Episode 14 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 14

Antiques challenge. Charles Hanson and Mark Stacey start in Stratford-upon-Avon and end at their penultimate auction in Wotton-under-Edge.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antique experts.

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What about that?!

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With £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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Can I buy everything here?

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The aim?

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To make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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Feeling a little sore!

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This is going to be an epic battle.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-The honeymoon is over.

-I'm sorry!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah.

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It's time to hit the road again

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with two of Britain's best-loved auctioneers,

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who've been getting on like a house on fire.

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-Charles, we're having a ball. Give me a high-five.

-Exactly.

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Yeah, exactly, Mark.

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Auctioneer Mark Stacey has been in the antiques game for 30 years.

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And when he wants something, he'll do anything to get it.

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Please, please, please...

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Unconventional antiques oracle Charles Hanson

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has his unique way of getting a bargain.

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Look... Look at me.

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-Look at me. Look at me. Look at me. Happy?

-Yes.

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Both our pros set forth with £200.

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We're now beginning the home stretch on day four

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and the gap is getting even wider,

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with over £200 between them.

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Mark made big losses at the last auction,

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leaving him with less than he started

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and has just £161.18 in his pocket today.

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But Charles forged ahead again,

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scooping a rather grandiose £393.98p for his next spending spree.

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-You're looking very laid-back right now.

-What more can I do, Charles?

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I'm 120 quid behind you.

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What is the point of being miserable about it?

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Quite right.

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Although, Mark, you are actually more than £200 behind Charles.

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At least he's looking good in the passenger seat

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of the 1973 convertible VW Beetle.

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I need to put a big P into profit.

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To be or not to be in profit?

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That certainly is the question.

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Your biggest P, which you'll always hold on to, Mark,

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is a P for passion.

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And yours is P for personality.

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Our two savvy antiques specialists are partway through

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a gigantic jaunt from the North of England,

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down through the East to the South, up to the West Midlands,

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down, up, down and then up again,

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finishing in Flintshire in Wales.

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Leg four starts in Stratford-upon-Avon

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and ends in Wotton-under-Edge in Gloucestershire.

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Stratford's known worldwide as the birthplace of William Shakespeare.

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Now, what do you know about Stratford, Charles?

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It's probably one of the most-visited towns in England.

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Absolutely.

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To quote Shakespeare,

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my kingdom, my kingdom for something that will make a profit!

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Wasn't it a horse?

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Mark is first off the shopping blocks just outside the town

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at Stratford Antiques, run by David Wilkes.

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-Good morning.

-Hello, Mark.

-How'd you know my name?

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-And you are?

-David.

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David. Lovely to meet you, David.

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The centre has 12,500 square feet.

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So, there should be plenty for Mark to choose from.

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But it seems losing all three legs so far has knocked his confidence.

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Oh, this is a little bit like how I feel at the moment.

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A rabbit trapped in the headlights.

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Mark's keen to catch up with Charles,

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so he phones the auction house to see if he can get some insider knowledge.

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Lovely. Take care. Bye-bye.

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He says they've got a very big silver and jewellery section.

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And they are groaning, to use his words, with ceramics and glass.

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So, that might be a good thing. So, that's all very positive.

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And he just reiterates, really,

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that anything quirky, unusual,

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fresh to the market

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is going to do well.

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So, quirky, silver, jewellery, ceramics and glass

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is a good place to start.

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That's quite nice, actually, isn't it? Lots of nice ware on the bottom.

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And, actually, I quite like that with the fish overlay, actually.

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-What date would you say that was, '50s?

-'50s, yes.

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It's £25.

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Do you think they'd be open to severe negotiation?

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What are you thinking?

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I think I'd like to buy that for £15.

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I probably could do 18.

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I mean, if we could do 15, I'd love to buy it.

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Well, let's do 15.

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-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

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And I promise, I'll carry on looking

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to see if I can find another item or two.

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That's a tenner off the asking price for a 1950s Murano vase

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with silver fish overlay.

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It's glass and it's quirky, so should fit in well, come the auction.

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Oh...

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And true to his word, Mark's sought out another item or two.

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A fair few items, in fact.

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There's all sorts of things in here.

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Various sort of jugs and teapots.

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And some silver-plated trays.

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I mean, it's not in great condition,

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but it might just be the sort of thing

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that, you know, attracts attention.

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Back to David again.

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-I mean, what are you hoping to get for that?

-I don't know.

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-£10, something like that.

-Oh, God, I need to sit down.

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£10?

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-What are you thinking, Mark?

-Well, I was thinking of a fiver.

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Yeah, well, we're not going to argue.

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Oh, shake hands, David. Let's do a fiver.

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-OK. Cheers.

-Thank you.

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Mark's ticked another box for the auction,

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picking up a collection of mainly 19th-century silver plate for a fiver.

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And along with his £15 Murano vase,

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he spent a grand total of £20.

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-Thank you so much.

-You're welcome.

-Thanks.

-Thank you.

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Just a few minutes away, Charles is heading into Stratford's centre.

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Home to the Royal Shakespeare Company,

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Charles has come to hear how this theatre company,

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after facing great tragedy,

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has helped redefine how we interpret the works of Shakespeare,

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growing into one of the biggest theatre companies in the world.

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Here to explain more about its eventful origins

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is events director Geraldine Collinge.

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-Good morning.

-Hi.

-Charles Hanson.

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Really nice to meet you.

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Welcome to the Swan Theatre and to the Royal Shakespeare Company.

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-I can't wait to go inside.

-Come in.

-I can't wait.

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The Swan Theatre stands on the foundations

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of the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre,

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where the roots of the RSC began.

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Opening in 1879,

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this was the first full-scale permanent theatre in Shakespeare's home town,

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commissioned by a local family

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to commemorate Britain's greatest playwright.

