a target of four hours where we asked -- we are

:42:21.:42:28.

supposed to see patients. We are so busy, we are picking patients up

:42:29.:42:34.

over that time, regularly seeing patients who had been in the

:42:35.:42:39.

Department for and a half hours, five, six hours, perhaps more. We

:42:40.:42:44.

are overwhelmed, we do not have enough beds and staffs and we are

:42:45.:42:48.

not properly funded. Have they taken beds out because they do not have

:42:49.:42:53.

the money? That is part of it. We have had a huge amount of acute beds

:42:54.:42:58.

cut in the last ten years and A attendance in the last ten years is

:42:59.:43:02.

up 25%, in a specialty that struggles to recruit staff. You say

:43:03.:43:08.

it is about beds rather than staff? It is a combination of the two, we

:43:09.:43:14.

need more and we need to ask ourselves questions about why the

:43:15.:43:18.

government can ignore the fact we are in provided full. You know that

:43:19.:43:24.

they would reject they are ignoring you and improperly... That they are

:43:25.:43:27.

not improperly providing. I'm sure they would but I would like to

:43:28.:43:33.

remind Theresa May the British Prime Minister 's arm looked on harshly by

:43:34.:43:37.

ministers when they use phrases like crisis, what crisis? We are caught

:43:38.:43:42.

under the wheels of a chariot. Do you acknowledge that the Health

:43:43.:43:46.

Secretary is saying there are severe problems, I am not complacent, and

:43:47.:43:51.

they will address it? I am overjoyed he has come back from his holiday

:43:52.:43:54.

and business trip in Japan to address the problem he should have

:43:55.:43:58.

been here to see two in the first place. I do not think his

:43:59.:44:03.

acknowledgement means much to fund -- to front-line staff now. Give our

:44:04.:44:10.

audience within sight of your work and pressures you are facing and how

:44:11.:44:16.

it is different to two years ago. Yesterday, I was not supposed to be

:44:17.:44:20.

in work, but my colleagues asked me to come in, to help, because the

:44:21.:44:26.

pressures we are seeing are so intense. Recently, the chair of the

:44:27.:44:34.

GMC, a professor of paediatrics, he said that in 30 years he has been in

:44:35.:44:39.

paediatrics, the level of intensity and level of pressure seen in NHS

:44:40.:44:44.

hospitals is like nothing that has ever been seen before. What is

:44:45.:44:51.

different this year? It is complex. There are lots of factors. The fact

:44:52.:44:57.

remains this is something junior doctors, the colleges have been

:44:58.:45:01.

telling the government about across the year. What are the factors? We

:45:02.:45:09.

have a huge amount of illness, an ageing population, we have reducing

:45:10.:45:17.

staff morale and the winter particularly is something where

:45:18.:45:21.

illness hits, particularly with children, who have severe

:45:22.:45:24.

infections. One thing that has not been touched on so far, it is not

:45:25.:45:30.

only patients getting sick of that doctors also. We have a lot of staff

:45:31.:45:35.

off in the winter and the other day a colleague ended up working in the

:45:36.:45:39.

hospital for 19 hours because the team on nights were too sick to come

:45:40.:45:43.

in because they had been working so hard. This is really difficult and a

:45:44.:45:47.

situation that needs urgent change. Let me bring in a doctor. You're a

:45:48.:45:57.

medical student. How do you find working in the NHS? I am a first

:45:58.:46:02.

year doctor. I am not a medical student. It is complete crisis. It

:46:03.:46:08.

is actually a humanitarian crisis. I'm an international student. I came

:46:09.:46:13.

to study medicine in the UK. And it is the biggest regret of my life. It

:46:14.:46:19.

is because we are basically, we studied so hard for six years, but

:46:20.:46:22.

it is, we had a patient die in the hospital because we couldn't give

:46:23.:46:26.

her oxygen in time. She wasn't seen in time and she passed away. She was

:46:27.:46:30.

