Episode 5 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 5

Antiques challenge. Charles Hanson and Raj Bisram take their road trip through Devon, and Raj takes a big risk on the way to auction in Exeter.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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-I don't know what to do.

-HORN TOOTS

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..with £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game...Charlie!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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-SHE GASPS

-So, will it be the high road

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to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-Oh!

-This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah.

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It's the penultimate leg of this adventure

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and our expert auctioneers are revved up and ready to go.

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-Charles, wake up, wake up.

-Sorry. Sorry!

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Charles Hanson is an antiques expert

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who loves nothing more than getting giddy at a great find.

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Aren't we lucky to be living almost in a hazy dream

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that's the Antiques Road Trip?

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Good Lord. This week, he's on the road with Raj Bisram,

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our top auctioneer from Kent.

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-ENGINE REVS

-Sorry, sorry again.

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Can you get in the back?

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Raj made money on the last leg, which means he's got

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an impressive £414.86 to spend.

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GAVEL BANGS

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Charles also bagged himself a profit,

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which means he's currently in the lead with £464.64 to play with.

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Our chaps' mammoth mission began in Corsham in Wiltshire

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and takes in most of the south-west of England,

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eventually finishing around 900 miles later

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at Crewkerne in Somerset.

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Today's trip kicks off in Hele in Devon

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and will finish up at an auction in Exeter.

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They're bonding up nicely, though, aren't they,

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in the dashing Triumph Herald nicknamed Bella?

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First stop today is Fagins Antiques.

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Look at that! Thousands and thousands of square feet.

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THEY LAUGH

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-After you.

-After you.

-Go on, get in.

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It should be big enough for both of them.

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Raj has enlisted owner Chris to help him hunt.

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Well, I think it's made out of an old shell.

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First World War, maybe, converted to a moneybox.

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Some of the estimated one billion shells fired

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during World War I were transformed into trench art,

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but I think this is likely to be a later reproduction, don't you?

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-There's a lot of people that collect that sort of thing.

-Yeah.

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And what would that have to be?

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-60.

-60?

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-There's not going to be a profit in that, is there?

-There is...

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-Not at 60.

-I'd say...

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At auction, I reckon that's £40-£60.

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Well, seeing as I've only just unearthed it,

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-I can't remember what it cost me...which is terrible.

-£30.

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I've got to have a chance at 30.

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-40.

-35.

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-All right.

-35?

-I should think you'll do well on that. That's a start.

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OK, that's a start. OK. Thank you very much. Brilliant.

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Right, Raj is off the mark. Charles?

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It's always the most nerve-racking time on the first day of a shop

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of a new county and you've got to start digging deep

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because the hardest thing ever is to find the first purchase.

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It's always that twitchy time where you're doing this.

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Well, you might want to get a move on

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as Raj has already found something else he fancies. Look at that.

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Chris, I noticed this on the way in. It's a nice Georgian cheese coaster

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It's a nice piece of mahogany. It does need repair.

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It would have to be very cheap.

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-The ticket price is £50.

-I could probably do that for 40 for you.

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I think there's quite a good profit.

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I mean, they usually go 300-plus, don't they?

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Well, I've sold a few recently and I've got about £100-£150 for them,

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-but they've been in good condition.

-Oh, right.

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In that condition...30 quid.

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-It's got to have the work.

-Yeah.

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-OK, you can have it.

-Yep, £30?

-A deal on that.

-Fantastic.

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A roaring start there for Raj, with two items bought for £65.

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Charles, meanwhile, has decided to move on empty-handed

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and is headed south to the pretty town of Topsham.

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Perhaps he'll have better luck at Quay Antiques.

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-Hello, sir.

-Hello.

-How are you?

-I'm well. I'm Albert.

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-Albert, Charles Hanson.

-Nice to meet you.

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-Is it your emporium?

-No, not mine.

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-I can't afford anything like this.

-Get out of here.

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You're in the bow tie. You look the part, sir.

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Well, if you look the part, you can fool anybody.

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Shh, don't tell anyone, Albert.

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Surely there's something to tickle our Derby dandy in this place.

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One thing I do quite like is this lady here.

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She's what we call a peg-jointed doll,

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and she would be early Victorian - 1820, 1830.

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What impresses me is, I think she's in her original clothes.

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I think it's a very nice object, which is certainly worth

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-further inspection.

-Only one way to find out.

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I like her original face - it hasn't been changed or altered.

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My only concern with her is, Albert, she's missing a leg.

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-So, although she's a peg-jointed doll...

-She's a peg leg.

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I'll call her Peggy. Peggy is missing a leg, which is a shame.

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Peggy is priced at £49.

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If I could make an offer with your dealer,

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what sort of figure do you think would be acceptable?

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-She'd probably do it for 45.

-Yeah.