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The initiative very much came through the kind of,

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the big Victorians, who were wanting to celebrate Shakespeare.

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So, yeah, Dickens was involved in campaigns in Stratford.

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And for us, it was the Flower family,

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who were the big brewing family,

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who gave lots of money, gave their land and their support.

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They kind of spearheaded the campaign to get the theatre going.

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The theatre became the venue for staging

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the annual festival of Shakespeare's plays in Stratford.

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And slowly grew in popularity.

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The organisers even took their productions across the Atlantic

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for the first time in 1913.

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But, then, tragedy hit.

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A terrible fire destroyed most of the building.

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A new theatre was built next door,

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but the company always had the intention of restoring the original building,

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which they did in the 1980s,

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recreating the feel of the Shakespearean era.

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What's really great about these theatres is they've got a thrust stage.

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So, the thrust stage comes out into the audience.

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The audience is all around it.

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And it's very much how theatre would have been presented in Shakespeare's time.

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So, like it was at the Globe or the Rose,

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you know, the theatres along Bankside.

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So, here, you can almost be in that 360,

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almost you can see every angle.

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The rawness of the play is borne out to you

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and I suppose you're very much part of it, aren't you?

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Yeah, no, absolutely.

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A big turning point in the company's history came in the 1960s,

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when the now legendary theatre director Peter Hall

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took over as artistic director.

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He created Stratford's first fully fledged ensemble company,

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modernised the ways plays were performed,

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helped bring in new audiences

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and opened the theatre all year round.

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This is considered the time the company, as we know it today, began.

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And with the royal seal of approval,

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became the Royal Shakespeare Company.

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So, the 1960s was a period of real innovation?

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It was a really formative time. You know, amazing things were happening.

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This production of The War Of The Roses

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that this dress is from,

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was ground-breaking.

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They cut bits from the text

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and kind of made a new show from those stories.

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And, you know, we didn't do that. We treated Shakespeare as, you know...

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We kind of revered him.

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The RSC has become one of the world's largest theatre companies,

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staging over 1,000 performances each year,

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attracting over one million visitors to Stratford

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and luring the world's biggest acting talent

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from Judi Dench to David Tennant and Patrick Stewart.

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So, this costume was worn by Judi Dench in 2003 in All's Well.

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And then these were worn by David Tennant

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when he was here playing Hamlet.

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So, again, you know, very modern dress.

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And some of the more traditional.

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And what great names have been here.

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-Well, I've really, really enjoyed it. Thanks so much.

-Thanks a lot.

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Now the chaps must make their way

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just a few miles south-west of Stratford to Long Marston,

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still in Warwickshire.

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This pretty village is home to an antiques centre

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based in a 13,000-square-foot barn.

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-High-five.

-See you later.

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See you later.

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Mark's got just over £140 left to spend.

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And Laura Scott will, no doubt, be happy to help him part with some of it.

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Oh, ring for attention.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

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-I'm Mark.

-Hello, Mark. I'm Laura.

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Nice to meet you, Laura.

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-What a lovely day.

-It is beautiful, isn't it?

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-What a lovely day for finding a bargain.

-I hope so.

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I hope so, too.

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Well, get on with it, then.

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I'm looking for silver, silver plate, good ceramics, jewellery.

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Or something that's quirky. Or some Chinese stuff.

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It would be lovely to find some antique Chinese items,

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because there's still a big market for that.

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Mark's very focused.

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And with over 40 experienced dealers

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selling a variety of antiques, furniture and collectables,

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he should be able to tick off an item off his wish list here.

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Now, when you first look in this cabinet,

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you see lots of collectable items.

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But then, in amongst it, you have things like this fan.

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This is all painted on feathers.

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And look at the detailing of that and the flowers.

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Almost certainly, I would call it, Cantonese.

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I mean, that is absolutely exquisite.

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I would have thought this is carved bone, actually.

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And the date on this, 1870, 1880.

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All the little sticks here are in good condition.

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Gosh, that is absolutely beautiful. Priced up at £110.

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I mean, that's very nearly all my remaining money.

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-Laura, can I have a word?

-Of course.

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Is it possible, Laura, you could have a word with the dealer

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and explain my plight to them?

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I really would like that,

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but I really need their very, very best price.

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Very, very best.

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-OK, well, as it's you, I will find out what I could do for you.

-Please.

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The fan is rather unusual

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and Mark was looking for antique Chinese items.

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But can he get it for the right price?

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-Oh, Laura, how did you get on?

-I can get it down to 80 for you.

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It would help if you could get me to 70.

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Or less.

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-I can do 70 for you.

-Oh!

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And it's a bargain at that.

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Stop it!

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Gosh, it's hot in here. I need to sit down and think about this.

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OK. OK.

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£70 for a hand-painted 19th-century Cantonese fan

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could go down well in the right auction room. But it's a risk.

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So, is he going for it?

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-Let's go for it.

-Brilliant!

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So, that gives Mark just over £70 left to spend.

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Thank you very much.

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Well, let's hope I make some fans out there, anyway.

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Ha-ha...

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Meanwhile, Charles has made his way to Evesham,

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across the county border in Worcestershire.

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The riverside town of Evesham is on the northern edge of the Cotswolds.

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Charles is here to visit Twyford Antique Centre, run by Andy Mayhew.

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-Afternoon to you, sir.

-Nice to see you.

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-And your name is?

-My name's Andy.

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Charles has almost £400 to spend on this stretch of his journey.

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But, like Mark, he wants to buy right.

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So, he's calling the auction house for some inside advice.

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You're saying, perhaps, China, glassware, jewellery and silver.

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-And, hopefully, we can't go wrong.

-I think that's about right.

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See you in a short while.

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Right, they've both got their shopping lists.

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So, now, best get cracking.

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That's quite sweet, isn't it?

