Episode 10 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 10

Antiques challenge. Natasha Raskin is playing catch up on this episode of Antiques Road Trip as she and fellow auctioneer Philip Serrell take a trip round Sussex and Kent.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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I don't know what to do! HORN TOOTS

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..with ?200 each, a classic car

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and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game. Charlie!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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SHE GASPS

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh! This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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Today, we're continuing our road trip in the company of two

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charming antiques experts, Philip Serrell and Natasha Raskin.

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Do you know, there's one thing that you can rely on in this country.

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What's that?

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Unreliable weather!

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Esteemed auctioneer Philip has an eye for a bargain

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and a nose to sniff out antiques in unlikely places.

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This is just the best, this is much better than antique shops.

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Joining him on this road trip is enchanting Glaswegian Natasha

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with expertise in paintings, sculpture,

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jewellery and female wiles.

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Oh, my goodness, I'm going to have to be like Cupid and sort of...

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throw a little arrow in your direction.

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Our duelling duo set off in a 1957 Porsche with ?200 each.

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As the penultimate leg of the road trip gets under way,

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Philip edged in front with ?214.04 to spend.

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Natasha, however, has just ?122.84.

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Your purse is bulging now. You're over ?200. It's not bulging!

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It's about 12 quid better than we started

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I don't know how many days ago.

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I'm almost ?100 worse off than when we started.

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I've lost the plot. I think I got the rules wrong.

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Natasha and Phil kicked off the week in Narberth in Pembrokeshire.

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Their journey has seen them travel through the Home Counties.

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Now they're heading to the south coast,

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before heading to Salisbury, Wiltshire.

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The fourth stretch has them going to an auction in Rayleigh in Essex.

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But they're starting in Arundel.

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Our experts' first stop is Arundel Antiques.

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David's been trading in militaria for over 20 years

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and has amassed quite a stock.

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So, what do you know about militaria, Phil? Nothing. Nothing?

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Most of it comes from the military.

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Most of it. That's sounding good, yeah(!) Thanks.

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Thankfully for Natasha,

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there's another floor of items she can get her teeth into.

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OK. This looks a bit more my cup of tea. Less militaria, more stuff.

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But it's very nicely set out, isn't it?

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Better if you take the covers off, Phil.

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What about that? Oh, yeah. That's quite a good old piece.

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A good, solid piece. How much is that? 35 quid.

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It might benefit from a polish up, but... Wouldn't we all!

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Speak for yourself.

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Is 35 the best, or can we get under 30? Er, 28. How about that? OK.

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I might just have a go at you with that.

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Let me just have a wander around see if there's anything else I can see.

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As Philip continues his search, Natasha finds David.

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What do you have in mind?

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Well, I think these are quite interesting,

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two albums of cigarette cards from the 1930s.

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Right, OK. Something I've never bought before. Always a popular subject.

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So you've got all the insignias in there. Are they totally complete?

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They're totally complete and in marvellous condition.

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Cigarette cards were introduced to stiffen the packaging

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and to advertise brands.

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The first in the UK were introduced by John Player Sons in 1893.

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The ticket price is ?25.

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What about 20 for the two, a tenner apiece?

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Oh, I don't know. Can I have a look? Naturally. I think they're a really good subject matter.

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Because I don't have a clue. I'm just worried about the rarity value,

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because I don't really think there is one, is there?

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The most that I'm prepared to pay is probably eight quid.

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Eight pounds sounds like a good deal to me. Really? Yeah, I think so.

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I'm quite surprised. No, because I'm going to be stuck with them otherwise.

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Oh, really? I get it. Well, shall we do it then?

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Yeah, we'll do it. Eight quid.

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What an incredible deal.

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Natasha has persuaded David to part with

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these at a third of their ticket price.

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And with one deal done, David makes his way over to Philip.

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He's spotted a 19th-century boxwood truncheon.

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It's got a ribbed handle.

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Leather here, which looks suspiciously like it's been replaced

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at some point in time. Replaced, yes.

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And it's got a not overly subtle screw in there and there,

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and then this is lead-filled.

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And they used to call these life preservers, didn't they?

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Which is actually the last thing in the world they did,

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cos when you got that on the back of the head,

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that really would just see you out, wouldn't it? Mmm.

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And how much is that? It's ?45.

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Phil's still keen on the bronze propeller, too.

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Total ticket price for both items is ?80.

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What could you do the two for?

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40. 20 quid each.

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?40 for the two? Yep.

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You've caught me by surprise, cos I thought they were going to be more than that.

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I'd better pay you now.

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Yeah, and with that both experts leave their first shop

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with some promising purchases for auction.

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Next stop for Natasha is just along the coast, in Peacehaven.

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Her next shop may be small, but it's certainly crammed full.

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I'm really into a little bit of pokerwork,

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and these are really sweet, these wee napkin rings.

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It's called pokerwork because that's exactly what it is.

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It's a hot poker that goes in and actually makes the design.

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We've got the actual stylised flowers...have been lined out by the poker.

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And then the background has been, typical of its style, dot-dot-dotted in.

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Then they've been filled in in colour.

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But they're a little bit lacking in their colour.

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It's all come off, to be honest with you.

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And then I think maybe from the same sort of set is this one here.

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Let me just get it. There we go.

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Because I think this one's the most obviously Art Nouveau in its style,

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because this here, you've got the lovely soft yellow

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and then the green and the blue all working together in harmony.

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Yes, there's a wee bit of paint loss and it's not in the world's best condition,

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but I think for its age, that's just such a lovely thing.

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The Arts and Crafts pokerwork pot has a ticket price of ?20.

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One to think about.

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Dealer Steve is on hand to help Natasha find some more goodies.

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There are some sweet wee things in here.

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There's one down here that's lovely,

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the enamelled one with the 19 on it. Yeah, that's really sweet.

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What's that - 12 quid? Oh, it's a tie clip! Yes.

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And it's the 19th hole. Yes, indeed.

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So, I thought that when I saw the price tag from above it said 120,

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because I presumed it was going to be in nine-carat gold. But it's not.

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It's just in a sort of rolled gold, or gold plate.

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I mean, the enamel's all right. It's not in the worst order you've ever seen.

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But it's kind of cool, isn't it?

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That's now two items Natasha has her eye on.

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Anything else?

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I absolutely love this little pillbox.

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Do you mind if we do a closer look at that? No, indeed. Thank you.

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This pillbox has a 1992 hallmark.

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Hardly antique, but as it's not terribly old it is in pristine condition.

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It sports a ticket price of ?24.

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OK, Steve.

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There are things that I like in your shop, truly.

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I really like the pokerwork box.

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And I really like the tiepin.

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Then you've got this gorgeous hallmarked bit of silver as well.

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I wonder if you would be open to a sort of a deal.

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You can tempt me, Natasha.

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And how often do you fall for temptation?

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I'm a fool for temptation. You're a fool for temptation!

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Just say...?30 the lot. I'm just going to say it, Steve.

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Make it 35 and it's yours.

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35? For the whole lot? Yeah.

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Steve, I can't resist. I'm now falling for you.

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I think that's an absolute deal.

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Natasha has picked up three items

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that had a total ticket price of ?56 for just ?35.

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And with that, time for a rest.

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Nighty-night, you two.

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Today, our pair will be hoping for more deals,

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and they are making the journey north

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to the beautiful village of Golden Cross.

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Bye! Bye.

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Philip is first to shop this morning.

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Time to introduce yourself to owner Rhoda.

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He's really casing the joint.

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These are quite interesting, Rhoda. How old do you think those are?

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I would imagine about 1910, something like that?

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What do you think? Yeah, I think you're right.

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Philip's keen.

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I think they're quite interesting.

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And I don't blame him. They're in the style of William Benson,

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one of the most forward-thinking of the Arts and Crafts designers,

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known for producing well-thought-out functional items,

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particularly light fittings.

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This is a drip pan. Yes.

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So, you put your candle in there, and this is a drip pan.

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Quite clever, really,

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so it catches the wax so you're not forever getting

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wax off your damask tablecloth.

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If they're by Benson, they could be worth a few quid.

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However, there's no maker's mark, and Philip's spotted a problem.

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That's just... It's been dropped, hasn't it?

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If you look at that one... Yes.

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If you look at that one there... And look at that one there... Yes.

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And it's just been absolutely... It's been dropped.

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Yeah, maybe Rhoda will drop a bit off her ?25 ticket price.

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I could do them for...

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I could do them for 20.

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Is that your very, very best, or can I squeeze you down to 15?

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No, not really as far as 15. What could I squeeze you to?

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18. OK.

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I'll have those, my love. Thank you very much indeed.

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That's most kind, Rhoda.