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In the perfect world, I'll probably want to pay more like 35,

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but you might say, "Look, Charles, that's just one bid below too far."

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-Shall we find out?

-Could you, Albert? That'd be great.

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I'll give her to you.

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With Peggy put aside for later, anything else grab you, Carlos?

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I quite like the little goblet in here, you know,

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which is quite decorative. I'll bring it out to you.

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That's quite attractive, isn't it? What I like about it

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is, if you turn it upside down,

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you've got some nice wear on the base.

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That's a good Bristol Blue goblet of probably around 1820.

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Another item goes on the consideration list.

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Are you actually going to buy anything, Charles?

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What you hope to see is objects that jump out at you

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-and they say, "Come on, Hanson, buy me."

-Yeah, quite.

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Well, what does this desk calendar say to you, then, Charles?

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What's nice is it's set on this nice oak plinth base,

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which is mounted with the leather, but what's really nice

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is the engine turning and the fact it's also hallmarked

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just on the side here.

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Hallmarked for Birmingham and the date code does coincide to 1930.

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I quite like it.

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With a ticket price of £75, Charles has some thinking to do.

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Uh-oh. He's on to something else as well, look.

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What I like about this... This is a what appears to be

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a Russian silver sifter spoon by Grigory Sbitnev of Moscow.

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It's quite heavy. Feel the weight of that, Albert.

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I love the trefid handle, I love the pierced silver gilded bowl

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and it is Moscow. It would date to around 1890.

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I quite like, Albert, this spoon as well.

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And this is Russian silver, hallmarked,

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again probably around 1890.

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I just wonder, Albert,

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..if you could do me a favour and just find out

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-if the dealer would do a deal for the two together?

-OK.

-Is that OK?

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-Yeah.

-That's really kind.

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So, Charles has now shown interest in four lots,

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but will he buy them?

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Peggy's dealer has knocked £9 off the price tag,

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making the damage for the doll £40.

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I'm going to buy her because I fell in love with her

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and with a passion, you buy what you like, so I'm going to say,

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"At last, I've bought an object." Put it there...for £40.

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Hooray! First lot bought, finally.

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-The blue glass goblet...

-Yeah.

-Best price?

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-15.

-£15, I'll take it. Sold. That's two things down.

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I feel a lot better now. The day is warming up.

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Now for those Russian spoons.

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Desperate for a deal, plucky Charles is sweet-talking the dealer himself.

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I was just wondering whether you could do the two together for £50?

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No. So, your best price finally is 65?

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-OK. Thanks a lot.

-You in or out, then, Charles?

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Because my day has been so sparse, I think I'm going to buy them.

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-Right.

-Because I've got a busy day tomorrow.

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-Well, you can take it easy tomorrow.

-Oh, dear... Hanson, Hanson, Hanson.

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-Go on, put it there. I'll take them.

-OK.

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Clocking up the lots now, eh? What about the calendar?

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-And your best price is...?

-£60.

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-Yes. I brought these three for 120.

-So another £60.

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I'll take it.

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That flurry of activity has landed him four lots for £180.

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40, 60... Am I happy?

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I'm always happy cos life's too short.

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Well said, that man. And so day one is done. Nighty-night, chaps.

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Morning has broken and the boys are back on the road.

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Our road-trippers have made their way to Paignton,

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a gorgeous seaside town on the coast of Torbay.

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Raj is playing catch-up on the buying stakes,

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so he's hoping he'll find some gems at his first shop of the day.

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Peter's in charge, and is pointing Raj

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in the direction of something a bit different.

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-This is unusual.

-Hello.

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You've labelled it as 18th-century.

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-18th to 19th, thereabout.

-18th to 19th.

-Yeah.

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But this is original gilding that we can see on here.

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Oh, yeah. Difficult to date, this thing.

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It could easily be 20th-century and possibly part of a larger piece.

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It's a decorative item and Raj will need to get a lot off

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the 275 price tag to make it worthwhile.

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I would be looking to pay about £100 for it.

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-Not even close.

-OK, well, give me an idea.

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The best would be 180.

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It's a big chunk of Raj's budget. Will he risk it for a biscuit?

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I know you've said 180.

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I've only got a limited budget as well. I think...

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That's already over £100 off.

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-Is there a bit more movement...?

-175?

-160 cash.

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Come on. That's not a bad price.

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We'll split the difference at 170.

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I can't say fairer than that.

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-We have a deal.

-£170.

-Well done. You'll do very well.

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I hope so. I do like it. Thank you.

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Hang on. Looks like Raj isn't spent out yet.

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I'm playing it a bit safe here, Peter.

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You've got a pair of claret jugs.

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They're definitely 20th-century ones.

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-There's not a lot of age to those.

-They're a good-looking pair, though.

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They are a good-looking pair and, if I can get those cheap,

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I'm definitely going to buy them.

