Episode 17 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 17

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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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What about that?

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..with £200 each, a classic car,

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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Can I buy everything here?

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-Feeling a little saw.

-This is going to be an epic battle.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-The honeymoon is over.

-I'm sorry!

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This is the Antiques Roadtrip!

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On this Antiques Roadtrip, we're on our second leg of an adventure

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with seasoned pros Paul Laidlaw and Anita Manning.

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Well, Paul, day one of our second leg.

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We had our first auction and I wiped the floor with you!

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I thought you were going to be more gentle than this.

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I didn't expect a drubbing.

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No, I know that my competitor is a giant.

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Oh, man.

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He's not a giant, Anita. You're just quite petite.

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She's also a garrulous Glaswegian girl

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with an auctioneer's love for the aesthetic and unusual,

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and a complementary way with words.

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You are never dull.

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I am sitting next to you

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and I think that you're one of the most exciting antique experts out.

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Quite!

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While Paul Laidlaw's an eagle-eyed Carlisle auctioneer

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who specialises in militaria.

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This is much better than the drubbing!

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Better than "I've got loads of money, you've got nothing, Laidlaw!"

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I'm loving the new Anita.

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Both our learned pair started with £200.

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From that, Paul has now amassed a budget of £216.10.

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But Anita has romped away so far,

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boasting coffers standing at £300.40.

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And she hasn't yet tired of reminding Paul of the fact.

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No offence!

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Don't let her get to you, Paul.

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Count those chickens.

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I see those chickens, but I don't care how many there are. Nope.

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Neither do I.

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Today, they're driving a natty little

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1957 Morris Minor 1000 Traveller.

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The car was manufactured before seat belts were mandatory,

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so it's legal to drive without them.

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On this epic roadtrip,

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they'll travel from Ford in Northumberland

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before traversing England's ancient shires,

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to end up in Stamford in Lincolnshire,

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docking up more than 1,000 miles.

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On today's leg, they begin in the steel city of Sheffield,

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heading for auction in Luddendenfoot in West Yorkshire.

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Well, we're in Sheffield today, and already,

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pockets are full of dosh...

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Yours may be!

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Oh, Paul...

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-Looks an exciting city, as well.

-I'll tell you what - chimney pots!

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What's this chimney pots thing?

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I'm none the wiser, Anita.

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The number of chimney pots.

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Population.

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I think he means the higher the number of chimney pots,

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the greater the population of the city.

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Glad that's settled.

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But they are indeed arriving in the glorious city of Sheffield,

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chimney pots and all.

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A recent study found that Sheffield is the happiest city in Britain,

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so let's hope some of that positive spirit rubs off on Anita and Paul.

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They're pulling up at Langton's Antiques and Collectibles,

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so stand by...

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-Here we go, this is it!

-Here we are!

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-Oh!

-THEY LAUGH

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-Are you having problems there?

-I'm having problems stopping it!

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I think it's because you're a bit nervous.

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-Come on, darling.

-Right, let's do this.

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-Oh, this looks great. It's huge!

-So, we're going to...

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We'll avoid the elbows at dawn and we'll split up.

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Yes, we don't want elbows at dawn.

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There's plenty of space in here for both of you

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to have a jolly good browse.

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On this second leg of their trip,

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what are Anita's tactics for besting her rival?

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I'm in the lead

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and the temptation would be to spend a lot of money

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to feel safe and secure and go for it,

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but I know that Paul Laidlaw is a canny sort of chap.

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All he needs is a little bit of luck and he will sail away from me,

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so I'm going to continue to try and be a little bit careful.

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Very canny, Anita.

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Wow, this is a really good military section

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and this is just a Paul Laidlaw street!

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I hope he doesn't notice this bit.

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MUSIC: Who Do You Think You Are Kidding Mr Hitler? by Bud Flanagan

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I think I'll guard it.

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You do look fearsome.

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Does my bum look big in this hat?

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No comment.

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-Paul!

-PAUL LAUGHS

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I don't think there's anything here to interest you,

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so I'd like you to back right off.

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What on earth?!

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Honestly, Paul, I have no idea.

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Enough of this tomfoolery - time to scout out some items, Anita.

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And soon enough...

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-You're a jewellery lady...

-I know.

-I thought you might like this one.

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-That's quite nice. Amethyst...

-And pearls.

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It's a sort of choker -

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a close-fitting necklace in the Arts and Crafts style,

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and set with seed pearls and amethyst-coloured stones.

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-That is very sweet, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-What sort of price is that?

-30 quid.

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I do like these tiny seed pearls and I do like the...

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-I think it's maybe amethyst glass rather than amethyst.

-Yeah.

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I would probably consider it...a piece of costume jewellery,

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rather than a precious piece.

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What is the very, very best that you could do on that?

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-25.

-25?

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I was thinking round about...

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15 to 18.

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Can you come anywhere nearer that?

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-I'll do it for 20.

-Will you do it for 20?

-Yep.

-Right, OK. Let's go.

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Thank you very much. That's lovely.

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And she's off.

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A very decisive first deal struck for a modest price.

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She's sticking to her strategy.

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Meanwhile, Paul's in another area of the shop

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and on his own hunt for treasure.

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Ah! He's spied something.

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Here I am looking at a piece that I'm beguiled by,

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and I've got to drill down further

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because we're looking at a joined-oak bedding chest.

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Yeah, let's. Bear with me, OK? Let me clear the debris here.

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It is indeed a chest...

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fashioned of oak and ticketed at a very hefty £155,

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but this one might have some serious age to it.

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What is the period?

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Late 17th, late 18th century.

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So, I mean, this is potentially a 300-year-old piece of furniture,

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and a useful piece of furniture.

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Open it up, Laidlaw. What do you see?