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Philip's leaving with the brass candlesticks for ?18.

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Natasha has taken the Porsche onwards to the village of Burwash.

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She's visiting a house deep in the wooded landscape

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of the Sussex Weald which became sanctuary to a world-famous writer.

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Hello, hi. I'm Tasha.

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Hello. Welcome to Bateman's.

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Thank you so much. Bateman's, indeed! This is...

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a spectacular home

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and the residence of one particularly important gentleman.

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An extraordinary man with an extraordinary story.

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In 1902, Rudyard Kipling was at the height of his fame.

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His Just So Stories were ready to go to print

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and The Jungle Book had been published globally

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and translated into many languages.

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As a man of great wealth and fame,

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Rudyard could have chosen to live anywhere,

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but he fell in love with Bateman's in the secluded Dudwell Valley.

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And it was here he experienced some of his greatest joys

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and deepest sorrows.

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Rudyard Kipling comes to Bateman's in the autumn of his life, really.

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But where did it all begin for him?

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He was born in India.

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His father was a head teacher who had set up a school in India,

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and that Indian influence,

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those early years in Bombay, really had a big influence on him.

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His father managed to get him a job as a reporter

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on one of the English newspapers in India

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and he started writing little stories.

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One day, the editor asked Rudyard if he'd mind writing a story

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to sort of fill half-a-dozen pages.

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That became really successful,

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and so they were serialised into little booklet forms

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and they sold by an extraordinary amount, as well.

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By the age of 32, he was the highest-paid author in the world.

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Rudyard married and had three children.

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Life could not be better.

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But all the riches in the world were no compensation

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for the loss of the eldest of his three children to pneumonia.

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So, Josephine died, and that really did influence him.

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It took a long time to get over it.

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Josephine was just six years old.

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Overcome with grief and wishing to escape public glare,

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Rudyard bought Bateman's, and he threw his energies into writing,

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drawing inspiration from his new surroundings.

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Look at the view! His surroundings...!

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And being at Bateman's and being in such a beautifully beamed study

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with this view...

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He can't have lacked inspiration in here. No, he certainly didn't.

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He really did... His whole focus had slightly changed

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by the time he moved to Bateman's.

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He was really influenced by the Sussex countryside,

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by this valley, this environment. It really did influence his work.

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He doesn't have to write for money, monetary reasons, any longer.

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He can actually just write for the enjoyment.

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And so he writes his stories for his children.

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Rudyard welcomed many guests to Bateman's

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and kept a meticulous record of every visitor.

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So, you've got extraordinary people.

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You've got politicians - so, Stanley Baldwin.

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You've also got people like Scott and Shackleton, the explorers.

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And you've got American presidents.

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George Clemenceau, the President of France, he comes here.

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He was the man to visit, I was going to say. Yeah.

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And even Mother gets a mention. In fact, she's highlighted!

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Mother came on August the 4th, 1920.

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"About 6.30pm."

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And he's annotated that "FIP".

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Yes, that's a bit of a personal joke that Rudyard made.

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For many, many years no-one actually knew, really, what it meant.

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And it was only a maid, many years after Rudyard's death,

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was able to come back and explain what "FIP" meant.

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It turns out it was Kipling's little personal joke

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for people that fell in the pond. Fell in the pond?!

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Yeah... It's interesting, because the pond here is not that dangerous.

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And considering the amount of people that did seem to...

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that it did seem to happen to,

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I've got a feeling it might've been closer to PIP, or Pushed In Pond.

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Pushed! And it may show you a little bit more of the sort of high jinks

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and the japes he would get up to

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and how he was very much an interesting figure

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that would love to have a good time. That's wild!

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You can't throw your mum in the pond!

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Well, Rudyard certainly did, by the look...!

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But this idyll was soon to be shattered.

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The world lurched towards the Great War,

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and Rudyard was to know personal tragedy for a second time.

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His son John, he then struggles to get into the military

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during the First World War, eventually manages to go away,

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partly because of Rud pulling a few strings for him.

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And, of course, John disappears during the Battle of Loos

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never to be seen again.

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Rud not only then blames himself for Josephine's death

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but very much also for John's death, as well.

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While Rudyard continued to write for the next two decades,

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he never again returned to the bright, cheery children's tales

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he had once so delighted in crafting.

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Health issues eventually caught up with Rudyard,

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the result of age but also of grief.

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I mean, Kipling must have been a man of extraordinary character

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to really carry that burden of outliving two of your children.

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Throughout all this tragedy,

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for a man that has so much to give and gives so much to the world

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with his literary genius and stuff,

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he experiences so much tragedy himself.

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And so it is very strange how that all comes out,

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all this literary genius comes out of all that tragedy, as well.

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Philip has hit the road

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and journeyed to just outside the East Sussex town of Battle.

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Although this doesn't look like an antiques shop.

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Philip's known for going rogue,

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and, true to form, he's making an unscheduled stop

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at a fencing contractor.

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And it looks like busy managing director Jon Hobden

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is humouring him.

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Where exactly is he taking our Phil?

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There's a few bits of old woodworking kit in there

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you're welcome to have a look at. Can I have a wander?

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Let me see what... I can find all the company records in here.

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Only Serrell would go looking for a bargain by torchlight.

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Jon, I think I might...

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Can I drag this out?

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Lord above...!

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I don't know what that is,

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but could we take that outside and put it in some daylight?

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So that's presumably bolted to the floor...

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Hopefully John will know what it is. You know, I've no idea! Oh.

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These clearly go round and round.

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Come on, chaps!

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Everyone knows that's a cast-iron saw-sharpening stand, right?!

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It does all work, doesn't it?

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It does all work. It's all freed up, which I'm amazed...

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It's been sitting up there for... years and years.

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Decades, probably.

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When would be the last time this was used? 20 years ago, at least.

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That it was used. At least. It's cool thing, though, isn't it?

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Philip knows there's value in bygone machinery

0:16:420:16:44

that can be upcycled into something trendy.

0:16:440:16:47

Well, I tell you what, when I saw it dragged out, I thought 20 quid.

0:16:470:16:50

That's what I thought.

0:16:500:16:51

Can I...? I'll have a deal with you at 15 quid.

0:16:510:16:53

Deal. You're a gentleman. Good man. Thank you. Thank you.

0:16:530:16:56

Philip's nose for a unique buy has bagged him his fourth lot for auction.

0:16:560:17:01

There you are. Good man. Thank you. Thank you for having me.

0:17:010:17:04

Pleasure doing business.

0:17:040:17:05

Got to lug it to the car now - Gordon Bennett!

0:17:050:17:07

As Philip gets back on track,

0:17:070:17:10

Natasha's stopped off in the village of Appledore

0:17:100:17:13

just north of Romney Marsh.

0:17:130:17:15

Here we go!

0:17:150:17:17

Here in this mid-19th-century building

0:17:190:17:21

was once the local blacksmith. Today it's home to Old Forge Antiques.

0:17:210:17:24

Natasha has just over ?79 left in her pocket.

0:17:240:17:27

What's she found?

0:17:290:17:31

I always look at mahogany dressing mirrors, or toilet mirrors -

0:17:310:17:34

whatever you call them -

0:17:340:17:35

because they're always lovely and Victorian and Georgian

0:17:350:17:38

and always really super-expensive.

0:17:380:17:40

But there's one here that is not crazy expensive.

0:17:400:17:42

It's ?63. So, first of all, I thought - "Why's it only ?63?

0:17:420:17:45

"Maybe it's repro or something." But, actually, it's really nice.

0:17:450:17:49

A lovely mahogany finish, and it's really nicely carved and turned.

0:17:490:17:52

It's got everything you'd want from a nice toilet mirror.

0:17:520:17:55

It's quite large, so it would work in any interior.

0:17:550:17:58

But, at the back, it's a bit of a mess.

0:17:580:18:01

It's actually the backing panel here...

0:18:010:18:03

has all split and been repaired.

0:18:030:18:05

Personally, I'd only want to be paying ?30 for it, or so.

0:18:050:18:07

So I don't REALLY know...if that's going to work out.

0:18:070:18:11

There's another one, too.

0:18:110:18:13

This one's ?55 and it's marked "AF" - As Found.

0:18:130:18:17

I think the As Found or Sold As Seen sort of element

0:18:170:18:20

is because of this really poor glass.

0:18:200:18:24

Yes, but that's reflected in the ticket price.

0:18:240:18:27

You can see that the wooden panel back...

0:18:270:18:30

is totally...

0:18:300:18:32

complete.

0:18:320:18:34

So you can see how the other one SHOULD look,

0:18:340:18:35

and this one has that.

0:18:350:18:38

Two mirrors, neither in great condition.