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I've noticed that you've got £24 on, I presume, each ticket. That's £48.

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-These have got to be cheap. What's the best on these?

-Well...

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Remembering I've already spent £170 with you.

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-As it's your first trip, Raj...

-OK, here we go.

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..you can have the pair for £24.

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-We've got a deal. No arguing.

-Well done.

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-I'll take them at 24.

-Fast work there, Raj.

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Charles, meanwhile, has come to well-known landmark Oldway Mansion.

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This Grade II listed building was built

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by the super-rich American family the Singers,

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who lavished hundreds of thousands of pounds

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creating this impressive status symbol.

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Chairman of the Friends of Oldway, Paul Hawthorne,

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is here to tell Charles more.

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-Good morning. Mr Hawthorne?

-Yep, Paul.

-Paul, I'm Charles.

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Nice to meet you, Charles.

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It's great to be on the French Riviera.

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-I almost feel I'm outside Versailles.

-Yeah.

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No, no. Welcome to Oldway Mansion, historic home of the Singer family,

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a model on Versailles.

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It was a recreation based on the Petit Trianon gardens in Versailles.

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It's interesting, Paul, that in my day job we often handle Singer

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sewing machines and of course it was that money which really built this.

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Yeah, very much so. The first machine was put together in 1850,

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patented 1851. The company was really starting to get up speed

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and a lot of wealth by the time Isaac Singer came here in 1872.

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When Isaac Singer left America,

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not only was he one of the richest men alive,

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he had also fathered 18 children with several different women,

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a scandal which forced him to flee to Europe.

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He soon settled in England with his new wife,

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living in London before heading to the English Riviera.

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He came here with his French wife and six young children.

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He came down to recuperate from a heart condition,

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recommended by his doctors to take the airs on the Riviera

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and fell in love with the place. He'd taken a lease

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on the house, the original villa behind here, called Little Oldway.

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And this place, 100 feet exactly above sea level,

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gave him a panoramic view right across the bay,

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where he could build a great house to look out on the bay

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but also, for Isaac Singer, being a showman,

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everybody in the bay could stand anywhere and look up

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and see his great house that he'd constructed watching over them.

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Sadly, Isaac never got much time to fully enjoy his dream home

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as, in the summer of 1875, his health worsened

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and he passed away. Whilst Isaac Singer designed

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the original mansion, it was one of his sons, Paris,

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who remodelled the building on the design of the Palace of Versailles

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and the real show stopper was his reproduction

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of the lost Ambassadors' Staircase.

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I almost feel as though I'm in a place of myth.

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It's magical. It's like a fairytale.

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We're in the space that was originally the father's theatre.

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-When he made over the house outside, he did the same inside...

-Yes.

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..and he recreated the legendary lost staircase,

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Ambassadors' Staircase from the Palace of Versailles

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that no longer existed and actually, to the day,

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there are only two recreations of this staircase.

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One is here at Oldway. The other is in one of the palaces

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of the Bavarian kings, Ludwig.

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It's just high society American decadence of what age?

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What date are we talking, Paul? When was this put in?

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This is probably about 1900, 1905 this was being done.

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The big David painting he had the original of,

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he acquired in about 1898 at auction in Paris

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-and he introduced that into the design.

-Yes.

-But all the marble here

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is all quarried from the same quarries the French kings

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had used at Versailles.

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They were opened up especially for Paris Singer,

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-so no expense was spared on the materials.

-Yes.

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It takes your breath away. Let's go, Paul.

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Another impressive part of Oldway is the Rotunda.

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Originally built by Isaac Singer as a horse-riding pavilion,

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this stunning structure has morphed into many things over the years

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from a swimming pool to a film studio,

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and it was even used as a hospital ward during World War I.

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Was this actually a place, the Rotunda, where we had beds?

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Yeah, this was a ward. You'd have beds all around the circular walls

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there and in the centre here. This was St George's Ward

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and you had nursing stations at the back and another big ward.

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The wards were sponsored by wealthy Americans.

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It was The American Women's War Hospital,

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so it was called St George after a wealthy American benefactor.

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It was entirely funded by the American people.

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Nothing from the UK Government went to pay

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for the treatment of the 5,000 soldiers that came here.

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After the First World War, what happened to Paris?

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Was he here for a few more years?

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Paris Singer... By the end of the First World War,

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he'd moved on because of various personal problems and associations.

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He started project building a castle in the south of France, Cap-Ferrat,

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and he went over as well, convalescing from a heart condition,

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and developed what's today Palm Beach, Florida. That was his resort.

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Without Paris Singer, Palm Beach in Florida would be nothing but...

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What was it the architect called it at the time?

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"Without him, it would have been nothing but a sandspit."