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Well, I'm going to be honest with you - I think it's right.

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A lover of a real antique, Paul's quite smitten with it.

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I'm really seriously tempted to.

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Don't blow your top, old chap.

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I want to buy it, but it's too big a gamble.

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With a budget of £216.10,

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it certainly would be a risky purchase,

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but perhaps if he finds some other items to buy with it,

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there could be a deal to be done.

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And he soon unearths a candle box dating from the late 18th

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or early 19th century, ticketed at £35.

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And a Georgian tea urn, or samovar,

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which is marked up at £80. Gosh.

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This would have sat on some lovely Georgian sideboard

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and it dates to 1830.

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That's a good thing, is it not?

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But again, it's copper and brass, and copper and brass doesn't sell.

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Time to give Chris, the owner of these items, a call.

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With a combined ticket price of a whopping £270,

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he'll have to negotiate a terrific deal.

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-OVER PHONE:

-If you make it 180 for the three, I'd be happy with that.

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-I've got to come back at you cos we're still talking.

-Yep.

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But there's a bit of chasm between it.

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I'm going to 160, but that's me pulling my own teeth out.

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If we make it 170, that's really...

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160, can we do it or not?

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And I'd respect no because we're both in business here.

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-Do you 165 and you've got a deal.

-You've got a deal.

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-OK.

-Chris, you're a good man. I like your style.

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And I like yours, Paul.

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Thanks to Chris's generosity, he's got all three items

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for a bargain £165,

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but now he's only got a paltry £51.10 left in his pocket.

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Make no bones about it, I've gambled.

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Well, let's hope it pays off, eh?

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So, while Paul's paying the big stakes,

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Anita's still nibbling away at smaller items.

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You know, I've passed this little guy half a dozen times,

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and every time I've passed him, he's brought a smile to my face.

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I mean, he's a modern thing, but he is kinda fun, isn't he?

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"Metal mouse."

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A metal mouse he is - a rather quirky contemporary ornament.

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I can't resist that. I think I'm going to have a go at it.

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Jill, I know you're going to think I'm mad...

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I'd quite like to buy it,

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but I'd quite like to buy it very, very cheaply.

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-Like, VERY, very cheaply.

-"VERY, very cheaply"? £10.

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-£10? Is that the lowest you can go?

-I don't know. £8?

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-£8, let's go for it.

-Deal.

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-It's brought a smile to both of our faces.

-Good.

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Another swift haggle means she has two buys under her belt already

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and for only £28 in total.

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Ah, but she's not finished.

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Do you know, Jill? I was just thinking,

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see if we had a wee bow-tie or a wee ribbon around it,

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-it would make that mouse irresistible.

-Of course it would.

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Obligingly, Jill has searched out a ribbon. You are demanding, Anita.

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And she gets the prettifying ribbon

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for a budget-busting 5p - ha! - making the mouse £8.05 in total.

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Last of the big spenders, eh, Anita(?)

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-Excellent, excellent.

-£8.05.

-Brilliant.

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Now, having blown most of his cash, Paul's jumped in the car

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and he's heading for the village of Eyam in Derbyshire.

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Paul's going to spend the afternoon

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in this pretty Peak District village

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where he'll learn about an extraordinary sacrifice

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made by Eyam's villagers in the 17th century,

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one that saved countless thousands of lives.

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Paul's aiming for the parish church -

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the heart of this community since Saxon times

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and central to the village's extraordinary 17th-century story.

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-Francine?

-Yes, hello.

-Pleased to meet you! I'm Paul.

-Hello, Paul.

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-This is Eyam Parish Church, isn't it?

-Yes, it is. Welcome.

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And I'm here because I believe it's got a particularly poignant history.

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It has indeed, yes.

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It's well-known for its heroic action that it took in the 17th century

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when we were having the plague.

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-May we go in so you can tell me more, please?

-Yes, come in.

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In 1665, an epidemic of bubonic plague spread horrifyingly

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throughout the city of London.

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Transmitted by rat fleas,

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the disease claimed about 15% of the city's total population.

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At the same time, a tailor in Eyam, more than 150 miles away,

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ordered a consignment of cloth

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that arrived in the village infested with the deadly fleas.

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As villagers began succumbing to plague,

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the parish's rector, William Mompesson,

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knew that action had to be taken to prevent it spreading.

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This stained glass window

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commemorates what happened in the months following.

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They agreed to put a quarantine in place

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and have all the congregation, have all the community,

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agree nobody in and nobody out,

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completely isolating themselves from the outside world

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so that the infection didn't spread any further than Eyam.

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Because William Mompesson knew that, if people left the village,

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they would take the infection with them.

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And not only would a large proportion of Eyam people die,

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but if it got into the cities and towns nearby,

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there would be thousands dying and not just hundreds.

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This act of sacrifice on the part of the villagers of Eyam

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doubtless prevented the wider spread of plague in the north

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and saved many thousands of lives in nearby towns.

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We're famous because it worked. Nobody...

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There were no cases of plague outside,

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in the vicinity of Eyam, anywhere.

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Derbyshire, Yorkshire...

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So, how long does the quarantine last?

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-14 months.

-Astonishing.

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From a population of around 800,

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Eyam had suffered devastating losses.

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Mompesson wrote that 76 families had been affected by the plague,

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260 had died...

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-A third of population...

-A third of them died.

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The stained glass window also commemorates

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the story of one young couple who lived during the quarantine.

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The girl in the golden dress is Emmott Syddall.

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She was engaged to be married to the man you can see there,

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a chap called Rowland Torre, who came from the next village,

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and he was told to keep away, to keep out of the infection.

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But the courting couple still wanted to see each other

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and so met on either side of a wide stream.

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She, in the quarantined village, and he, outside.