0:18:380:18:40

Natasha, though, can see an opportunity for a deal

0:18:400:18:43

staring at her in the face. Now, Steph...

0:18:430:18:46

If, for the two, I were to offer you a really cheeky ?65...

0:18:460:18:51

For the two.

0:18:510:18:52

For the two? For the two.

0:18:520:18:54

It would be sort of 32.50 a mirror.

0:18:540:18:56

I'll do them for 70.

0:18:560:18:58

?70 the two?

0:18:580:19:00

You're quite happy with that? Yeah.

0:19:000:19:02

What a deal! A ?50 discount.

0:19:020:19:04

Could these two mirrors be the lot to give Natasha a big profit?

0:19:040:19:08

Just outside the village of Appledore is Philip.

0:19:100:19:12

He's found Station Antiques

0:19:120:19:15

Hi. How are you? I'm Philip. Hello! I'm Kelly.

0:19:150:19:17

Good to see you, Kelly. Welcome.

0:19:170:19:19

Introductions over, it's time for a mooch about.

0:19:190:19:22

Those are quite interesting, aren't they? They're lovely.

0:19:250:19:28

They're Indian, aren't they? Yeah.

0:19:280:19:30

Philip's found three carved-wood friezes.

0:19:300:19:33

Originally, these would have been over a door or fireplace.

0:19:330:19:37

Kelly, I like these.

0:19:370:19:39

So, these have come from India, right? Yeah.

0:19:390:19:42

They probably cost...

0:19:440:19:46

the middle and both ends of not very much over there.

0:19:460:19:50

They're priced at ?40 each.

0:19:500:19:52

What could you do them for? What would you be prepared...?

0:19:520:19:54

I could phone the owner of them

0:19:540:19:56

and ask what his lowest would be for the three of them.

0:19:560:19:59

I tell you what you could do.

0:19:590:20:01

Ask him what his best would be for one, two and three. Yep.

0:20:010:20:03

I think they've got to come for somewhere between...

0:20:030:20:07

?50 and ?80 - something like that.

0:20:070:20:09

I'll go and give him a call. Give him a call.

0:20:110:20:13

And see what he can do on them.

0:20:130:20:15

All right. You're an angel. Thank you.

0:20:150:20:17

That was quick. Kelly's back.

0:20:170:20:20

How much for one?

0:20:200:20:22

For one it's got to be the 40.

0:20:220:20:24

For two. It's cost price.

0:20:240:20:25

If you have all three...

0:20:250:20:28

we can only really drop another ?10.

0:20:280:20:32

No. That wouldn't work for me.

0:20:320:20:35

Let me just...

0:20:350:20:36

Let's put that one there.

0:20:360:20:38

I like them.

0:20:450:20:46

They're lovely.

0:20:460:20:48

I think Kelly knows a cheeky offer for two of them is on its way.

0:20:480:20:53

If you agree to 60 quid, I'll take them now.

0:20:530:20:56

That's ?20 off what the dealer is asking for.

0:20:560:20:59

OK. I'll do 60.

0:20:590:21:01

You're an angel.

0:21:010:21:03

Kelly, this is it.

0:21:030:21:05

You've been very kind to me.

0:21:050:21:07

Two, four, six. Lovely. ?60. Thank you. Thank you.

0:21:070:21:10

And let me just sit and wonder if I've done the right thing or not.

0:21:100:21:12

Of course you have!

0:21:120:21:14

Well, we're about to find out, as we're now off to auction.

0:21:140:21:17

Here's a rundown of what Natasha and Philip picked up on this leg.

0:21:170:21:21

Natasha bought two cigarette albums, a poker work pot,

0:21:220:21:27

a novelty golfer's tiepin,

0:21:270:21:29

a silver pillbox

0:21:290:21:31

and two large Victorian dressing mirrors.

0:21:310:21:34

The five lots cost her ?113.

0:21:340:21:36

Philip's purchases included a lead-weighted life preserver,

0:21:380:21:42

a bronze ship's propeller,

0:21:420:21:44

a pair of candlesticks,

0:21:440:21:46

a saw-sharpening stand

0:21:460:21:48

and two Indian carved friezes.

0:21:480:21:50

All that lot cost him ?133.

0:21:500:21:54

What do they make of each other's lots?

0:21:540:21:56

Well, Phil's lead-weighted

0:21:580:21:59

life preserver could be his life-saver.

0:21:590:22:01

I've never seen anything like it.

0:22:010:22:03

Her little cigarette-card albums,

0:22:030:22:05

I think they're quite sweet things. RAF theme...

0:22:050:22:07

They could do quite well.

0:22:070:22:09

It's exactly like Philip Serrell to buy a crazy saw-sharpener

0:22:090:22:12

for ?15 from a timber yard.

0:22:120:22:14

He's been true to himself, and I'm sure it will pay off.

0:22:140:22:17

It always does for the Serrell.

0:22:170:22:19

I've taken a bit of a risk, you know?

0:22:190:22:21

We could be all square after this one.

0:22:210:22:24

Well, it's time to turn those lots into a profit

0:22:240:22:27

and head to Rayleigh in Essex.

0:22:270:22:30

The scene for today's auction is Stacey's Auctioneers And Valuers,

0:22:300:22:34

a family business now operating

0:22:340:22:36

under the third generation of the clan.

0:22:360:22:39

Oh, this is exciting. Good luck.

0:22:390:22:42

You, too, lovey. Oh, here we go!

0:22:420:22:44

Mark Stacey, but not our Mark, will be wielding the gavel today.

0:22:440:22:48

First up is that silver pillbox.

0:22:480:22:50

Hallmarked as 1992,

0:22:500:22:52

technically, it IS last century,

0:22:520:22:55

but will it make any money?

0:22:550:22:56

?20 for it. 20, 22 online.

0:22:560:22:59

25 is bid. 28.

0:22:590:23:00

Internet's running at 30.

0:23:000:23:02

32 now bid.

0:23:020:23:04

30, 32. 35.

0:23:040:23:05

All on the internet.

0:23:050:23:06

Now 38 bid.

0:23:060:23:08

38, 40.

0:23:080:23:09

At 40, 42 now.

0:23:090:23:11

(Well done, girl.) Running online at ?42.

0:23:110:23:13

All finished online. You finished in the room?

0:23:130:23:16

Internet bidding at ?42. All done?

0:23:160:23:18

That's a great start!

0:23:200:23:22

(Hurrah! That's a good 30 quid profit, isn't it? That's all right.

0:23:220:23:25

Yeah, that's really good. That is OK! Oh, cool!

0:23:250:23:28

First up for Philip are the two Indian carved friezes.

0:23:280:23:33

Interest commission bid, I have. Must commence the bidding at ?40.

0:23:330:23:36

The bid's here with me on the commission at ?40.

0:23:360:23:38

Against you, at ?40.

0:23:380:23:40

Any advances?

0:23:400:23:41

42 on the internet. 45 back with me.

0:23:410:23:43

Against you, online bidder.

0:23:430:23:45

48. 50 is bid.

0:23:450:23:48

And five. Internet's at 55.

0:23:480:23:50

60 anywhere? ?60, thank you, sir.

0:23:500:23:52

?60 against you, online bidder.

0:23:520:23:54

Back online at 65.

0:23:540:23:56

One more? At ?65, internet bidding, then.

0:23:560:23:59

All done. All finished. (That's a loss.)

0:23:590:24:02

I'll sell at 65. Fair warning. Minor. That's a loss.

0:24:020:24:04

Yep. Sadly so,

0:24:040:24:05

because after auction costs are deducted,

0:24:050:24:08

he'll be slightly out of pocket.

0:24:080:24:11

Up next...

0:24:110:24:12

Natasha's lovely novelty golfer's tiepin.

0:24:120:24:15

Commission bids, two of them.

0:24:150:24:17

Must start the bidding to clear the book at ?15. 18 anywhere?

0:24:170:24:20

Promising start.

0:24:200:24:21

18, 20 against you.

0:24:210:24:24

22. At ?22.

0:24:240:24:25

Back in the room at ?22.

0:24:250:24:27

Advance, if you like. All done? All finished?

0:24:270:24:29

At ?22 only.

0:24:290:24:30

(That's all right.) That's OK, isn't it?

0:24:320:24:34

Write it down, girl. I can deal with that, Phil. Absolutely right.

0:24:340:24:37

Well, it's going the right way, isn't it? It can only go...

0:24:370:24:41

Come on, stay positive, chaps.

0:24:410:24:43

A ?13 profit isn't to be sniffed at.

0:24:430:24:45

The next lot is Philip's salvaged saw-sharpening stand.

0:24:470:24:52

20 straight in, please. At 20, thank you, sir. ?20 yours.

