Episode 1 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 1

Antiques challenge. Experts Christina Trevanion and Paul Laidlaw kick off their road trip through Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Gloucestershire and Northamptonshire.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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-I don't know what to do!

-HORN BEEPS

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..with £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at option,

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but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game! Charlie!

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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CHRISTINA GASPS

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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-or the slow road to disaster?

-Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today we embark on a brand-new road trip

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with a fresh pair of intrepid antiquers.

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I haven't actually worked with you before

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and it makes me quite nervous.

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No, I mean, seriously,

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you have forgotten more than I will ever, ever, ever...

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Behave yourself!

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Whereas you are like the neuroscientist of antiques.

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Hmm, quite! Ha!

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Auctioneer Paul Laidlaw is also a specialist in militaria

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and knows more than a couple of things about antiques.

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He is also quite nimble...

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..and sharp.

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You don't want to get me started about Georgian wine glasses!

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We've opened Pandora's box!

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His rival is auctioneer and valuer Christina Trevanion

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whose charm is matched only by her optimism and determination.

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I could give it a new home.

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Would you like to pay me to give it a new home?

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It's not the sort of thing I normally do!

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Today, our lovable duo start their awfully big journey with £200 each

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and a rather fetching 1951 Standard Phase 1 pick-up.

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The pick-up was manufactured before seatbelts were mandatory,

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which is why our experts aren't wearing any.

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On their trip this week, our duo will be traversing the country,

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setting off from Clare in Suffolk

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before careering through Worcestershire and the West Midlands

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and twisting up through Staffordshire,

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before their journey culminates in Northwich in Cheshire

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over 600 miles later.

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I think there is a gear problem.

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Oh, no, you haven't broken it already, Paul?

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I don't know about you, but I don't like the smell in here.

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It's really not smelling very healthy, is it?

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No, not a great start, this.

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-Uh-oh!

-Wait a minute, how do we pop the...?

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Oh, I think you've broken it!

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-Here we go.

-Oh.

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Ohh...

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PAUL LAUGHS

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It's ruptured.

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Just as well we're not in the middle of nowhere.

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Oh, no, wait a minute... Oh, no!

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-There's a footpath.

-Can we head towards civilisation?

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It's been nice knowing you.

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Don't worry, chaps. Someone else will look after the car.

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Having to rely on their own steam for a while,

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their first shop is the wool town of Clare.

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Christina is first to get the shopping under way.

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-Hello!

-Hi.

-Hello, hi, Christina.

-Hi, Christina. I'm David.

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Pleasantries over, it's time to get down to business.

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See, the temptation is to go... to stick to the usual,

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to stick to what you know, which is silver, jewellery, small things,

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but I feel like I want to go a bit wacky.

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Yeah, this should be interesting.

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These look really sweet -

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a pair of silver-plated pickle forks, Scottish.

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Little thistles on the top.

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Not that wacky, then.

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Specialised utensils like the pickle fork

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were commonplace at Victorian dining tables,

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popular at a time when table manners increased

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and handling your food became taboo.

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The owner is looking for £22 for those pickle forks.

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Is there any chance you think he might go for sort of £15 on those?

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Erm, I can find out.

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I don't think he will, but let me phone him for you.

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While Christina waits for David to get hold of the dealer,

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Paul is rummaging round the shelves of Market Hill Antiques.

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I'm just going to buy what tickles my fancy

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in terms of interest and price.

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Nice scent bottle there for you, look.

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-Which one are we looking at?

-The big one.

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-That one there?

-That, you can have for 30 quid.

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That's a fantastic discount from the original ticket price of 125!

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You know there's profit in that.

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You know how to tempt a man, there's no two ways about it!

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Lovely, late Victorian.

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Do you call them grenade perfumes? I do.

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Yeah, that's what it is.

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Yeah, we've got a pleasingly worked hinged lid,

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opening to reveal a ground-in stopper.

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No nasty surprises where the neck has been chipped or cracked.

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I'm going to leave that there because...

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I just can't argue with the numbers, to be honest.

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You know I can't argue with the numbers!

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Speaking of which, what price do we have for those pickle forks?

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Christina, I've got the dealer on the phone.

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He's not able to do £15, but he is willing to do £17.

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-Oh, can I...? Can I?

-Of course you can.

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-(What's his name?)

-Alan.

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Hello, Alan. Alan, I was just having a little look

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at these pickle forks here and they are very, very sweet.

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Is there any chance you would do 15 on them?

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It just gives me a fighting chance at auction, really, if possible.

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Ooh, 15 would be better for me.

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Are you sure, Alan?

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That's really kind.

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That sounded like a deal to me,

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so Christina is up and running, picking up the pickle forks for £15.

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-OK, I'll keep wandering, see if there's anything else.

-Yeah, sure.

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Meanwhile, Paul has clapped an eye on something rather unusual.

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You...crank up this,

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drop a pellet in,

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open it up

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and you have landed

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in trap 1, 2, 9 or B.

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-Do you know what that means?

-Not in the slightest.

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What is the price on that?

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I've got a 65 ticket.

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You can always make me an offer.

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My problem is, I've got five things to buy over the next two days

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-and I...I hope to buy ONE here.

-Yep.

-PAUL LAUGHS

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One is looking like it's out the window!

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It seems both our experts are having a very productive morning.

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Ow!

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Isn't that lovely? I really like that!

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I mean, that is... It's very... It's very Arts and Crafts.

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It's copper.

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That...is fab.

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Love it!

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Really love it!

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£60.

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Do I love it £60 worth?

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God, I really... I've got to

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carry this down four flights of stairs now, haven't I?

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It's really heavy.

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No such trouble for Paul,

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who is still stalking the floor over at Market Hill Antiques.

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You could save yourself a lot of time and buy all five items here.

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Don't encourage him, Robin!

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What price is on the wounded soldiers?

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They can be about £25.

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£25... We've got here, lead soldiers and nurses

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and, in the late 19th century,

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the best ones were made of die-cast lead.

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£25, I am tempted.

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And he's noticed something else right up his street.

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This is very me!

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This is, of course... You know who that is.

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Admiral Lord Nelson, a truly great Briton

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and this is a commemorative made by Doulton & Watts

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in salt-glazed stoneware.

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You'd call it a toby jug, I'd call it a character jug.

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You don't need to be an expert to identify the manufacturer of that.

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Lambeth London Stoneware.

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Absolutely fanta...

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I mean, I really like this.

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I like the medium, I like the origin and the subject matter...

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Well, don't even get me started!

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You got started all by yourself!

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While Paul considers half the shop,

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Christina is hoping David can convince the dealer

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to take her offer of £40.

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£50, Karen? I understand.

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£50? Do I like it £50?

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Is it going to make that at auction?

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Probably not, but I like it.

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I think I'm happy with that, David.

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That's the copper planter and the pickle forks for Christina,

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for the grand old sum of £65.

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Good girl.

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But has her rival managed to sort out his own shopping list conundrum?

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How many items have you clocked up now, Paul?

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One, two, three, four lots.

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I would be off my head to buy four lots here.

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If I'm going to be mad, give me the deal of deals on four lots

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and I take my chances, but it's got to be right.

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125.

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No negotiation.

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Three unknown quantities, one is not...

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And one tricky piece!

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You got him!

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That's a bold start for Paul, all for £125.

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Meanwhile, Christina has arrived in the picturesque village

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of Steeple Bumpstead - ha! - in Essex,

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with a little bit of catching up to do.

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Just over the border from Suffolk,

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this delightful village is home to Bumpstead Antiques And Interiors.

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Don't you love it?!

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Maybe you could borrow their car, Christina?

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Owner Graham Hessel is showing Christina around.

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Beautiful! Look at those guys!

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That's rather lovely, isn't it?

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Nice Shelley mark on the bottom, Wild Flowers pattern, 13668.

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So, what have we got here, Graham? We've got four cups...

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So, originally, there probably would have been

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-a set of six, wouldn't there?

-Yes.

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So collectors would want it as a set of six,

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but nonetheless, it's very pretty, isn't it?

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And people do collect Shelley, it is very collectable.

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What have you got on that, on our label?

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-We've got 75 for the set.

-Oh, yes.

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Oof! What... Can you do any...?

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Of course I can.

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I'll knock £25 off.

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-Right, so it's £50.

-£50 for the set...

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-OK.

-..which is about as far as I can go on that.

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That is pretty, I do like that.

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And from coffee service to something completely different.

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OK, so, how much have you got on your record player, Graham?

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You can make me an offer on that.

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I would be looking for something in the region of £35 or £40 for it.

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But the problem is, it doesn't work.

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You can just imagine putting it into the back of your car,

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taking it down to the river on a nice sunny day,

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taking out the records, having a picnic...

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-And then finding it doesn't work!

-Yes!