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They would just be able to wave to one another.

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They wouldn't be able to call out or touch one another,

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but they'd be reassured that everything was all right.

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He came every day until the end of April

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and she didn't turn up.

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And, of course, he couldn't come into the village

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to find out what happened to her.

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It's said that when the plague was over,

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he was one of the first people to rush into the village and say,

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"Where's Emmott? Where's Emmott?"

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And, er, he found out that she had died.

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A tragic story.

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And it's always said that Rowland was so devastated

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by the death of Emmott that he never married, and...

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He became quite a recluse, I think.

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Oh, it's tragic!

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The church still has the parish plague register

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where Emmott's name is recorded.

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You've got Emmott Syddall on the 29th April.

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It's quite moving, isn't it?

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This register holds the memory of all the brave villagers

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who gave their lives to prevent the spread of the plague.

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That really shows the community spirit

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and the caring of other people.

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It's an inspiring piece of history.

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Well, I have loved visiting it, I've got to say.

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That's a really moving story and I'm heartbroken down to the individuals.

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-Poor Emmott! Thank you very much.

-Thank you for coming.

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-It has been tremendous.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Now, Anita is still back in the fine city of Sheffield

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where she's heading for the lavishly named NP and A Salt Antiques

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and meeting dealer Chris.

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-Hi, I'm Anita.

-Hi, Anita. Chris.

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-What a wonderful, splendid house.

-Yeah, lovely, isn't it?

-Chris!

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This building once belonged to a renowned 19th-century

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Sheffield silversmith and master cutler, John Rogers.

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So, it's an appropriately historic place

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for Anita to continue the hunt.

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I saw some wee bits and pieces around here, Chris.

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Right.

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I quite like that combination of horn and the white metal there.

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Could I have a wee look at that?

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There we go.

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Thank you.

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-So, is this a little spirit flask?

-Yep.

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Yeah, it's a flask for carrying grog,

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fashioned of horn and white metal.

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Probably dating from the early 20th century,

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but there's no ticket on it, which presents an opportunity.

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What sort of price on that, bearing in mind, Chris?

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I know! I know!

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Bearing in mind I've got a wee bit of repair on here.

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£30.

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-£30? Are you able to come to 25?

-£25, sold.

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-Are you able to come to £20?

-Just!

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Ah, right, that's great! Thanks very much.

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So, she's bagged that for another modest amount.

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Very thrifty, Anita!

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And, she's browsing on.

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Wow!

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Yep! Right into an area that specialises in jukebox.

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Here we go!

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MUSIC: Tutti Frutti by Little Richard

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Boogie!

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Glad to see you've made a new friend, Anita.

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-So, does your budget run to one, that's the question?

-Probably not.

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Definitely not! Less jiving, more shopping, please.

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ROCKSTEADY MUSIC

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-There was another thing which caught my eye.

-What was that?

0:17:540:17:57

-The mask, up here.

-Oh, my word! Yes.

0:17:570:18:01

-Is that an old one?

-It is.

0:18:010:18:03

I think it is, that one. That's one of Norman's.

0:18:030:18:07

Dear Norman will be summoned.

0:18:070:18:10

What's caught my eye out here is that wonderful African mask.

0:18:100:18:14

Is this an old one, Norman?

0:18:140:18:15

Yes, it's quite old, that one.

0:18:150:18:17

-It looks sort of late Victorian, round about that sort of age.

-Right.

0:18:170:18:22

But what we'll do, we'll get it down and have a look.

0:18:220:18:24

Have a good look at it.

0:18:240:18:25

Lovely! It's a West African tribal mask ticketed at a pricey £220.

0:18:250:18:31

-It's got a nice patina on this.

-It's beautiful.

-Yeah.

0:18:310:18:34

You can have it for 100 if you wish.

0:18:340:18:36

If I'm paying £100 for it, I know that I'm taking a chance on it.

0:18:360:18:39

-Do you think I should take a chance?

-Oh, definitely!

0:18:390:18:43

-Let's just take a chance!

-Thank you very much. Thank you, Anita.

0:18:430:18:46

Thank you.

0:18:460:18:47

Crikey! Anita abandons her small spending strategy to splurge

0:18:470:18:52

on the striking mask, though at a terrific discount

0:18:520:18:55

thanks to storming Norman!

0:18:550:18:57

-Certainly different.

-Does this suit me?

-Gorgeous!

0:18:570:19:01

Indeed!

0:19:010:19:02

With that, it's a playful end to a very successful first day.

0:19:040:19:09

Nighty-night!

0:19:090:19:11

Anita, being £100 behind you...

0:19:170:19:22

Aw, my heart bleeds for you!

0:19:220:19:24

I'm feeling the love and the sympathy...

0:19:240:19:26

I think it would be...

0:19:260:19:28

You would understand if I was cautious,

0:19:280:19:31

didn't spend so heavily

0:19:310:19:33

and certainly didn't take risks on, you know, like furniture!

0:19:330:19:38

Imagine if I bought furniture!

0:19:380:19:40

Oh, you're not going to buy furniture, are you, Paul?

0:19:400:19:44

Oh, isn't he?

0:19:440:19:45

So far, Paul has spent a whopping £165 on three lots.

0:19:450:19:49

The tea urn,

0:19:510:19:52

the candle box and, indeed,

0:19:520:19:54

the late 17th century or early 18th century chest.

0:19:540:19:58

While Anita has scarcely been less of a spendthrift.

0:19:580:20:02

Splashing out £153.05 on four lots.

0:20:020:20:06

The choker with sea pearls,

0:20:070:20:09

the ornamental metal mouse with jaunty scarf,

0:20:090:20:12

the horn and white metal flask

0:20:120:20:14

and the African tribal mask.

0:20:140:20:17

I found that I was tempted beyond temptation...

