Episode 9 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 9

Antiques challenge. Philip Serrell and Natasha Raskin take in the delights of south west Wales before crossing into England. Who will be victorious at their auctions?


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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I don't know what to do!

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HORN BEEPS With ?200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game!

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Charlie!

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There'll be worthy winners

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and valiant losers.

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SHE GASPS

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah.

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It's leg two of this week's epic road trip

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with dynamic duo Natasha Raskin and Philip Serrell.

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I think we're a good match, do you know that? Yeah.

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Do you get tired being happy all the time?

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No, but do you know what I think you're doing?

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You're kind of chilling me out a little bit.

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Phil is a Road Trip veteran and an expert auctioneer

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with a reputation for being a bit of an old grump.

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Have you got any idea where we are? No, no idea.

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Have you got any idea where we're going to? Er...Newport.

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Newport, we're in Newport and we're heading for Newport.

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I don't want to be picky but this is not Newport.

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Let's just establish roles here.

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Pilot, navigator.

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Novice Road Tripper Natasha is an auctioneer in Glasgow

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who specialises in Scottish contemporary art.

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I cannot think of a better way to spend a day than driving around

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Wales in a gorgeous Porsche with a handsome man like you.

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Oh, what a girl, what a girl. SHE LAUGHS

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I'm so glad you've memorised that script I gave you.

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On this journey, our Trippers are cruising

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in a classy 1957 Porsche 356 Coupe.

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Natasha made a loss on the last leg.

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After starting with ?200,

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she's ended up with ?161.96 to play with.

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Meanwhile, old hand Phil played a stormer

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and made a great profit, so he has ?275.90 to spend today.

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Our experts' mammoth mission began in Narberth in Pembrokeshire

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and will see them travel several hundred miles,

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covering Wales and southern England

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before finishing up in Salisbury, Wiltshire.

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Today's trip kicks off in Newport

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and will meander its way north towards the auction in Newent.

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Natasha is up first, so go, girl!

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Hello?

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Hello. Oh, hello. Hi, there. I'm Natasha. Hi, I'm John. Hi, John.

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Lovely to meet you. Nice to meet you.

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This looks like an absolute treasure trove of a shop.

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Good name, too. Strawberry Water Junk Company. HE LAUGHS

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OK, OK.

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I don't really know where to start. There's so much everywhere.

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There are... I can't help but look up, cos there are so many pictures.

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I can't stop looking up, but I don't think we're going to look at pictures today.

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Look at stuff, look at stuff.

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Stuff, eh? Plenty of that in here.

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That is the best thing.

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Maybe that's by somebody.

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Oh. How excit... Oh, a Beswick.

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Oh, that's amazing.

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I do know the name Beswick, of course, because everyone does.

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It's probably 1970s. But it's in the form of a pheasant.

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It's probably for keeping eggs.

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It's hand-painted, which is really nice,

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and he's only 15 quid, and if John would give me something off of him,

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come on, he's got to be a winner.

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There's only one way to find out.

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I wonder what would be your best price on the pheasant terrine.

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Oh, dear.

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I'll be sweet to you, a tenner. A tenner, OK.

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Well, I think, for a tenner, it's a pretty good deal,

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but before we shake on it, there's another thing as well

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that I've just clocked as we walked past.

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Ah, she's spotted a rather large glass carboy,

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which were primarily used to carry acids.

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It's, I guess, moulded glass. It wouldn't be blown, would it? No, no.

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So, it's a big bit of moulded glass,

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but they're so decorative, aren't they? You can do anything with those.

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Well, you put a garden inside, and have it growing... Yeah. They're really awesome.

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I think it's a lovely lot.

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And I'm thinking... I haven't even seen the price.

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OK, so it's got ?28 on it.

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I really like the two.

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I think they're totally bizarre and disparate.

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But at the top end, their combined price was ?43. Mm-hm.

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Would you be open to an offer of ?30?

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Yeah, go on. It's near enough. Are you sure? Yes, I'm sure. SHE LAUGHS

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I feel awfully cheeky but, if you're happy with that,

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I'm going to grab your hand and go with it.

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With two lots bought, Natasha's off to a flying start.

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Phil, meanwhile, has motored his way south

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to the Welsh capital, Cardiff,

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and his first stop, the Pumping Station.

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It's on an industrial scale,

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with more than 35 different traders all under one roof.

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Lovely.

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How are you, good sir? Are you well? I'm good, young man. Yourself?

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Young man? I'm warming to you already.

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Hey, Phil's not been a young man for a long time.

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But, what's this he's spotted?

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Your intaglios, here. Yes.

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Can I have a look at the group of them, please? Yes.

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It's a collection of 19th-century

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intaglio metal moulds and glass seals.

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Intaglios are designs or images

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that are cut into hard surfaces such as metal or stone.

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And back in the 18th and 19th centuries,

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they were collected by Grand Tourists

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as sophisticated keepsakes of classical antiquity.

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These are Grand Tour bits,

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so when you went on your Grand Tour in 1820 and you wanted a souvenir,

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you didn't bring back a stick of rock or a piece of troika... Yes.

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You brought back books...

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and you opened the books out and the books would be full of intaglios.

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Phil's clearly interested, but can he strike a bargain?

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What would you take for those and what would you take for those?

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?150.

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That's for all of it?

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See, I'm miles away from you on price.

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I've really got to try and get these under 30 quid.

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You're going to struggle.

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Could 25 quid buy them?

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Cash. The folding holding.

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Mmm...

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Yeah, go on. Oh, you're an absolute gentleman. Thank you ever so much.

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So, a generous discount there from Paul has secured Phil his first purchase.

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Anything else float your boat?

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Oh, this is a little watercolour.

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It's of HMS Tidepool, which, one presumes, is that there.

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I just think it's a really interesting little watercolour.

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It's quite finely done.

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The ticket price is ?28, but can Phil convince dealer David to take less?

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I think, at auction, that's going to make between, oh, I don't know...

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20 and 40 quid.

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Well, I'm going to shock you. Oh! I'm going to shock you.

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Hark at this. I'm going to shock you. Go on, then.

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You can have it for ?14 and that's my final offer.

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Thank you very much. You're a gentleman. Thank you very much indeed.

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That purchase puts Phil neck and neck with Natasha on the buying front,

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with both of them bagging two lots each in their first shops.

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Natasha's also made her way to Cardiff

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and has come to its indoor flea market for a scratch about.

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OK.

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This is really great.

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There's one thing I really like. It is quite unusual.

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It's this little coral and seed pearl brooch.

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What's going on with that? I don't have a clue what the motif is.

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Well, it is a riding crop.

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You can see the whip. You've got your handle up here...

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And the horseshoe is to represent hunting and all that sort of thing.

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Good luck. Seed pearls and coral, is that right? Yes.

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I think it is gilded.

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OK. I'm not pricing it as nine carat gold.

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What is your price on that then?

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I'd do it for ?25 for you.

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What if I said ?20? What if I said that, what would you do?

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?20. You're OK with ?20. Can we shake on it? Definitely. Oh!

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That's excellent. Thank you so much. I think that is really cute.

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Nice deal done, knocking ?5 off the asking price,

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and it looks like Natasha's artistic eye has spotted

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another little treasure.

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This lovely little oil on canvas board painting is making me

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pretty misty eyed because it is the most nostalgic, really nicely

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executed painting of what I am guessing would be the artist's father.

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Signed Jan Fisher, so I am saying female artist,

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probably around the 1980s.

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It is just a lovely thing.

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Can she convince owner Pete to part with

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the painting for under the ?50 ticket price?

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I was hoping that you would offer it to me for ?20.

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That is ludicrous, isn't it? Ludicrous! Oh, come on.

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What can I say? What do you reckon? Am I being too cheeky?

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No, go on, you can have it. Are you sure? Yeah.

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Oh, Pete, you're such a star. Thank you so much. Oh, my goodness.

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Come on! He is so cute. He is everyone's best friend.

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Yeah, he is. And you are now mine!

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Aw, another great deal done securing the painting for ?20. Yes!

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She is off to a strong start.

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It has been a busy day all round.

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It's time for our weary experts to head off for some well-earned rest.

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Nighty-night!

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It's the start of a brand-new day.

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Having crossed the border into England, Natasha has

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dropped Phil off in the popular market town of Evesham.

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His first shop of the day is Twyford Antiques,

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with an eclectic range of collectables set over two floors.

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There's two quite nice wine labels that might be worth a look at.

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In the 17th and 18th century,

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there were wine labels that were put onto whisky, gin,

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brandy, whatever, and it was a little silver tag that went around

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the collar of the decanter or the bottle that told you what it was.

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It's just sherry and champagne that dealer Andy has on the menu today.

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This is a sherry label

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and it's silver. Hallmarked London.

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And it's interesting because this one here

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is twice the price of that one, isn't it?