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THEY LAUGH

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As one that isn't working, I would probably be looking at

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maybe £10 or £15, to sell it on at auction.

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What are your thoughts about that?

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-Well, I'm shocked!

-Oh!

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-But I'm still standing.

-Good, that's the main thing.

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It would need to come up a little bit, I think.

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What about if we did £60 for the two?

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-No.

-Oh, Graham!

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-Let's do 70.

-70...

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Will you meet me in the middle at 65?

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Fine, OK, we'll do that.

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-£65 for the two?

-Indeed.

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For a record player that doesn't work

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and an incomplete coffee service.

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-That sounds a bargain to me!

-THEY LAUGH

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Thank you...I think!

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Long handshake.

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So, with the Shelley coffee service and the gramophone

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added to Christina's haul,

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both our experts have acquired quite a lot already.

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With the pressure off, Paul can forget about shopping,

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for a while at least.

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Without the ailing pick-up, he has made his way north

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and is hotfooting through the hallowed streets of Cambridge.

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Amongst the famous university buildings,

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Paul is meeting Dr Jane Hughes at the Samuel Pepys Library

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to discover how one celebrated graduate

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helped shape our understanding

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of one of the most extraordinary periods in British history.

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Hi, is it Jane?

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-It is, hello, Paul. Very nice to meet you!

-And you!

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So, this is Pepys's library?

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It certainly is, we are going to go upstairs

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-and have a look at the library itself.

-I can't wait.

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Born in London in 1633, Samuel Pepys was the son of a tailor.

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Despite his relatively humble beginnings,

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Pepys found himself at Cambridge University,

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where his library now sits

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with pride of place in his former college.

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What marked Pepys out from the 17th-century crowd

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was his desire to record the events around him.

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At the age of 27, Pepys started a diary

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that would record a tumultuous decade in British history.

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This is one of the six volumes of the diary.

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He kept it across ten years, but because paper was expensive,

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you didn't stop the volume at the end of the year, you carried on

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until you had completed the volume, so it covers six volumes.

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And, in fact, although the diary is written in shorthand,

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because there were quite a number of different shorthands,

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it's difficult for people, maybe 100 or 200 years after this,

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to have read it. When this was being deciphered

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by a man called the Reverend John Smith in the 1800s, 1818 he started,

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he didn't know that it was a shorthand.

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However, had he looked in the shelf above where the diary was kept

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here in the library, he would have found the crib,

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so Pepys, in fact,

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had the little booklet from which the shorthand came.

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Pepys' diary is possibly

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one of the most famous in the English language,

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mainly because the rich descriptions detail everyday life

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and some of the more tragic events in a turbulent period in history.

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His writing gave a personal insight throughout the great plague

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as it wiped out a fifth of London's population in just seven months

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and soon he was describing another disaster

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as the Great Fire of London swept across the capital.

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Here, in this particular part of it, he's recording how he was anxious

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-that the fire was in fact getting very close to his own house.

-Yes.

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So he went to do whatever he could to try and protect his belongings

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and, first of all, he sent his books and his goods and his furniture off

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to be taken up the river.

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For the remainder of his prized possessions,

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he came up with a rather interesting solution.

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He and a friend dug a large hole, a pit in the garden,

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and put many of their most precious possessions in,

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which involved things you might expect, like important documents

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and he also put his wine into the pit

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and he, very famously, put his cheese in,

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but this wasn't just a small piece of cheddar,

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this was a large piece of Parmesan, an Italian cheese.

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A man after my own heart, books and wine! Wonderful!

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Samuel Pepys' diary didn't just capture large events

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and personal details, it charted his rise through the Royal Navy

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and in his social standing.

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Pepys had become an influential member of society,

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even rubbing shoulders with royalty.

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This is known as the Anthony Roll,

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after the person who painted it, who was called Anthony Anthony.

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He produced this wonderful roll,

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with the ships of the line of Henry VIII,

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so it was already 150 years old

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when it was given to Samuel Pepys by Charles II as a gift.

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The ship at the top is a very famous ship.

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-It's called the Mary Rose.

-Indeed. Yes.

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Before it sank, leading the attack on the French fleet in 1545,

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the Mary Rose saw 34 years of service,

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as the flagship to Henry VIII.

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-This is the only contemporary image of the Mary Rose.

-Is it?

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From when it was actually sailing.

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Pepys worked tirelessly

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to add to his collection of books and manuscripts,

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but the titles in his possession

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show that he was more than just a 17th-century aficionado.

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This is the Principia Mathematica by Isaac Newton.

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-It's one of the great books of the Royal Society.

-Yes.

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-And it has Samuel Pepys's name on the front.

-So it does.

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So, "Imprimatur S Pepys".

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So, Pepys gave permission for it to be published.

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The reason was, he was the president of the Royal Society

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and the president had to give the licence to any book to be produced.

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Newton's law of motion formed the foundation

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of classical mechanics

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and with Pepys as the president of the Royal Society,

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he was an integral part

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of this time of social and intellectual change.

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So, somebody like Pepys who didn't come from a good background

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could nevertheless rise up in this new kind of world and, I think,

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he probably enjoyed the prospect of meeting people who, perhaps,

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he, in a previous generation,

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-would never have had the opportunity to get to know.

-Yeah.

0:16:580:17:01

Pepys embodied a period of social change in the same way

0:17:010:17:05

that his diary captured it for generations to come

0:17:050:17:08

and the 3,000 articles that line the handcrafted shelves

0:17:080:17:11

of the Pepys Library remain his enduring legacy.

0:17:110:17:16

It's been a long and eventful first day for our intrepid antiquers,

0:17:160:17:20

but not for their car, and it's time for all to say goodnight.

0:17:200:17:23

Sweet dreams.

0:17:230:17:25

Another day, and, miracle of miracles,

0:17:300:17:32

a new lease of life for the classic car.

0:17:320:17:35

With a set of refurbished wheels to carry them,

0:17:350:17:37

our pair are motoring their way

0:17:370:17:39

towards their first auction of the week in Market Harborough.

0:17:390:17:43

But there's plenty of shopping to do before that

0:17:430:17:45

and we're back in Cambridge.

0:17:450:17:47

Paul is now trying to relieve himself of his remaining cash

0:17:470:17:50

and Gabor Cossa Antiques seems like the perfect place to start.

0:17:500:17:54

David Theobald is overseeing the petite surroundings.

0:17:540:17:57

-Hello there. Is it David?

-Yes. Good morning. Nice to meet you.

0:17:570:18:00

-And you. I'm Paul.

-Hello, Paul.

0:18:000:18:03

Oh, my word. If you hear a clatter, call the cavalry.

0:18:050:18:08

Have you attributed your little Cotswolds-esque?

0:18:110:18:14

It's anonymous, I'm afraid.

0:18:140:18:17

-Is it expensive?

-Ooh, no.

0:18:170:18:18

-I love the way you said that, David.

-Of course not. What say?

0:18:200:18:23

Er... It's £20.

0:18:230:18:25

It just...

0:18:250:18:27

-It actually says...

-Oh, my word.

-.."To Dad, July 24 '49."

0:18:270:18:31

So, presumably, that's 1949. But was it new? I don't know.

0:18:310:18:35

It's not without charm. I'm not dismissing that.

0:18:350:18:37

I think it's priced right. Thank you.

0:18:370:18:39

Paul seems keen on the Arts and Crafts-style copper plaque...

0:18:400:18:44

..but there's plenty more to consider.

0:18:450:18:48

-Your caddy spoon, there, who's that?

-It's Keswick.

-Is it?

0:18:480:18:52

I've not seen the long-stemmed one before.

0:18:520:18:54

-No, but it's not silver, it's nickel.

-Staybrite?

0:18:540:18:57

Staybrite is a form of stainless steel

0:18:570:18:59

successfully used by the Keswick School of Art from around the 1930s.

0:18:590:19:03

The school, established in 1884,

0:19:030:19:06

has long been a proponent of the Arts and Crafts movement.

0:19:060:19:10

You've got me with that, David. I love it to bits.

0:19:100:19:14

Erm, and your price is... absolutely fantastic.

0:19:140:19:16

The £10 ticket price has really worked its charm on Paul.

0:19:160:19:20

That's a real sweetie.

0:19:200:19:22

The speculative piece is the copper plaque.

0:19:230:19:26

What's the very best you could do for me?

0:19:260:19:30

The two Arts and Crafty pieces.

0:19:310:19:33

Well, I'd like 30 for the two.

0:19:330:19:35

But 25, that would have to be, sort of...

0:19:350:19:39

David...

0:19:390:19:41

you're a joy to do business with.

0:19:410:19:42

-I'm not going to be silly.

-Thank you.

0:19:420:19:44

-That's a great price and I'm going to shake your hand.

-I hope so.

0:19:440:19:46

A great price indeed. £25 and another two items bought.