0:20:170:20:21

Go on!

0:20:210:20:23

..into making speculative buys.

0:20:230:20:26

You've entered the world of speculation?!

0:20:260:20:29

It would seem so.

0:20:290:20:30

This morning, on this grand tour of the North,

0:20:300:20:33

they're heading to the city of Leeds,

0:20:330:20:36

whose canals and byways speak of its proud industrial history.

0:20:360:20:40

This morning, Paul is heading for the city's Swiss Cottage Antiques

0:20:430:20:47

where resides dealer John.

0:20:470:20:49

This is my place. Welcome.

0:20:490:20:51

-Good to see you. You are?

-John.

-I am Paul.

0:20:510:20:54

Sharp, Paul. Sharp!

0:20:540:20:55

Before long, he's spied something that chimes

0:21:010:21:04

with his love of wartime items.

0:21:040:21:06

Look at that.

0:21:060:21:08

That's a pretty nasty little plywood box of the 1940s.

0:21:080:21:14

A money box, you'd think, yes?

0:21:140:21:16

Look at that. A little paper label there.

0:21:160:21:19

Sunday School Force's Comforts Fund. Thank you.

0:21:190:21:24

The comforts phones were where...

0:21:240:21:26

It's an umbrella title that we can use to describe all of the civilian

0:21:280:21:32

volunteer activities that lent support in some way

0:21:320:21:37

to our fighting forces.

0:21:370:21:39

It taps into the sentiment of the population doing little things

0:21:390:21:42

where they could to support our troops fighting during the war.

0:21:420:21:45

Isn't that great?!

0:21:450:21:46

It's a good thing. Commercial thing?

0:21:460:21:49

No. It's worthless and priceless at the same time, no?

0:21:490:21:51

Nearby, there's a box stuffed full of more wartime memories...

0:21:510:21:56

Straight in from a house clearance.

0:21:560:21:59

..and an item dating from World War I.

0:21:590:22:01

This is the badge of the Old Contemptibles.

0:22:010:22:05

Who were the Old Contemptibles?

0:22:050:22:06

Well, they were the first British soldiers to fight overseas

0:22:060:22:11

during the First World War.

0:22:110:22:12

Kaiser Wilhelm referred to our British volunteers

0:22:120:22:16

and soldiers overseas as, "that contemptible little army".

0:22:160:22:20

And they took that, turned it right back at them

0:22:200:22:24

and referred to themselves as the Old Contemptibles.

0:22:240:22:27

So, this old veteran sat and whittled that thing

0:22:270:22:30

and hung it on in his office wall or whatever.

0:22:300:22:34

It's sweet. Not hugely valuable.

0:22:340:22:37

How do you put a price on a thing like that?

0:22:370:22:39

But I like what it evokes. Along with it, but from a different war...

0:22:390:22:43

It's a strange beast. That's an oil on canvas, yeah?

0:22:440:22:48

It's an amateur painting dating from the Second World War

0:22:480:22:51

celebrating the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers.

0:22:510:22:55

They were the technicians of the Army.

0:22:560:22:59

Armourers and artificers and so on.

0:22:590:23:01

In addition, Paul also found a cigarette box made of walnut

0:23:010:23:05

and dating from the period just after World War II in Germany.

0:23:050:23:09

Paul would like to add that, the painting,

0:23:090:23:12

Old Contemptibles carving

0:23:120:23:13

and the little Sunday school collections box

0:23:130:23:16

as one job lot of militaria.

0:23:160:23:19

Really set my world on fire? Well, no, they don't.

0:23:190:23:22

I think they're interesting, but they're not high-end.

0:23:220:23:25

Then again, I don't have a high-end budget. I've got no money to spend.

0:23:250:23:29

Very, very true, Paul.

0:23:290:23:31

But on his way to find dealer John, something else catches his eye.

0:23:310:23:35

I tell you what's hot, luggage.

0:23:350:23:38

And luggage is selling,...

0:23:380:23:40

Erm...

0:23:400:23:41

I dare say it'd be selling to some hipsters.

0:23:410:23:44

Hipsters, daddy-o! Crikey!

0:23:440:23:47

But I think most of it is selling to...

0:23:470:23:50

Er... Joe public as furnishing pieces.

0:23:500:23:54

Up here we've got a rather smart, rich, blue hide case.

0:23:540:24:01

I guess dating to the mid-20th century.

0:24:020:24:05

The '30s or as late as the '50s.

0:24:050:24:07

It was originally retailed by the famous London store Harrods

0:24:070:24:10

and marked up here at £55.

0:24:100:24:13

This was expensive.

0:24:130:24:15

It was a lady's piece.

0:24:150:24:16

So, he'd like both that and the assortment of wartime items

0:24:160:24:20

and best speak to John.

0:24:200:24:21

Can I ask you about your Harrods travel case?

0:24:210:24:24

-That's rather smart, is it not?

-55 quid, that one.

0:24:240:24:28

Straight to the chase! No, that works for me.

0:24:280:24:30

You know what doesn't work for me? I'll come clean with you.

0:24:300:24:34

Oh, dear!

0:24:340:24:36

-Oh, no!

-I've got a budget of 10 pence more than £51.

0:24:360:24:40

And I want to buy more than one thing.

0:24:400:24:43

Oh, dear!

0:24:430:24:44

Have we kicked it into touch

0:24:440:24:46

or are you the kind of man that I can negotiate with?

0:24:460:24:48

We can talk. See what else you're looking at first.

0:24:480:24:51

The various militaria is new stock and hasn't been ticketed yet.

0:24:510:24:55

And, of all things, the Sunday School Comforts...

0:24:550:24:59

-The collection box?

-Yes.

0:24:590:25:00

I'll take 50 quid across...