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I love him because he's just novelty value.

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-Whenever we see a man with a big tummy, we think of a toby jug.

-Yeah.

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And this man is almost based on that great Yorkshireman Toby Philapot.

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He used to drink lots of beer.

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And on the back of Toby Philapot, we invented the toby jug.

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I think you'll find it's Toby Philpot, not Philapot.

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But the problem is,

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triangular hat with a yellow enamel has got a chip on this corner here.

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Hence why he's quite cheap, isn't he?

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Yeah, onwards and upwards.

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That's quite stylish.

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Tom Cruise, eat your heart out, eh?

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I could be...

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Sorry...

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Or more like butterfingers.

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I'd love to call it '30s. But it isn't.

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I suspect this "vintage" cocktail shaker

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is more like 1960s,

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even 1970s.

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What I could call it is Art Deco style.

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-This cocktail shaker...

-Yeah?

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It's got a bit of style about it. Tell me, what's the best price?

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-£10.50.

-Oh...

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-£7.50?

-£5?

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-Make it six.

-Go on, I'll take it.

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I think, at £6, it could be shaken not stirred, OK?

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Smooth, Mr Hanson.

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Don't stop while you're on a roll, boy.

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Well, when I picked out the man with the portly tummy,

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the toby,

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I also noticed two interesting cats.

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They're quite collectable.

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Yes, they are. These are Lorna Bailey.

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And the number of times I've been asked,

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"Charles, what is the antique of the future?" These are.

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Staffordshire-born Lorna Bailey found success in the late 1990s

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with her range of modern Art Deco designs.

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With cats like these her speciality.

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-They're quite neat, aren't they?

-They are.

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On the label it says they are from the heroes and villains series.

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They're not very old

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and there's a chip on the back of the hat.

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I think they're a good pair. What's your best price?

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-£20 for the pair.

-You wouldn't do 15, would you, for the pair?

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-I can't get down that low, I'm afraid.

-Meet me halfway?

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-Go on, £17.50.

-Oh, I say! Are you sure? Are you sure? Give me a paw.

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-There we are. Are you sure?

-Yep.

-Lovely.

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So, despite his huge budget, Charles seems to be playing it safe,

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spending just £17.50 on the Lorna Bailey pottery cats

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and £6 on the Art Deco style cocktail shaker.

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With that, both the chaps can put their shopping lists to bed

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and get some shuteye.

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Morning has broken.

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The sun is shining.

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The roof is down.

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And they're ready to dig in for the day.

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# Hi-ho, hi-ho it's off to work we go... #

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Well, Charles is, anyway.

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# Hi-ho hi-ho-hi-ho hi-ho... #

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I do like you. You know, I think you're an expert with a difference.

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You're one-of-a-kind.

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But you're my sort of guy.

0:17:090:17:11

Well, Charles, you are certainly one-of-a-kind.

0:17:110:17:13

-And you're my kind of guy, too.

-Oh, thanks, Mark.

0:17:130:17:16

Who said bromance is dead?

0:17:160:17:18

Yesterday, Charles barely scratched the surface of his budget,

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spending just £23.50p

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on a cocktail shaker and a pair of Lorna Bailey cats.

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So, he's sitting pretty with £370.48 for today.

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Mark seems to be going for broke,

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after splashing £90

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on a Cantonese fan, a silver-plated selection and a Murano vase.

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He'll have to shop smart today with just over £71 left.

0:17:430:17:47

I bought three lots, Charles.

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Have they got a sniff of a profit?

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-Not a chance.

-Get out of here, Mark Stacey.

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Mark may be losing his confidence

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but, if he gets the right bidders at auction,

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he could overtake Charles in a flash.

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After starting in Stratford,

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the fellows are now approaching the hamlet of Little Alne,

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near Henley-in-Arden, at the core of Warwickshire's countryside.

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After speaking to the auction house, both the chaps are on the hunt

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for bits of silver, jewellery, ceramics, glassware and the unique.

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We're going to the same shop together.

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So, why don't I focus on, like, the silver and porcelain

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and you, perhaps, look at the works of art and furniture.

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Yes, shall I do that, Charles?

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Sneaky, Mr Hanson.

0:18:330:18:35

But Little Alne's Fabulous Finds

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should have enough for them both,

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with their eclectic collection of furniture and collectables

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from the 1800s to the 1960s,

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run by owner Caroline Howard.

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Why aren't you parking in the lines? Park in the lines instead.

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-I haven't got time to park in lines, Charles.

-OK.

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I'm hungry for shopping.

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-Well, me too.

-Right, I'll see you later, Charles.

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-First-come, first-served.

-See you later.

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Now, now, boys.

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-Thank you.

-Can I help?

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I see the rivalry's heating up here a bit.

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-Sorry. They're quite nice.

-Charles!

-Yes?

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-Where are you going?

-I'm finding something to control you with.

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Right, get up those stairs! Get up!

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Sorry!

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I'm sorry, OK?

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I'll see you shortly, Mark.

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Cor, Mark is quick off the mark to spot something

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which could go with his Cantonese fan.

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This, I think, is probably late-19th century.

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The label says late-19th century.

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But it's in terrible condition.

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It's...

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It's all been cracked here and restored.

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And then you've got the dragons.

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Oh, he's lucky. He's just, literally, just now

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spotted a really good Chinese blue and white vase.

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This could be a real bargain. It could be his match-winner.

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You've got the sort of primrose border, which matches there.

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But, you know...

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Mark? If you don't want it, I'll buy it.

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-Thanks, Charles.

-Pleasure.

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Nice try, Charles. But Mark's not giving up that easily.

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The thing I like about it, it's only marked at 50 quid.

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It's got a good decorative look.

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And perfect, it would be a few hundred pounds.

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And now, Mark's got a theme in mind.