0:24:520:24:55

20, 22.

0:24:550:24:56

Against you online.

0:24:560:24:58

25 now bid. 28.

0:24:580:25:00

Back in the room at ?28. All done?

0:25:000:25:01

Are you all finished at ?28?

0:25:010:25:03

Philip's wandering off-piste has landed him a profit.

0:25:050:25:09

Next under the gavel is Natasha's pokerwork pot.

0:25:090:25:12

At ?10 bid.

0:25:120:25:13

12. 14.

0:25:130:25:14

Against you online.

0:25:140:25:15

16 internet bidding.

0:25:150:25:17

18, back on the commission.

0:25:170:25:19

18 now. Two bidders online now.

0:25:190:25:21

?20 bid. All on the internet at ?20.

0:25:210:25:23

Now 22. Going on.

0:25:230:25:25

At 22. 25. Internet.

0:25:250:25:26

All at ?25 now.

0:25:260:25:28

28 anywhere?

0:25:280:25:30

All done. All finished.

0:25:300:25:31

I'll sell to the internet, then. At ?25.

0:25:310:25:33

28. Come along a bit quicker online.

0:25:330:25:36

Last opportunity, then, please.

0:25:360:25:38

I'm selling. At ?28. Hammer's going down.

0:25:380:25:41

He eked that out for me. Thank you.

0:25:420:25:44

She's more than doubled her money with that.

0:25:440:25:47

Up now, Philip's bronze propeller.

0:25:470:25:49

?20 bid. 22.

0:25:510:25:52

25 against you online.

0:25:520:25:54

28 I've got. 30, if you wish, sir.

0:25:540:25:56

At ?28, now.

0:25:570:25:58

Internet bidding is at ?28.

0:25:580:26:00

30, new bidder. Thank you.

0:26:000:26:01

Coming back online, 32.

0:26:010:26:03

35.

0:26:030:26:04

38. 40 bid.

0:26:040:26:06

42.

0:26:060:26:07

45.

0:26:070:26:09

By the gents, at ?45.

0:26:090:26:10

You all done? All finished at 45?

0:26:100:26:13

Another strong profit for Philip...

0:26:140:26:17

..putting the pressure on Natasha.

0:26:180:26:20

Can her two Victorian toilet mirrors turn a profit?

0:26:200:26:23

Let's not waste time. ?20 to bid straight in.

0:26:230:26:25

?20 now. 20 bid. Thank you.

0:26:250:26:26

At 22. Five. Eight. 30 bid.

0:26:260:26:29

At ?30, now.

0:26:290:26:30

Coming on the phone...

0:26:300:26:31

32.

0:26:310:26:33

35.

0:26:330:26:35

38. 40 bid.

0:26:350:26:36

42. 45.

0:26:360:26:38

48. 50 bid.

0:26:390:26:41

(I think you'll show a profit, my love.)

0:26:410:26:43

(Oh, no...!) 55. (Come on...!)

0:26:440:26:46

New bidder. 60 I've got. (Tempt him!)

0:26:460:26:48

Commission bid's at 60. Against you.

0:26:480:26:50

Back in the room at ?60.

0:26:500:26:51

Commission bid I've got now. ?60. Out on the phone? (No, one more...!)

0:26:510:26:54

All done. Fair warning at 60. Hammer's going down.

0:26:540:26:57

Ah, disappointing. Bad luck.

0:26:580:27:00

Och, well! What can you do?

0:27:010:27:03

What can you do? I tried.

0:27:030:27:05

Philip's candlesticks in the style of Benson are next.

0:27:050:27:09

Two commission bids on this lot, ladies and gentlemen.

0:27:090:27:12

Must start the bidding to clear the book at ?50. 50 is bid.

0:27:120:27:15

Five anywhere? At ?50.

0:27:150:27:17

You only paid 18? Yeah.

0:27:170:27:19

55 online. 60 I've got.

0:27:190:27:21

?60 against you, online bidder.

0:27:210:27:24

65. 70 is bid.

0:27:240:27:26

?75. Commission bids are out.

0:27:270:27:29

75 on the internet.

0:27:290:27:31

75 online. 80 if you like.

0:27:310:27:34

?75, internet bidding all done.

0:27:340:27:36

All finished. Last chance, then.

0:27:360:27:37

I sell to the internet at ?75.

0:27:370:27:39

Hammer's going down.

0:27:390:27:41

That's OK, isn't it? You're a legend! You're a legend!

0:27:410:27:43

A very healthy gain for Phil.

0:27:450:27:47

Next, Natasha's cigarette-card albums.

0:27:470:27:50

She bought two for ?8.

0:27:500:27:52

Commission bids. Two of them. Must start the bidding at ?20.

0:27:520:27:55

(Why? Get in.) ?20 advance if you wish.

0:27:550:27:58

We're at 20. 22.

0:27:580:27:59

25. 28. 30.

0:27:590:28:01

32. 35.

0:28:010:28:03

38, I am out.

0:28:030:28:05

Back in the room at ?38.

0:28:050:28:07

I am just so, so pleased.

0:28:070:28:08

At ?38. Hammer's going down.

0:28:080:28:10

Another canny buy gets Natasha a great profit.

0:28:120:28:15

Next, Philip's last lot.

0:28:160:28:18

Must commence at ?60. 60 bid.

0:28:210:28:23

Five anywhere? You coming in, sir?

0:28:230:28:24

Great start. 70 against you.

0:28:240:28:27

75.

0:28:270:28:28

80. One more takes it.

0:28:280:28:30

85, I'm out.

0:28:300:28:31

Just behind, 85.

0:28:310:28:32

?85, any advances. Are you all done?

0:28:320:28:34

All finished, fair warning. At ?85.

0:28:340:28:38

(Yes! Phil!

0:28:380:28:40

(You're a genius. You're a genius!)

0:28:400:28:42

A cracking result and a lovely profit.

0:28:420:28:46

And what's more, I think you're driving.

0:28:460:28:49

No, I'm wearing heels. If you don't mind.

0:28:490:28:52

Yeah, but I am, as well.

0:28:520:28:54

Come on.

0:28:540:28:55

After paying auction-house fees,

0:28:570:28:59

Natasha has made a gain of ?42.80.

0:28:590:29:03

As a result, Ms Raskin

0:29:030:29:06

has ?165.64 in her kitty.

0:29:060:29:09

Well done.

0:29:090:29:12

Philip made a gain of ?111.36 after costs.

0:29:120:29:17

He now has ?325.40

0:29:170:29:20

and is in the lead. Well done, Phil.

0:29:200:29:23

A new day beckons and Hampshire awaits,

0:29:280:29:31

as our pair embark on the final leg of their road trip.

0:29:310:29:35

I'm really, really sad, cos we're just heading towards

0:29:350:29:37

our last auction. Isn't that sad? That is a bit sad, isn't it?

0:29:370:29:41

It's a bit weird as well, because I've got used to it now.

0:29:410:29:44

Well, we'd better make this a good one, then.

0:29:440:29:47

Before their final auction in Salisbury,

0:29:490:29:51

they're kicking off in Eversley, Hampshire.

0:29:510:29:54

Come on. Go on, you first. Let's go.

0:29:540:29:57

First stop is Eversley Barn Antiques.

0:29:570:30:00

Owner Hilary is helping Phil,

0:30:000:30:02

while Natasha has made a break for it upstairs.

0:30:020:30:05

Oh, this looks good up here. Yes! In the attic. A bit more my cup of tea.

0:30:060:30:10

Tile-top coffee tables, modern. Yes, I'm into this.

0:30:100:30:15

Oh, I actually thought I liked it up here cos it was modern,

0:30:150:30:18

but I love this cellarette.

0:30:180:30:20

It's totally cool, because in the very beginning of the 20th century,

0:30:200:30:24

when this would have been produced, I reckon,

0:30:240:30:27

this is taking the wine from the cellar

0:30:270:30:29

and then bringing it to the dining room

0:30:290:30:31

but keeping it cool in a cellarette. So a mini wine cellar.

0:30:310:30:35

This looks more like a plant-pot holder or jardiniere to me.

0:30:350:30:39

Nice thing, though.

0:30:390:30:41

It's not perfect.

0:30:410:30:42

It's a little bit worn, but it's got to be late 19th century,

0:30:420:30:45

early 20th century so we'd expect that.

0:30:450:30:47

This is ?88, and as I'm saying that, I've actually just clocked the fact

0:30:470:30:52

it's got blinking woodworm in it! That is...

0:30:520:30:56

Oh! How did I not notice that?