0:25:020:25:04

50 quid, I clear out those bits and bobs,

0:25:040:25:06

-and I'd take the good bit as well?

-Yes.

0:25:060:25:09

-You're a good man.

-Yeah.

0:25:090:25:11

Success! He gets the quality case and the interesting

0:25:110:25:14

wartime bits and bobs for £50 all in,

0:25:140:25:16

leaving him a regal £1.10 in his wallet.

0:25:160:25:22

Meanwhile, Anita is about to embark on a right royal adventure of her own.

0:25:220:25:25

She is heading for Leeds City Varieties Music Hall.

0:25:250:25:29

An historic venue,

0:25:290:25:31

which has entertained the people of the city for around 100 years

0:25:310:25:34

and along the way, played host to royalty

0:25:340:25:38

and some of the most famous entertainers in history.

0:25:380:25:41

Anita is meeting Rachel Lythe

0:25:410:25:42

of the theatre's History and Stories Department.

0:25:420:25:46

-Hello, I'm Anita.

-Hello, nice to meet you. I'm Rachel.

0:25:460:25:49

Rachel, it's wonderful to be here.

0:25:490:25:51

-Shall we go and have a look?

-I can't wait!

0:25:510:25:54

Music hall was a type of theatrical entertainment

0:25:550:25:57

popular in Britain from the mid- 1800s into the early 20th century.

0:25:570:26:02

In music halls like this one,

0:26:020:26:03

a variety performance of musical acts, novelty turns

0:26:030:26:07

and comedians would delight a packed crowd of punters.

0:26:070:26:11

This musical theatre opened in 1865.

0:26:110:26:14

In recent years, the theatre has been restored

0:26:140:26:17

to the glory of its Victorian heyday.

0:26:170:26:19

Rachel, this looks absolutely wonderful.

0:26:210:26:26

-And this is how it would have been in Victorian times?

-That's right.

0:26:260:26:29

About the 1900s.

0:26:290:26:31

So, what about the folk who came here?

0:26:310:26:34

What was the audience like?

0:26:340:26:35

The audience... This was very much a place for the masses.

0:26:350:26:38

It was the working man who'd been in the industries

0:26:380:26:41

and the mills all day, really hard grafting.

0:26:410:26:43

They looked to the music hall for light entertainment, a bit of relief.

0:26:430:26:47

It looks very grand and posh today,

0:26:470:26:49

but it would have been quite a different experience.

0:26:490:26:51

It was very noisy, very loud, very smoky, very smelly.

0:26:510:26:55

-Were they all sat down? Do you think they were well-behaved?

-No!

0:26:550:26:58

Definitely not. In the early days, we would have had thousands here.

0:26:580:27:02

Up to 2,000, potentially.

0:27:020:27:03

Today, we only have 467, so it shows the contrast

0:27:030:27:05

of how many people they would cram in here.

0:27:050:27:08

I wonder if they heckled the actors.

0:27:080:27:10

They definitely would have done.

0:27:100:27:11

So, the acts and the comedians,

0:27:110:27:13

part of their patter would have been to try and control that

0:27:130:27:16

and make sure they didn't get pulled off stage.

0:27:160:27:18

The music hall of 1900s might have been a rowdy affair,

0:27:180:27:21

but the stage here played host to performers who would go on to be

0:27:210:27:25

the most famous in the world.

0:27:250:27:27

Rachel has a record book dating from around the turn-of-the-century

0:27:270:27:31

in which the theatre manager has recorded the names

0:27:310:27:35

of some starry performers.

0:27:350:27:36

There's an interesting one here.

0:27:360:27:38

Can you see the Eight Lancashire Boys?

0:27:380:27:41

Charlie Chaplin was actually part of the Eight Lancashire Lads, the troupe,

0:27:410:27:45

a clog dancing troupe which used to tour around the country

0:27:450:27:48

before Charlie Chaplin became famous for his movies.

0:27:480:27:51

So, this would have been one of the first theatres that

0:27:510:27:54

-Charlie Chaplin appeared in.

-That's right.

0:27:540:27:57

-I wonder how much he made in those days?

-It was only a pound.

-A pound!

0:27:570:28:02

The other example, which is the other extreme, is Harry Houdini,

0:28:020:28:05

the great Harry Houdini has performed on this stage

0:28:050:28:08

and he came twice to the music hall in 1902 and 1904.

0:28:080:28:12

He was the great escapologist.

0:28:120:28:15

Yes, they used to come and wow the crowds with his big,

0:28:150:28:18

extravagant performances of escaping from handcuffs and various traps.

0:28:180:28:22

He was actually the highest-paid artist we've ever had here at the music hall.

0:28:220:28:25

In 1897 and 1902 and 1904, he was paid £130 and, again,

0:28:250:28:31

£150 two years later.

0:28:310:28:34

That is the equivalent of 8,000 today.

0:28:340:28:36

£8,000 a performance? Wow!

0:28:360:28:38

And it is thought the theatre not only played host to the

0:28:380:28:42

era's superstars, but also to royalty.

0:28:420:28:45

There's a rumour that Prince Edward used to sneak in here.

0:28:450:28:49

Right, and I don't suppose he would have been in these rows in the back.

0:28:490:28:52

No, he would have been further down in one of our boxes.

0:28:520:28:55

The Prince of Wales, later to become King Edward VII,

0:28:550:28:58

is rumoured to have snuck into the box here in order

0:28:580:29:01

to watch his mistress, the famous and the celebrated actress

0:29:010:29:05

Lillie Langtry, perform on stage.

0:29:050:29:07

Of course, to avoid scandal, the Prince would have been incognito.

0:29:070:29:11

This is where the Prince of Wales would have sat?