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I mean, this is another Chinese vase. Much smaller, of course.

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But it has got this four-character mark for the Emperor Kangxi,

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late-19th century.

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Bit of restoration again. Marked at £5.

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I'm buying Chinese things because the market is quite strong,

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particularly over the internet.

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If the price is right, there is a profit to be made there.

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Meanwhile, Charles has been trying to uncover owner Caroline's fresh goods.

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Is there much in this room here, Caroline,

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you can, perhaps, give me a narrative on?

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Er, this?

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Oh, that's nice.

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-Has it just come in?

-It has indeed.

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Wow, just come in.

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Tell me, this, I think, Caroline, is an olive-wood blotter.

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Yes.

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So, it's part of a late-Victorian desk set.

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And you would've had blotting paper in here for your quill pen.

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What's its sweetest price, sweet Caroline?

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-Sorry. Sorry. Sorry.

-All right.

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I think... I think it's got to be worth 50, hasn't it?

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-OK.

-Yes.

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What's this next door?

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This is another thing that's just come in.

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-Oh, wonderful.

-Yes.

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This is a pretty silver, almost cartouche-shaped tray,

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with a hallmark for London.

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And it must be about 1917.

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So it's what we call George V in period.

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What's your best price?

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I should think 110.

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-Yeah...

-Well, it's a nice...

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-Quite light, though, isn't it?

-Oh, I don't know.

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What would be your absolute bottom?

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I think, how about...

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Hmm... As it's you, 90.

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-If I bought the two together, Caroline...

-Yes.

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What would be your very best?

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He's sitting on cash, about 400 quid here.

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-Hey!

-Oh, that's interesting.

-Hey, that's confidential!

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Absolutely not.

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That's interesting to know.

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Oh, controversial.

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Devious, more like.

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Go on, give me a price, Caroline, for trying £100.

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70 and 30.

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We're very close. We're very close.

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I was thinking 120.

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If I say to you,

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I really also will, hopefully, try and acquire one more object...

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OK.

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..could you do 100?

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-Yes, OK.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

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-I'm going to buy the two...

-OK.

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..for £100.

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-That's fine.

-Thanks a lot.

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And I'm going to keep going.

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Meanwhile, Mark's enlisted the help of shop assistant Ronnie Potter.

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Good to meet you, Ronnie. Come in.

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Now this is wrecked, this vase and cover.

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I mean, there's damage and restoration everywhere.

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And I think it's got potential.

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But I really need to get this for a...

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I'm sorry, a really bargain basement price.

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I'm actually on less money than I started the beginning of the week.

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Right. OK.

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-And he is £200 ahead of me.

-Right.

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We can't have that.

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Mark, the violins are out especially for you.

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-And I've got a little vase over there as well...

-OK.

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..which is marked at a fiver.

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I need special, special prices.

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We can't go any lower than 25.

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Oh...

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£30 for the two vases.

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Oh, I can't do it, Ronnie.

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But while Charles continues to quiz Caroline for any more new stock,

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Mark has sought out yet another damaged Chinese vase.

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OK, with a six-character mark on it this time.

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But, look, it's all smashed and...

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Such a shame. Look at it.

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So that one's 55.

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Chinese. Famille rose. It has the pink and the blues and yellows.

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But the cover's suffered a lot of restoration.

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But, you see, I think that's rather attractive in its own way.

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But it is damaged.

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With a potential price of £30 for the first two vases,

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Mark needs to see if he can negotiate

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a great deal for the three,

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now that Caroline's managed to escape Charles's clutches.

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-Now, if I take all three...

-Ooh, yes.

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..what is the very best you...?

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Can I scrape 50 out of you?

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Is there any way we can do them for 40?

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Well, I think you might be in luck today.

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Are you sure?

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Well, I'd like to see you try and catch Charles up.

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-Shall we go with that, then?

-Oh, Caroline!

-Go on, then.

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-Thank you so much.

-You're welcome.

-Thank you.

-You're welcome.

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So, that's £20 for the two blue and white vases.

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An incredibly generous discount.

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And then another 20 for the famille rose vase.

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Leaving Mark virtually penniless.

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With Charles rummaging around the upstairs storeroom,

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Mark heads north-east to Coventry,

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legendary birthplace of St George, the patron saint of England.

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This historic city has had three different cathedrals

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over the last 1,000 years.

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Two are now left in ruins.

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Mark's here to find out the story behind the adversity they faced.

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Brenda Williams is the cathedrals' tour guide.

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-Hello.

-Hello, Mark.

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-I'm Brenda.

-Nice to meet you, Brenda.

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Brenda, why are we standing out in the courtyard here

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looking at what looks like an open piece of ground?

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Well, these are the only remains above ground

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of the first cathedral of Coventry.

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Coventry's first cathedral was built in 1043

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by the Lord of Coventry and his wife Lady Godiva.

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The lady is famed for her legendary naked horseback ride

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through the streets of Coventry to convince her husband

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to lower heavy taxes imposed on the locals.

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Try that today.

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This started off as a church attached to a Benedictine priory

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that was endowed by Earl Leofric and his wife Lady Godiva.

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They were very rich landowners in Anglo-Saxon times

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and to ensure their place in heaven

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they gave lots of money to the church.

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Within 100 years, it became a cathedral.

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-It was obviously a very wealthy...

-It was enormously wealthy.

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And it prospered throughout the centuries.

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That was until the 1530s,

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when King Henry VIII had made himself head of the Church of England

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and was closing 800 religious buildings

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throughout England and Wales.

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Known as the Dissolution Of The Monasteries,

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it was a highly lucrative business,

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stripping places bare of treasures and selling off land,

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such as Coventry's first cathedral.

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It was sold to a gentleman called John Hales.

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No?

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And he eventually sold it off for building materials, like a quarry.

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No?! Gosh!