0:19:460:19:50

Christina, meanwhile, has journeyed to Risby in Suffolk,

0:19:510:19:54

where she still has some shopping to do.

0:19:540:19:57

Love that.

0:20:000:20:01

That's lovely. Nice, in oak, as well.

0:20:010:20:04

Really nice thing. £250.

0:20:040:20:06

I really haven't got anywhere near that left, have I?

0:20:070:20:10

No! You only have £70 left to spend, Christina.

0:20:100:20:14

Let's see what Paul's up to.

0:20:140:20:17

-Oh, thanks a lot.

-Thank you very much.

-Wonderful. Thank you.

0:20:170:20:20

Hmm. Things seem to have slowed from amble to complete stop.

0:20:200:20:23

But Christina is still full steam ahead

0:20:230:20:26

and has found something unusual outside.

0:20:260:20:29

Where would you find another of those? It's beautiful.

0:20:300:20:32

Cast iron. It would have been, obviously,

0:20:320:20:34

on the side of a building, here, bolted through,

0:20:340:20:36

and you would have had your sign suspended, from there,

0:20:360:20:39

maybe a pub sign or...

0:20:390:20:42

Personally, I can see an antiques sign swinging from there.

0:20:420:20:46

I just think it's rather lovely. How much has he got on it?

0:20:460:20:48

Ooh, it's in the sale.

0:20:480:20:50

Time to involve owner Joe Aldridge.

0:20:500:20:53

OK. It's in the sale

0:20:530:20:54

and I'm assuming, before it went in the sale, it was £45.

0:20:540:20:57

-What is it now?

-Before, it was £80.

0:20:580:21:02

-Oh.

-It's been reduced to 45.

-OK.

0:21:020:21:04

As a special treat, I'll do it for 40.

0:21:040:21:07

-I was thinking £20, £30.

-Oooh.

-Come on, Joe.

0:21:070:21:10

-Oh-oh! Give me £30.

-I'd rather give you 20.

0:21:100:21:14

£20. And you have a deal.

0:21:140:21:16

-Yeah. OK.

-Yay! Thank you, Joe.

0:21:160:21:19

You're a star!

0:21:190:21:21

Thanks to Joe's generosity, that's a reduction of £25 off the sale price.

0:21:210:21:25

Let's remind ourselves of what they bought.

0:21:270:21:29

Along with the bracket, Christina has a pair of pickle forks,

0:21:290:21:33

a copper planter and stand, a Shelley coffee service,

0:21:330:21:36

and a gramophone.

0:21:360:21:37

She spent £150 on all five items.

0:21:370:21:40

Paul picked up the grenade perfume bottle,

0:21:420:21:45

the wooden roulette wheel,

0:21:450:21:46

the lead soldiers,

0:21:460:21:48

the stoneware character jug of Lord Nelson,

0:21:480:21:50

and the caddy spoon and copper plaque.

0:21:500:21:53

He too spent £150.

0:21:530:21:56

So, our pair have come out even on the spending stakes,

0:21:560:22:00

but what do they think of each other's offerings?

0:22:000:22:02

Holy Moley! It's a hell of a lump of wrought iron metalwork.

0:22:020:22:07

I don't know that I understand that purchase, to be honest with you.

0:22:070:22:10

Wait a minute, I do.

0:22:100:22:11

It was £20.

0:22:110:22:13

Now I get it.

0:22:130:22:14

I don't see anything, to be perfectly honest,

0:22:140:22:17

in his selection of items that is going to make a huge profit.

0:22:170:22:20

So, it'll be interesting.

0:22:200:22:22

So, it's off to the auction. But, sadly,

0:22:220:22:24

after yet another incident, the pick-up has bitten the dust.

0:22:240:22:28

And they've traded it in for something with a bit more...

0:22:280:22:31

style.

0:22:310:22:33

It's got gears, it's got brakes.

0:22:340:22:36

I am slightly nervous that we've just got into somebody else's car

0:22:360:22:39

and driven it off from the car park.

0:22:390:22:41

No, this rather racy 1999 HMC MkIV

0:22:410:22:44

is definitely yours.

0:22:440:22:47

Just don't break it, eh?

0:22:470:22:48

And with their new transport,

0:22:510:22:53

it's off to the first auction of the week in Market Harborough.

0:22:530:22:56

Are you looking forward to the auctions?

0:22:560:22:59

-I am not cool with these things.

-Oh, really?

0:22:590:23:01

I don't get excited, I get nervous.

0:23:010:23:03

Well, we'll soon see if Paul's fears are warranted,

0:23:030:23:06

as our duo pull up at the family run firm of Gildings Auctioneers.

0:23:060:23:10

And the man with the gavel today is auctioneer Will Gilding.

0:23:110:23:15

So, let's get started.

0:23:150:23:17

First up, are Paul's led soldiers.

0:23:180:23:21

£20 here, please. At £20.

0:23:210:23:23

Thank you. £20.

0:23:230:23:24

At 22 online. 22?

0:23:240:23:26

22. 25? 25. 28?

0:23:260:23:28

Online bid is at £28, at 28.

0:23:280:23:29

Come on. You're into a profit, aren't you?

0:23:290:23:31

-You're into a profit.

-More bidders at £30 online. At 30. 32?

0:23:310:23:34

Is there any further bids? You're out online. You're both out.

0:23:340:23:37

That's £7 profit on Paul's first lot.

0:23:400:23:43

Let's see if Christina can fare any better with her pickle forks.

0:23:440:23:47

There they are. A nice little pair of pickle forks,

0:23:470:23:50

for the man who has everything.

0:23:500:23:51

Let's open the bidding, please. £20, please? 20. £10 bid, thank you.

0:23:510:23:55

-£10.

-£10. 12 online, at £12. Internet bidder at 12. 15? At £15.

0:23:550:24:00

At 15, thank you. £15 bid.

0:24:000:24:02

-18 online. At 18.

-You're there.

-£18.

0:24:020:24:05

Internet bid at 18.

0:24:050:24:06

You're out in the room at £18.

0:24:060:24:08

So, ignoring the auction costs,

0:24:100:24:13

they scrape home with a £3 profit.

0:24:130:24:15

Paul has combined his caddy spoon and plaque into a single lot

0:24:160:24:20

and they're up next.

0:24:200:24:21

This is going to be my nemesis. You're going to do well with this.

0:24:210:24:24

Thank you, sir. £30 bid. Straight in at 30.

0:24:240:24:26

At two, five, eight, 40.

0:24:260:24:30

Two, five, eight, 50.

0:24:300:24:32

-300(!)

-Standing here at 50. Five, 60.

0:24:320:24:37

Standing at 60.

0:24:370:24:38

That's a fantastic £35 profit, stretching Paul's lead.

0:24:410:24:45

Time for Christina's gramophone.

0:24:450:24:48

-£20.

-Commission already.

0:24:480:24:50

-20, two, five, eight, 30.

-Yeah.

0:24:500:24:53

Two, five. £35 my bid. Absentee at £35.

0:24:530:24:57

At £35. 38 bid. Thank you. At 38.

0:24:570:25:00

The absentees are lost, at 38. It is in the room at £38. All done?

0:25:000:25:04

GAVEL BANGS

0:25:040:25:06

-Sweet.

-Happy days!

0:25:060:25:08

So, all that hard bargaining paid off in the end,

0:25:080:25:11

giving Christina a £23 profit.

0:25:110:25:14

The next lot is Paul's perfume bottle.

0:25:150:25:17

Anyone's bid at £30. At 30. Thank you. £30 bid.

0:25:170:25:19

It's going to go cheap if he's starting at that. Too cheap.

0:25:190:25:23

Maiden bid. Modest, but selling, at £30.

0:25:230:25:26

Got it cheap, though. Man alive! Oof!

0:25:270:25:30

A profit is a profit, Paul.

0:25:300:25:32

Next up is Christina's wrought-iron bracket.

0:25:330:25:36

-£10, then. Let's start low at £10.

-No!

0:25:360:25:39

-£10.

-Cheap!

-Do I see 10? I do. Thank you. £10 bid. At £10.

0:25:390:25:42

£12 is the bid. £12, second row.

0:25:420:25:44

-12, 15. 15. £18.

-Somebody will make a lot of money on this.

0:25:440:25:47

-Oh!

-At £18. Any further bids?

0:25:470:25:50

Out online...

0:25:500:25:52

I'd round that up. 18. That's virtually 20.

0:25:520:25:55

We might as well round it up to 30. You actually made profit on that!

0:25:550:25:58

Ah, there's that optimism again, Paul. Or is it cheek?!

0:25:580:26:02

It's time for Paul's stoneware character jug of Nelson.

0:26:030:26:06

£50, to start, then. At £50. At 50, thank you.