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Hm. Why is that?

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I suppose champagne will be a little bit...

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Well, I suppose champagne's more expensive,

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so the label's more expensive.

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Can't fault his logic, can you? Certainly not.

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The ticket price on the cheaper sherry label is a hefty ?136.

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It's a possibility. Can I leave that one out?

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Yeah, certainly.

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One to think about.

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Anything else take your fancy?

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This is just a really cool thing, isn't it?

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This is a stationary engine.

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And you've got the...steam engine here.

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You then boil the furnace and the steam then operates...

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..that punt there, like that.

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I think that's a real good bit of fun.

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Andy? Yeah.

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Could there be a bit of movement in the price on that one as well?

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With a ticket price of ?99 on the stationary engine

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and ?136 on the sherry label, what kind of deal can Phil work, eh?

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What would be the best you could do on each of those?

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Realistically, we'll probably be looking about sort of ?60 on him,

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?80 on him.

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If I could have the two...

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for ?90, I'd have them both off you.

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?95? Do it for ?90 and I'll have a deal with you.

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Go on, then. Thank you.

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That very generous deal bags Phil another two lots.

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Natasha has taken a cruise south to one of the most unspoilt villages

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in the Cotswolds - Snowshill.

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She's come to visit Snowshill Manor.

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This 16th-century house holds a unique collection

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of extraordinary treasures that, back in the 1920s and '30s,

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attracted both the famous and royalty.

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Hello. Hi, there. You must be Sue. I am. Hello. I'm Tasha.

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Hi, Tasha. Lovely to meet you.

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Thank you very much for having me along.

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This is the collection of Charles Wade, is that right? It is.

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This is Snowshill Manor and this is place that Charles Wade

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chose to house his collection of around 22,000 objects.

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Charles Wade was an architect, artist,

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craftsman and most famously a collector.

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Inspired by his grandma's special cupboard of curios as a child,

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at the age of seven, Charles starting building his incredible collection

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of children's toys, clocks,

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mechanical oddities another bizarre items.

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In 1919, after stumbling across an advert for the sale

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of Snowshill Manor, Charles knew he'd found the perfect place

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to house his collection.

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So this is our first port of call.

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This room is called Zenith.

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Charles Wade named all his rooms... OK.

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..depending on where they were in the house or maybe what was in them,

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but the important thing about this room is that it contains

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Granny's cabinet. I was just about to say.

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This is a stunning lacquered cabinet.

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So from when does this date, do you think?

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It dates from mid-19th century.

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And my eyes are darting around because it's quite a collection.

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Are these things that Charles collected,

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or are these Grandma's curios?

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Well, these ones here are things that were in the cabinet

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when Charles was a child, so these were Granny's curios. Amazing.

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And she only opened this cabinet on Sundays, so it was quite a ritual.

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Looking at Granny's collection on a Sunday, that special day

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that made Charles want to be a collector.

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Bitten by the collecting bug and his love of hand-crafted objects,

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Charles spent his life building an impressive catalogue of weird

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and wonderful items, most of which he surprisingly uncovered in the UK.

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What I'd love to see is something so exotic

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that I just would never believe you that he purchased it here in the UK.

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Is there anything of that ilk?

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Well, I think, if you come and look at Charles Wade's collection

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of samurai armour, you'll find that pretty amazing.

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Housed in the Green room is one of Europe's largest collections

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of samurai armour.

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The 26 suits date from the 17th to the 19th centuries.

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This is mad.

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I'm speechless and a little bit terrified.

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Where on earth did he find this collection

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of samurai suits in the UK?!

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There's actually quite an amusing story

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about where he found some of the suits.

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He needed a washer for a tap, so he took himself to the plumber's

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and it was a tiny plumber shop apparently -

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barely room for a sink in the window and a few washers -

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and he went in and there was a suit of samurai armour.

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And the man said, "If you want some more,

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"there's a whole load underneath the tarpaulin in the yard."

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And there were...I think six sets of samurai armour in total,

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really laid out almost as scrap.

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That's just bizarre.

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And he was able to buy them for quite a small sum of money.

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It's really fitting actually because didn't he have a saying

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that he had a set motto, as it were, three words, "let nothing perish"?

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Yes, indeed. That was what he said. His own motto.

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It must have absolutely disgusted him when this tarpaulin

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was thrown off and to see these things lying on the floor.

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He must have thought, "They're perishing! I can save these!"

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Absolutely. And that's what he loved to do.

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He would have took them to his workshop at the back of his cottage

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and spent many hours working on them.

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Charles' motto also applied to the manor itself.

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Completely run down when he bought it,

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he spent three years restoring it to its former glory.

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So impressive was the end result that both royalty

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and celebrities came to visit, including writer Virginia Woolf,

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who turned out to be one of Charles' few unhappy house guests.

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Well, I think you either got Charles Wade or you didn't

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and Virginia certainly didn't.

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He loved his clocks... Many clocks throughout the house

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and they were all set to different times,

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and they'd all chime at different times.

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Oh, not Virginia's cup of tea?

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Not her cup of tea because she made the mistake of relying on

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these clocks and missed her train back to London,

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so she thought he was a bit of fraud and didn't get him at all,

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so not a happy weekend.

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After marrying late in life, Charles retired to St Kitts

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and, in 1951, the estate was passed to the National Trust.

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He regularly returned to his beloved manor, but on one such visit in 1956,

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Charles sadly took ill and passed away in a nearby hospital.

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So his life came full circle.

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He was back in the manor that he loved and had created.

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Yeah, well, he had a very busy life and a seriously interesting one.

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Yes. It has been a real thrill, a real dramatic thrill

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to learn about Charles Wade and his fabulous legacy.

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Thank you so much for showing me around.

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I'll never forget it. Oh, that's brilliant.

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That's what Charles Wade would have wanted.

0:16:330:16:35

And so, the fascinating collection of a wonderfully eccentric man

0:16:350:16:39

will continue to live on at Snowshill Manor.

0:16:390:16:42

Phil, meanwhile, has made his way to the birthplace

0:16:450:16:48

of William Shakespeare - Stratford-upon-Avon.

0:16:480:16:51

He's heading to the very street Shakespeare was born in

0:16:510:16:55

and into Henley Street Antiques to meet owner Steve.

0:16:550:16:58

That's looking like it's tried to be Mr Chippendale?

0:17:020:17:05

Yeah.

0:17:050:17:06

And how much could that come for? That could be 150.

0:17:060:17:10

OK. Anything else? Yep.

0:17:100:17:12

There's a bit more brown at the back in the form of a settle.

0:17:120:17:15

Now this is made out of oak, isn't it?

0:17:150:17:18

Top marks. Interested, Phil?

0:17:180:17:20

I have made a certain speciality...out of buying

0:17:200:17:24

things that have been nibbled by a bit of worm.

0:17:240:17:27

So, is it worth the ?175 ticket price?

0:17:270:17:30

If you can shove your little pinkie in places that you shouldn't

0:17:300:17:34

shove your little pinkie, that is a problem.

0:17:340:17:37

Your little pinkie shouldn't go there.

0:17:400:17:42

Perhaps one last look at the chest of drawers will help decide.

0:17:420:17:47

So the death on this is 150. Yes.

0:17:470:17:50

And on the settle? 140.

0:17:500:17:53

Can we split it and do 130? 130, yep, let's do it.

0:17:530:17:56

You're a gentleman, thank you.

0:17:560:17:57

Deal done on the damaged oak settle,

0:17:570:18:00

for a pricy ?130.

0:18:000:18:03

Natasha has now made her way to Deddington Antique Centre,

0:18:050:18:09

with ?91.96 in her pocket.

0:18:090:18:13

Hopefully, owner Brenda has something up her sleeve.

0:18:130:18:18

OK. Now, you say you've got a piece of Beswick.

0:18:180:18:21

I do already, yes. And it's a tureen.

0:18:210:18:23

It's in the form of a pheasant. It's for eggs.

0:18:230:18:26

Would you like a penguin? Sort of because they're very saleable, aren't they?

0:18:260:18:30

Yeah. This little feathered friend is priced at ?33.

0:18:300:18:33

OK, so it's got the exact same stamp as my pheasant,

0:18:330:18:36

so we're talking about 1970s. That's right.

0:18:360:18:38

What else were you thinking? Cos I do love pottery.

0:18:380:18:41

It all depends on how much money you've got.

0:18:410:18:44

They are fabulous. They are pretty cool, aren't they?

0:18:440:18:47

Ah, but with a ?58 price tag, are the piggies worth a punt?

0:18:470:18:51

I love penguins. You prefer the pigs.

0:18:510:18:53

But I think I prefer the pigs.

0:18:530:18:55

And I think Philip will be devastated you've got the piggies.