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Coventry's second cathedral

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began as the parish church of St Michael in the 11th century

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and was renamed Coventry's cathedral in 1918.

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But it wasn't long before disaster struck again.

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So why is it ruined?

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-It was destroyed in the Blitz in November 1940.

-Gosh.

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In one night,

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almost half the buildings in the centre of Coventry were destroyed.

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Amongst them, this beautiful cathedral.

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Why was Coventry so heavily bombed?

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It's possibly because a short while before,

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Hitler had been giving a speech to his followers in Munich

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and the RAF interrupted him.

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And it's thought that, in revenge,

0:27:230:27:25

he would completely destroy a British city.

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And he chose Coventry.

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It was the most devastating bombing raid on Britain so far.

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King George VI made the journey to Coventry

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to witness the ruins for himself,

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where three quarters of the city lay flattened.

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But, out of the wreckage, came inspiration.

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The cathedral stonemason, Jock Forbes,

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when he went up to the tower to look down upon the rubble,

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he saw two of the old medieval roof beams

0:27:540:27:58

-had fallen in the shape of a cross.

-Gosh.

0:27:580:28:00

These burned-out beams were tied together to form the Charred Cross.

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Which is what we are looking at here.

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This is a replica.

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The original, which as you can imagine, is very fragile,

0:28:080:28:11

and is held inside the cathedral.

0:28:110:28:13

-It's very moving, isn't it?

-It is.

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The third cathedral was commissioned almost immediately.

0:28:170:28:21

A competition was held in 1950 for architects across the Commonwealth.

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It was won by British architect Basil Spence.

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And the new St Michael's was built in just seven years,

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opening in 1962.

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It contains not only the original Charred Cross,

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but also the very special Cross Of Nails.

0:28:390:28:41

Brenda, this is amazing.

0:28:420:28:44

Here we can see the high altar cross.

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And within it you can see the Cross Of Nails.

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These nails, which were picked up from the ruins,

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symbolise Coventry's work for reconciliation.

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And they're also nails that represent

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the nails that Christ was crucified with.

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The crosses are sent to conflict zones across the world.

0:29:020:29:05

Out of the ashes of adversity came a symbol of peace and reconciliation.

0:29:060:29:10

Well, I've thoroughly enjoyed myself.

0:29:110:29:13

-Thank you so much, Brenda.

-You're very welcome, Mark.

0:29:130:29:16

Back in Little Alne, Charles has got £270 left.

0:29:190:29:23

So, he's still on the hunt.

0:29:230:29:25

-Caroline, just one more thing.

-Yes?

0:29:260:29:28

I just noticed on the floor down here...

0:29:280:29:31

-Is this yours?

-Yes.

0:29:310:29:33

I've only had it in about two weeks.

0:29:330:29:36

OK.

0:29:360:29:37

He does seem to have a nose for fresh stock.

0:29:370:29:40

This, I'm almost certain, is a Staffordshire pottery,

0:29:400:29:44

what I would call a platter.

0:29:440:29:47

OK.

0:29:470:29:48

Transfer printed. Blue and white.

0:29:480:29:50

It's very neoclassic

0:29:500:29:52

with these laurel-leaf sprays around the exterior.

0:29:520:29:57

I love these almost round medallion flower heads.

0:29:570:30:01

It's been really well used.

0:30:020:30:04

And there's also a huge chip on the side there as well.

0:30:040:30:07

Caroline, hit me.

0:30:090:30:10

Usually, something this size would go for about 60.

0:30:100:30:13

-Oh...

-I know.

0:30:130:30:15

-Really?

-Yes.

0:30:150:30:16

What's the best price?

0:30:160:30:17

Shall we say 40?

0:30:200:30:22

Would you take £30 for it?

0:30:220:30:24

-All right, then.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

0:30:250:30:27

-Are you sure?

-I think I can just do that.

0:30:270:30:29

Charles seems to have played it safe again with his £30 platter.

0:30:300:30:34

The silver tray for 70.

0:30:350:30:36

And another 30 for the olive-wood blotter.

0:30:360:30:39

A total of £130.

0:30:390:30:40

-Thank you.

-Caroline, thanks a lot. Give you a kiss. Thanks so much.

0:30:420:30:44

I'm so grateful.

0:30:440:30:46

-Thank you. See you soon.

-Bye-bye.

0:30:460:30:48

Now Charles has finished shopping, he's hitting the road.

0:30:520:30:55

But there's one last stop to get him in the zone for the auction.

0:30:550:30:58

Sometimes it's good to take all the mental strain out

0:30:590:31:02

on the assault course.

0:31:020:31:03

Careful... Oh!

0:31:060:31:08

Blimey, O'Reilly!

0:31:100:31:11

Sometimes, Mark,

0:31:150:31:17

you've got to be strong-armed in the auction and grip hard.

0:31:170:31:21

Like this, Mark.

0:31:210:31:22

Do stop monkeying about.

0:31:220:31:24

Sometimes twinkle toes in the shops.

0:31:250:31:26

Mind those shoes!

0:31:280:31:29

Mark, may the best man win at auction.

0:31:320:31:35

Snazzy socks.

0:31:410:31:42

Two, three...

0:31:510:31:52

Oh, crikey...!

0:31:560:31:58

This is the life.

0:32:050:32:06

He's such a child, that boy.

0:32:060:32:08

OK, now, back to business.

0:32:080:32:10

And time to look at the fellows' finds.

0:32:100:32:13

Charles bought an Art Deco style cocktail shaker,

0:32:130:32:16

a pair of Lorna Bailey cats, a pottery platter,

0:32:160:32:19

a Victorian olive-wood blotter

0:32:190:32:21

and a George V silver tray.

0:32:210:32:23

All for £153.50.

0:32:230:32:25

Less than half of his budget.