0:30:560:30:58

So, woodworm aside, I only really want to spend

0:30:580:31:00

about ?35 or ?40 on it, which is a bit cheeky, I know,

0:31:000:31:03

but it's what I want to spend. I want to make a profit at the end.

0:31:030:31:07

As does Phil. Spotted anything yet?

0:31:070:31:10

That little rocker's sweet, isn't it? It is, isn't it?

0:31:110:31:14

Good condition, too.

0:31:140:31:16

So this is what, 1950s, is it? Yes, I think so.

0:31:180:31:21

And it's got this... little piggy and the bunny rabbit.

0:31:210:31:25

That's quite sweet, isn't it? You've got 30 on it.

0:31:270:31:30

What could you do that for, Hilary?

0:31:300:31:32

I'm selling that for a friend, so probably about 24.

0:31:320:31:36

Would ?20 buy it? I knew you were going to say that.

0:31:380:31:41

Yes, ?20. Yes.

0:31:410:31:42

Hilary, I think that's lovely. I'm going to buy that off you.

0:31:420:31:45

Oh, lovely. I'm going to buy that. Thank you so much. Thank you very much indeed.

0:31:450:31:48

So, that's the first lot bought on this final leg.

0:31:480:31:52

Hopefully Natasha is faring well back inside.

0:31:520:31:57

I love revolving bookcases, and this looks like a really nice one.

0:31:570:32:00

I'm hoping that underneath this jug...

0:32:000:32:02

Yes, there is a really nice sort of Edwardian inlaid cartouche,

0:32:020:32:06

a little bit of marquetry, which is always good,

0:32:060:32:08

but what's really nice about it

0:32:080:32:10

is that you've got books all the way around

0:32:100:32:12

and it revolves, so let's check out... Oh.

0:32:120:32:14

It's a little bit stiff, actually. It's not quite got that slick... No.

0:32:140:32:19

It's actually a bookcase that's a tale of two stories, really.

0:32:190:32:23

You've got the early 20th century up here

0:32:230:32:25

with its lovely Edwardian motifs,

0:32:250:32:27

and then you've got late 20th century down here,

0:32:270:32:30

with dodgy plastic casters that everyone is trying to forget.

0:32:300:32:33

So, let's have a look at the price

0:32:330:32:36

because that's probably reflected here. "Revolving bookcase," 55 quid.

0:32:360:32:40

So, it's not quite a revolving bookcase.

0:32:400:32:42

It's a book case that revolves, if you know what I mean?

0:32:420:32:45

Er... I think so. Another possibility.

0:32:450:32:49

Downstairs, Phil's found a lovely set of boat steps,

0:32:490:32:53

ticket price ?165.

0:32:530:32:56

I think they're fun things. There'll be one or two uses.

0:32:560:32:59

They're either the sort of thing that someone is going to hang

0:32:590:33:03

in a seaside cottage or they're the type of thing

0:33:030:33:07

that someone might have in a library or, for me,

0:33:070:33:12

they're the type of thing that you...

0:33:120:33:15

Actually... I'll just work this out.

0:33:170:33:19

Aren't those a cool set of shelves to hang up somewhere?

0:33:220:33:25

Brilliant. Yeah, they would hang on a wall. Yeah.

0:33:250:33:27

I think on a bad day...

0:33:270:33:29

..those are going to make ?60 or ?70.

0:33:310:33:33

On a good day, they might make 120, 130. That's what I think.

0:33:330:33:37

I'd like to try and buy them for somewhere between ?80 and ?90,

0:33:370:33:41

if I could. I really like those.

0:33:410:33:44

How about 90? Are you sure? Smashing. Thanks very much.

0:33:440:33:49

A very generous ?75 off the ticket price.

0:33:490:33:54

How's Natasha getting on?

0:33:540:33:55

These are really sweet.

0:33:550:33:57

These are napkin rings and they are, I think, Bakelite,

0:33:570:34:02

which is an early plastic and kind of dates them

0:34:020:34:05

to probably the 1930s or '40s, and they're novelty.

0:34:050:34:08

The dog lovers would like them. But they're quite sweet.

0:34:080:34:11

They're a tenner each.

0:34:110:34:12

They are marked with this code, EBA, and so is the bookcase,

0:34:120:34:17

so I don't know who the seller is but I reckon that's their initials,

0:34:170:34:21

and if they want to get rid of both these things, maybe they could do it

0:34:210:34:24

in one fell sweep... One fell swoop! Ah!

0:34:240:34:26

It turns out the jardiniere is marked "EBA" too.

0:34:280:34:30

They're all owned by the same dealer.

0:34:300:34:33

With a collective ticket price of ?163,

0:34:330:34:36

will Natasha try a cheeky offer for the three?

0:34:360:34:39

I bet she does.

0:34:390:34:41

All together 75.

0:34:410:34:43

Can you do 85? I definitely can,

0:34:430:34:45

because that's still a massive chunk off. Brilliant.

0:34:450:34:48

If you're cool with that, I'm cool with that. Brilliant.

0:34:480:34:51

A great deal for three interesting items. Well done, Natasha.

0:34:510:34:54

Does anything else grab you, Phil?

0:34:560:34:58

This is just an interesting tray.

0:35:000:35:03

It's late 19th century. It's in mahogany.

0:35:030:35:05

Now, there's two issues with this.

0:35:050:35:08

The first thing is condition, cos we've got a bit of a crack there,

0:35:080:35:12

and the second thing is

0:35:120:35:13

it's completely and utterly out of fashion.

0:35:130:35:17

So, a tray like this in good order, 15 years ago,

0:35:170:35:21

would have been between ?200 and ?400.

0:35:210:35:24

This is now priced up at ?55.

0:35:240:35:27

Cor. Better get your bartering head on, old bean.

0:35:290:35:33

I'm hoping I can try and buy it off you for around the ?20 mark.

0:35:330:35:36

How does that...? It's a bit low. Come on, tell me. A bit low.

0:35:360:35:40

It's the condition, really, isn't it? It's priced as damaged, but...

0:35:410:35:45

Can you do...25?

0:35:450:35:49

Go on. You're an angel. All right, brilliant. Thank you very much.

0:35:500:35:54

That's three lots for Phil, as well.

0:35:540:35:59

After that busy first stop, he is heading north, to Reading,

0:35:590:36:03

in search of something to spend his remaining ?210 on.

0:36:030:36:07

He's meeting Will,

0:36:100:36:11

and in the back yard he's found something architectural.

0:36:110:36:14

Uh-oh...

0:36:140:36:15

I love that. Originally it would have been one of a pair, wouldn't it?

0:36:160:36:19

Yeah, off a gatepost, I'd imagine. Yeah.

0:36:190:36:22

What's the ticket price on that one?

0:36:220:36:24

Well, I think the problem with that is it's been here so long

0:36:240:36:27

that we had a bit of sort-out this weekend and it suddenly appeared.

0:36:270:36:31

Suddenly appeared. Oh, I like this. So, I think we can...

0:36:310:36:34

If you make me a sensible price...

0:36:340:36:36

OK. And I mean sensible. The trouble with it is

0:36:360:36:41

that a pair would be really, really saleable, wouldn't they? But one...

0:36:410:36:44

But I still think it's quite fun. Would a ?20 note buy it?

0:36:440:36:48

Well...

0:36:510:36:53

If it gets rid of it, I suppose, yeah. Go on, ?20. Oh, go on, then.

0:36:540:36:59

So, that's a hefty lot bought.

0:37:010:37:04

Now, how about a pig's trough?

0:37:040:37:06

This is cast iron, isn't it? Yep.

0:37:060:37:08

Pre-war. That's got to be the 1920s, I would imagine,

0:37:100:37:14

cos after a while they made them galvanised, didn't they?

0:37:140:37:18

Galvanised come in after the war. How much is that, Will?

0:37:180:37:21

Well, we did have 75 on it.

0:37:210:37:23

I've got to give you somewhere between 20 and 25 quid.

0:37:250:37:29

No, I'd have to have a little bit more than that.

0:37:290:37:31

30 quid's my best.

0:37:310:37:33

Dear, oh, dear. You got your hand out quick earlier.

0:37:330:37:36

HE SIGHS

0:37:360:37:37

That's a round 50, isn't it, really? Yeah. So, I owe you ?50 for the two,

0:37:370:37:41

and I'm going to put the two in as one lot in the auction.

0:37:410:37:44

A great bit of bargaining secures another lot.

0:37:450:37:48

And so the sun sets on a busy day for our road trippers,

0:37:500:37:54

and all I can say is nighty-night.

0:37:540:37:57

The next morning, our dynamic duo are back on the road.

0:38:000:38:04

First stop of the day is the small seaside town of Bognor Regis,

0:38:050:38:10

where Natasha's hunt for more antiques begins. Go, girl!