0:18:550:19:00

Do you reckon? Yes. I think he'll be so jealous.

0:19:000:19:02

What if I offered you ?25?

0:19:020:19:05

What if you offered me ?35?

0:19:050:19:07

35. Hm.

0:19:070:19:09

What if I offered you 30?

0:19:090:19:11

What if you offer me...

0:19:110:19:14

32? This is fun, isn't it? Come on. 32.

0:19:140:19:17

Are you forcing it? 32. Oh, go on, then, Brenda.

0:19:170:19:20

Well done.

0:19:200:19:21

And, with that, they're all bought up.

0:19:210:19:24

So Natasha bought the Beswick pheasant tureen,

0:19:260:19:29

the piggyback, also stamped Beswick, the decorative carboy,

0:19:290:19:34

the oil painting and the coral and seed pearl brooch.

0:19:340:19:39

That little lot cost her ?102.

0:19:390:19:42

Meanwhile, Philip bought the stationary model,

0:19:420:19:46

the collection of intaglios, the silver sherry label,

0:19:460:19:50

the watercolour and the costly oak settle.

0:19:500:19:54

He spent a mighty ?259 in total.

0:19:540:19:57

So, what do they think of each other's lots?

0:19:570:20:00

This is going to be the battle of the late 20th-century paintings.

0:20:000:20:04

I've gone oil, Phil's gone watercolour.

0:20:040:20:06

They couldn't be more different, but I think that Phil has won a watch.

0:20:060:20:11

At ?14, that watercolour is stunning.

0:20:110:20:13

What I absolutely love is that portrait.

0:20:130:20:17

That's very her, that's a really cool thing,

0:20:170:20:20

and I think that's absolutely lovely.

0:20:200:20:22

With a woodworm-infested antique oak settle,

0:20:220:20:25

he's determined to shoot himself in the foot, but guess what?

0:20:250:20:29

I'm going to predict it's going to be his star lot.

0:20:290:20:32

So, from starting this leg in Newport in Wales, our experts are now

0:20:320:20:37

hurtling towards the auction in Newent in Gloucestershire.

0:20:370:20:41

I'm sort of OK with most of my lots,

0:20:410:20:43

but I threw 130 quid into a settle.

0:20:430:20:47

All in. And that thing's got more worm...

0:20:470:20:50

than Ilkley Moor Bar T'at.

0:20:500:20:52

I'm a big fan of statement pieces of furniture.

0:20:520:20:54

Yeah. You've got to make one. This statement is, "Help!"

0:20:540:20:57

Too late for that, Philip,

0:20:570:20:59

as you've now arrived at today's saleroom -

0:20:590:21:02

Smiths of Newent Auctions.

0:21:020:21:04

There are two auctioneers wielding the gavel today -

0:21:040:21:07

Barry Meade and Rita Kearsey.

0:21:070:21:10

The auction's about to begin...

0:21:100:21:13

First up is Natasha's 1960s Beswick animal group piggyback.

0:21:150:21:19

I'm looking for 20 for that one.

0:21:200:21:22

20. Oh, no.

0:21:220:21:24

Can I have at ten? 12.

0:21:240:21:26

12. Make it 14.

0:21:260:21:27

14 bid. 16. Make it 18.

0:21:270:21:29

18. Make it 20.

0:21:290:21:31

18, sitting down.

0:21:310:21:32

20 anywhere else?

0:21:320:21:34

Selling at 18.

0:21:340:21:36

297.

0:21:360:21:37

Unlucky, Natasha, but plenty still to come in this auction.

0:21:390:21:43

Shall we walk in again and just pretend that didn't happen?

0:21:430:21:46

Yeah, that'd be nice. Yeah.

0:21:460:21:48

No time for that, though, as Phil's silver sherry label's up next.

0:21:480:21:52

?40 for the sherry label.

0:21:520:21:53

40 I'm bid. Looking for 42.

0:21:530:21:55

I've got 40 now.

0:21:550:21:57

Looking for 42 on the net. Come on, creep up.

0:21:570:21:59

44. At 42 on the internet. Cheeky fox. You've got a net bidder.

0:21:590:22:03

At 42. At 42. Looking for 44.

0:22:030:22:06

44 in the room. 46. 48.

0:22:060:22:09

46 on the net. Looking for 48.

0:22:090:22:11

At ?46.

0:22:110:22:13

You all done? You all finished?

0:22:130:22:15

I'm selling at 46.

0:22:150:22:16

That really isn't very expensive, that.

0:22:160:22:19

Ouch.

0:22:190:22:21

A shock loss there for Phil.

0:22:210:22:23

Not ouch. That's not an ouch situation.

0:22:230:22:26

That's a gentle bump.

0:22:260:22:28

It's a gentle knee in the nether regions, isn't it?

0:22:290:22:33

Can Natasha fare any better with her second bit of Beswick?

0:22:330:22:37

This time it's a 1970s pheasant.

0:22:370:22:39

20. Yes. 20 for that one.

0:22:390:22:42

We're off. 22. At 20.

0:22:420:22:45

Any advance on 20? I'll take 22.

0:22:450:22:47

At 20 in the middle there.

0:22:470:22:49

22 anywhere else?

0:22:490:22:50

Selling at 20 in the middle.

0:22:500:22:52

That's all right, but it could have done better.

0:22:530:22:56

A profit's a profit and that's the first of the day.

0:22:560:22:59

Can Phil score a profit with his Wilesco

0:22:590:23:03

working model of a stationary engine?

0:23:030:23:05

I've got interest on commission. Starts me at ?24.

0:23:050:23:07

I'm looking for ?26.

0:23:070:23:10

At 26 now. Looking for 28.

0:23:100:23:12

?28 now. Looking for 30.

0:23:120:23:15

At 28.

0:23:150:23:16

At ?28. Looking for 30.

0:23:160:23:18

You all done? At ?28, you all finished?

0:23:180:23:22

Selling at ?28.

0:23:220:23:23

Clearly there are no engine enthusiasts in the saleroom today.

0:23:250:23:29

Will a spot of jewellery be more to their taste?

0:23:300:23:33

It's Natasha's unmarked yellow metal seed pearl and coral brooch next.

0:23:330:23:37

I think this will do well. This will do well.

0:23:370:23:40

?20 for this one.

0:23:400:23:41

Can I see 20 for it?

0:23:410:23:43

20 I'm bid. On the net at 20.

0:23:430:23:45

Thank you. At 22. At 20 now.

0:23:450:23:47

Come on.

0:23:470:23:48

At ?20. 22 online.

0:23:480:23:50

Two online bidders. Looking for 24.

0:23:500:23:53

Looking for 26.

0:23:530:23:54

Come on. The battle of the bidders.

0:23:540:23:57

At 26 now.

0:23:570:23:58

?28 now. Looking for 30.

0:23:580:24:01

At 30 now. Looking for 32.

0:24:010:24:03

Come on. At 32. Make it 34 online. At 32.

0:24:030:24:07

At 32. 34 now. Looking for 36.

0:24:070:24:10

At ?36. You all done?

0:24:100:24:12

Selling at ?36.

0:24:120:24:14

Oh. That's a tiny little profit.

0:24:140:24:16

That's OK. It deserved a bit more than that.

0:24:160:24:19

It did deserve a bit more.

0:24:190:24:21

A good profit nevertheless.

0:24:210:24:24

Phil's turn again. Can his watercolour secure his first profit?

0:24:260:24:30

?20.

0:24:300:24:31

20 for it. 20, anyone?

0:24:310:24:35

Someone start me at ?10 for it.

0:24:360:24:38

?10 for the watercolour. Phil.

0:24:380:24:41

Must be worth ?10.

0:24:410:24:43

10 I'm bid. Looking for 12.

0:24:430:24:45

At ?10. That's a bit of a relief, really.

0:24:450:24:47

Looking for 12. At 10.

0:24:470:24:50

At ?10. Are you all done?

0:24:500:24:52

I'm selling at ?10.

0:24:520:24:55

Talk about an unlucky streak, but at least it wasn't a big loss.

0:24:550:24:59

I just want you to know that I'm not warped or bitter in any way at all.

0:24:590:25:04

Next up, Natasha's oversized carboy.

0:25:040:25:06

?20 for it.

0:25:060:25:08

Oh, gosh. ?20, anyone?

0:25:080:25:09

Not a hand in sight.

0:25:090:25:11

20 I'm bid. on the net at ?20.

0:25:110:25:13

Looking for 22.

0:25:130:25:14

At ?20 on the net.

0:25:140:25:16

Go on.

0:25:160:25:17

That's plus two quid.

0:25:170:25:19

At ?20.

0:25:200:25:21

Are you all done? Selling at ?20.

0:25:210:25:27

I reckon you're about minus oomph pence for that.

0:25:270:25:30

Phil's right.