0:26:060:26:08

£50 bid. With me online, I'm afraid, at 55. At 55.

0:26:080:26:13

60 in the corner. At 60. 65.

0:26:130:26:16

Online at 70.

0:26:160:26:17

80, they bid.

0:26:170:26:19

85. Still going.

0:26:190:26:20

-At 85.

-Fired by imagination.

-90 bid.

-Come on!

0:26:200:26:23

Are we all done? I'll sell.

0:26:230:26:24

Paul has almost doubled his money there, with a £40 profit.

0:26:270:26:30

Less brackets, more jugs. Less brackets, more jugs.

0:26:300:26:34

A fine lesson for life!

0:26:340:26:35

Now, it's over to Christina's Shelley coffee service.

0:26:350:26:39

-£30, I'm bid. £30 here. At £30.

-Worth a lot more than that.

0:26:390:26:42

£30. At 32. 35.

0:26:420:26:44

£38 bid now, in the room. I'm out at 38. Any further bids?

0:26:440:26:47

I'll sell, at £38.

0:26:470:26:49

Don't worry, Christina. You still have another lot to go.

0:26:510:26:54

Here comes the roulette wheel.

0:26:550:26:57

£20, then. At £20. Who will open the bidding at £20?

0:26:570:26:59

Thank you. £20 bid. At 20.

0:26:590:27:01

At £20. Is there any further bids?

0:27:010:27:02

-At £20. Maiden bid. At £20. I will sell.

-No money.

0:27:020:27:06

-Ouch.

-£5 down, but still out in front.

0:27:090:27:13

Christina has one last chance to pull it all back.

0:27:140:27:17

And it comes down to the copper planter and stand.

0:27:170:27:20

There are bids coming in here.

0:27:200:27:21

-At £40. 40, I'm bid.

-I thought he was going to say 400.

0:27:210:27:24

-He said, "For..." hundred and...

-42. 45.

0:27:240:27:27

48. 50.

0:27:270:27:29

£50. You're out in the room, at 50. Here is the bid. With me, at 50.

0:27:290:27:33

-At £50. Are we all done? 50.

-That is just to break even.

0:27:330:27:36

£50.

0:27:360:27:38

Christina breaks even on her planter, although it is a loss,

0:27:390:27:41

after auction costs,

0:27:410:27:43

I'm afraid. Christina set off with £200

0:27:430:27:45

and after paying auction costs, she has lost £17.16,

0:27:450:27:50

leaving her with £182.84 for next time.

0:27:500:27:56

Paul also started today with £200. After auction costs,

0:27:560:27:59

he is up by £40.24,

0:27:590:28:02

nudging his budget up to £240.24

0:28:020:28:07

and giving him the lead after the first leg.

0:28:070:28:09

With one auction down,

0:28:100:28:12

our pair are back behind the wheel. Today, they kick off

0:28:120:28:15

in Tetbury, in Gloucestershire, and head north, towards the auction

0:28:150:28:19

in Evesham, in Worcestershire.

0:28:190:28:21

Our pair are headed for Top Banana Antiques,

0:28:210:28:25

which has items from over 50 dealers.

0:28:250:28:27

Plenty to keep our experts occupied.

0:28:270:28:29

Miniature brass coal scuttles, circa 1920. These are really sweet.

0:28:310:28:34

Useless for coal, obviously, but, nonetheless, they are probably,

0:28:340:28:40

sort of, little salts or something like that,

0:28:400:28:43

-in the shape of coal scuttles.

-Rather large for salts, Christina.

0:28:430:28:46

What is Paul up to?

0:28:480:28:49

PAUL LAUGHS

0:28:490:28:52

Welcome to my world! Step into my office.

0:28:520:28:54

Oh, yes.

0:28:540:28:55

MILITARY MARCH PLAYS

0:28:550:28:59

This, as you know, is what lights my fire. This floats my boat.

0:28:590:29:03

Honestly, that boy and militaria!

0:29:050:29:07

A bit like Christina and silver.

0:29:090:29:11

A game bird letter opener. WMF.

0:29:130:29:15

Oh, that is interesting. WMF. So, WMF was a German factory,

0:29:150:29:22

who, I think, opened in 1852-53.

0:29:220:29:25

They originally opened as a, sort of, metalware repairing workshop.

0:29:250:29:29

But by 1900, I think they were the largest producer

0:29:290:29:34

of household metalwares. And that is really lovely.

0:29:340:29:38

She is taken by that letter opener.

0:29:390:29:42

The ticket price is £25.

0:29:420:29:44

It is a nice thing. I'm going to need a basket soon, aren't I?

0:29:440:29:47

Better still,

0:29:470:29:49

manager Dan.

0:29:490:29:50

I picked up those little scuttles, there,

0:29:510:29:56

-and that little letter knife, there.

-Right.

-So, what would be your

0:29:560:30:00

very best price on a pair of miniature brass coal scuttles,

0:30:000:30:04

Dan The Man? Come on, Dan The Man, I need to win. I'm losing.

0:30:040:30:06

HE CHUCKLES

0:30:060:30:08

-We can do 28 for you on those.

-28 on those and how much

0:30:080:30:11

-on my letter knife?

-Eh, we can do 20 for you there.

0:30:110:30:13

-28 and 20. £48.

-Yes.

0:30:130:30:16

I'm not sure these are going to make me a profit. I really need to think

0:30:160:30:20

about profit at the moment. But you could, potentially, do...

0:30:200:30:23

-If I said 15 on that, would you hate me?

-I wouldn't hate you,

0:30:230:30:27

but I would not agree with you, either. How about 18?

0:30:270:30:30

-Go on, then.

-16?

-You're squeezing me for every penny, aren't you?

0:30:300:30:35

CHRISTINA LAUGHS

0:30:350:30:36

-17, and we'll...

-17, brilliant.

0:30:360:30:38

-£17. I'm happy. Thank you very much, Dan, you're a star.

-Cheers.

0:30:380:30:43

Meanwhile, Paul has dragged himself away from the militaria

0:30:430:30:48

and cornered Julian, for some advice on a corkscrew he has spotted.

0:30:480:30:51

So, this is one of the more ingenious, but most common,

0:30:510:30:56

of the Georgian designs - Thomason's screw.

0:30:560:30:58

It is a double action, so that, with one action,

0:30:580:31:02

you will wind the worm into the cork and, then,

0:31:020:31:09

when it is fully...screwed in,

0:31:090:31:11

keep turning and it will withdraw the cork.

0:31:110:31:15

So, none of this - Eugh! Eugh! Eugh!

0:31:150:31:17

It is nice, but the ticket says £168.

0:31:190:31:22

-Um...I'm going to leave a cheeky little bid on it.

-Right.

0:31:220:31:25

-OK.

-And it is cheeky.

0:31:250:31:27

I'll stick 80 quid into that, but I am going to keep walking

0:31:270:31:30

and not really holding out much hope.

0:31:300:31:31

-Give me a minute and I will see what we can do, yeah?

-No hurry.

0:31:310:31:35

Glad to see you are taking things easy, Paul.

0:31:350:31:37

In the bowels of the place.

0:31:370:31:38

-But Christina is hot on your heels.

-What's that?

0:31:400:31:44

Yeah, that is actually fab.

0:31:440:31:46

That is a French silver, probably about 1890,

0:31:460:31:49

-it has got little French marks on the side.

-Oh, yeah.

0:31:490:31:54

It is, literally, a snuff box.

0:31:540:31:56

What can you do that for?

0:31:560:31:58

-I actually have 280. So, trade, 240.

-Oh.

0:31:580:32:03

However, I would not normally do this, but I will do 100 quid.

0:32:030:32:07

-£100?

-£100.

0:32:070:32:09

That is pretty much most of all the money I have got left.

0:32:100:32:14

Is there any way you could just nudge under the 100?

0:32:140:32:17

Just cos three figures really scare me. I never, ever spend

0:32:170:32:20

that sort of money. I mean, 90?

0:32:200:32:21

£95...and you are mad if you do not buy it.

0:32:210:32:26

-£95.

-Yeah. Job done.

0:32:260:32:28

-Marvellous.

-I think I love you!

-Thank you!

0:32:280:32:30

I'm just completely in love with this thing.

0:32:300:32:33

-It is smashing.

-£95. I have just spent £95.

0:32:330:32:35

I have just spent... Oh, I have just spent £95.

0:32:350:32:37

Indeed, she has, leaving her with just £70

0:32:370:32:42

and a lot of shopping to do.

0:32:420:32:43

Oh! I'm a bit hot. I'm really hot!

0:32:430:32:45

That is what taking risks feels like.

0:32:470:32:50

Meanwhile, Paul has spotted a rusty dress sword,

0:32:500:32:53

with a price of £120.

0:32:530:32:56

-Julian, how are you doing?

-Hi, Paul.