0:38:100:38:15

Hello. Good morning. Hi. Good morning.

0:38:150:38:17

Hello. Hi, I'm Tasha. I'm Stephan. Stephan.

0:38:170:38:21

How cute is your Wemyss pig at the front? Right.

0:38:210:38:24

I don't think it is Wemyss, though. Oh, really?

0:38:240:38:27

I think it's another make. OK, so in the style of? In the style of.

0:38:270:38:30

That would be quite nice. Can we have a look?

0:38:300:38:32

Wemyss Ware is probably the most collectable

0:38:320:38:34

and sought-after Scottish pottery.

0:38:340:38:36

Ah, a cane.

0:38:360:38:38

Let's have a look. Hook the pig. Hook out the pig.

0:38:390:38:43

This piggy, however, is a piece of Plichta pottery,

0:38:430:38:47

which, though generally inferior in quality to Wemyss, is still popular.

0:38:470:38:51

It's super cute. Look at him face on.

0:38:530:38:55

He's got a bit of a wonky face, doesn't he?

0:38:550:38:57

He doesn't have quite the fine execution of Wemyss, does he?

0:38:570:39:00

No, he doesn't. But he does have the look. It's hand-painted, is it not?

0:39:000:39:03

It is hand-painted and no damage.

0:39:030:39:06

Oh, Stephan, I think there is a wee bit of damage.

0:39:060:39:09

I think there's a wee bit of a curly tail option. Oh, there is.

0:39:090:39:12

And I'm the one wearing glasses. I'm just keeping my eyes peeled.

0:39:120:39:16

So, she's really sweet because the little holes in her snout

0:39:160:39:20

are mimicked all the way across her body, her ears, all over the place.

0:39:200:39:25

Maybe it's for hatpins! Yes, hatpins. Oh, cos it's quite big.

0:39:250:39:28

Maybe it is for hatpins.

0:39:280:39:30

I love this! The more I hold it and learn about it, the more I love it.

0:39:300:39:33

Now, I've touched it, which means apparently I've got to buy it,

0:39:330:39:35

but... We were asking ?15, but you pointed out the damage on the tail,

0:39:350:39:41

so now it's a crisp ?10 note. A ?10 note?

0:39:410:39:44

What do you reckon?

0:39:450:39:46

I think I can deal with this little piggy for a tenner.

0:39:460:39:49

Shall we go for it? I think you ought to.

0:39:490:39:50

Oh, Stephan, that was quick! I wasn't expecting that.

0:39:500:39:53

I'm glad I spotted her. I'm chuffed.

0:39:530:39:56

Here's hoping this little piggy makes a profit at auction.

0:39:560:39:59

Philip, meanwhile, is easing into the day, taking a trip to Portsmouth,

0:40:050:40:09

home to one of the most famous warships in the world - HMS Victory.

0:40:090:40:14

Best known for her role in Britain's greatest naval success,

0:40:140:40:18

the Battle of Trafalgar, Victory was the flagship of Admiral Nelson

0:40:180:40:22

and was the vessel where he drew his last breath.

0:40:220:40:27

Philip's meeting curator Andrew Baines to find out more.

0:40:270:40:31

This room that we're in now, this is Nelson's? This is Nelson's.

0:40:310:40:34

This is a great cabin, which is divided into four sections.

0:40:340:40:37

His steerage, his anteroom, if you like, the dining place,

0:40:370:40:41

the day cabin, where we are now, and then his bed place.

0:40:410:40:44

You can just feel history coming out of the walls, can't you? Yeah.

0:40:440:40:47

Nelson pacing back and forth. Oh, just unbelievable.

0:40:470:40:50

In her 34 years of service, Victory fought in five naval battles

0:40:510:40:56

but it was the 1805 defeat of the French and Spanish

0:40:560:41:00

at the Battle of Trafalgar she became most famous for.

0:41:000:41:05

You've got the palatial surroundings that we just left

0:41:050:41:09

for the one person,

0:41:090:41:11

and the other 820 are spread throughout this ship...

0:41:110:41:14

and this is the cooking range?

0:41:140:41:16

For everyone onboard, whether it's Nelson, an admiral,

0:41:160:41:20

or the lowest of the ratings onboard, the boy seamen.

0:41:200:41:23

All the cooking is done here.

0:41:230:41:25

But that just strikes me as being a fairly strange mix, really

0:41:250:41:29

cos we've got a timber wooden ship and a fire in the middle of it.

0:41:290:41:34

Yeah. Well, men need a hot meal, so if you look, the stove sits on tiles

0:41:340:41:39

and we're very careful.

0:41:390:41:41

This is the only place you're allowed fire onboard the ship,

0:41:410:41:46

but actually on the morning of the battle, this had been dismantled

0:41:460:41:49

so there's no hot meal and the guys fight the Battle of Trafalgar

0:41:490:41:54

on a lunch meal of raw pork and wine. Oh, great.

0:41:540:41:59

Food is incredibly important as a part of morale

0:42:010:42:04

so everybody onboard gets exactly the same ration.

0:42:040:42:07

Nelson's advantage is, as a man of some means,

0:42:090:42:12

he is able to supplement that ration,

0:42:120:42:14

so he will bring onboard his own pantry of stores, if you like.

0:42:140:42:18

However, the men here can do just the same.

0:42:180:42:21

You eat and live as part of a mess, as four, six or eight men.

0:42:210:42:25

You'll pay into a kitty

0:42:250:42:26

and that kitty will be used to buy things like mustard and spices,

0:42:260:42:31

and indeed live animals you might choose to bring onboard

0:42:310:42:34

that are YOUR animal

0:42:340:42:35

that you will then slaughter and eat as you go through.

0:42:350:42:38

To keep up with the hard physical work onboard,

0:42:380:42:42

each crew member consumed around 5,000 calories a day,

0:42:420:42:46

a good portion of which came from alcohol.

0:42:460:42:49

These chaps are getting about half a pint of rum

0:42:490:42:56

per man per day, when we're on rum,

0:42:560:42:59

and the proof of their rum is about double what we call strong now.

0:42:590:43:05

So it's firewater.

0:43:050:43:07

On the 21 October 1805, Nelson led the British fleet

0:43:070:43:13

into battle against the French and Spanish.

0:43:130:43:16

It was 27 vessels versus 33.

0:43:160:43:20

Some 1,700 British men were killed or wounded

0:43:200:43:24

including the great Nelson himself, who was shot on the quarterdeck.

0:43:240:43:29

Below deck, the ship's surgeon, Mr Beatty,

0:43:290:43:32

knew Nelson wouldn't survive.

0:43:320:43:34

Captain Hardy came to bid his Admiral farewell.

0:43:340:43:38

He knows he's going to die.

0:43:380:43:39

He could really, although he's surrounded by people, be very alone.

0:43:390:43:43

He craves human touch and that's why he says, "Kiss me, Hardy."

0:43:430:43:48

And Hardy bends and kisses him on the forehead,

0:43:480:43:51

stands up, then actually goes down,

0:43:510:43:53

bends and kisses him on the cheek this time

0:43:530:43:56

before apparently, overcome with emotion, he leaves the scene.

0:43:560:43:59

Not long afterwards, Nelson died.

0:43:590:44:03

With Nelson's death... He must have been a national hero before,

0:44:040:44:10

and afterwards he must have almost achieved superstar status.

0:44:100:44:15

The funeral is huge.

0:44:150:44:17

It's the biggest state funeral ever to take place up until that time

0:44:170:44:21

and the funeral procession is so long that it leaves Whitehall

0:44:210:44:26

and Nelson's body arrives at St Paul's Cathedral

0:44:260:44:30

before the rest of the procession has finished leaving Whitehall.

0:44:300:44:33

It's that big.

0:44:330:44:35

In 1922, HMS Victory was placed into dry dock.

0:44:360:44:41

Millions have since flocked to visit

0:44:410:44:43

the oldest commissioned warship in the world

0:44:430:44:46

and remember one of Britain's greatest heroes,

0:44:460:44:49

Admiral Nelson.

0:44:490:44:50

Our pair have reunited to make their way to Birdham,

0:44:520:44:56

where they'll share their final shopping experience of this Road Trip

0:44:560:44:59

at Whitestone Farm Antiques.

0:44:590:45:02

Here we are. This is off the beaten track. It is indeedy-doody.

0:45:020:45:06

OK, let's do it. Our last items. This is sad, isn't it? Ugh, what?

0:45:060:45:12

Here we go. I'm ready for it, Phil, are you?

0:45:140:45:17

Well, my eyes are watering, but, yeah, let's go. Come on.

0:45:170:45:21

Our final foray. Come on, darling, after you.