0:32:250:32:27

Mark has the 19th-century Cantonese fan,

0:32:290:32:31

and 1950s Murano vase,

0:32:310:32:33

a box of mixed silver plate,

0:32:330:32:35

two Chinese blue and white vases

0:32:350:32:38

and 19th-century Chinese famille rose vase,

0:32:380:32:41

costing £130 all in.

0:32:410:32:43

So, what are your thoughts on the competition, chaps?

0:32:430:32:46

Charles, Charles, Charles...

0:32:480:32:50

I'm so, so, so disappointed in you.

0:32:500:32:52

Cocktail shaker?

0:32:520:32:53

I think you might have had one too many cocktails

0:32:530:32:56

if you bought that for £6.

0:32:560:32:58

The olive-wood panel or whatever is,

0:32:580:33:00

they're very mass produced, of course. They're tourist items.

0:33:000:33:04

I love the platter. A real antique, Charles. Well done.

0:33:040:33:07

I think Mark's bought really well.

0:33:070:33:09

And his Chinese famille vase is wonderful.

0:33:090:33:12

He's bought a wonderful fan. Cantonese.

0:33:120:33:15

Full of Eastern promise.

0:33:150:33:17

The better you buy, the more luck you deserve to make.

0:33:170:33:19

Mark's done that.

0:33:190:33:21

And I'm just convinced this time it might pay dividends.

0:33:210:33:24

So, this could finally be Mark's chance to overtake Charles

0:33:250:33:29

at the fourth hurdle.

0:33:290:33:31

Our two road trippers started their sojourn in Stratford

0:33:310:33:34

and now they're nearing Wotton-under-Edge.

0:33:340:33:37

-I'm weary, Charles.

-You're weary?

0:33:380:33:41

I just feel you've been really, really unlucky.

0:33:410:33:43

-And I mean that sincerely, Mark.

-Well, that's kind of you, Charles.

0:33:430:33:45

Mark might have lost the last three auctions,

0:33:450:33:47

but it could be about to change.

0:33:470:33:49

You've gone for the big one, and that's the oriental objects.

0:33:490:33:53

And I kid you not, I wouldn't be surprised

0:33:530:33:55

if you made a small fortune.

0:33:550:33:57

I think my star lot, Mark,

0:33:570:33:58

in the auction today will probably be the silver tray.

0:33:580:34:03

-But it's quite light, isn't it?

-Yeah, OK, thanks for that.

0:34:030:34:05

-Yeah, it is quite light.

-And you paid 70 quid for it.

0:34:050:34:08

Yeah, I could be in trouble.

0:34:080:34:09

But, when you're over £200 ahead,

0:34:090:34:13

you'd need to be in serious trouble, boy.

0:34:130:34:16

The chaps are now in the hands of Wotton Auction Rooms,

0:34:160:34:19

who've been trading in the area since the mid-19th century

0:34:190:34:22

and are now based in a former tabernacle.

0:34:220:34:24

-We're here. Do you know what I feel like saying?

-Tell me.

0:34:240:34:27

Dearly beloved, we're gathered here today to watch

0:34:270:34:32

another annihilation of Mark Stacey.

0:34:320:34:34

Get out of here.

0:34:340:34:35

Who would like to start?

0:34:350:34:37

Auctioneer Philip Taubenheim

0:34:370:34:38

has over 1,000 lots to get through today.

0:34:380:34:41

But he's made time to give the experts' items a once-over.

0:34:410:34:44

There's one very nice Spode blue and white meat plate.

0:34:440:34:48

I think that's a fantastic plate.

0:34:480:34:49

There's a very nice, honest silver tray.

0:34:490:34:52

Very, very plain. Very simple.

0:34:520:34:55

I think that will work as a good hall piece.

0:34:550:34:57

There's a little mixture of Chinese ceramics

0:34:570:35:00

which, again, could do very well,

0:35:000:35:01

but we've got a bit of a condition issue there.

0:35:010:35:04

Speaking on condition, Mark has had more bad news.

0:35:040:35:07

At the auction's viewing, the Cantonese fan was damaged.

0:35:070:35:11

It has an insurance valuation of £60,

0:35:120:35:14

so, even if it doesn't reach that in the sale,

0:35:140:35:16

Mark will receive a minimum of £60.

0:35:160:35:19

Well, I feel very sorry for you,

0:35:200:35:21

because it's one of those objects that could really have risen.

0:35:210:35:24

It could have flown, to be honest.

0:35:240:35:27

But never mind.

0:35:270:35:28

Mark's taking it very well.

0:35:280:35:30

And it's the first of the experts' lots to go under the hammer.

0:35:300:35:33

How do you see it? £40 to start. £40 for the fan.

0:35:330:35:35

30 will you? At £30 I'm bid. Thank you. At 30, we're in. I'm bid. 35.

0:35:350:35:40

Bid 40. Bid five. Bid 50. 50 it lodges. At £50 I'm bid.

0:35:400:35:44

Five anywhere now?

0:35:440:35:45

Anybody moving it on now? Five I'm bid. At £55 I'm only bid.

0:35:450:35:49

£55 and it goes, then.

0:35:490:35:51

It may be a £15 loss in the sale,

0:35:510:35:53

but he'll still receive the insurer's full value of £60,

0:35:530:35:57

giving him a shortfall of £10.

0:35:570:36:00

That tells me that, had it been perfect,

0:36:000:36:02

-there would have been a lot more interest in that.

-Yeah.

0:36:020:36:04

So, let's hope Mark's 1950s Murano vase can put him into profit.

0:36:050:36:09

-How much was it?

-15 quid.

-15? Not 50?

0:36:110:36:13

-No, no, one-five.

-Cheap!

0:36:130:36:14

£20 I'm bid. At £20.

0:36:140:36:16

-Come on, net. Come on, net.