0:29:110:29:14

Yes, so the story goes that he used to sneak in here,

0:29:140:29:16

he'd come to Leeds to go to Harewood House to see his cousins and go grouse shooting,

0:29:160:29:20

and then apparently he used to sneak in here, pull the curtains to,

0:29:200:29:24

and then watch Lille Langtry perform on stage.

0:29:240:29:26

And then, we believe as a thank you for our discretion for letting him sneak in and out of the theatre,

0:29:260:29:31

when Prince Edward became king, donated us the royal crest,

0:29:310:29:34

which you can see up above the proscenium arch today.

0:29:340:29:37

Isn't that wonderful?

0:29:370:29:39

As a final treat,

0:29:390:29:40

Rachel is taking Anita right down on to the very stage

0:29:400:29:44

from behind whose curtain the stars of music hall would have emerged.

0:29:440:29:48

-This is where the greats would have waited before the performance began.

-That's right.

0:29:480:29:54

You'd be standing here, ready to go on stage.

0:29:540:29:56

A wee bit nervous.

0:29:560:29:58

-They'd be standing here...

-Ready for the curtain to open!

0:29:580:30:01

And the show to begin!

0:30:030:30:05

Don't milk your part, Anita. Honestly.

0:30:050:30:08

It's time to be on your way, girl.

0:30:080:30:10

Rachel, before I break into song,

0:30:100:30:12

I've got to say thank you very much. I've enjoyed it so much.

0:30:120:30:15

-You're very welcome.

-You've been wonderful. Bye-bye.

-Thank you.

0:30:150:30:18

Now, having splurged all his cash, bar £1.10,

0:30:220:30:27

Paul has gone for a walk around Leeds docks,

0:30:270:30:29

and as usual, he's looking at a bit of militaria.

0:30:290:30:32

I don't think you're going to be able to get that for £1, Paul.

0:30:330:30:36

Ah, that's more like it. You must be confident!

0:30:370:30:40

Well, I'm feeling good about today.

0:30:400:30:44

Jolly good!

0:30:440:30:45

But Anita is still on the hunt,

0:30:460:30:48

so she's driven to Gomersal, West Yorkshire,

0:30:480:30:50

where she is heading into the old silk mill and greeting dealer Tony.

0:30:500:30:54

-Hi there.

-Hello, I'm Anita.

0:30:560:30:58

-I'm Tony. Nice to meet you.

-It's lovely to see you.

0:30:580:31:01

Anita is running out of time to make her last purchase.

0:31:010:31:04

But, happily, she's spotted something.

0:31:100:31:13

I'm looking at these medals up here, can you tell me anything about them?

0:31:130:31:18

-I see there's a wee photograph of the guy.

-Yeah, the chap that won them.

0:31:180:31:23

To tell you the truth, we've not had them all that long,

0:31:230:31:25

I can't tell you all that much.

0:31:250:31:27

-Shall I get them down?

-Can I have a wee look?

0:31:270:31:29

It's a collection of medals, awarded during the Second World War

0:31:290:31:33

and framed along with a photograph, presumably of the soldier who won them.

0:31:330:31:36

Anita is branching out into Paul's specialism of militaria -

0:31:390:31:43

brave girl.

0:31:430:31:44

I'll tell you what's drawn me to these,

0:31:440:31:47

the fact that we have the guy's photograph. I always like that.

0:31:470:31:53

Gives it more of a story.

0:31:530:31:55

-We've only got £30 on it.

-£30 on it?

0:31:550:31:58

I'm kind of tempted!

0:31:580:32:01

I'm a wee bit tempted, I'm a wee bit tempted.

0:32:010:32:05

Would you take 20 for it?

0:32:050:32:06

-20?

-20.

0:32:060:32:08

It would give me a bit of a chance.

0:32:080:32:10

-Yeah, yeah.

-Do 20 on it? Go on, then.

0:32:100:32:11

Thank you, let's go for that.

0:32:110:32:13

That deal is done with military efficiency!

0:32:130:32:16

And she's got all her lots for auction.

0:32:160:32:19

So, Anita bought the choker, set with sea pearls,

0:32:220:32:25

the metal vase, the horn and white metal spirit flask and the African tribal mask.

0:32:250:32:31

And the frame of medals. She spent £173.05.

0:32:310:32:35

While Paul bought the copper and brass tea urn,

0:32:370:32:40

the wooden candle box

0:32:400:32:42

the oak chest,

0:32:420:32:44

the job lot of militaria,

0:32:440:32:45

and the vintage Harrods case.

0:32:450:32:48

He forked out £215 exactly.

0:32:480:32:51

But what do they make of each other's lots?

0:32:510:32:53

Paul has bought an interesting group of items this time

0:32:540:32:59

and I actually like all of his items.

0:32:590:33:02

The kist! Isn't that just the most wonderful,

0:33:020:33:06

wonderful piece of furniture?

0:33:060:33:08

300 years old. Paul is always a man of style

0:33:080:33:12

and what better style than to have a wonderful piece of Harrods luggage?

0:33:120:33:18

And in that marvellous blue colour.

0:33:180:33:20

I think in this leg he might have the advantage on me.

0:33:200:33:23

Very interesting. And Paul?

0:33:230:33:26

I'm worried about the necklet.

0:33:260:33:29

It looks to me as though you get a lot of rather smart jewellery for your money there.

0:33:290:33:35

£20 paid.

0:33:350:33:36

What can I say about the mouse? The mouse is a riot.

0:33:360:33:39

It's a wee charmer, so I'm in more bother. She's going to be difficult to beat,

0:33:390:33:44

she's, she plays this game well!

0:33:440:33:47

So, everyone is worried. Just the way we like it!