0:45:210:45:24

Hello, you must be Jo. I am Jo. I'm Tasha. Lovely to meet you.

0:45:240:45:27

With ?70 left what's going to tickle their fancy in here then?

0:45:270:45:31

Let's have a look.

0:45:330:45:35

OK, so, ghouls to the front. They're not hand-painted, right? They're transferred on.

0:45:350:45:38

No, it's transfer, but... Is the colour done by hand? ..hand-painted over the top.

0:45:380:45:42

OK, so hand-finished I guess we can say.

0:45:420:45:45

So, I'm not so up on Carlton Ware

0:45:450:45:47

but that looks like a post-1930s mark, doesn't it? It's quite crisp.

0:45:470:45:50

This is very 1930s but of course it could be as late as 1950.

0:45:500:45:55

Oh, look! "A Dorset Litany. From ghoulies ghosties..."

0:45:550:45:59

It's marked up at ?50, which scares me a little bit.

0:45:590:46:02

Not as much as the ghoulies and ghosties, which are terrifying.

0:46:020:46:06

Do you want a tempting price though? A tempting price? Oh, I don't know.

0:46:060:46:10

How tempting?

0:46:100:46:11

30? 30. That's quite a chunk off. that is a very generous offer, Jo.

0:46:110:46:16

Phil is just eavesdropping. He's so bad!

0:46:170:46:20

What if I made you a cheeky offer, and it is really cheeky

0:46:200:46:23

but it's my last chance to be cheeky, of ?20?

0:46:230:46:27

?20. What would you do?

0:46:270:46:29

25 and it's yours. 25 and it's mine?

0:46:310:46:33

I'm going to put it down carefully and say, "Jo, thank you so much."

0:46:330:46:37

Because at ?25 it does have a real chance, doesn't it?

0:46:370:46:40

I think it's got a real good chance.

0:46:400:46:42

Well, it won't be long before we find out. Now, has Phil found anything?

0:46:420:46:47

A pair of leather chairs perhaps?

0:46:470:46:49

When you're looking at a chair, you just need to make sure

0:46:510:46:54

that there's no breaks. People lean back on chairs,

0:46:540:46:57

particularly people of my size lean back on chairs,

0:46:570:47:01

and if you lean back on a chair, it breaks there.

0:47:010:47:04

So, whenever you look at a chair, you want to make sure

0:47:040:47:07

that there's no breaks just there

0:47:070:47:09

cos that is just not a good thing.

0:47:090:47:11

I quite like these.

0:47:110:47:13

The pair have a ticket price of ?110 but generous Jo has indicated

0:47:140:47:20

he'd be willing to drop to 60. Wow.

0:47:200:47:23

I know that you've said these at 60. 60, that is too much for me.

0:47:230:47:27

Can you do them for 40 and a bit of polish and I'll shake your hand?

0:47:270:47:33

How about 50 and a bit of polish? I'll even help you if you like.

0:47:330:47:37

No, no, I'll do it on my own. 45 and I'll do it myself.

0:47:370:47:40

Go on, then. You're a gentleman, Jo.

0:47:400:47:42

With that last buy, it means our Road Trippers are all bought up.

0:47:420:47:48

Natasha spent ?120 on five lots.

0:47:480:47:51

The wooden cellarette,

0:47:510:47:53

a revolving bookcase,

0:47:530:47:55

the Scottie dog napkin rings,

0:47:550:47:58

a piggy hatpin holder

0:47:580:48:00

and the ghoulish Carlton mug.

0:48:000:48:02

Phil spent ?230 buying the children's rocking chair,

0:48:030:48:08

the boat steps,

0:48:080:48:09

a mahogany tray,

0:48:090:48:11

the pig trough and garden ball,

0:48:110:48:14

and the pair of newly buffed up leather chairs.

0:48:140:48:17

What do they make of each other's lots?

0:48:200:48:23

I'm going to bow to Tasha's knowledge

0:48:230:48:26

with that Carlton Ware mug.

0:48:260:48:27

I think it's a cool thing but at ?25, it might be a problem.

0:48:270:48:32

But if it's rare, it should just see it through.

0:48:320:48:35

On the very last leg, Phil had to buy something salvage,

0:48:350:48:39

he had to do it, and he's come away

0:48:390:48:40

with a huge spherical gate finial and a pig's trough.

0:48:400:48:44

My pig item is a little ceramic dainty thing, his is a pig's trough.

0:48:440:48:48

It just explains the difference between Phil and I

0:48:480:48:51

and why opposites attract.

0:48:510:48:52

After starting this leg in Eversley,

0:48:540:48:57

they're now hurtling towards

0:48:570:48:58

their final destination, Salisbury.

0:48:580:49:02

I think, "infectious, bubbly Natasha".

0:49:030:49:06

That's what I'm going to miss. I'm not infectious. That sounds awful!

0:49:060:49:09

I sound contagious! You are because you've actually made me smile.

0:49:090:49:13

On that bombshell, it's auction time.

0:49:140:49:18

The final sale is taking place at Netherhampton Salerooms.

0:49:190:49:23

Presiding over today's events is Richard Petty.

0:49:240:49:28

Ah, Philip. Here we go then. Here we go.

0:49:280:49:31

Here we go indeed. First up - Phil's mahogany tray.

0:49:320:49:35

I'll start the bidding at ?10. At ?10, ?10, ?10, ?10...

0:49:350:49:39

?12, 15, 18, ?20

0:49:390:49:42

22, 25 from me. 25 my bid.

0:49:420:49:45

28. I've got 30.

0:49:450:49:48

32, 35, 38, ?40 from me.

0:49:480:49:51

45 and I'm out. 45, 45, 45...

0:49:510:49:53

45! You were bang on. ..In the room then at 45.

0:49:530:49:56

Anybody else? Being sold this time at ?45.

0:49:560:49:59

GAVEL BANGS Oh! Phil, that's excellent!

0:49:590:50:02

First lot and he's pulled in a profit. Well done, Philip.

0:50:030:50:06

That is a good start. Yeah.

0:50:060:50:08

Can Natasha's ghoulish mug keep up the profits?

0:50:090:50:12

At ?12 I've got. 15, 18, 20, 22,

0:50:130:50:17

25. I'm out. 28... Oh, yay! ..?30.

0:50:170:50:21

?30. 32? 32. 35?

0:50:210:50:24

35. Oh. Another for you? 38. Oh, keen crowd!

0:50:240:50:28

?40, 42, 42.

0:50:280:50:32

45. Gentleman's bid then at 45.

0:50:320:50:34

48. On my left at 48. Anyone else want to join in?

0:50:340:50:39

At 48. Being sold this time then at ?48.

0:50:390:50:43

GAVEL BANGS By Jove!

0:50:430:50:45

That's some profit on the mug. Nicely done, Natasha.

0:50:450:50:48

But will her Bakelite Scottie dog napkin holders prove as popular?

0:50:490:50:54

Maybe they'll fly and do really well.

0:50:550:50:57

Who's got 10? Thank you, ?10 I've got. 10! ?10, ?10, ?10, ?10...

0:50:570:51:01

Who else wants it? ?12. I want them. I want them.

0:51:010:51:04

15, 18... Yay! ..?20. At ?20. Gentleman's bid at ?20.

0:51:040:51:09

Oh, I want them. ?20, ?20, 20. Anyone else want them at 20?

0:51:090:51:11

Shout if we don't see you. Being sold this time then at ?20.

0:51:110:51:15

GAVEL BANGS Relax! Ooh! Yes!

0:51:150:51:18

The Scottie doggies have done our Scottish lass proud.

0:51:180:51:22

That's good. That's good, that's good, that's good. Double the money.

0:51:220:51:25

Yeah. Right, Phil, the battle is well and truly on.

0:51:250:51:28

Up next is your set of boat steps.

0:51:280:51:31

I've got three lots of instructions.

0:51:310:51:33

I'm going to start the bidding at...

0:51:330:51:34

?40. Ooh. ?40 I've got. ?40, ?40, ?40, ?40...

0:51:340:51:39

45. I've got 50. 55. I've got 60.

0:51:390:51:43

Another one for you? 65. I've got 70.

0:51:430:51:46

70... You know, that's a result, as far as I'm concerned.

0:51:460:51:49

Oh, keep going. Someone's got to come in. Got to.

0:51:490:51:51

Last chance. Being sold this time then at ?70.

0:51:510:51:55

GAVEL BANGS Oh, Phil, that was close!

0:51:550:51:57

Ah, a bit of a loss there.

0:51:570:52:01

Someone in Salisbury got a great deal.

0:52:010:52:03

Natasha's still in pole position at this auction.

0:52:040:52:07

Can she edge further ahead with the piggy hatpin holder?