0:25:300:25:31

The ?2 profit will result in a small loss

0:25:310:25:33

after auction costs are deducted.

0:25:330:25:36

Right. Come on, Phil.

0:25:360:25:37

Let's get you that first profit with your 19th-century intaglio

0:25:370:25:40

moulds and seals.

0:25:400:25:42

Interest in this

0:25:420:25:43

starts me on the internet at ?32.

0:25:430:25:46

Yes, profit!

0:25:460:25:47

I'm looking for 34.

0:25:470:25:48

At 34 now. Looking for 36.

0:25:480:25:51

At ?34.

0:25:510:25:53

Are you all finished? Oh, come on.

0:25:530:25:55

Selling on the net at ?34.

0:25:550:25:58

You'll take a profit. You're absolutely right I will.

0:25:580:26:01

By Jove, he's done it.

0:26:010:26:03

Great little profit there for Phil.

0:26:030:26:04

Wish I hadn't spent all that money on that settle.

0:26:040:26:08

Settle down, Phil.

0:26:080:26:10

Next up, it's art expert Natasha's final buy,

0:26:100:26:13

the modern British original oil painting.

0:26:130:26:16

Telephone bid on this item. Stop it!

0:26:160:26:19

Can I see 20 for it? Yes, you can. Go on.

0:26:190:26:21

20 I'm bid.

0:26:210:26:23

20 on the telephone.

0:26:230:26:24

Well done, you. Come on, online. At 20 on the phone.

0:26:240:26:27

Looking for 22.

0:26:270:26:28

At 22. 24. Looking for 26.

0:26:280:26:33

28. Looking for 30.

0:26:330:26:35

Yes. 30. Looking for 32.

0:26:350:26:37

It's worth it.

0:26:370:26:39

Looking for 34.

0:26:390:26:41

36.

0:26:410:26:42

Yes. Well done, you. Looking for 38. 40.

0:26:420:26:46

Looking for 42. 44.

0:26:460:26:49

Looking for 46.

0:26:490:26:50

At ?44 on the telephone.

0:26:500:26:52

Are you all done at 44?

0:26:520:26:55

Selling then at ?44.

0:26:550:26:57

Great profit there for Natasha,

0:26:570:26:59

but she hasn't won yet as there's still one lot to go -

0:26:590:27:03

Phil's big risk, the antique oak settle.

0:27:030:27:06

Would someone like to start me at ?100 for this?

0:27:060:27:09

Looking for ?100.

0:27:090:27:11

Looking for 100.

0:27:110:27:13

Looking for ?100.

0:27:130:27:15

Start me at ?60.

0:27:150:27:17

60 for the settle.

0:27:170:27:19

60 I have. ?60 online. Looking for 65 now. At 65.

0:27:190:27:24

You coming back in, online?

0:27:240:27:26

I'm going to sell then at ?65.

0:27:260:27:29

You all done?

0:27:290:27:31

You've got to laugh, haven't you? At ?65.

0:27:310:27:33

You've got to laugh cos, if you didn't, you'd cry.

0:27:330:27:35

Oh, Phil. That's 991.

0:27:350:27:38

Bloomin' 999, not 991.

0:27:380:27:41

Someone's got a nice settle there for a great price - lucky devil.

0:27:410:27:45

I need nurturing and looking after gently here.

0:27:450:27:48

I might even need a darkened room.

0:27:480:27:50

Come on, let me drive you home.

0:27:500:27:52

Well done.

0:27:520:27:54

Phil was down on his luck today, resulting in a loss of ?108.94.

0:27:540:28:00

But he's still got a healthy ?166.96 to spend on the next leg.

0:28:030:28:08

Natasha fared better,

0:28:100:28:12

giving her an overall profit of ?11.16 after auction costs,

0:28:120:28:16

which means she takes the lead going into the third leg

0:28:160:28:19

with ?173.12 to play with.

0:28:190:28:23

You're in a state of shock. I'm in a state of shock, but in a good way.

0:28:230:28:26

But I feel sorry for you.

0:28:260:28:28

Really? Yeah. You look it.

0:28:280:28:30

Right, here we go. Now, now, Philip, nobody likes a sore loser.

0:28:300:28:34

Go, go, go. And they're off. Toodle-pip, Road Trippers.

0:28:340:28:38

With two auctions behind them, it's still all to play for.

0:28:390:28:43

So time for the next leg in their glorious Road Trip.

0:28:430:28:46

I'm in good spirits, Phil.

0:28:460:28:48

Why's that? Not because I'm in the company of someone so wonderful.

0:28:480:28:52

Not ONLY that. Yeah, yeah.

0:28:520:28:53

But because I've edged in front.

0:28:530:28:55

I don't know if you've done the maths but...

0:28:550:28:58

My goal now is to try and get to Friday solvent!

0:28:580:29:02

This morning, they've started off in St Albans, before winding

0:29:020:29:06

their way down to an auction in Chiswick, west London.

0:29:060:29:09

First shop of the day for Natasha is the Hertfordshire town of St Albans.

0:29:110:29:15

I will see you soon. Have a good day, lovely. Thank you so much.

0:29:150:29:18

See you later! Right.

0:29:180:29:21

Bye!

0:29:210:29:22

A keen Natasha gets straight to it.

0:29:220:29:25

OK, there is quite a lot of stuff here that is very modern,

0:29:270:29:29

I think I'm going to look for something a bit more...

0:29:290:29:31

a bit more age to it.

0:29:310:29:32

I don't know. Maybe a bit more interest, a bit more quirk.

0:29:320:29:35

I spy some Scottish-looking jewellery, Natasha.

0:29:420:29:45

Time to call on dealer Dee.

0:29:450:29:47

The best thing for me has got to be that citrine. Yeah.

0:29:470:29:50

That is just a beauty, isn't it?

0:29:500:29:51

Would you mind terribly if we take a closer look? No, not at all.

0:29:510:29:54

Purely because... It's a bit of a whopper!

0:29:540:29:56

It is obviously not in gold. Right, OK, so we can see that now.

0:29:560:29:59

So it is just a metal that has been gilded, right?

0:29:590:30:02

I mean, I like the fact that it is exactly what you would wear for

0:30:020:30:05

sort of Highland dress, but maybe you could wear that in a more modern way?

0:30:050:30:09

Oh, absolutely. Do you reckon? Yes, yes. Would you wear that?

0:30:090:30:12

Maybe pair it with these here?

0:30:120:30:15

Oh. I was thinking that together that might be quite a nice look.

0:30:150:30:18

THEY LAUGH A good night out.

0:30:180:30:19

Right, stick that back.

0:30:190:30:20

What do you think? I am going to make an offer for it. OK.

0:30:200:30:23

If that is OK with you. Yes.

0:30:230:30:24

It is ?12 ticket, what if I say eight?

0:30:240:30:27

Ten?

0:30:270:30:28

Could we make it single figures and go nine? Do you reckon? Yes.

0:30:280:30:32

Quite happy with that? Yes.

0:30:320:30:33

Dee, I'd like to shake on that.

0:30:330:30:35

Deal done, Dee.

0:30:350:30:36

But Natasha has spied another potential purchase

0:30:360:30:39

when she first arrived.

0:30:390:30:40

So we drove in here, and the first thing

0:30:400:30:43

I saw was this lovely Belfast sink, but it is really big.

0:30:430:30:46

Looks really heavy, too.

0:30:460:30:48

I'm going to try... I don't think I can shift it.

0:30:480:30:50

Arrrgh!

0:30:500:30:52

Between us, Dee. Girl power.

0:30:520:30:54

Right. So if we have a little look in the basin,

0:30:540:30:57

it looks to be in pretty...pretty good order, actually.

0:30:570:31:00

I don't see any...any scary bits. No, there is no cracks.

0:31:000:31:03

Dee is asking ?40 for the old sink. But think carefully,

0:31:030:31:06

Natasha, you don't want your profits going down the old plughole.

0:31:060:31:09

What if I said to you I would like to buy it from you at ?20?

0:31:090:31:14

I don't know. 30? What if I said you 28?

0:31:140:31:17

Deal. But do you still get something out of that? Yes.

0:31:180:31:20

She is managing very well so far on limited means.

0:31:200:31:24

I think that is it. I think two items at Alley Cats and I'm done.

0:31:240:31:27

Phil has travelled on to Hertford.

0:31:270:31:30

With just under ?167 left, he's meeting Bonnie

0:31:300:31:33

at his first shop of the day.

0:31:330:31:37

Now...

0:31:370:31:39

Gah, you've got some things in here, haven't you?

0:31:390:31:41

These are cool things, aren't they?

0:31:460:31:47

These sort of stork thread pullers or whatever they are.

0:31:470:31:52

They are ribbon pullers. How does that work, then?

0:31:520:31:55

Well, in the old days...

0:31:550:31:56

"In the old days..." I was there. I was there!