-Sword, hanging in your stairwell

0:32:560:33:01

to the basement. Um...is there traction in that?

0:33:010:33:05

Tell me that has been sitting here for a while.

0:33:050:33:07

This happens to belong to my manager. If you can just give me

0:33:070:33:10

-a couple of seconds...

-Hell, yeah.

-..and I'll come back to you.

0:33:100:33:14

Give him a couple of minutes! You can do the business!

0:33:140:33:16

Seriously, I'll leave that with you. Fingers crossed.

0:33:160:33:20

I'd say, the longer he is away, the better,

0:33:200:33:22

because an immediate response is generally, "You're having a laugh!"

0:33:220:33:25

There is a chance Paul knows something about this sword.

0:33:250:33:27

He is just not letting on.

0:33:270:33:29

Dan The Man is saying 80 quid. And you're saying 80 on the other. 160.

0:33:290:33:34

-So, 80 on that?

-Hmm, but, obviously, I have got a bit of an uphill battle

0:33:340:33:38

with the corkscrew.

0:33:380:33:39

No messing around. One and a half on the two.

0:33:410:33:43

-I think that is a good deal, honestly.

-Good man.

0:33:450:33:47

Paul is not messing about. That is £150 for his two items

0:33:470:33:52

in the first shop.

0:33:520:33:53

So, come on, tell us what you know about this sword, then.

0:33:530:33:57

Well, if this... This has got a levy blade.

0:33:570:34:01

Very slender dress piece.

0:34:010:34:03

If this was plain, we would be no further forward,

0:34:030:34:06

but, oh, no, it is etched.

0:34:060:34:08

We have a whole host of scrolls and battle honours

0:34:080:34:14

running all the way up that fuller,

0:34:140:34:17

terminating in the royal cipher of King George V.

0:34:170:34:21

It is centred by a cartouche,

0:34:210:34:25

and those are the initials of the officer who wore this sword.

0:34:250:34:30

How many are unique to an identifiable individual?

0:34:300:34:34

I don't know. One in 100? That is a good thing.

0:34:340:34:37

Worth the money? That remains to be seen.

0:34:370:34:39

But I think so.

0:34:390:34:40

After a successful first shop for all,

0:34:420:34:45

Christina is weaving her way through

0:34:450:34:47

a quiet Cotswold valley. She is on her way to the site

0:34:470:34:50

of a magnificent mansion. It was the brainchild

0:34:500:34:52

of affluent Victorian gentleman, William Leigh, who was inspired

0:34:520:34:57

by his new-found Catholic faith to build a mansion.

0:34:570:35:01

But a series of misfortunes meant his masterpiece remains incomplete,

0:35:010:35:06

after 140 years.

0:35:060:35:07

-Hello.

-Hello, you must be Terry.

0:35:090:35:11

-Yes, welcome to Woodchester.

-Christina.

-Come on in.

0:35:110:35:13

Thank you so much. Thank you. Wow, I can't wait.

0:35:130:35:16

After inheriting his father's fortune at the age of 13,

0:35:160:35:20

Leigh was educated at Eton and Oxford,

0:35:200:35:23

but it wasn't until after his conversion

0:35:230:35:26

into the Roman Catholic faith in his early 40s that he moved to

0:35:260:35:29

Gloucestershire to build Woodchester Mansion.

0:35:290:35:32

This wasn't just to be a family home and, as a staunch Catholic,

0:35:320:35:37

Leigh began building work with a monastery and a church.

0:35:370:35:41

This is where the family would have been expected to be

0:35:410:35:44

-several times a day.

-And, as a very devout family,

0:35:440:35:46

-this would have been, really, the heart of the house.

-Yes. yes.

0:35:460:35:49

Yes, and the religious orders would have been conducted by people coming

0:35:490:35:53

up from the monastery that he'd built at the bottom of the valley.

0:35:530:35:57

To capture the scale of his faith,

0:35:570:35:58

he turned to pre-eminent architect and fellow convert Augustus Pugin,

0:35:580:36:04

who was considered the leader of Gothic Revival,

0:36:040:36:07

a movement which expressed faith through the arts.

0:36:070:36:11

Although Pugin resigned the commission,

0:36:110:36:13

work continued in this manner and it is understood the final architect

0:36:130:36:18

based his work largely on Pugin's designs.

0:36:180:36:21

This is a glorious bit of the building.

0:36:240:36:27

Victorian Gothic was about lifting your eyes to heaven

0:36:270:36:31

-and this is what you do in here...

-Mmm.

0:36:310:36:34

..and when you look up to heaven, you see these magnificent,

0:36:340:36:37

-beautiful, carved bosses up on the top.

-Oh, wow.

0:36:370:36:39

-Gosh, yes.

-On the carved top of the pillars.

0:36:390:36:42

Driven by his quest to expand Catholicism in Victorian England,

0:36:430:36:48

Leigh focused on the monastery and church,

0:36:480:36:50

waiting for their completion before starting on the mansion.

0:36:500:36:54

By this time, nearly ten years after he began on the estate,

0:36:540:36:57

signs of financial strain started to show.

0:36:570:37:00

So, this would have been the family's dining room,

0:37:010:37:04

and this is a room in the house where we can really see

0:37:040:37:08

everything to do with how you build and make great, big buildings

0:37:080:37:12

that the Victorians were building,

0:37:120:37:14

but it goes way back to the medieval period.

0:37:140:37:16

-Yeah.

-It's exactly the same engineering techniques.

0:37:160:37:19

Stonemasons were given space to create arches, doorways

0:37:190:37:22

and fireplaces on each of the levels,

0:37:220:37:25

before any of the floors were installed,

0:37:250:37:27

but, in Woodchester Mansion,

0:37:270:37:29

the day when those floors were laid never came,

0:37:290:37:33

leaving a unique view of the work behind the building.

0:37:330:37:37

-It's very instructive...

-Uh-huh.

0:37:370:37:39

..because you do, you know, you understand how this works,

0:37:390:37:42

you can go in to Canterbury, Gloucester, Westminster Abbey,

0:37:420:37:45

any of the cathedrals, and they're all working in exactly the same way,

0:37:450:37:48

because one of the geniuses that drove Victorian Gothic Revival

0:37:480:37:54

architecture was to ape the glories of the medieval, lofty buildings.

0:37:540:37:59

The time and love lavished on the religious buildings

0:37:590:38:02

took their toll and, ultimately, old age,

0:38:020:38:05

ill-health and a lack of funds hampered the final years of work,

0:38:050:38:09

and the building remained incomplete at William's death in 1873.

0:38:090:38:14

The entire estate passed to his son, Willie.

0:38:140:38:17

Shortly after his dad died,

0:38:170:38:18

Willie Leigh did write to the architects

0:38:180:38:20

and say, "Can you tell me what this is going to cost to complete?"

0:38:200:38:24

-Right.

-And I'm afraid the answer he got was,

0:38:240:38:27

"£8,000 to complete it -

0:38:270:38:29

"£6,000 to pull it down and put you up a new one."

0:38:290:38:32

The next two generations of the family struggled with

0:38:320:38:35

financial strain, and the mansion was sold in the early 1920s.

0:38:350:38:40

Although he never realised his dream,

0:38:400:38:42

a trust was created in 1989 to preserve the house and ensure

0:38:420:38:46

that it remains a dramatic memorial to William Leigh's faith and vision.

0:38:460:38:51

Meanwhile, with two pieces under his belt already,

0:38:560:38:59

Paul is on his way to Stroud, with £90.24 burning a hole in his pocket.

0:38:590:39:06

The antiques store is housed in a former industrial building,

0:39:060:39:09

packed with two floors of antiques,

0:39:090:39:11

which certainly gives Paul a chance to stretch his legs,

0:39:110:39:14

but has he come up with anything that takes his fancy?

0:39:140:39:17

Victorian gentleman's walking cane.

0:39:190:39:23

No. No, none of that.

0:39:250:39:28

Stop telling me lies, Paul!

0:39:280:39:29

It originated in South Africa.

0:39:290:39:32

This is probably what the Zulu would call "iron wood".

0:39:320:39:37

These staffs were carried,

0:39:370:39:41

almost as a badge of rank, by Zulu chiefs,

0:39:410:39:46

and that's the common form of such a shaft -

0:39:460:39:50

a pommel and then this spiral decoration.

0:39:500:39:53

Sometimes the pommel is modelled as a fist.

0:39:530:39:55

A few variations on the theme.

0:39:550:39:56

If you hold it up to the light, you will see,

0:39:560:39:59

primitively but charmingly,

0:39:590:40:01

scratched into the pommel,

0:40:010:40:04

the date "1884" and the initials "IY".

0:40:040:40:10

Ah. Mmm!

0:40:100:40:12

Don't you just love this stuff?