just missed because of the amount of patients that we have in. There is

:46:31.:46:35.

people who work in admin who cannot get their rota fixed properly. We

:46:36.:46:39.

have one team that has nine doctors and one team that has two doctors,

:46:40.:46:44.

it is in a complete crisis. You hate your work, do you? Well, it is not

:46:45.:46:50.

what I expected to be doing. And what I really wanted to be doing is

:46:51.:46:54.

saving lives and I'm not seeing this. There is three doctors who the

:46:55.:47:00.

hospital trust got from India to work. They resigned within three

:47:01.:47:05.

months. They said we would rather go back, not work, rather than be in

:47:06.:47:09.

this mess. Paul Robinson, what would you suggest... They're stretching

:47:10.:47:13.

the doctors so much that they don't want to work anymore. My colleagues

:47:14.:47:19.

who has been working 87 hours a week and they get a call on Sunday from

:47:20.:47:23.

the medical chief to ask them to come to work and I mean how is this

:47:24.:47:28.

even allowed? We have got patients waiting in corridors. You go into

:47:29.:47:35.

A, it is like walking into Tesco's.

:47:36.:47:39.

There is just so many patients lining up. There is no staff. No

:47:40.:47:47.

rota and most importantly, there is No respect at all. These little

:47:48.:47:50.

things that doctors have to fight about like having a car park. Sorry,

:47:51.:47:55.

Victoria, you work for the BBC, don't you? I do. Do you have a room

:47:56.:48:01.

to take breaks in? I don't think so, no. When you want to have a break,

:48:02.:48:05.

you don't have an actual place where you can go and have a break in? No,

:48:06.:48:12.

not that I am aware of. There is a green room down there. We have a

:48:13.:48:17.

mess room and we have to pay to use it. What sort of respect is this?

:48:18.:48:24.

Paul Robinson, what would you say to the doctor who said it is the

:48:25.:48:28.

biggest regret of her life coming to the UK to be a doctor? Nothing

:48:29.:48:33.

frustrates hard-working, keen people more than not being able to do their

:48:34.:48:37.

job properly. What we need to see on this is two things. We need to see

:48:38.:48:43.

the 2012 Health and Social Care Act repealed because that took away any

:48:44.:48:47.

need for Jeremy Hunt fob responsible for the provision of healthcare and

:48:48.:48:50.

we need Theresa May to engage with this issue directly. Engage directly

:48:51.:48:56.

and what, go to your hospital, talk to you, see for herself... She needs

:48:57.:49:02.

to see this. And then what? What we are seeing is a prelude to

:49:03.:49:05.

privatisation and that's the current Government's agenda. They would deny

:49:06.:49:11.

that completely. What evidence have you seen for that? Theresa May used

:49:12.:49:14.

the language of it. Used the language? She said she would be

:49:15.:49:18.

considering things that were avoided by previous governments. But there

:49:19.:49:22.

are no plans to charge people at the point of delivery? You know that.

:49:23.:49:26.

Well, there better not be. You know that. We see people too desperate to

:49:27.:49:30.

have that kind of money. Theresa May and Jeremy Hunt don't have to engage

:49:31.:49:34.

with healthcare in the way the rest of the country does. These are not

:49:35.:49:38.

people who have to queue for four-and-a-half hours. These aren't

:49:39.:49:41.

people who get sent across London because they have got a facial

:49:42.:49:49.

abscess and there are no beds. Sorry, privatisation, I really

:49:50.:49:53.

appreciate the NHS. I'm Syrian. I came before the war to study

:49:54.:49:58.

medicine. I really love the NHS, but maybe privatisation will be a good

:49:59.:50:01.

thing for the public. If they get a private company to sort out the

:50:02.:50:04.

mess. We are in a mess. Maybe it will be better for the public,

:50:05.:50:09.

better for the doctors, and it will be a better delivery of care. What

:50:10.:50:14.

we're seeing now is the public taking advantage of the actual

:50:15.:50:18.

situation. In what way? We're called in to see patients who come in

:50:19.:50:22.

because they have a scab on their hand and they want a sicknote.