0:31:560:31:59

Yeah, go on.

0:31:590:32:00

They knitted babies' garments rather than mass produced them.

0:32:000:32:05

And they were always adorned with ribbons and things.

0:32:050:32:08

And to try and get the ribbons through the holes of booties

0:32:080:32:10

or bonnets... They pulled that. ..it was difficult.

0:32:100:32:12

You've got another one here. I do.

0:32:120:32:14

So that is silver. It is. And what is this made from? Silver-plate.

0:32:160:32:20

That is ?95. And how much is the other one? ?250. OK, fine.

0:32:200:32:24

You haven't got any chairs in here, have you? I mean, I just...

0:32:240:32:27

No, just feeling... I'm become a bit faint.

0:32:270:32:30

Right.

0:32:320:32:33

Is he really?

0:32:330:32:35

He's fine.

0:32:350:32:36

You don't know how low he'll stoop.

0:32:360:32:38

Steady, Bonnie. Steady. You're winding me up.

0:32:380:32:40

You nearly knocked me over there, Bonnie.

0:32:400:32:43

Philip puts the expensive ribbon puller back in the cabinet

0:32:430:32:47

and the cheaper pair to one side to think about.

0:32:470:32:50

I love that. This is...

0:32:530:32:55

This is a desk seal that would have sat on a gentleman's desk.

0:32:550:33:00

And you have got an agate ball that is held by this claw, bird's claw.

0:33:000:33:05

And then you have got this seal here.

0:33:050:33:07

This would have sat on the desk.

0:33:070:33:09

And when he wrote to someone, he would have got his sealing wax

0:33:090:33:12

out, sealed the letter or the envelope with his seal.

0:33:120:33:16

And then to give it his own personal seal, as the wax was hot,

0:33:160:33:19

he just dunk that in there. And off it came.

0:33:190:33:22

These are quite collectable. That is quite fun.

0:33:220:33:24

The ticket price is ?65.

0:33:240:33:26

Phil wants to strike a deal along with the ribbon puller,

0:33:260:33:30

but Bonnie is suggesting a second seal as part of a job lot.

0:33:300:33:35

Can I give you ?80 for that lot? And I can't go any more,

0:33:350:33:38

honestly. Yes, go on, then.

0:33:380:33:39

Are you sure? Yeah, that's fine.

0:33:390:33:41

Are you happy with that, honestly? I'm not really happy,

0:33:410:33:44

but I will accept that.

0:33:440:33:45

You are an angel, thank you very much. Thank you.

0:33:450:33:47

You're welcome. Thank you very much indeed.

0:33:470:33:49

Very generous, Bonnie.

0:33:490:33:52

?35 for the two seals, and the ribbon puller for ?45.

0:33:520:33:56

Cheers now! Bye!

0:33:560:33:58

It's a great start but he's not done for the day yet.

0:33:580:34:02

He heads west to Hemel Hempstead.

0:34:020:34:04

Cherry Antiques is run by dealer Scott. Where's Cherry, then?

0:34:050:34:09

Those are quite cool. How much are those?

0:34:090:34:12

I'll do you a good price on those. Can you? Yeah.

0:34:120:34:15

Philip has found some 1920s Art Deco burr walnut chairs.

0:34:150:34:19

They are priced at ?90 for the four. Wow.

0:34:200:34:23

And what could you do those for, then?

0:34:230:34:25

Very, very, very best would be 60.

0:34:250:34:27

One to think about. While he is thinking...

0:34:290:34:32

What I'm going to try and do is to see if I can

0:34:320:34:34

make up a job lot of prints.

0:34:340:34:38

How much is that print?

0:34:380:34:40

A couple of pounds. OK.

0:34:430:34:44

I think that is quite nice, you know. So, how much is that?

0:34:460:34:49

Is that another pound or two? Yes.

0:34:510:34:53

Philip has picked out a selection of five prints. Could I bid you...?

0:34:550:34:59

Yep. Could I bid you five pounds and ?45?

0:35:000:35:03

Yeah, happy with that. You are a gentleman, sir.

0:35:030:35:05

Thank you very much indeed. Thank you.

0:35:050:35:07

That is a cracking deal on the four chairs.

0:35:070:35:10

Philip's got them for half their ticket price.

0:35:100:35:12

Scott, you've been very kind to me, I better pay you.

0:35:120:35:15

And he has paid a pound apiece for the five prints.

0:35:150:35:18

Let's hope there's a dog lover at the auction. Ha!

0:35:180:35:21

One day down, one to go for our duelling duo.

0:35:220:35:26

Time for a well-earned rest all round.

0:35:260:35:29

OK, night-night, you two.

0:35:290:35:31

With another day of shopping ahead of them,

0:35:370:35:39

our pair are back behind the wheel and first shop is just

0:35:390:35:42

a few miles from Aylesbury.

0:35:420:35:43

Philip's come to Stoke Mandeville sports stadium to find out

0:35:450:35:49

how a small patch of land behind a hospital became the birthplace

0:35:490:35:53

of the world's second biggest sporting event.

0:35:530:35:56

I am so looking forward to this. I think...

0:35:560:35:58

Really looking forward to it. ..you're going to be very inspired.

0:35:580:36:00

Very humbled. Humbled and inspired.

0:36:000:36:03

Very, very humbled.

0:36:030:36:05

You take care. You too.

0:36:050:36:06

Have a really lousy day!

0:36:060:36:08

Thanks, Phil!

0:36:080:36:10

Bye. Bye.

0:36:100:36:12

Stoke Mandeville Hospital is home to one of the largest

0:36:130:36:17

and the oldest spinal injuries centres in the world.

0:36:170:36:20

It was founded by a neurologist in 1944 who had a radical

0:36:200:36:24

approach to rehabilitation.

0:36:240:36:26

And Philip is meeting former hospital patient Martin McElhatton

0:36:260:36:30

to find out how Dr Ludwig Guttmann's ground-breaking treatment worked.

0:36:300:36:35

He introduced a comprehensive medical model of treatment

0:36:350:36:40

for people coming back from the war with spinal injuries.

0:36:400:36:43

In what way exactly was he different to the way everybody else

0:36:430:36:46

treated spinal injuries?

0:36:460:36:47

Well, he brought all the knowledge from around the world together

0:36:470:36:51

into, you know, his treatment.

0:36:510:36:53

And he treated the patients really in a fantastic way.

0:36:530:36:57

And they even called him Poppa.

0:36:570:36:59

You know, a very affectionate name of how much they felt about him.

0:36:590:37:02

Before Dr Guttmann, unthinkable though it is now,

0:37:020:37:06

the paralysed were considered untreatable.

0:37:060:37:09

Up until the mid-1940s, eight out of ten spinal injury patients

0:37:090:37:14

died within three years of paralysis.

0:37:140:37:17

However, Dr Guttmann's visionary approach changed

0:37:170:37:20

the course of thousands of lives.

0:37:200:37:23

He made sure they had the right medical care.

0:37:230:37:25

You know, the right physiotherapy.

0:37:250:37:28

But he also felt that there was something missing in the treatment.

0:37:280:37:32

And he loved sports.

0:37:320:37:33

He felt that sport would add that dimension of comradery

0:37:330:37:37

and psychological wellbeing for the injured servicemen and women.

0:37:370:37:41

This pioneering notion led to the world's first sporting

0:37:410:37:45

competition for disabled people - the Stoke Mandeville Games.

0:37:450:37:49

The brainchild of Dr Guttmann,

0:37:490:37:51

it took place on the hospital lawns on the very same day

0:37:510:37:55

as the Opening Ceremony of the 1948 London Olympics.

0:37:550:37:59

How wonderful.

0:37:590:38:00

Presumably, I mean, this wasn't here then.

0:38:000:38:03

No, there was nothing here, just green fields and a car park

0:38:030:38:07

and the old huts that are behind us.

0:38:070:38:10

14 men and two women, all injured military personnel, competed.

0:38:100:38:15

Well, initially, they did things

0:38:150:38:17

like archery, because the chairs were very big and cumbersome.

0:38:170:38:22

So, you know, doing other sports that involve propelling

0:38:220:38:25

the wheelchair was probably more difficult.

0:38:250:38:28

But athletics was done. And they did javelin.

0:38:280:38:31

The referees were made up of doctors and nurses.

0:38:320:38:35

It was nothing more than a glorified sports day.

0:38:350:38:39

But Dr Guttmann had started something remarkable.

0:38:390:38:41

We had 16 in the first Games in 1948.

0:38:430:38:46

And by 1956, that had grown to 130 competitors.

0:38:460:38:51

And in London 2012,

0:38:510:38:53

around 5,000 athletes from all over the world.

0:38:530:38:57

The Stoke Mandeville Games were the forerunner to the Paralympic Games.