0:40:120:40:14

Price on that - £40.

0:40:140:40:16

History.

0:40:160:40:18

History for four £10 notes.

0:40:180:40:20

Well, that was a find.

0:40:210:40:23

Paul seems to be in the swing of it now and, believe it or not,

0:40:230:40:26

he seems to be making a quick dash towards another

0:40:260:40:28

item of a military persuasion.

0:40:280:40:31

Check out my friend.

0:40:310:40:33

I like that but I'm deeply frustrated by it.

0:40:330:40:36

It's described as a 19th-century original watercolour.

0:40:360:40:39

I can't argue with that

0:40:390:40:41

but it's way more than a 19th-century watercolour,

0:40:410:40:45

because that, I think, is a not-half-bad portrait

0:40:450:40:52

of an officer of the British Army

0:40:520:40:54

of the middle years of the 19th century.

0:40:540:40:59

1840? 1850?

0:40:590:41:02

At the moment, all I can tell you is,

0:41:020:41:04

he's almost certainly an infantry officer

0:41:040:41:06

of about 1840, 1850, and that's it.

0:41:060:41:10

My biggest issue is, it's lost its integrity,

0:41:100:41:12

insofar as that's in a new frame.

0:41:120:41:15

Antiqued gilt, yes, but nevertheless new.

0:41:150:41:19

So, my issues - the later frame,

0:41:190:41:24

no further detail about the subject,

0:41:240:41:26

and then a price of £85.

0:41:260:41:28

A few things to talk about, then.

0:41:280:41:31

Perhaps time to involve assistant manager Andy.

0:41:310:41:34

-On the one hand, we've got this rustic cane.

-Yup.

0:41:350:41:39

On the other, we've got the 19th-century portrait.

0:41:390:41:43

-How flexible can you guys be on price with these?

-40 at the moment.

0:41:430:41:46

-Yeah.

-I could go to 25 with that.

0:41:460:41:49

OK, I like the way you think. This is the biggie.

0:41:490:41:52

Could that be cheap, or does that have to be a lot of money?

0:41:520:41:55

I could do 60 on that.

0:41:550:41:57

That's not going to cut it.

0:41:570:41:58

-OK.

-I thought you'd maybe go there.

0:41:580:42:00

Can I make you an offer on that?

0:42:000:42:03

-Fire away.

-Well, I think it's worth £30-£60 under the hammer.

0:42:030:42:06

Is that dead in the water or is there any chance?

0:42:060:42:09

I'll do 40 on the painting.

0:42:100:42:12

Stick in hand, I'm going to try and beat you down some more.

0:42:150:42:18

£20...

0:42:200:42:22

and 35 and I'll buy the two things.

0:42:220:42:24

OK. Yeah, we'll go with that.

0:42:280:42:31

-Good man.

-No problem at all.

-Two things, out of nowhere.

0:42:310:42:33

-That's great and I'm delighted with them.

-Yes, good, good.

0:42:330:42:36

Thanks to Andy's generous £70 discount,

0:42:360:42:39

Paul gets the Zulu staff for £20 and the portrait for £35.

0:42:390:42:44

Well, it's been a productive day.

0:42:450:42:47

Time for our chaps to get some rest.

0:42:470:42:50

Nighty-night.

0:42:500:42:51

As a new day dawns, our pair are headed north

0:42:550:42:59

to the gorgeous town of Winchcombe.

0:42:590:43:01

Christina is nipping into Winchcombe Antiques Centre,

0:43:060:43:09

where owner Richard is on hand.

0:43:090:43:11

That's quite nice.

0:43:130:43:15

That's very nice. A little brass-and-copper bucket and can.

0:43:170:43:20

I'm a bit worried about this price tag already.

0:43:200:43:22

Ticket price of £69.

0:43:220:43:24

Well, at least you would have a pound or two left over.

0:43:240:43:27

Expensive for a bucket, isn't it?

0:43:270:43:29

Has it got a hole in it? It's got a hole in it.

0:43:290:43:31

-Oh, come on. Really?

-Yeah.

0:43:310:43:33

-Did you just put that in there?

-Look. Look.

0:43:330:43:36

Well, you put coal in there,

0:43:360:43:37

so, you know, no coal is going to get through that hole.

0:43:370:43:40

Dust might.

0:43:400:43:41

What could you do on that? That's quite smart.

0:43:410:43:43

-The very best death on it...

-Mmm.

0:43:430:43:45

..is, I should think, £40.

0:43:450:43:48

I like that. I mean, you can see it's obviously hand-beaten,

0:43:480:43:50

-which is quite nice.

-Yeah.

0:43:500:43:52

These rivets are lovely.

0:43:520:43:53

-OK, I'll carry my bucket round. Let's keep wandering.

-All right.

0:43:530:43:56

Show me the rest of your wares, Richard.

0:43:560:43:58

Right, let's have a look in these cabinets.

0:44:000:44:02

I know I said I was going to steer clear...

0:44:020:44:04

Do you mind if I put my bucket down?

0:44:040:44:05

-Yeah, no, feel free.

-I'll pop it down just there.

0:44:050:44:08

Oh, that's pretty.

0:44:100:44:12

A little vesta case.

0:44:120:44:15

Oh, there's sort of a little Ruskin plaque on it,

0:44:150:44:17

so that would have been...

0:44:170:44:18

Looks like it was silver plate at one point.

0:44:180:44:20

Looks like it's just been...

0:44:200:44:22

-Polished it off, yeah.

-..heavily polished.

0:44:220:44:24

Christina has found a matchbox-holder

0:44:240:44:26

with a ticket price of £58.

0:44:260:44:29

These were popular, not to carry around,

0:44:290:44:32

but to conceal ugly matchboxes in a decorative sleeve,

0:44:320:44:37

so it's time to strike a deal.

0:44:370:44:39

So, I would be looking at securing, potentially,

0:44:410:44:45

-both of those...

-Uh-huh.

0:44:450:44:48

..for £40.

0:44:480:44:49

-Yeah, I can't do it, basically.

-What can you do?

0:44:490:44:52

-What can I do?

-What can you do with those two?

0:44:520:44:54

-Well, this one, as I say, I need to speak to the owner about that.

-Yeah.

0:44:540:44:57

Yeah, erm...

0:44:570:45:00

-And your bucket with a hole in it?

-And the most beautiful bucket...

0:45:000:45:02

With a hole in it.

0:45:020:45:04

30 is the absolute bottom.

0:45:040:45:06

-Well, see what you can get that for.

-OK.

0:45:060:45:08

After some discussion with the dealer on the phone,

0:45:080:45:11

Richard's willing to let the matchbox-holder go for £49.

0:45:110:45:15

Let negotiations commence!

0:45:150:45:17

£50 for the two.

0:45:170:45:20

-Did we say that?

-No. We didn't say that.

0:45:200:45:22

-What did we say?

-No, no, no.

0:45:220:45:24

Me being nice, it's 60 for the two.

0:45:240:45:26

You know that's a good deal.

0:45:290:45:31

That's a £67 discount,

0:45:310:45:34

but would leave Christina with just over £10,

0:45:340:45:36

with one shop still to go, so she's playing hard to get.

0:45:360:45:40

55.

0:45:400:45:41

No, no, no. Come on, 60,

0:45:410:45:43

cos that is 49 and that's... only working at £11.

0:45:430:45:46

58...

0:45:460:45:47

and I'll shake your hand now.

0:45:470:45:49

-Are you that desperate for the £2?

-Yes. Yes.

0:45:490:45:52

-Go on, then.

-Every penny counts.

0:45:520:45:53

-Thank you very much, Richard.

-No problem at all.

0:45:530:45:55

Well done. There you go, £2 for the hole.

0:45:550:45:57

So, a copper bucket and matchbox-holder for £58

0:45:570:46:02

leaves Christina with just over £10.

0:46:020:46:04

Paul has meandered north

0:46:090:46:11

to the town of Chipping Campden.

0:46:110:46:13

Stuart House Antiques has been around for 27 years, and the shop,

0:46:180:46:23

including its vast selection of ceramics, is overseen by owner Jim.

0:46:230:46:27

-BELL RINGS

-Good afternoon.

-Hi, Paul.

0:46:270:46:30

-Jim?

-Yeah, Jim.

-Good to see you, sir.

0:46:300:46:33

I like your taste in jackets.

0:46:330:46:35

Ah, yes, I like yours.

0:46:350:46:37

Sartorial elegance aside, Paul is off to the task of trying

0:46:380:46:42

to uncover something glamorous that he can sell at auction.

0:46:420:46:46

Jim, I know it's a daft question -

0:46:490:46:51

it's sitting in there -

0:46:510:46:52

is it a cheapie, Jim?

0:46:520:46:53

Is it a cheapie?

0:46:530:46:55

-Yes.

-How cheap?