-Come on, net.

0:36:160:36:19

At £20 I'm bid. Any advance on that?

0:36:190:36:21

You're all happy with that at £20 and a maiden bid.

0:36:210:36:24

That's quite cheap, Charles.

0:36:240:36:26

Less than he was hoping. But it's still £5 profit for Mark.

0:36:260:36:30

Half the auctioneer's guide price.

0:36:300:36:32

But anyway, Charles, I haven't lost money on it, which is something.

0:36:320:36:35

You've made money.

0:36:350:36:37

He has indeed. Next, it's Charles's first item, the Lorna Bailey cats.

0:36:370:36:41

What do we say for them? £20 the lot. £20 the lot.

0:36:420:36:44

£20 bid, thank you.

0:36:440:36:46

Come on, let's go.

0:36:460:36:47

I'm bid £20. 25 on the screen.

0:36:470:36:48

-30 the room. At 30 I'm bid.

-Come on...

0:36:480:36:50

At 35 on the screen. At £35 I'm bid.

0:36:500:36:53

At £35 here on the screen.

0:36:530:36:55

At £35 I'm only bid.

0:36:550:36:56

-40 I'm bid. Thank you.

-Oh, more! That's great!

0:36:560:36:58

At £40 I'm bid.

0:36:580:37:00

Back in the room. It's still you, madam, at £40 this time, then.

0:37:000:37:03

That's a fantastic gain of £22.50.

0:37:030:37:07

I feel like I'm the cat and I got the cream.

0:37:070:37:08

You certainly have, Charles.

0:37:080:37:10

But can Charles's cocktail shaker stir up as much interest?

0:37:110:37:14

-Do you enjoy cocktails?

-I do enjoy cocktails.

0:37:140:37:17

But I wouldn't want one out of that.

0:37:170:37:18

-£20 the lot.

-Come on.

0:37:180:37:20

-Ten if you must.

-Come on.

0:37:200:37:21

£10 bid. And 15 on the screen.

0:37:210:37:23

-I'm in trouble.

-You're not in trouble.

0:37:230:37:25

At £20. 25. New buyer. At £25 I'm bid.

0:37:250:37:27

It's a serious decision.

0:37:270:37:29

30 I'm bid. At 30. 35 I'm bid.

0:37:290:37:31

Come on, internet. Come back in, net. Come back in.

0:37:310:37:34

£35, then.

0:37:340:37:36

It's cocktail time for Charles, with a pretty profit of £29.

0:37:360:37:39

Mine's a Harvey Wallbanger.

0:37:390:37:41

-That's good, isn't it?

-It's fantastic, Charles.

0:37:410:37:43

I'm over the moon for you.

0:37:430:37:45

It was a right corker.

0:37:450:37:46

Up next, Mark's mix of silver-plated items.

0:37:480:37:52

I think it'll make £32.

0:37:520:37:55

-£32?

-Yes. Your guess?

0:37:550:37:57

-Very precise.

-Your guess?

0:37:570:37:58

-35.

-OK.

0:37:580:37:59

-20 for the lot. 15 for the lot I'm bid. Thank you.

-Come on...

0:37:590:38:02

I'm bid 20 now, then. At 25 I'm bid.

0:38:020:38:04

Commission bid has it now. At £30 I'm bid. Five anywhere now?

0:38:040:38:07

At £30 I'm bid. Any advance on it?

0:38:070:38:09

-That's a massive profit.

-I bought them quite cheap.

0:38:090:38:11

£30. And it's sold at 30, then.

0:38:110:38:12

-Well done.

-Thanks, Charles. Thank you.

0:38:120:38:16

That's a fantastic 500% profit, which could help Mark catch up.

0:38:160:38:21

Now, auctioneer Joseph Trinder takes over the gavel,

0:38:210:38:24

as we go to Charles's olive-wood blotter.

0:38:240:38:27

The reason I bought this lot was because it had nice colour.

0:38:270:38:30

-And it was cheap.

-It was quite richly patterned.

-And it was cheap.

0:38:300:38:33

-I can start you straight in at £20 I'm bid.

-Oh, no...

0:38:330:38:36

At £20 I'm bid.

0:38:360:38:37

-25. Thank you.

-Come on!

-Can I see five again?

0:38:370:38:41

No. Five anywhere?

0:38:410:38:42

The hammer's up against you. You're all quiet. At £30. I sell at 30.

0:38:420:38:46

Well, that one's wiped its face at least.

0:38:470:38:50

Mark continues his Chinese theme now,

0:38:500:38:52

with his pair of blue and white vases.

0:38:520:38:55

Internet bids could be popular for this lot.

0:38:550:38:57

And at this auction, online bids are shown on the screen.

0:38:570:39:00

This is the sort of lot where, in the current market,

0:39:000:39:03

with the oriental market just speculating,

0:39:030:39:05

it cost you 20 and I wouldn't be surprised if it made £200. It could.

0:39:050:39:11

-It would be nice, wouldn't it?

-It could.

0:39:110:39:12

A cheap start. At 20 I'll take. And 20 is bid. Thank you.

0:39:120:39:15

Watch it run now, Mark.

0:39:150:39:17

Five here on the screen. 30 back in the room.

0:39:170:39:19

35 now on the screen. 40 for you, sir? 40 again there.

0:39:190:39:23

Now it's going wild, Mark.

0:39:230:39:24

45 is bid. 50 is bid.

0:39:240:39:25

Again on the screen. It builds again here at 50. And five. Thank you.

0:39:250:39:29

On the net. And 60.

0:39:290:39:30

And it climbs here at 60.

0:39:300:39:32

65.

0:39:320:39:33

The room's quiet.

0:39:330:39:35

The net's bidding. At £70 I'm bid. Five I'm bid.

0:39:350:39:37

80.