0:38:570:39:02

Today, a modern stadium sits alongside the hospital.

0:39:020:39:06

And what would Guttmann have thought of all of this?

0:39:060:39:08

I think he would have been amazed. I think he would be really proud.

0:39:080:39:11

And I think, you know, he would have wanted more.

0:39:110:39:15

Because he was a guy who, I think, always wanted to push

0:39:150:39:20

the boundaries.

0:39:200:39:21

And by pushing those boundaries, he enabled so many men

0:39:210:39:25

and women around the world to achieve their sporting dreams.

0:39:250:39:28

He always had the vision there would be

0:39:280:39:31

an Olympics for the paralysed or a parallel Olympics,

0:39:310:39:35

and that is where the term Paralympics comes from.

0:39:350:39:38

Dr Guttmann's legacy has helped

0:39:380:39:40

Martin achieve his sporting dreams too.

0:39:400:39:43

Aged 18, he was hit by a lorry and left paralysed.

0:39:430:39:46

He was treated at Stoke Mandeville Hospital

0:39:460:39:48

and had to learn how to adjust to life in a wheelchair.

0:39:480:39:52

What was your sport, Martin?

0:39:520:39:54

Well, I played wheelchair basketball in the 1984 Paralympic Games,

0:39:540:39:57

which happened to be here, in Stoke Mandeville.

0:39:570:39:59

So you have pulled your Olympic vest on? Yes! What did that feel like?

0:39:590:40:03

Well, it was an inspirational moment and something you feel hugely

0:40:030:40:07

honoured and proud to represent your country.

0:40:070:40:10

When Dr Guttmann died in 1980, his dream of a Paralympic Games being

0:40:100:40:16

held in parallel with the Olympic Games

0:40:160:40:18

was still yet to happen.

0:40:180:40:20

It wasn't until Seoul in 1988 that both games happened together.

0:40:200:40:24

So, Martin, you've got some ephemera here.

0:40:240:40:27

Is this all one person's?

0:40:270:40:29

No, it is a selection from our archive here, at Stoke Mandeville,

0:40:290:40:34

which tells the story of Dr Guttmann

0:40:340:40:38

and the Paralympic movement

0:40:380:40:40

and, you know, really about some of the individual athletes who

0:40:400:40:44

have been inspirational as part of that story.

0:40:440:40:48

I bet he didn't realise what he was creating, did he?

0:40:480:40:51

For me, personally, if he hadn't done what he did,

0:40:510:40:54

I wouldn't have had the opportunity to take part in Paralympic sport.

0:40:540:40:59

I don't think Dr Guttmann is on his own in being an inspiration,

0:40:590:41:02

really, you know. Thank you.

0:41:020:41:04

Natasha's motored the Porsche to Tetsworth, in Oxfordshire.

0:41:120:41:16

She is heading for The Swan Antiques Centre

0:41:180:41:20

with her remaining ?136.

0:41:200:41:24

I think I am going to

0:41:240:41:26

work my way to the top

0:41:260:41:28

and then work my way back down again.

0:41:280:41:31

This is a nice wee room, this.

0:41:350:41:37

I'm going to have more of a look cos there are trinkety things.

0:41:370:41:40

Trinkety things is what I am after.

0:41:400:41:42

She is drawn to a French hand-painted pin dish.

0:41:420:41:46

And it is porcelain. It is actually on a little porcelain dish.

0:41:460:41:51

And you can see it has got a little bit of crazing on it. Not really.

0:41:510:41:53

It is in nice condition overall.

0:41:530:41:55

I think that is a really sweet little stand.

0:41:560:41:59

This pretty little dish dates from the late 19th century.

0:41:590:42:03

It sports a ticket price of ?80.

0:42:030:42:05

It is just a decorative thing, but it is absolutely beautiful.

0:42:050:42:09

There certainly won't be two of these at the auction.

0:42:090:42:12

But this would be a gamble piece.

0:42:120:42:14

Lovely though it is, it is not going to have wide appeal.

0:42:140:42:17

Time to have a word with the man in charge.

0:42:170:42:19

Stand by, Paul.

0:42:190:42:22

If I knocked you a tenner off... So what has it got on it? 80.

0:42:220:42:24

If I said 70? We could round it down to 70. Do you know what?

0:42:240:42:27

I love the little papillon.

0:42:270:42:29

For 70 quid, shall we shake on it?

0:42:290:42:31

Let's shake on it. Yay! Merci, madame. Merci and thank you.

0:42:310:42:35

Tres bon! A deal done for the French hand-painted dish.

0:42:350:42:39

The next shop for both our Road Trippers is the picturesque

0:42:390:42:42

town of Wendover.

0:42:420:42:44

Phil has stolen a lead on Natasha,

0:42:440:42:46

so he is getting first pick at the local antiques centre.

0:42:460:42:50

Hopefully, dealer Mike knows where the bargains can be found.

0:42:500:42:53

Have a look in this room. There is a cabinet full of curiosities.

0:42:530:42:57

And lots of bits and bobs.

0:42:570:42:58

EARLY 1900S PIANO MUSIC

0:42:580:43:03

Oh, I like that.

0:43:030:43:04

Yes, I do like that.

0:43:060:43:09

Labelled as a fireman's hose nozzle and priced at ?35.

0:43:090:43:12

What could that be? As it is you, and all that old gag.

0:43:120:43:17

Yeah, yeah, yeah. 27.

0:43:170:43:19

Seeing as it was me, I was hoping for like 15 or 20.

0:43:210:43:24

25 quid is the bottom line.

0:43:240:43:28

That is ten pounds off the asking price

0:43:280:43:30

and within Philip's remaining budget of ?36.96.

0:43:300:43:34

Anything else catch your eye?

0:43:340:43:36

These are for fitting on the hooves of ponies.

0:43:380:43:44

If you can imagine in the 19th century,

0:43:440:43:47

a big country house with a croquet lawn at the front.

0:43:470:43:49

When it was mowed,

0:43:490:43:51

there wasn't any cylinder lawnmower or whatever.

0:43:510:43:54

Your mower was pulled by a team of ponies or horses.

0:43:540:43:57

You didn't want the horses' hooves to sink in

0:43:570:44:00

to your lovely, beautifully manicured

0:44:000:44:03

croquet lawn. So the ponies had little booties. Aren't they cool?

0:44:030:44:07

They are also 160 quid.

0:44:080:44:11

And the only thing that just confused me a little bit,

0:44:110:44:14

there is only two there. I don't know that many two-legged ponies.

0:44:140:44:19

With the horseshoe back on the shelf,

0:44:190:44:22

Phil has settled on the hose nozzle.

0:44:220:44:24

Time to shout for Mike.

0:44:240:44:26

Mike! Come into my office.

0:44:260:44:29

Do have a seat. Thank you.

0:44:290:44:30

Maybe some wax fruit would be nice. Absolutely right.

0:44:300:44:35

Now, I really like that. Mm-hm.

0:44:350:44:37

I'm not sure, actually,

0:44:370:44:38

whether it was a fireman's nozzle or it was just a big country house type

0:44:380:44:43

of thing because that ain't going to put out much of a fire, really.

0:44:430:44:47

And all of this is me working around to the fact

0:44:470:44:49

that I do want to buy it off you. But? I can hear a "but".

0:44:490:44:51

Yeah, no, you have been very, very kind to me, but...20 quid.

0:44:510:44:55

23, bottom line. That won't get us anywhere, that.

0:44:560:45:00

The dealer has got TWO ex-wives to keep.

0:45:000:45:03

Thank you very much.

0:45:040:45:06

Thank goodness he hasn't three divorces!

0:45:060:45:08

Even so, that is a generous settlement off the ticket price.

0:45:080:45:12

Oh, look! Natasha has finally arrived in Wendover.

0:45:160:45:20

Look out.

0:45:200:45:22

Oh, it is Serrell.

0:45:230:45:25

What a lovely way to shove it in my face, as you stuff your face,

0:45:250:45:29

that I've still got things to buy.

0:45:290:45:31

Finish that off. It is rude to speak with your mouth full.

0:45:310:45:34

I'm glad you're... You've been minding your manners.

0:45:340:45:38

But you are awfully cheeky for starting without me.

0:45:380:45:40

I will remember this. Thanks, Phil.

0:45:400:45:43

See you in a sec. This really is very, very good, honestly.

0:45:430:45:46

It really is.

0:45:460:45:47

Wasting no time, Natasha delves deep to find a bargain...or two.

0:45:490:45:53

Dealer Sarah is ready to help.

0:45:530:45:56

I saw a really cute thing in here. Oh!

0:45:560:45:58

It is ridiculously cheap and it is a sweet little thing.

0:45:580:46:01

And I am guessing that it is not silver.

0:46:010:46:03

But it is a little sewing machine.