-A tenner.

0:46:550:46:57

Not cheap enough, Jim. Can it be a fiver?

0:46:570:46:59

-Just a wee throwaway piece.

-Yeah.

0:46:590:47:02

Good man. Thank you very much, Jim.

0:47:020:47:04

My word, that was a quick deal. Paul clearly couldn't wait.

0:47:050:47:09

So, what is it that made you so keen, Paul?

0:47:090:47:11

That is no ordinary bracelet strap,

0:47:130:47:16

because it's marked with patent numbers and so on,

0:47:160:47:19

but also the word "army".

0:47:190:47:22

So, it ain't a granny watchstrap after all -

0:47:240:47:27

it's actually a trench watchstrap.

0:47:270:47:30

The First World War was largely responsible for wristwatches

0:47:300:47:34

becoming the timepiece of choice, as it was easier for soldiers to

0:47:340:47:37

check in a hurry than a pocket watch,

0:47:370:47:39

and now he's on to another military-themed item to go with it.

0:47:390:47:43

Jim, how are you doing?

0:47:430:47:45

If I may, I'd like to buy the little watchstrap

0:47:450:47:48

and that badge there with the "LG" in the wreath.

0:47:480:47:52

A tenner, the pair?

0:47:520:47:53

-I'll do you a deal on that, aye.

-You're a good man, Jim.

0:47:530:47:56

I'll shake your hand. You're a gentleman.

0:47:560:47:59

Swift business.

0:47:590:48:00

The military badge makes purchase number two here,

0:48:000:48:03

and Paul's planning to combine the two together into a single lot,

0:48:030:48:07

all for a total of £10.

0:48:070:48:10

Meanwhile, Christina is making her way

0:48:100:48:12

to the historic town of Brackley

0:48:120:48:14

in Northamptonshire.

0:48:140:48:16

The Brackley Antique Centre has over 30,000 square feet

0:48:160:48:19

of goodies on display.

0:48:190:48:21

Remind me what you have left to spend, Christina?

0:48:210:48:24

Oh, £12.

0:48:240:48:26

Why did I only leave myself £12?

0:48:260:48:28

Too late to worry about that, now.

0:48:280:48:30

Time to look for a little help.

0:48:300:48:32

Thankfully, Penny is on hand, and you know what to say,

0:48:320:48:35

look after your "pennies" and... Ha-ha(!) Never mind.

0:48:350:48:38

-I am looking at some lovely things...

-Yeah.

0:48:380:48:40

..and if you're thinking that it's nowhere near my price bracket,

0:48:400:48:43

-and my price bracket is about £10...

-PENNY LAUGHS

0:48:430:48:47

..then just, just steer me away.

0:48:470:48:50

-OK. Yeah, we'll do that.

-OK? All right? Ready?

0:48:500:48:52

-Ready to steer?

-OK. Ready to steer.

-OK.

0:48:520:48:54

-£34 on it.

-34.

-Is that... Is that steer or is that OK?

0:48:580:49:02

I think that's a steer, I'm afraid.

0:49:020:49:04

The other thing I saw was this little bamboo cabinet, here.

0:49:040:49:06

-Oh, yeah.

-Are we thinking that might be a goer?

0:49:060:49:10

-SHE LAUGHS

-No, sadly.

0:49:100:49:12

-No?

-Sadly another steer, I think, I'm afraid.

-Really?

-Yeah, afraid so.

0:49:120:49:15

Oh, dear. I'm sensing a theme, here, Christina.

0:49:150:49:19

What about something like...

0:49:190:49:20

I mean, would something like this be all right? Would it?

0:49:200:49:23

-What do you think on that?

-What has it got on it?

0:49:230:49:25

-Yeah, let's take these off and...

-Have a little look.

0:49:250:49:28

..have a little look.

0:49:280:49:31

I mean, that would be really quite useful for a, sort of,

0:49:310:49:33

a trader or a dealer. That is like a tabletop cabinet, isn't it?

0:49:330:49:36

A tabletop, and that's the way it needs to go, isn't it?

0:49:360:49:39

-Yeah, like that, and then you could stand here.

-There we are.

0:49:390:49:41

If you were, for example, like, a jewellery dealer

0:49:410:49:44

-or with some small bits of silver...

-Yeah.

0:49:440:49:46

..then you could open it up like that, couldn't you?

0:49:460:49:48

-And hand things to people.

-That's right, and hand them the item, yeah.

0:49:480:49:51

Yeah, it's a good, strong thing, isn't it?

0:49:510:49:53

Ticket price says £35.

0:49:530:49:55

Will it be another "steer"?

0:49:550:49:57

I literally have £12 left.

0:49:570:50:00

Do you think she'd be open to, like, that sort of offer?

0:50:000:50:04

-Yes, I know the dealer and I know she'd...

-Do you think?

0:50:040:50:08

-Yeah, yeah, I'm sure she would.

-Really?

0:50:080:50:10

-Yeah.

-Is she going to kill you?

0:50:100:50:11

-Hopefully not.

-Penny, I'm very grateful.

0:50:110:50:13

-You're welcome.

-£12. It's a deal.

0:50:130:50:15

And, with that, our experts' shopping is complete.

0:50:150:50:19

Christina spent £182 on a letter opener,

0:50:220:50:25

silver snuffbox,

0:50:250:50:27

copper bucket,

0:50:270:50:28

matchbox-holder and display cabinet.

0:50:280:50:32

Paul picked up a military lot of a regimental badge and watchstrap,

0:50:320:50:36

dress sword, corkscrew,

0:50:360:50:39

19th-century portrait and a Zulu staff,

0:50:390:50:42

spending a total of £215.

0:50:420:50:44

So, let's see what our antiques aces think of each other's objects.

0:50:440:50:49

In the round, an interesting little group of purchases, there.

0:50:490:50:53

Anything that's scaring the pants off me?

0:50:530:50:57

Nah.

0:50:570:50:58

Yeah, I mean, militaria and wine-related ephemera -

0:50:580:51:02

that is Paul Laidlaw, isn't it?

0:51:020:51:04

I think I've got the stronger hand, here.

0:51:040:51:06

Well, we shall see.

0:51:070:51:09

After starting off in

0:51:100:51:11

the Gloucestershire town of Tetbury,

0:51:110:51:13

this leg concludes at auction

0:51:130:51:15

in Evesham in Worcestershire.

0:51:150:51:17

Right, here we go. Second auction.

0:51:180:51:20

-Yeah.

-Oh, I've got the nerves again.

0:51:200:51:23

-Have you?

-The knee's not going yet, but it will be.

0:51:230:51:26

Today's battleground is Littleton Auctions

0:51:260:51:29

and in charge is auctioneer Martin Homer.

0:51:290:51:32

If you're all quite settled in, let's get this show on the road.

0:51:330:51:37

£20 anywhere? Give me 10, then.

0:51:370:51:39

First up is Christina's letter opener.

0:51:430:51:45

There we are. Nice piece, there. You can see that pictured.

0:51:450:51:47

-Bid me on that one. Where should we go?

-Come on.

0:51:470:51:49

20, I'm bid. Thank you, the room has it at 20. I'll take two.

0:51:490:51:52

At £20, are we done? 22, I've got.

0:51:520:51:54

At 22 and five, sir. 25.

0:51:540:51:57

-Yeah, he's back.

-At £25. All done, then, at the back of the room at 25?

0:51:570:52:00

Are we done, then, at £25? Fair warning at 25...

0:52:000:52:03

Ooh. Net! Net!

0:52:030:52:04

-25.

-Internet!

-LAUGHTER

0:52:040:52:07

-27, thank you.

-Oh, thank God.

0:52:070:52:08

-Oh!

-Blimey, Christina, well spotted.

0:52:080:52:11

30 at the back.

0:52:110:52:12

£30, the room has it at 30. All done?

0:52:120:52:13

£30. Fair warning at £30...

0:52:130:52:16

-You took five years off that poor auctioneer's life.

-I think I...

0:52:160:52:19

Verbally assaulted him, there. "Internet! Oi!"

0:52:190:52:24

Well, always nice to get involved, isn't it?

0:52:240:52:27

Paul's double-action corkscrew is up next.

0:52:270:52:30

Where shall we go with that? £100 for it? I'm looking for £100.

0:52:300:52:34

-Should be.

-Go 50 for it, then. Come on.

0:52:340:52:36

-Surely £50.

-Internet, straight in at £50.

0:52:360:52:38

-Straight away. Go on.

-Net has it at 50.

0:52:380:52:40

At 50, I'll take five. 55.

0:52:400:52:43

60 on the net. Five.

0:52:430:52:45

At 65 in the room.

0:52:450:52:46

Looking for 70, now.

0:52:460:52:48

-75, come on.

-The net has it now at 75.

0:52:480:52:49

-I've not even broken even yet.