0:33:470:33:51

On this road trip, Anita and Paul have traversed the English North, beginning in Sheffield,

0:33:510:33:56

and ending up at auction here today at Luddendenfoot, West Yorkshire.

0:33:560:34:01

And they are enjoying the handsome and vertiginous landscape.

0:34:010:34:04

Look at that view! Isn't that absolutely magnificent?

0:34:040:34:09

We are at some altitude, are we not?

0:34:090:34:11

-Oh, wow.

-Need oxygen in a minute!

0:34:110:34:13

-Isn't that...?

-Keep your eye on the road, Anita!

0:34:150:34:17

That's a long way down there!

0:34:170:34:19

-Are you getting a wee bit nervous?

-What colour are these knuckles?

0:34:190:34:23

Thankfully they are just arriving at Calder Valley Auctioneers.

0:34:230:34:27

-Second auction, Paul.

-Second, round two.

0:34:270:34:30

Round two, who's going to win this one?

0:34:300:34:33

We'll see. Auctioneer Ian Piece is presiding today,

0:34:330:34:37

but before this grudge match kicks off,

0:34:370:34:40

what does he make of their lots?

0:34:400:34:41

A good assortment, one or two very quirky lots.

0:34:410:34:46

The Harrods case, travelling case.

0:34:460:34:50

Absolute wonderful quality. We always get...

0:34:500:34:52

..one lot that stands out and the mouse ornament is this week's.

0:34:540:34:58

The auction is about to begin. Good luck, you cheeky pair.

0:34:580:35:01

First up is Anita's horn and white metal spirit flask.

0:35:020:35:06

What am I bid for this, ladies and gentlemen? 40?

0:35:060:35:08

-30? 20 then. £20.

-Come on! Please, please!

0:35:080:35:13

20 I'm bid, thank you. At £20.

0:35:130:35:15

And 2.50. 25.

0:35:150:35:17

27.50.

0:35:170:35:19

At £30.

0:35:190:35:21

£32.50. 35.

0:35:210:35:23

£37.50.

0:35:230:35:25

£40.

0:35:250:35:27

£42.50.

0:35:270:35:29

-45.

-Where is it going to stop?

0:35:290:35:31

-At £45.

-£45.

0:35:310:35:33

£45, any bids over 45?

0:35:330:35:36

I hope I'm not going to have deja vu

0:35:360:35:39

all through this auction.

0:35:390:35:41

The flask has still seen her to a spirited profit.

0:35:410:35:44

Listen, it is early days.

0:35:440:35:47

It is. And there's everything to play for

0:35:470:35:49

as it's Paul's Georgian tea urn, now.

0:35:490:35:51

Shall we say for that, 50?

0:35:510:35:53

-40?

-Come on, come on!

0:35:530:35:54

30? 20?

0:35:540:35:57

20 I'm bid, thank you. 25.

0:35:570:36:00

-Where are we?

-30, £30.

0:36:000:36:03

-35.

-Yes!

-40.

0:36:030:36:04

45. At £45 on my right.

0:36:040:36:10

£45, any further bids? At £45...

0:36:100:36:14

Well done, darlin', well done.

0:36:140:36:16

-Are you happy?

-It's a baby step.

0:36:160:36:18

-Is it a baby step?

-It's a baby step.

-I think it's a sort of teenage step.

0:36:180:36:22

A teenage step? You two do talk some nonsense,

0:36:230:36:27

but that's another nice profit.

0:36:270:36:30

Now it's Anita's choker in the arts and crafts style.

0:36:300:36:33

It has Paul worried. Should he be?

0:36:330:36:36

-30.

-Yes, yes!

-20, I'm over 20 on a commission bid.

0:36:360:36:41

-At 20, and 20, any advances on 20?

-Come on!

0:36:410:36:46

22.50, madam, 25 on commission.

0:36:460:36:48

25, 27.50,

0:36:480:36:51

I'm 30 on commission bid, £30.

0:36:510:36:54

At £30, are we all done? Then at £30, it's selling, at £30...

0:36:540:37:00

Bang on the money...

0:37:000:37:01

Another decent profit to Anita and she is sitting pretty.

0:37:010:37:05

£30 is OK.

0:37:050:37:06

I think I got away lightly there.

0:37:060:37:08

That could have been more painful than that.

0:37:080:37:11

Next it's Paul's candle box, bought as part of a job lot.

0:37:110:37:15

Right, we shall say £20.

0:37:150:37:18

-Don't talk like that!

-15 I'm bid, 20 anywhere?

0:37:180:37:22

-A profit.

-15? I'll take 2.50. 17.50.

0:37:220:37:25

20. 2.50. 25.

0:37:250:37:27

7.50. 30. 2.50.

0:37:270:37:30

-32.50, anybody else now? 32.50.

-You've just stolen the midden there!

0:37:310:37:37

32.50, all done.

0:37:370:37:40

Another winner! They're on fire today.

0:37:400:37:43

Have the nerves calmed down, darling?

0:37:430:37:45

They're always there, lurking in the background.

0:37:450:37:48

Not to worry you further, Paul,

0:37:480:37:49

but Anita's charming metal mouse is next.

0:37:490:37:52

Eek!

0:37:520:37:53

£20? £15? 10?

0:37:530:37:57

Here we are. 10 I'm bid. 12.50.

0:37:570:38:00

15, 17.50, 20,

0:38:000:38:03

-2.50. 22.50. 25.

-There's more bids on it!

0:38:030:38:05

And it certainly does seem to have made an impression on the crowd.

0:38:050:38:09

-27.50.

-Yes!

0:38:090:38:11

Or Anita has!

0:38:110:38:13

-£30.

-It is a flying mouse!

0:38:130:38:15

And £30. £32.50.

0:38:160:38:19

£35. That's all that you need. There you go. 35.