0:46:030:46:05

But seeing as I have very little money,

0:46:050:46:08

things with a five-pound price tag

0:46:080:46:10

are starting to appeal. Appealing to you.

0:46:100:46:12

Yeah. Out of the cabinet, it actually looks better in the light.

0:46:120:46:18

It looks really sweet. I think it is rather sweet.

0:46:180:46:20

It is unusual, isn't it? Yeah, cos it is really well worked.

0:46:200:46:22

All the parts are there of the sewing machine.

0:46:220:46:24

You've even got the sort of wheel at the back doing all the turning.

0:46:240:46:28

And it is a really cute thing.

0:46:280:46:29

Can Natasha get this tiny bracelet charm for a tiny price?

0:46:290:46:34

If I were to offer you three pounds for it,

0:46:340:46:35

how would you feel about that?

0:46:350:46:37

I think that'd be fine. You think you can deal with that?

0:46:370:46:40

I think that will be absolutely fine.

0:46:400:46:41

Let's shake on the three quid. Yes, absolutely.

0:46:410:46:43

Another deal sewn up, and for three pounds!

0:46:430:46:46

I'd say there is hope of a little profit.

0:46:460:46:49

But Natasha isn't finished yet. I just caught this.

0:46:490:46:52

And, you know, this is something that has caught my eye for one

0:46:520:46:55

particular reason - because everything about it is quite pretty.

0:46:550:46:59

It is lovely. On a distance, on a shelf, you would just say,

0:46:590:47:02

"Oh, that is so sweet."

0:47:020:47:03

You have got lovely hand-painted decoration on this very

0:47:030:47:06

sort of Bristol blue glass with a nice kind of frilly top

0:47:060:47:10

and what looks to be the original stopper.

0:47:100:47:12

Let's have a wee look, let's see if we can see the pontil mark.

0:47:120:47:14

Yep, you know, it's nicely hand-blown.

0:47:140:47:18

It is just a good thing.

0:47:180:47:20

But what is not particularly pretty is the fact that whoever

0:47:200:47:23

has taken the time to paint this,

0:47:230:47:25

they have not done the best job with her sweet little face.

0:47:250:47:28

She has got sweet little hands with a pointing finger,

0:47:280:47:31

dainty little feet, a sweet little waist and a cute little haircut.

0:47:310:47:34

And on the face, they have just been a wee bit sloppy.

0:47:340:47:37

She's right.

0:47:370:47:38

The label only indicates this decanter MIGHT be painted

0:47:380:47:42

by Mary Gregory, who was an American woman and fine enameller of glass.

0:47:420:47:46

This story is told that she was an old lady who painted

0:47:460:47:49

the children she never had.

0:47:490:47:51

Whether this tale is true is questionable,

0:47:510:47:53

but without a doubt, her pieces are very collectable. But!

0:47:530:47:57

She was a perfectionist

0:47:570:47:58

and would certainly never have painted ugly chops like that.

0:47:580:48:01

Now, it has got that age-old motif written on their - A/F.

0:48:010:48:06

So sold as found.

0:48:060:48:08

So there has got to be some damage somewhere.

0:48:080:48:11

So see if we can source it.

0:48:110:48:13

Yeah, there is a little bit of a crack where the handle meets

0:48:140:48:17

the neck of the decanter.

0:48:170:48:19

It has a fair ticket price of ?28.

0:48:190:48:23

Sarah, out of all the lovely things in the shop,

0:48:230:48:25

I have been attracted to this sort of glistening blue decanter.

0:48:250:48:29

Isn't it lovely? It is a little bit damaged, it is noted on the label.

0:48:290:48:32

So I was thinking of making an offer, it's a wee bit cheeky.

0:48:320:48:35

OK. But I thought, seeing as we have become such good friends...

0:48:350:48:38

You wouldn't be offended. It is worth a try.

0:48:380:48:40

You would take it in good humour and you wouldn't slap me across the face.

0:48:400:48:43

I'm going to offer 18. And see what you can do for me.

0:48:430:48:47

Sarah needs to put Natasha's cheeky offer to the dealer

0:48:470:48:50

selling the decanter.

0:48:500:48:51

Time for a quick phone call.

0:48:510:48:53

She said if you make it 20, then you could have it. Oh...

0:48:530:48:57

Two pounds more. What about if I said 19? Just for a laugh.

0:48:570:49:01

Oh, how about 19 for a laugh?

0:49:010:49:03

Yeah, you sure?

0:49:050:49:07

OK. Great. Thanks, Chloe. Thanks very much.

0:49:070:49:10

Natasha has haggled hard,

0:49:100:49:12

getting around a third of the ticket price

0:49:120:49:14

knocked off the decanter, plus the bracelet charm for three pounds.

0:49:140:49:18

Could these be the lots to get Natasha a big profit?

0:49:180:49:22

As this leg of the journey draws to a close, here's

0:49:240:49:27

a rundown of what Philip and Natasha bought on their travels.

0:49:270:49:30

Natasha started the road trip by picking up a Scottish plaid

0:49:300:49:34

brooch and a large Belfast sink.

0:49:340:49:36

As you do.

0:49:360:49:37

She also bought a hand-painted pin dish, a white metal bracelet

0:49:370:49:41

charm and a blue glass decanter depicting a Victorian girl.

0:49:410:49:45

The five lots cost Natasha ?129.

0:49:450:49:49

Philip's purchases include a folio of prints,

0:49:490:49:53

a set of four Art Deco burr walnut chairs,

0:49:530:49:56

two Victorian letter seals,

0:49:560:49:58

a silver-plated ribbon puller in the shape of a stork

0:49:580:50:02

and a 19th-century copper and brass nozzle.

0:50:020:50:05

All that lot cost him ?153.

0:50:050:50:08

What did they think of each other's buys?

0:50:080:50:10

Phil has done a great job.

0:50:100:50:11

It doesn't matter how poor the condition of those prints is

0:50:110:50:15

because they are not foxed, so it is salvageable.

0:50:150:50:18

And for a fiver, they'll do fine.

0:50:180:50:20

I really, really love that oval dish.

0:50:200:50:22

I think it is pure Victorian. But it is such a lovely, lovely thing.

0:50:220:50:26

And if you can find two people at the auction who really want that

0:50:260:50:29

and covet it, it could go and make a lot of money for her.

0:50:290:50:32

?45 for four Art Deco chairs could be all the money. I'm not sure.

0:50:320:50:36

They could make 100, they could make 20,

0:50:360:50:38

such is the story with furniture these days.

0:50:380:50:40

So not too sure, but I think he has got the balance just right.

0:50:400:50:43

He will do fine with those.

0:50:430:50:45

The sink, however, there is an exception to every rule.

0:50:450:50:48

I think she might just go down the plugger with that.

0:50:480:50:51

It's time now to turn those lots into a profit

0:50:530:50:56

and head to auction in Chiswick, in west London.

0:50:560:50:59

This is my Mecca. This is my Mecca!

0:50:590:51:02

Natasha is enjoying her time in the capital already.

0:51:020:51:05

I don't think she gets out much.

0:51:050:51:07

I think you think this is a fairground ride, honestly.

0:51:070:51:10

Scream if you want to go faster!

0:51:100:51:12

Aaaah!

0:51:120:51:13

Almost there, Philip. Hold on tight.

0:51:130:51:16

High Road Auctions is the venue for today's sale.

0:51:160:51:19

As auctioneer Ross Mercer takes to the rostrum,

0:51:210:51:24

our experts take to their seats.

0:51:240:51:26

First up, lovely, is your brooch. I know.

0:51:260:51:29

Our Glasgow girl was quite taken

0:51:290:51:32

with this brooch.

0:51:320:51:33

Hopefully, someone in the room

0:51:330:51:34

is just as keen.

0:51:340:51:36

I've got a bid here at ?5.

0:51:360:51:38

Oh, off to the races.

0:51:380:51:40

At ?8, bid me 10.

0:51:400:51:41

12 now. 15, do I hear?

0:51:410:51:43

15 now on the telephone. At ?15.

0:51:430:51:47

A phone bidder!

0:51:470:51:48

From Scotland.

0:51:480:51:49

Last chance, going to sell it now

0:51:490:51:52

to my colleague on the telephone at ?15.

0:51:520:51:55

That's all right. It's ?15. I'll take that.

0:51:550:51:59

A steady start.

0:51:590:52:00

First up for Philip, his folio of prints.

0:52:020:52:04

Maybe this chap wants to get his paws on dog pictures.

0:52:040:52:07

Let's find out. Arrr!

0:52:070:52:09

I've got bids here at ?10.

0:52:090:52:11

Against you at 10.

0:52:110:52:12

15, I will take. 15. 20 now.

0:52:120:52:14

20 bid on the phone. I'll take five.

0:52:140:52:16

25. 30 now.