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After World War I, Paris's other projects saw him

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spend more time away from Oldway, so his original plans to fully remodel

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the mansion and demolish the Rotunda were put on hold.

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Thanks to this, the Oldway we see today shows the unique vision

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of both father and son. Amazing.

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It has a romance, it has this lost American glamour,

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which I really hope the public will rejoice at in years to come

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-and be able to enjoy for what it represents.

-Oh, very much.

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I think the history of the house and the Singer family has a lot

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to give to the public, to the world, that hasn't yet been told.

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I think it's so unspoilt. It's so sleepy and market-fresh,

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and I'm sure one day it will sing again.

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-Do you get it? Sing?

-I do. Very good.

0:17:140:17:17

-Which way is my way out, Paul? I'd better go.

-We go out this way.

0:17:170:17:20

I'll follow your lead. Thanks a lot.

0:17:200:17:22

Back together again, our boys have hit the road

0:17:250:17:28

and are travelling 30 miles west to Plymouth.

0:17:280:17:31

They've even made an ice cream pit stop en route.

0:17:310:17:34

-Oh, no!

-I'm sorry!

0:17:360:17:39

Hey, I hope you're not making a mess of that car, Charles.

0:17:390:17:42

Ice creams demolished, it's time to shop.

0:17:420:17:45

Raj is off to Parade Antiques, known for having perhaps

0:17:450:17:48

the largest selection of military antiques in south-west England.

0:17:480:17:52

Can dealer John help Raj part with some of his cash?

0:17:520:17:55

That's nice. I like that because it's a Hussars-type uniform,

0:17:550:18:00

but it's actually Horse Artillery.

0:18:000:18:03

-It looks quite small.

-People were small. It could have been a bugler,

0:18:030:18:08

in which case it would have been a youngish lad.

0:18:080:18:11

I guess it's going to date from the early 1900s.

0:18:110:18:13

I'm pretty sure the buttons are King's Crown...

0:18:130:18:17

Yeah, so I think there is a label in here.

0:18:170:18:21

If I remember right, it dates from about 1900-1906.

0:18:210:18:25

I really quite like that. What's the price on that?

0:18:250:18:29

The absolute death on that would be...

0:18:290:18:33

I'll do it for 60. How's that?

0:18:330:18:36

-That is not bad, John. That's not bad.

-It's VERY good.

0:18:360:18:39

-I mean, I couldn't offer you £50? It would be cash.

-No, no, you can't.

0:18:390:18:43

No, you can't. No, £60 would be the absolute best.

0:18:430:18:46

I tell you what, John, I'm going to show you something and if you think

0:18:460:18:49

it's worth knocking off the extra fiver to make it 55, we have a deal.

0:18:490:18:53

If not, I'll give you £65 instead. Are you prepared for that?

0:18:530:18:58

-OK, yeah, I'm happy to make 65.

-How's that?

-That's OK.

0:18:580:19:01

-And you've got to be honest, OK?

-This is taking haggling to a new level.

0:19:010:19:06

OK, watch carefully.

0:19:060:19:07

OK, you can see there's nothing in my hand there.

0:19:070:19:09

I'm going to take the silk hanky and I'm going to put it

0:19:090:19:12

into this hand here, right under your nose right there.

0:19:120:19:16

OK, you can see it. It's right there.

0:19:160:19:18

All I'm going to ask you to do is to just blow on my hands.

0:19:180:19:21

Right.

0:19:210:19:23

Gone. Completely and utterly disappeared.

0:19:230:19:27

Of course. I knew you were going to do that, but...

0:19:270:19:29

-Yeah, actually, that's good.

-It's not bad, is it?

0:19:290:19:32

-That's not bad.

-Is that worth £55?

-Go on, then.

0:19:320:19:35

-We have a deal. Thank you.

-I've been conned but I don't know how.

0:19:350:19:40

Neither do I. You're a man of many talents, Raj,

0:19:400:19:43

and with that little trick, you're all bought up.

0:19:430:19:46

If you do find my green silk hanky, please post it back to me, OK?

0:19:460:19:50

-I'm impressed, actually.

-40, 60. Brilliant.

0:19:510:19:55

Thank you very much indeed.

0:19:550:19:57

Charles still has some spending to do with a final shop to browse.

0:19:590:20:02

This group of old storehouses holds one of the biggest collections

0:20:020:20:06

-of antique traders in the South West.

-Hello there.

0:20:060:20:10

-Hello.

-How are you?

-I'm fine.

-And your name is?

-Anton.

0:20:100:20:13

-Anton, are you a local man?

-Yes.

-Anton is... Is it Polish or...? No.

0:20:130:20:18

-No, it's just a trade name.

-And your real name is...?

-Tony.

-Tony.

0:20:180:20:22

Hello, Tony. I like your style.

0:20:220:20:25

Well, it's not HIS style you're here to buy. Any antiques grab you, boy?