:50:23.:50:27.

Right, OK. So there is something we could do as general patients and

:50:28.:50:31.

taxpayers in terms of trying to relieve a bit of stress. What would

:50:32.:50:35.

you say needs to be done right now, the urgent need that you talked

:50:36.:50:38.

about, how would you like to see the Prime Minister address it? I think

:50:39.:50:43.

there are a few things that are very clear. Hospitals are asking for more

:50:44.:50:50.

money, Chris hob son is asking for more money, the chief of NHS

:50:51.:50:53.

provider, Simon Stevens the head of the NHS wants more money. We are not

:50:54.:50:57.

only being given less than is expected, but also being lied to

:50:58.:51:01.

about figures. The Government's own Health Select Committee have said

:51:02.:51:04.

that the Government have been misleading with the amount of money

:51:05.:51:09.

that they are giving us. Also social care money is being reduced in the

:51:10.:51:13.

figure of millions, meaning that more and more pressure is being put

:51:14.:51:16.

on hospitals. I think what needs to happen is there needs to be a

:51:17.:51:21.

genuine and honest discussion where by people like us on the frontline,

:51:22.:51:25.

are listened to and we can talk about the problems. There are simple

:51:26.:51:29.

solutions that I think can really help. For example, increasing the

:51:30.:51:33.

amount of community care that can be offered, not only in terms of giving

:51:34.:51:38.

antibiotics, and seeing patients, but also the social care and welfare

:51:39.:51:42.

particularly for the elderly that helps keep them out of hospital and

:51:43.:51:45.

save in the winter. Thank you very much. I really appreciate your time.

:51:46.:51:48.

Thank you for coming on the programme. Thank you.

:51:49.:51:55.

The Mayor of London says that thousands of people were

:51:56.:52:00.

inconvenienced for no reason. The Mayor of London says there were

:52:01.:52:05.

concerns about safety at some stations.

:52:06.:52:07.

Steve Griffiths is the Chief Operating Officer London Underground

:52:08.:52:10.

What's going on? Clearly, this is an unnecessary strike. First of all, I

:52:11.:52:17.

want to apologise for the disruption that our customers are experiencing

:52:18.:52:21.

today. We acknowledge the patience that they are showing. We've always

:52:22.:52:27.

said that we will, within the first 12 months of our new operating model

:52:28.:52:32.

in our stations as a result of the ticket office closures, review our

:52:33.:52:34.

staffing levels with the trade unions. We have been doing that

:52:35.:52:42.

review and we have identified 200 new roles that we have started

:52:43.:52:46.

recruitment immediately to put into our stations staffing to improve the

:52:47.:52:49.

level of service that we can offer our can yous mirs on a daily basis.

:52:50.:52:54.

So the unions say they are on strike because you're closing ticket

:52:55.:52:57.

offices and you're making too many people redundant. Those new jobs

:52:58.:53:03.

that you have talked about, they are to say they are to fill new jobs?

:53:04.:53:10.

No, they are new jobs. Station ticket offices closed over 12 months

:53:11.:53:16.

ago and we have deployed our new staff into the frontline of

:53:17.:53:19.

operations. We have identified 200 new staff. How are you going to

:53:20.:53:24.

resolve this with the unions? This can only be resolved, not through

:53:25.:53:29.

strike action, that not only disrupts our customers and disrupts

:53:30.:53:32.