0:52:160:52:18

?30 bid with my colleague, left-hand side. 30. Last chance.

0:52:180:52:22

Going to sell it now

0:52:220:52:23

to the telephone at ?30.

0:52:230:52:26

That's remarkable, isn't it?

0:52:260:52:28

That is excellent!

0:52:280:52:30

I'm please with that.

0:52:300:52:31

Very pleased, very pleased.

0:52:310:52:33

Five prints, bought for a pound each

0:52:330:52:35

and turning a ?25 profit.

0:52:350:52:37

Now that is how to do it.

0:52:370:52:39

Next to go under the gavel is Natasha's big Belfast sink.

0:52:390:52:43

Just the job for London.

0:52:430:52:44

?10 surely for it. Five I will take.

0:52:440:52:47

It has got to make a pound.

0:52:470:52:48

A pound on bid. A pound? Two. Three.

0:52:480:52:51

?5 bid. 8. 10. 12.

0:52:510:52:54

15 I have. At ?15. 20 bid on the phone.

0:52:540:52:57

At ?20. Probably broken a record here somewhere.

0:52:570:53:00

At 20. Hey! All done?

0:53:000:53:03

Bad luck, the first loss of the day.

0:53:040:53:07

But there is still time to claw it all back.

0:53:070:53:10

Philip's fire hose nozzle is next.

0:53:100:53:13

?10, it's no money.

0:53:130:53:15

?10 bid. At 10. 12. ?12. Bid me 14.

0:53:150:53:19

14. OK. 16 bid. 18 now.

0:53:190:53:21

20 bid. And two.

0:53:210:53:23

At ?22 I'm bid. The gentleman stood in front, at 22. So close.

0:53:230:53:26

Clearly, I paid the right price for it.

0:53:260:53:29

?22.

0:53:290:53:30

24, may I say? ?24 bid.

0:53:300:53:33

Profit! At ?24, then.

0:53:330:53:36

At ?24...

0:53:360:53:38

Sadly, after commission is deducted,

0:53:380:53:40

Philip is going to be a little out of pocket.

0:53:400:53:44

Now, Natasha's blue decanter,

0:53:440:53:46

enamelled with a face that looks

0:53:460:53:48

as if it launched 1,000 ships.

0:53:480:53:51

Will she appeal to any bidders?

0:53:510:53:52

?5? At ?5. Bid 10.

0:53:520:53:54

15. 20. New bidder at 20. Why?

0:53:540:53:57

Five now.

0:53:570:53:58

?20. 25. OK, OK.

0:53:580:54:01

?25. ?25, lady's bid.

0:54:010:54:03

Sitting in the front row at 25.

0:54:030:54:07

Thank you!

0:54:070:54:09

Well done. You bought a nice thing.

0:54:090:54:12

Oh, yes. Decent profit for Natasha there.

0:54:120:54:15

Philip has received some bad news about his next lot.

0:54:150:54:18

Do you remember those two seals? Mm-hm.

0:54:180:54:20

There was the bone one and the agate one.

0:54:200:54:22

Ah-ha, yeah, they were pretty nice. Yeah, one of them has gone astray.

0:54:220:54:25

Oh, no! Has it been lost? Yeah. Don't know where.

0:54:250:54:29

Philip paid ?35 for the two seals.

0:54:290:54:32

An insurance valuation for the lot was given at ?65.

0:54:320:54:36

If the one remaining seal sells for less,

0:54:380:54:41

Philip will get the insurance valuation.

0:54:410:54:43

But if it makes more in the sale, Philip is even better off.

0:54:430:54:47

?10 I'm bid on the books. At ?10. 15 now.

0:54:470:54:51

20 there. At 20. 25. 30.

0:54:510:54:54

30 bid. 35.

0:54:540:54:56

Sure? At ?30, through to the back, at 30.

0:54:560:54:58

Do you know what? It has done all right on its own.

0:54:580:55:01

Stood at the back of the seating, at ?30. I'm going to sell it.

0:55:010:55:05

So, the gavel is down at ?30.

0:55:050:55:06

And Philip's insurance valuation is ?65,

0:55:060:55:11

which means he has actually made a ?30 profit.

0:55:110:55:14

Natasha paid just ?3 for this bracelet charm.

0:55:140:55:18

?5 starts me.

0:55:180:55:19

?5 I'm bid. At 8. Get in, girl, get in.

0:55:190:55:22

12 in the centre. At 14?

0:55:220:55:24

?12, I have.

0:55:240:55:25

In the centre of the seating at 12.

0:55:250:55:26

14.

0:55:260:55:28

16. At ?16.

0:55:280:55:29

Do you know what? You should have bought the whole charm bracelet

0:55:290:55:32

and chopped them up.

0:55:320:55:33

Last chance. Going to the gentleman at ?16.

0:55:330:55:38

So, five times what Natasha paid

0:55:380:55:40

for it, that really is charming. Ha!

0:55:400:55:43

Next up, Philip's ribbon puller.

0:55:430:55:46

?20 starts.

0:55:460:55:47

20 bid. 25. 30.

0:55:470:55:50

Five with you, sir. At 35.

0:55:500:55:52

Straight in now 40. Left-hand side at 40.

0:55:520:55:55

At ?40.

0:55:550:55:57

Lady's bid at ?40 only. I am going to sell them on at 40. Oh, Phil.

0:55:570:56:01

Don't make a loss, don't make a loss, no! At ?40...

0:56:010:56:04

Yes, it is a loss. But only a small one.

0:56:040:56:07

Phil got a great deal for his set of four chairs

0:56:070:56:10

but how will they do at today's sale?

0:56:100:56:13

We have got bids at ?40. Straight in at 40.

0:56:130:56:15

Five now. At 45.

0:56:150:56:17

50 bid. 50. Five now. 55. 60.

0:56:170:56:20

Oh!

0:56:220:56:24

65. At ?70 bid now.

0:56:240:56:27

Come all this way, sir. 75.

0:56:270:56:29

?75 now. 85. Still worth it.

0:56:290:56:33

?85. At 85.

0:56:330:56:36

90 bid.

0:56:360:56:38

Come along. At ?85.

0:56:380:56:40

Gentleman in the seating at 85. This is exciting.

0:56:400:56:42

I'm going to sell it to the gentleman.

0:56:420:56:44

You should say thank you to your man behind you. He is a good chap.

0:56:440:56:49

Philip has almost doubled his money.

0:56:490:56:51

Excellent stuff.

0:56:510:56:53

The pressure is on for Natasha.

0:56:530:56:55

And next up is her gamble buy.

0:56:550:56:57

She spent ?70 on this little pin dish.

0:56:570:57:00

But will it bring big bids?

0:57:000:57:03

I've got bids here at ?10.

0:57:030:57:05

Bid on the books at 10.

0:57:050:57:06

Take 12 from you. At ?12.

0:57:060:57:08

Bid me 14. 14. 16. At 16.

0:57:080:57:11

Why is he going in twos?

0:57:110:57:13

A minute ago he was moving in fivers.

0:57:130:57:16

Now with Rachel, 20 bid. It is not looking good. With the lady at 20.

0:57:160:57:19

In the seating at ?20. Say 25, don't say 22. I'll take five from you.

0:57:190:57:23

It is a lovely item. Yeah. At ?20. Last chance at ?20.

0:57:230:57:27

We are going to sell it to the lady at 20...

0:57:270:57:29

Oh, that is really horrific. Oh, that is a big, big ouch.

0:57:290:57:34

That is sort of physically sore as well as mentally bruising.

0:57:340:57:39

I know, Natasha, such a disappointing end. Bad luck.

0:57:390:57:42

Do you know what, lovely? I think I had a bit of luck there.

0:57:420:57:45

In auction terms, well, it is two on to me, isn't it?

0:57:450:57:48

Onwards and upwards. Come on, you OK?

0:57:480:57:51

(Well done.)

0:57:510:57:53

Natasha started this leg with ?173.12.

0:57:540:57:59

After paying auction house fees, she is down ?50.28. Oh, dear.

0:57:590:58:05

As a result, Natasha has ?122.84 to start next time.

0:58:050:58:11

Philip has stolen the lead, starting with ?166.96.

0:58:110:58:16

And after costs, he is up ?47.08,

0:58:160:58:20

leaving Mr Serrell with ?214.04 in his kitty to carry forward.

0:58:200:58:26

All right, go, go, go! Before the bus comes.

0:58:260:58:29

And so, until next time, cheerio!

0:58:290:58:32

Our service providers work truly all hours

0:59:010:59:03

to bring patients exceptional care.

0:59:030:59:06

Antique hunters Philip Serrell and Natasha Raskin continue their road trip as they take in the delights of south west Wales before crossing into England where they shop in Hertfordshire, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, but who will prove victorious at their crucial auctions in Newent in Gloucester and west London?