0:20:250:20:29

I like the Myatt tea set down here.

0:20:290:20:32

I'll be very honest with you. Why that is so sensibly priced...

0:20:320:20:37

-Yes.

-..one of the cups has got a chip.

0:20:370:20:40

Because of that, I can negotiate much, much better.

0:20:400:20:45

What's the best price on those, with a broken cup?

0:20:450:20:48

I can go very good on that. I can actually half it for you.

0:20:480:20:51

With a ticket price of £49, that would be a pretty sweet deal

0:20:510:20:55

for the striking Art Deco Myatt tea set.

0:20:550:20:58

-You mentioned one chip, Anton, just show me.

-It's there.

-Oh, no.

0:20:580:21:02

-That one little chip.

-What a shame.

0:21:020:21:04

That's all that's wrong.

0:21:050:21:07

So, what we've got here is an 18-piece, 19-piece tea set.

0:21:070:21:12

-Hand-painted.

-Yeah, it is. The design is vivid.

0:21:120:21:16

Myatt & Sons made it in Staffordshire. I do like it.

0:21:160:21:20

So, I think £25 is a good mid-estimate and, for that,

0:21:200:21:24

it's worth a gamble.

0:21:240:21:25

I shall take your 19-piece tea set for £25

0:21:250:21:30

-and say, "Good day."

-Right.

0:21:300:21:32

Good day. Thanks a lot.

0:21:320:21:34

And, with that, both our intrepid auctioneers are all bought up.

0:21:340:21:38

Raj spent £314, bagging himself the brass postbox moneybox,

0:21:380:21:45

the Georgian cheese coaster, the unusual bronze mask,

0:21:450:21:50

the pair of 20th-century claret jugs

0:21:500:21:53

and the Royal Horse Artillery uniform.

0:21:530:21:55

My father was in the Royal Horse Artillery.

0:21:550:21:58

Charles spent £205 buying the George III blue glass goblet,

0:21:580:22:04

the pair of Russian silver spoons,

0:22:040:22:06

the Queen Anne-style painted wooden doll,

0:22:060:22:09

the mounted silver desk calendar

0:22:090:22:12

and the porcelain Art Deco tea set.

0:22:120:22:15

So, what do they make of each other's lots?

0:22:150:22:17

The items that Charles has bought,

0:22:170:22:19

I think the two that could fly are the doll and the calendar.

0:22:190:22:23

His other items, I love. I love the uniform, I love his cheese coaster,

0:22:230:22:27

so I think Raj ought to soar at auction.

0:22:270:22:30

If I was asked to swap anything with Charles, the answer would be "No."

0:22:300:22:35

After starting this leg in Hele,

0:22:350:22:38

our experts are now hurtling

0:22:380:22:40

towards the auction in Exeter.

0:22:400:22:42

I wish you well.

0:22:420:22:43

So, the man wielding the gavel is Brian Goodison-Blanks.

0:22:430:22:49

Get comfy, as the auction's about to begin.

0:22:490:22:52

Right, here we go.

0:22:540:22:55

Charles, it's your Bristol Blue glass goblet first.

0:22:550:22:59

-Start me at 20, somebody.

-Come on.

-Start me at 10, somebody.

0:22:590:23:02

-Oh, it's painful.

-At 10, 12, 15?

0:23:020:23:06

-15. 18...

-Go on.

-..20, 22,

0:23:060:23:09

-25, 28? Are you sure, sir?

-One more.

0:23:090:23:12

At 25 here, then. Are we all done at 25? 8 now elsewhere?

0:23:120:23:15

-Last chance, then, at 25.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:23:150:23:17

-There we go. Happy with that.

-Fantastic.

0:23:170:23:20

First profit in the pocket. Raj is up next, with his brass moneybox.

0:23:200:23:25

£15. Save your pennies. You'll need them later.

0:23:250:23:30

-Oh, no.

-That's good!

0:23:300:23:33

-£10, madam.

-He's got 1,000 pence.

-12 now. 15?

-Here we go.

0:23:330:23:37

15. 18? No, at £15 in the middle to the lady.

0:23:370:23:41

15. 18, sure? At £18 on my left and standing at 18. And 20?

0:23:410:23:44

Are you quite sure then at 18?

0:23:440:23:47

GAVEL BANGS

0:23:470:23:48

It's almost been lost in the post, hasn't it?

0:23:480:23:50

Not sure now's the time for jokes, Charles.

0:23:500:23:53

That's a disappointing start for poor old Raj.

0:23:530:23:56

Now the pair of Russian silver spoons.

0:23:560:23:58

Various interests and commissions here.

0:23:580:24:00

With me here at 30, 5, 40, 5, 50. 50 is bid.

0:24:000:24:04

That's it. I'm out.