0:38:190:38:23

Anybody else? £35, on my right,

0:38:240:38:27

are you sure? At £35 then...

0:38:270:38:31

Yes!

0:38:310:38:33

APPLAUSE

0:38:330:38:36

It charms the punters, as desired,

0:38:360:38:38

and Anita's quite jubilant.

0:38:380:38:40

I got carried away, but I couldn't help it!

0:38:400:38:42

And it brought a smile to all these people's faces!

0:38:420:38:46

Now it's Paul's classy vintage case.

0:38:460:38:49

Anita liked it, will the punters?

0:38:490:38:51

50. 40?

0:38:510:38:53

30. Thank you, £30 bid.

0:38:540:38:56

35, 40, 45, 50,

0:38:560:39:00

-55, 60...

-We're going, we're going!

0:39:000:39:01

-I have 60, anybody else at £60?

-Come on, come on, come on, come on!

0:39:010:39:06

At £60 then on commission bid, are there any other bids?

0:39:060:39:09

£60, it's going, at 60...

0:39:090:39:12

Quality will out, that was a good buy.

0:39:130:39:16

-Good buy.

-That's what I said.

-Who's a clever boy?

-I am, Anita.

0:39:160:39:19

Now it's Anita's framed World War II medals.

0:39:210:39:24

Normally Paul's area of expertise,

0:39:240:39:26

but can she beat him at his own game?

0:39:260:39:29

Shall we say 30, 20?

0:39:290:39:31

-15?

-Come on!

-15 I'm bid.

0:39:310:39:34

17.50. 20. 2.50.

0:39:340:39:37

22.50. Anybody else now? 25.

0:39:370:39:40

27.50.

0:39:400:39:42

27.50. 30.

0:39:420:39:44

32.50. 35. 27.50.

0:39:440:39:48

37.50 bid here. At 37.50.

0:39:480:39:51

You were absolutely right.

0:39:510:39:52

Good buy, you bought it.

0:39:520:39:54

We're going, 37.50...

0:39:540:39:56

It may not be her area, but that was a smart buy.

0:39:590:40:02

Paul's own job lot of militaria now.

0:40:020:40:05

After Anita's good show on the last lot,

0:40:050:40:08

this better win or it'll be eggy face for him!

0:40:080:40:11

15 to start then. 15, thank you, straight in.

0:40:110:40:15

Straight in.

0:40:150:40:16

19. 21. 23. 25.

0:40:160:40:20

25, 27 on the commission bid, 27.

0:40:200:40:23

Anybody else now? £27.

0:40:230:40:26

Selling then, commission bid, £27, are we all done?

0:40:260:40:30

27.

0:40:300:40:32

And it does! Phew!

0:40:320:40:35

They are nearly neck and neck now, as the last two lots are up,

0:40:360:40:39

and it's their biggest gambles.

0:40:390:40:41

Are you feart?

0:40:420:40:43

Yeah!

0:40:450:40:47

First, Anita's beloved African tribal mask.

0:40:470:40:50

£20 I'm bid, at £20.

0:40:500:40:53

And 22.50, do I see?

0:40:530:40:55

At 2.50.

0:40:550:40:56

25. At £25, anybody else now?

0:40:560:41:00

25 on my left.

0:41:000:41:01

Another bidder on your left.

0:41:010:41:03

27.50. £30. £30 here on my left.

0:41:030:41:08

£30. Are you all done at £30?

0:41:080:41:11

Here we go, £30.

0:41:110:41:13

There we are.

0:41:140:41:16

I made a small loss of £70!

0:41:160:41:20

Someone in the crowd's got a bargain piece of African art.

0:41:200:41:24

Now everything rests on Paul's 300-year-old chest.

0:41:250:41:29

50. 50 I'm bid. And 5 anywhere. And 5.

0:41:290:41:34

60. And 5. 70.

0:41:340:41:36

There's a determined man behind us.

0:41:360:41:38

80, and 5, 90, and 5, 100, and 5, 105 in the doorway.

0:41:380:41:45

Don't stop, keep going!

0:41:450:41:46

110, third row.

0:41:460:41:48

115. 120.

0:41:480:41:51

120 in the third row.

0:41:510:41:53

-£120 and... 125, you're back in.

-You're back in!

0:41:530:41:57

125.

0:41:570:41:59

Gentleman over there, £125.

0:41:590:42:02

All finished, £125 then?

0:42:020:42:05

To the pound!

0:42:070:42:10

It breaks even on the nose.

0:42:100:42:13

-Happy enough?

-I'm happy enough

0:42:130:42:16

Yeah.

0:42:160:42:17

Anita started this leg with £300.40. After auction costs are deducted,

0:42:170:42:24

she made a loss of £27.50

0:42:240:42:26

and ends today with £272.90.

0:42:260:42:31

While Paul began with £216.10.

0:42:310:42:35

After costs, he made a profit of £22.39

0:42:350:42:41

and ends today with 238.49

0:42:410:42:44

Well done, Paul!

0:42:440:42:47

-Well, Paul, that was exciting!

-Wasn't it just?

0:42:480:42:52

-I'm closing the gap, yes!

-You are. I'm still a wee bit ahead!

0:42:520:42:55

I know, but I've got you in my sights!

0:42:550:42:58

Onwards and upwards.

0:43:000:43:02

Onwards, to victory!

0:43:020:43:04

On the next Antiques Road Trip, we have scares...

0:43:050:43:09

Aaargh! It's like something out the Hammer House of Horrors!

0:43:100:43:15

And stares,

0:43:150:43:17

as Anita and Paul face off again.

0:43:170:43:20

Paul Laidlaw and Anita Manning continue their antique adventure. They travel from the steel city of Sheffield, heading for auction in Luddendenfoot, West Yorkshire.


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