-80, do you want, sir?

0:52:490:52:52

£80 I've got. In the room at 80, and five.

0:52:520:52:54

90 on the net. At £90.

0:52:540:52:56

-Are we all done, then, £90?

-Come on... Come on.

0:52:560:52:59

Fair warning, and we're selling at £90...

0:52:590:53:03

No. Cheap corkscrew.

0:53:030:53:05

Cheap corkscrew...

0:53:050:53:08

Not what you were hoping for, but still a profit, Paul.

0:53:080:53:11

Christina fought hard to secure a good price for her

0:53:110:53:13

copper-and-brass bucket. Was it worth it?

0:53:130:53:16

I've got some interest on commission.

0:53:160:53:18

I can start that off at £50.

0:53:180:53:19

-The bid's with me at 50.

-How much?

0:53:190:53:21

At £50, I'm looking for 55 now.

0:53:210:53:24

At £50, the bid's here. 55, 60.

0:53:240:53:27

Five, 70.

0:53:270:53:28

-Five, 80.

-Oh, my God.

0:53:280:53:30

Are you out? At £80, the bid is still with me on the book at 80.

0:53:300:53:33

At £80, are we all done, ladies and gentlemen?

0:53:330:53:35

-This never happens to me.

-I'm selling at £80...

0:53:350:53:38

-They stuck in it...

-Did you just get £80 for that?

0:53:380:53:40

Yeah.

0:53:400:53:42

You might not believe that, Christina,

0:53:420:53:44

but that holey bucket has done the business with a £71 profit.

0:53:440:53:49

Paul will be hoping to close the gap with his military lot.

0:53:490:53:53

-On commission with me at 10.

-Commission at £10.

-Looking for 12.

0:53:530:53:55

10. 12, I've got.

0:53:550:53:57

Back to me at 15. 17.

0:53:570:54:00

Back to me at 20. Are you out?

0:54:000:54:02

At 20. Are we done, then?

0:54:020:54:04

-And I'm selling at £20.

-Double your money.

0:54:040:54:07

-Sold at 20.

-Well done. Well done.

-It's all right - a small step.

0:54:070:54:09

Despite a 100% profit for Paul,

0:54:090:54:12

Christina is still out in the lead on today's auction,

0:54:120:54:16

and it's her display cabinet up next.

0:54:160:54:18

20. I'm on the net at 20.

0:54:180:54:20

-Are you joking?

-Net's at 20. 22.

0:54:200:54:22

-25. At 27.

-What's happening to me?

0:54:220:54:24

£30. 32.

0:54:240:54:26

At 32, with you, sir.

0:54:260:54:28

Net comes in at 35. 37.

0:54:280:54:31

At 37. 40 on the net.

0:54:310:54:33

45, sir. 45.

0:54:330:54:35

-In the room at 45.

-I was just trying to spend the money.

0:54:350:54:37

At 45. 50 on the net.

0:54:370:54:39

At £50, and I'm selling at £50...

0:54:390:54:41

I'm really sorry.

0:54:430:54:45

It seems to be Christina's lucky day.

0:54:450:54:48

Paul's pinning his hopes of a comeback

0:54:480:54:50

on his 19th-century portrait.

0:54:500:54:52

And I can start this at £100 on commission.

0:54:520:54:55

-£100.

-With me at £100. At £100.

0:54:550:54:57

-See? £100.

-I'm back in the game.

-I'm looking for 110, now.

0:54:570:55:00

Yeah, I'm looking for 110 as well.

0:55:000:55:02

110.

0:55:020:55:03

120.

0:55:030:55:05

At 130.

0:55:050:55:06

-See?

-140.

0:55:060:55:08

-With me on the book at 140.

-£100 clear profit.

0:55:080:55:10

-Are we done, then? £140.

-That's brilliant.

0:55:100:55:13

Well done.

0:55:130:55:15

That fantastic profit brings our experts almost neck-and-neck.

0:55:150:55:19

Next up is Christina's matchbox-holder.

0:55:200:55:22

I've got commissioned interest.

0:55:220:55:24

-I can go in at £35 on this.

-Straight in. You're clear.

0:55:240:55:27

40. 5. 50.

0:55:270:55:29

Same as the book but you take preference.

0:55:290:55:31

It's in the room at 50.

0:55:310:55:32

Fair warning at £50...

0:55:320:55:36

I'm afraid that's a loss after auction costs,

0:55:360:55:40

which leaves the door open for Paul and his Zulu staff.

0:55:400:55:44

Does £30 start me, then? Come on, surely. 30, I'm bid.

0:55:440:55:47

-Thank you, sir, at £30, it's in the room at 30.

-The net...

0:55:470:55:49

-Look, there, 5, 37...

-Two net bidders. Two net bidders.

0:55:490:55:52

37, 40, and the net's running with this.

0:55:520:55:54

55 on the internet, ladies and gentlemen. Looking for 60 now.

0:55:540:55:57

Are we done, then?

0:55:570:55:58

-Fair warning at £55...

-WOMAN:

-No, you're not.

0:55:580:56:00

It's a new bidder in the room now.

0:56:000:56:02

-It comes into the room at £60.

-Good God. Bless you.

-Oh, really? No.

0:56:020:56:05

Come on, net.

0:56:050:56:06

65 on the net. At 65, 60...

0:56:060:56:09

£70, back in the room.

0:56:090:56:10

-Good man.

-At £70.

-Someone kick him.

-The room has it at 70,

0:56:100:56:13

and I'm selling at 70.

0:56:130:56:15

Sold at £70.

0:56:150:56:17

Paul has turned it around and moves ahead,

0:56:170:56:20

but Christina has one item left - her silver snuffbox.

0:56:200:56:23

What shall we say?

0:56:230:56:24

-£30, start me there, please?

-Oh!

0:56:240:56:26

Looking for £30.

0:56:260:56:27

No. Net's in, net's in, net's off.

0:56:270:56:28

On the net at 30.

0:56:280:56:30

-The net's just taken off.

-I can't watch.

0:56:300:56:32

Net, 50. On the internet at 50.

0:56:320:56:34

At 50, comes back into the room at 55.

0:56:340:56:37

Quite rightly so.

0:56:370:56:38

-It's a lovely thing. Yes.

-The room has it at 55.

0:56:380:56:40

At 55 in the room.

0:56:400:56:41

-Are we all done, ladies and gentlemen, at £55?

-Oh, my God, no.

0:56:410:56:45

Sold, 55.

0:56:450:56:47

Like a dagger through my heart.

0:56:470:56:49

That's a tough one to take,

0:56:510:56:54

and Paul still has his dress sword to go.

0:56:540:56:57

And I can start this at £50.

0:56:570:56:59

No, you're joking. There's a countryman laughing.

0:56:590:57:01

-That's what I'm telling you.

-Net.

0:57:010:57:03

-55 and the net's running now with this at 75.

-Five, 80, 5...

0:57:030:57:06

-90,

-5... 90, 5, 100...

0:57:060:57:09

10... Oh. I'm redundant!

0:57:090:57:12

The internet bidders have come alive.

0:57:120:57:14

170.

0:57:140:57:16

170, ladies and gentlemen, on the internet at £170.

0:57:160:57:20

Are we done, then?

0:57:200:57:22

Fair warning and I will sell at £170.

0:57:220:57:24

All done?

0:57:240:57:26

Sold at 170.

0:57:260:57:27

Hooray!

0:57:270:57:29

Well done.

0:57:300:57:31

What a fantastic way to end the auction,

0:57:310:57:34

as Paul completes his comeback with his second three-figure profit

0:57:340:57:37

of the day. Wow.

0:57:370:57:39

I'm done. I resign. Has anyone resigned after two days? Have they?

0:57:390:57:43

There we go. That's me.

0:57:430:57:44

Christina started this leg with £182.84.

0:57:440:57:50

After auction costs are deducted,

0:57:500:57:52

she's made £35.30 in profit,

0:57:520:57:57

taking her total to £218.14.

0:57:570:58:02

After auction costs,

0:58:040:58:05

Paul made £186.80 profit,

0:58:050:58:10

taking the day with a total of £427.04.

0:58:100:58:15

Wow.

0:58:150:58:17

-Goodness me.

-Look at that filthy car. Where's ours?

0:58:180:58:21

I will drive because then I will take

0:58:210:58:22

responsibility for the filthy car.

0:58:220:58:24

Yeah, you will drive cos you're taking it to have it valeted.

0:58:240:58:27

ENGINE PURRS Cheerio till next time.

0:58:280:58:31

Antique experts Christina Trevanion and Paul Laidlaw kick off their road trip. Armed with £200 each and an ailing pick-up truck, they shop up a storm as they road trip through Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Gloucestershire and Northamptonshire and go head to head at auctions in Market Harborough and Evesham.


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