0:24:040:24:06

At 50 with my commission bid, then. 55 in the room. I'm out, then.

0:24:060:24:10

-At 55 here. Looking for 60 now.

-That's it. I'm down 10. Go on.

-55...

0:24:100:24:15

-GAVEL BANGS

-Ah, hard luck, old chap.

0:24:150:24:18

Let's hope Raj fares a little bit better

0:24:180:24:20

with the Georgian cheese coaster.

0:24:200:24:22

What will I say for that? Somebody's got to be brave to take this on.

0:24:220:24:25

-£20?

-Oh, God.

-£10, then. 10, I have, wave of the hand.

0:24:250:24:29

-And 12, 15, 18, 20...

-It's going to move. Hold tight.

0:24:290:24:32

-22, 25?

-Yes.

-£22, cheaper than firewood.

-Yes, 25.

0:24:320:24:36

-No, no.

-5 elsewhere. At 22...

0:24:360:24:39

GAVEL BANGS

0:24:390:24:41

-Aw.

-Was that two fat ducks?

-That was two very fat ducks.

0:24:410:24:43

This saleroom is not proving popular with Raj. Another loss there.

0:24:430:24:47

-That's quackers, isn't it? It's quackers.

-Boom, boom, Charles.

0:24:470:24:51

OK, Peggy's up next. Can this damaged dolly pull in a profit?

0:24:510:24:55

-Hold tight. Come on, doll.

-Various interests here.

0:24:550:24:59

At 25, 35, 40.

0:24:590:25:01

-£40 is bid. At 40. Can I see 5 elsewhere?

-Come on. Let's go.

0:25:010:25:04

-At £40. Bid me 5, somebody.

-Come on. Come on.

0:25:040:25:07

45, 50. And 5? No.

0:25:070:25:09

-My commission has it then.

-Good.

-At £50 and 5 now? Quite sure, then?

0:25:090:25:14

-At £50, then. At 50!

-GAVEL BANGS

0:25:140:25:17

-Happy with that.

-50-80. Yeah, you can't complain with that.

0:25:170:25:20

A nice little earner there for Charles.

0:25:200:25:22

Next up is Raj's big-money spend.

0:25:220:25:25

It's the decorative bronze mask.

0:25:250:25:27

This mask is a massive gamble, but if I'd seen it in that shop

0:25:270:25:31

where you were, I would have bought it as well.

0:25:310:25:34

80 is commission bid here. Here at 80 with me.

0:25:340:25:36

Do I see 5 now in the room? 85. 90 now. 85. 90 at all?

0:25:360:25:41

85 with the lady. 90? 85, then, you're quite sure for the wall mask?

0:25:410:25:45

It's 19th-century. At 85, then. At 85...

0:25:450:25:49

GAVEL BANGS Well, I've got no chance now, have I?

0:25:490:25:52

That's a real shame, but don't throw in the towel yet, Raj.

0:25:520:25:56

-We're only halfway through.

-I'm never coming to Exeter again.

0:25:560:26:00

Oh, dear. Anyway, hold tight.

0:26:000:26:02

Next up, it's Charles' silver-mounted desk calendar.

0:26:020:26:06

-So what will I say for that? Start me at £20.

-Oh, no.

0:26:060:26:09

-£20 I have.

-That's tough.

-22, 25 seated, 25, 28?

-That's tough.

0:26:090:26:14

25 seated, then, looking for 28, then.

0:26:140:26:17

25 seated. 28 fresh place. 30, 2?

0:26:170:26:20

-Come on.

-Nope.

-Oh, no!

-30. Original bidder at 30.

0:26:200:26:22

If you're quite sure, are we all done at £30 then? At 30...

0:26:220:26:26

GAVEL BANGS

0:26:260:26:28

That gives Raj a chance to catch up with his 19th-century claret jugs.

0:26:280:26:33

If these make a loss, I'm going to... I don't know.

0:26:330:26:35

I was going to say I was going to eat my underpants, but I'm not.

0:26:350:26:38

-Various interests here. 25, 30, 5, 40.

-Wow.

-£40 is bid.

-Brilliant.

0:26:380:26:44

-Brilliant.

-Well, that's about right.

-At £40 here. 5 at all?

0:26:440:26:47

At £40 only for the decanters, then, are you quite sure?

0:26:470:26:49

I thought they'd make a little bit more. At £40. Are you quite sure?

0:26:490:26:52

-I'm selling at £40...

-GAVEL BANGS

0:26:520:26:54

-That's a result.

-That's a result.

-Put it there.

-No.

-Put it there.

0:26:540:26:59

-All the Ps, profit all round.

-That's more like it.

0:26:590:27:03

Raj's first profit of the day.

0:27:030:27:05

Let's see if the winning streak can continue

0:27:050:27:08

-with Charles' Art Deco tea set.