0:39:370:39:38

It continues here on the net. At £80 is bid.

0:39:380:39:41

-Five anywhere?

-Well done.

-Five and bid.

0:39:410:39:43

85 again here on the screen.

0:39:430:39:44

You're doing fantastic.

0:39:440:39:45

The hammer's at £85 this time.

0:39:450:39:48

Yes! High-five. High-five.

0:39:480:39:51

Fantastic.

0:39:510:39:53

Another amazing profit from Mark. Will it be enough to win this leg?

0:39:530:39:57

Next it's Charles's George V silver tray.

0:39:580:40:01

It's a favourite of auctioneer Philip's

0:40:010:40:03

and Charles believes it could be his star buy.

0:40:030:40:06

Start me here for a good piece of silver.

0:40:060:40:08

At £30 to start, surely?

0:40:080:40:09

Oh, crikey...

0:40:090:40:10

At £20 to start me, surely? And £20 bid. Thank you.

0:40:100:40:13

£20 I'm bid. 25 there. And 30.

0:40:130:40:16

It's 30 on the net.

0:40:160:40:17

35. Thank you. 40 is bid.

0:40:170:40:19

45 is bid. But no more.

0:40:190:40:20

It's here, then, at £45.

0:40:200:40:22

Do I see 50 now? It's still cheap and it is silver.

0:40:220:40:25

In the room at just £45 this time.

0:40:250:40:28

That tray to me was an absolute bargain.

0:40:290:40:31

And look at that, I lost £25.

0:40:310:40:32

-Hey?

-Welcome to my world, Charles.

0:40:320:40:34

So, Charles's first loss today.

0:40:340:40:37

Now, finishing Mark's Chinese theme is his last lot,

0:40:370:40:41

with his famille rose vase and cover.

0:40:410:40:43

And who will start me here for that one?

0:40:430:40:46

-£20 to start for the vase, surely?

-£20?

0:40:460:40:47

A £10 start for the vase, then, surely?

0:40:470:40:50

We've got 20 on the internet. You've got 35 on the internet!

0:40:500:40:53

20 do I see? 20 I'm bid.

0:40:530:40:55

-The net's going wild.

-Oh, I'm a bit behind.

0:40:550:40:57

I've looked to my screen and I see £50 is bid. I'll go from there.

0:40:570:41:00

Can I come back in with you, sir, at £50? No? He's out. It's here, then.

0:41:000:41:03

-That's really good, Mark. It's going to roll.

-At £50. Five anywhere?

0:41:030:41:06

You're all sure, then? At 50 takes it away.

0:41:060:41:09

I'm now in profit, I think, which I'm pleased about.

0:41:090:41:12

So you should be.

0:41:120:41:13

Another substantial profit is a step closer to Charles's lead.

0:41:130:41:16

That's if Charles doesn't widen the gap any further

0:41:160:41:20

with his final item, the Staffordshire meat platter.

0:41:200:41:23

-I think...

-Yes?

0:41:230:41:25

..this is one of the best lots you've bought.

0:41:250:41:27

-Are you being serious?

-Because I love printed blue and white.

0:41:270:41:30

I can start you here straight in at £90 I'm bid here.

0:41:300:41:33

£90!

0:41:330:41:35

Let's go!

0:41:350:41:36

95 I have. 95.

0:41:360:41:38

-100 here.

-It's history!

-110.

0:41:380:41:40

110 I'm bid. 110 is bid here. 120. 120 is bid.

0:41:400:41:44

130 I have. 140 will you? No, it's here, then.

0:41:440:41:48

-At £130.

-Come on, auctioneer!

0:41:480:41:50

Now, are you all sure? The hammer's up. We go £130.

0:41:500:41:53

Wow! That's a huge £100 profit.

0:41:540:41:58

I think you had an amazing result. Well done.

0:41:580:42:00

Mark opened today's leg with £116.18.

0:42:010:42:05

He picked up some decent profits.

0:42:050:42:06

So, after auction costs, he's made £70.90,

0:42:060:42:10

putting him back in the black with £232.08.

0:42:100:42:13

Well done.

0:42:130:42:14

Charles already had the lead with £393.98.

0:42:150:42:20

He's also managed to garner a good gain of £76.10 after auction costs,

0:42:200:42:26

so is walking away victorious again with £470.08.

0:42:260:42:31

-So, that is the secret, Mark, of the Road Trip.

-What?

-You make money.

0:42:320:42:35

Harsh.

0:42:350:42:36

-Thank you for pointing it out to me, Charles.

-No, you do.

0:42:360:42:38

That's what the show is all about.

0:42:380:42:39

You're still making more than me, but at least I made a profit.

0:42:390:42:43

Yeah, exactly.

0:42:430:42:44

My car won't start.

0:42:460:42:48

Car's flat as a pancake.

0:42:480:42:50

Oh, God...

0:42:500:42:51

Take the handbrake off and do it that way.

0:42:510:42:53

Is not going, Mark. The car's flat as a pancake.

0:42:540:42:57

-Turn it on.

-I'm trying.

0:42:570:42:59

It's flat.

0:42:590:43:00

I hope it starts before they need to go uphill.

0:43:000:43:03

Next time, it's the end of the road for this pally pair.

0:43:030:43:07

-I don't know what I'm going to do without you, Charles.

-Ditto.

0:43:070:43:09

Charles Hanson fights to retain his victory.

0:43:090:43:12

My tactics are to not hold back.

0:43:120:43:14

And despite his many losses,

0:43:140:43:15

Mark Stacey's still congratulating himself.

0:43:150:43:17

Big round of applause, I think.

0:43:170:43:19

Charles Hanson and Mark Stacey weave their way through Gloucestershire searching for treasure. They start in Stratford-upon-Avon and end at their penultimate auction in Wotton-under-Edge.


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