0:52:070:52:11

?10 I have. ?10, ?10, ?12... That's because of the...

0:52:110:52:13

..15, 18... Oh! Get in! ..20, 22, 25, 28.

0:52:130:52:17

I'm out. Oh, don't be out.

0:52:170:52:19

?30. 32... I'm in trouble here. ..35, 38?

0:52:190:52:23

I'm in trouble. ?40, 42... I really am in trouble here.

0:52:230:52:27

..45, 48, ?50.

0:52:270:52:30

?50. Lady's bid then at ?50. Anyone else at 50? Your last chance.

0:52:300:52:34

Being sold this time then at ?50. GAVEL BANGS

0:52:340:52:38

Yes, madam! # There may be trouble ahead. #

0:52:380:52:41

You could well be right, Phil.

0:52:430:52:44

A fantastic return on that little piggy.

0:52:440:52:47

The bookcase is up next.

0:52:470:52:49

It's nice. I like it because... And the people round here

0:52:490:52:52

are forward planning. Bonfire Night is not that far away.

0:52:520:52:55

Unbelievable. 100? 70 or 80? 50 if we have to. It's here to be sold.

0:52:570:53:02

Who's got 50? Thank you. Yes! ?50 I have. ?50, ?50, ?50...

0:53:020:53:05

I just cannot believe that. ..?50, ?50, ?50, ?50...

0:53:050:53:08

Join in when you're ready but be very, very quick. 55.

0:53:080:53:10

55? That chap thought he said 15.

0:53:100:53:13

..?70, 75, ?80, 85, 85...

0:53:130:53:18

Are you OK? ..85. Don't think tomorrow. Tomorrow will be too late.

0:53:180:53:23

85. 85. Anybody else? Being sold this time then at ?85.

0:53:230:53:29

GAVEL BANGS

0:53:290:53:31

Fantastic! Now that's a profit!

0:53:310:53:35

That is a top job, isn't it?

0:53:350:53:36

I'm so glad that someone else saw what I saw in it, Phil.

0:53:360:53:39

Someone else had the vision that you just simply lack.

0:53:390:53:41

Yeah. I'm going to go get all the books out and start again, I think.

0:53:410:53:45

Well done, you. Well done, you.

0:53:450:53:47

Right, Phil, if you've any chance of winning this leg,

0:53:470:53:51

you need to make a profit with your pig trough and garden ball.

0:53:510:53:55

Would it have been useful if you'd had two gate finials, do you reckon?

0:53:550:53:58

I would never have bought them. They'd be a couple hundred pounds.

0:53:580:54:01

Too logical. What do you want with one finial?

0:54:010:54:03

Who's ever going to buy one finial? I don't know. Except me.

0:54:030:54:05

Is there a guy with half a house or...?

0:54:050:54:08

So, with the instructions I've been given,

0:54:080:54:11

I need to start the bidding at ?35.

0:54:110:54:13

35 I've got. 35, 35, 40.

0:54:130:54:15

45, 50, 55, 60, 65 with me.

0:54:150:54:20

65. The bid's with me at 65. How's the phone looking, Gem?

0:54:200:54:25

65. I think he's got the speaking clock. I think he's gone out.

0:54:250:54:28

Oh, they're out. They're out. 65. Is he back in yet?

0:54:280:54:32

He's gone out. Oh, no, he's gone out to the shops!

0:54:320:54:35

He shakes his head. At ?65.

0:54:350:54:37

70. New bidder! 75, 80. Now I'm out.

0:54:370:54:41

80 in the seats then. ?80. 80, your last chance.

0:54:410:54:44

Anybody else? Being sold this time then at ?80.

0:54:440:54:48

GAVEL BANGS Phil!

0:54:480:54:50

That was good, that. That is so good. ?80.

0:54:500:54:53

Phil's random garden lot has put him back in the game. Great stuff!

0:54:530:54:59

This is getting exciting. It is, isn't it?

0:54:590:55:01

Edge of your seat stuff here.

0:55:020:55:04

Can Phil bag another profit with his pair of buffed up leather chairs?

0:55:040:55:08

Who's got ?20 then? Here to be sold. Who's got 20?

0:55:080:55:11

How many? 10? Thank you. ?10 I have. ?10, ?10, ?12, 15,

0:55:110:55:15

18, ?20, 22, 25... It's all go, it's all go. 25.

0:55:150:55:20

..28, ?30. ?30 I have then. Phil, it's getting there.

0:55:200:55:23

32, 35, 38, ?40... Slowly but surely. It's like pulling teeth.

0:55:230:55:28

42? 42? What a shame. 42. Anybody else got 42?

0:55:280:55:32

One more. Last chance on this lot. Being sold at 42...

0:55:320:55:34

One more. Help this man break even. GAVEL BANGS

0:55:340:55:36

Yours, sir. I'm so disappointed with that

0:55:360:55:39

after all that effort I put in polishing the wretched things.

0:55:390:55:42

Aw, hard luck. But it's only a little loss so your elbow grease

0:55:420:55:46

wasn't an entire waste of time.

0:55:460:55:48

And now for Natasha's final lot.

0:55:500:55:52

The romance of a cellarette is going to set this saleroom on fire.

0:55:530:55:58

At ?30 I've got. ?30, ?30, ?30, ?30...

0:55:580:56:01

32, 35, 38, ?40.

0:56:010:56:04

?40, ?40... Come on. No, no, no! Anybody else want in at ?40?

0:56:040:56:09

Last chance 40... I need one more.

0:56:090:56:11

No, I don't. Drop the hammer. No, no, no, no.

0:56:110:56:13

?40! Aw, no! Drop the hammer. GAVEL BANGS

0:56:130:56:16

A small loss there, but Natasha's still in the lead.

0:56:160:56:20

There doesn't seem any justice really

0:56:200:56:22

that that was probably worth a bit more than that, wasn't it?

0:56:220:56:24

It was worth more but I have to take the rough with the smooth

0:56:240:56:27

cos so many things today have made money that I did not expect to make money. Yeah.

0:56:270:56:30

Yeah. Talking of making money, to win this auction,

0:56:300:56:34

Phil will need a romping result on the rocking chair.

0:56:340:56:38

Tenner for you, sir, thank you. ?10 I have...

0:56:380:56:40

It's started. 15, 18, 20, 22,

0:56:400:56:43

25, 28, 28, 28.

0:56:430:56:47

I have ?30.

0:56:470:56:49

?30. First bid has it at ?30. ?30. Last chance...

0:56:490:56:53

32. 32. Anybody else at 32? Your last chance on this lot.

0:56:530:56:57

?32. Anyone else? Being sold then at ?32...

0:56:570:57:02

GAVEL BANGS

0:57:020:57:04

Aaah! Aaah! THEY LAUGH

0:57:040:57:06

So, there we have it. We end the Road Trip with a profit.

0:57:070:57:11

Marvellous.

0:57:110:57:12

What a brilliant week we've had, haven't we?

0:57:130:57:15

It's been so good. It's been so good.

0:57:150:57:18

Shall we go outside and have a little cry? Yeah, who's driving?

0:57:180:57:21

The winner. Oh, really? The winner drives us off. Come on, Philip.

0:57:210:57:26

Well, we'd better find out who that winner is then.

0:57:260:57:29

Natasha began with ?165.64 and after paying auction costs

0:57:300:57:36

she's made a pretty profit of ?79.26, making her today's winner,

0:57:360:57:42

with a final total of ?244.90.

0:57:420:57:47

Phil started with ?325.40. After paying auction costs,

0:57:490:57:54

he suffered a little loss of ?9.42.

0:57:540:57:59

This means he may have lost this leg, but he's won the trip

0:57:590:58:02

with a fabulous final tally of ?315.98.

0:58:020:58:07

Well done, old bean.

0:58:070:58:09

All profits go to Children in Need.

0:58:090:58:12

Oh, Phil, well done! Well, yeah, but you won the evening.

0:58:120:58:16

It doesn't matter. The winner overall drives away.

0:58:160:58:18

Oh, come on, then. I've just got to sit here and cry

0:58:180:58:21

in the passenger seat. SHE LAUGHS

0:58:210:58:23

No tears, no tears. It's too good. It's too good!

0:58:230:58:26

It's been a delight, chaps.

0:58:260:58:28

Until next time, cheerio!

0:58:280:58:30

Natasha Raskin is playing catch up on this episode of Antiques Road Trip as she and fellow auctioneer Philip Serrell take a trip round Sussex and Kent. They head for auction in Rayleigh, Essex, before they embark on the final stretch of their trip through Berkshire and Hampshire, but who will win the contest at the final auction in Salisbury, Wiltshire?


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