-I'll start at 40.

-Come on.

0:27:080:27:11

-I'll start at 20 then.

-Oh!

0:27:110:27:14

20 I have, wave of the hand there.

0:27:140:27:16

-Go on, sir.

-At 20. 5 now, anybody else?

-Come on.

0:27:160:27:19

25, thank you, madam. 30, sir?

0:27:190:27:21

-30, 5? 40, 5? At 40 to the gentleman...

-One more. Go on.

0:27:210:27:26

..the provisional bidder. Looking for the 5, then.

0:27:260:27:29

-At 40, are you quite sure?

-Squeeze a smile?

0:27:290:27:32

-GAVEL BANGS

-Thank you very much.

0:27:320:27:34

A result. Marvellous.

0:27:340:27:36

To have any chance of catching up, Raj will need a massive

0:27:360:27:39

profit on his last lot - the Royal Horse Artillery uniform.

0:27:390:27:44

-Attention!

-Various interests here.

0:27:440:27:46

Overlapping commission bids starting here at 25, 35, 45...

0:27:460:27:50

-Good.

-..55, 65, 75, 80.

0:27:500:27:55

-£80 here.

-Brilliant.

-At £80.

-I'm not...

-That's good.

0:27:550:27:59

5 now elsewhere? 85 I have. At 85.

0:27:590:28:01

I am out, then, at 85. 85 is now in the room.

0:28:010:28:03

90 now, somebody, for the uniform. Militaria is on the up.

0:28:030:28:06

At £85, then, looking for 90 now. You're quite sure then?

0:28:060:28:09

All in with 85. Right in the middle then and selling.

0:28:090:28:12

-GAVEL BANGS

-That's good.

-It's a profit, yeah.

0:28:120:28:14

-£30. That's fantastic.

-That it is!

0:28:140:28:18

A pretty profit for the uniform.

0:28:180:28:20

On that march, one, two, after you. Come on.

0:28:200:28:23

Well done, chaps. But the big question is who came out on top?

0:28:230:28:28

Raj struggled with three lots, which meant,

0:28:280:28:31

after paying auction costs, he made a loss of £109,

0:28:310:28:35

but he's not out of the game yet as he's still got £305.86.

0:28:350:28:41

Don't step back.

0:28:410:28:43

Charles also made a loss, albeit a little less dramatic.

0:28:430:28:47

After costs, he lost £41.

0:28:470:28:50

This means our dapper dandy has £423.64 left

0:28:500:28:56

and is in the lead going into the final leg.

0:28:560:28:58

Well, it's goodbye, Exeter...

0:28:580:29:01

-Hello, Cornwall.

-Hello, Cornwall.

-Yes.

0:29:010:29:04

Here we go.

0:29:040:29:05

It's the final leg of this week's adventure with our likely lads,

0:29:080:29:12

Raj and Charles.

0:29:120:29:14

You know, it's been a very, very lovely experience for me.

0:29:140:29:18

And, of course,

0:29:180:29:19

it wouldn't have been anywhere near this enjoyable without you.

0:29:190:29:22

I think what's nice, Raj...

0:29:220:29:24

I'm going to need therapy, though, I have to say. When I get home,

0:29:240:29:27

-I am going to need a little bit of therapy.

-Thanks a lot(!)

0:29:270:29:29

Their final leg starts in Lostwithiel, Cornwall,

0:29:290:29:33

and will finish at auction in Crewkerne.

0:29:330:29:35

First shopping stop is Uzella Court Antiques Centre.

0:29:350:29:40

-Let's go.

-Keep it real. Hello.

-Good morning.

0:29:400:29:43

-Hello, Vicky. I'm Raj.

-Hello, Raj.

-Lovely to meet you.

0:29:430:29:46

-And the famous Charles.

-And the famous Charles.

-Get out of here!

0:29:460:29:50

-Far from it.

-Good morning.

0:29:500:29:51

-You have a wonderful shop here.

-Yes.

-It is.

0:29:510:29:53

That means plenty of pretty pieces on offer for our experts.

0:29:530:29:57

I've just noticed there is a lovely,

0:29:580:30:01

lovely red serpentine stone lighthouse there.

0:30:010:30:06

Serpentine stone goes back millions of years.

0:30:060:30:10

And it comes in lots of different colours.

0:30:100:30:13

But the red one, I think, is actually

0:30:130:30:14

one of the most attractive ones.

0:30:140:30:17

It's not a cheap piece but I'm going to speak to Vicky

0:30:170:30:19

and see what we can do.

0:30:190:30:21

Huh. With a ticket price of £55, is there a deal to be had?

0:30:210:30:26

45 would be the very, very best.

0:30:260:30:29

I'd like to get it for about £35.

0:30:290:30:31

And I still don't think there is going to be a big

0:30:310:30:33

-profit in this at auction.