London and means that our people lose money. This can only be solved

:53:33.:53:36.

by working with us, around the table, and working through the

:53:37.:53:40.

issues that we have. Are you prepared to compromise? We will do

:53:41.:53:45.

the right thing for under London Underground. Are you prepared to

:53:46.:53:50.

compromise? We have said we will recruit 200 staff and we will do a

:53:51.:53:53.

station by station review between now and March to identify should

:53:54.:53:58.

those 200 need to increase which we believe they will, but we need to do

:53:59.:54:01.

the work with the trade unions. OK. Thank you very much. Thank you for

:54:02.:54:07.

corming on the programme. Steve Griffiths chief operating officer

:54:08.:54:08.

for Transport for London. La La Land won seven awards at the

:54:09.:54:26.

Golden Globes last night. Joining me now is Sinead Garvan,

:54:27.:54:32.

from BBC Newsbeat. A massive night for La La Land and

:54:33.:55:08.

also a great night for British actors too? Yes, indeed, The Night

:55:09.:55:13.

Manager with Tom Hiddleston, Olivia Coleman and Hugh Laurie and Claire

:55:14.:55:21.

Foy for The Crown. Tom Hiddleston used his speech to talk about some

:55:22.:55:25.

work he did with the UN in south Sudan. A little bit of a backlash to

:55:26.:55:30.

it. We will see a clip now. Let's have a look. It is a terrible

:55:31.:55:35.

situation happening for children, The Night Manager is about arms

:55:36.:55:39.

dealing and there are far too many arms going into south Sudan.

:55:40.:55:47.

I really, really wouldn't be here if it wasn't for some extraordinary

:55:48.:55:50.

women. I'm going to thank themment one of them is Queen Elizabeth II!

:55:51.:55:57.

She has been at the centre of the world for the past 63 years and I

:55:58.:56:03.

think the world could do with a few more women at the centre of it.

:56:04.:56:18.

A lot of the fwirt comments have been talking about him.

:56:19.:56:28.

And in the problem with Tom Hiddlestone over the past year and

:56:29.:56:32.

things that have happened in his personal life, there is a sense of

:56:33.:56:36.

people not wanting to be appreciative of him. And a lovely

:56:37.:56:40.

speech from Claire Foy, giving a shout out to the Queen, which was

:56:41.:56:45.

nice. The most talked about was Meryl Streep when she accepted the

:56:46.:56:51.

lifetime achievement award. Always with this award people have time to

:56:52.:56:55.

plan a speech and I think there was always going to be something said

:56:56.:57:00.

about Donald Trump. She used it to talk about how she felt about him

:57:01.:57:05.

and what happened. She did not mention his name once, which a lot

:57:06.:57:11.

of people commented on. She describes one of the best acting

:57:12.:57:16.

moments, performances of the year, when he appears to mock a journalist

:57:17.:57:22.

who is disabled. That was last year. She talks about that. Also, she has

:57:23.:57:27.

lost her voice and is croaky and it turns out she has been crying a lot

:57:28.:57:35.

over the weekend. Hollywood is crawling with outsiders and

:57:36.:57:38.

foreigners and if we kick them all out, we will have nothing to watch

:57:39.:57:43.

but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. CHEERING.

:57:44.:57:51.

Disrespect invites disrespect. Violence incites violence. When the

:57:52.:57:57.

powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose.

:57:58.:58:04.

Ryan Gosling picked up an award for his role in La La Land. Keep your

:58:05.:58:10.

eye out on the background because two of the people on his table, Ryan

:58:11.:58:17.

Reynolds and Andrew Garfield start kissing. That's done the rounds on

:58:18.:58:23.

social media now. And that along with Meryl Streep, the two

:58:24.:58:26.

highlights I believe. What a great shot! Thank you very much, Sinead.

:58:27.:58:32.

Thank you for your company today. That

:58:33.:58:36.

told through recordings he made over decades.

:58:37.:58:39.

Victoria Derbyshire discusses whether the UK should open its first "fix room", a safe space where addicts can take illegal narcotics under medical supervision.

She's joined by doctors who say the NHS has reached a crisis point.

And she hears from a woman who says she was sacked because of mental health issues.