-Perhaps not.

0:30:330:30:36

But it has got a tiny little nick there, which I hadn't noticed.

0:30:360:30:40

So I will have to reduce it.

0:30:400:30:42

40, Raj, would have to be truly my very, very best.

0:30:420:30:46

-And I'm speaking on behalf of the owner.

-OK.

0:30:460:30:49

I'm not going to rush into it but if I can just put it to one side

0:30:490:30:53

and think about it. Have a little look around and come back to it.

0:30:530:30:57

-I will keep it safe.

-Thank you very much, Vicky.

-Bye-bye.

0:30:570:31:00

Charles, meanwhile, is rummaging around upstairs.

0:31:010:31:04

These are quite nice. I quite like these vases.

0:31:040:31:07

What I love about these vases is they almost have a

0:31:100:31:13

bit of a Christopher Dresser, Linthorpe look.

0:31:130:31:17

And I suspect the vase would date to around 1905, 1910.

0:31:170:31:22

They are called a pair of Art Nouveau vases. £15.

0:31:220:31:27

If I could perhaps acquire them for a tenner...

0:31:270:31:30

They are a good buy.

0:31:300:31:32

Actually, I might, in case Raj comes upstairs, put them down here.

0:31:320:31:37

Out of harm's way.

0:31:370:31:39

Smart thinking, old bean. Now, what has Raj found?

0:31:390:31:43

-All these keys.

-I really like the crib boards. Do you play crib?

0:31:430:31:47

No, I don't.

0:31:470:31:49

-Really old-fashioned game.

-Yeah.

-Really old-fashioned game.

0:31:490:31:52

I particularly like that one. It looks in pretty good condition.

0:31:520:31:56

It's got lovely ball feet which are engraved.

0:31:560:31:58

It's quite a nice, early one.

0:31:580:32:00

I should think it's late 19th, early 20th century.

0:32:000:32:04

Vicky, it's priced at £55. What would be the best on it?

0:32:040:32:08

Um...

0:32:080:32:10

-£40.

-OK.

-You can have that, Raj, for £40.

0:32:110:32:15

That's not too bad.

0:32:150:32:17

I'm going to put it to one side with the lighthouse.

0:32:170:32:19

I'm putting a lot of things to one side at the moment.

0:32:190:32:22

-And come back to it. That'll be great.

-Thank you.

0:32:220:32:24

A third item has caught Raj's eye.

0:32:240:32:27

This is a really nice, decorative magnifying glass.

0:32:280:32:32

It's made out of silver plate and mother-of-pearl.

0:32:320:32:35

It's only got £14 on the ticket.

0:32:350:32:38

Which isn't a great deal of money.

0:32:380:32:40

If I can get this for £10-£12, there's got to be a profit in it.

0:32:400:32:44

So, Raj has three lots on the table.

0:32:440:32:47

Vicky has given a best combined ticket price of £90.

0:32:470:32:52

Would you do a little bit better if I buy all three?

0:32:520:32:54

Ah...

0:32:540:32:57

If I said 80 for all three, Raj,

0:32:570:32:59

that would have to be the absolute best I could do.

0:32:590:33:02

If you are happy with that, I certainly am.

0:33:020:33:05

I would certainly say yes.

0:33:050:33:07

So a bold, last leg move there from Raj,

0:33:070:33:09

buying three items in the first shop.

0:33:090:33:12

Right, where is Charles?

0:33:130:33:15

That's nice. Barnstaple.

0:33:150:33:17

I love this because it's almost a glaze. It gives me an oceanic feel.

0:33:170:33:22

It's like being here in Cornwall.

0:33:220:33:25

What I could do with this vase, tactically,

0:33:250:33:29

is almost put it with those vases

0:33:290:33:32

and it almost gives them, the Art Nouveau, a bit more of a punch.

0:33:320:33:37

Ah, but is Vicky willing to do the deal?

0:33:370:33:40

£15 is the initial ticket price on the vases. £9.50.

0:33:400:33:46

All in, it makes 24.50.

0:33:460:33:49

And I was hoping to buy the group for £15.

0:33:490:33:54

Which is quite a big discount. Could you do it for £15?

0:33:540:33:58

-No.

-No, OK.

-That's a bit low.

0:33:580:34:01

20 would be ideal.

0:34:010:34:03

-Yeah, I like your style. You're 20.

-Yes.

-I'm over here at 15.

-Yes.

0:34:040:34:09

-If I take a walk in...

-Yeah.

-..can you meet me...

-At 18.

0:34:090:34:13

Yeah. Come over here. That's it, great.

0:34:130:34:14

-£18. That's a deal.

-All right?

0:34:140:34:16

And with that, Charles is off the mark.

0:34:160:34:19

Raj is taking a break from shopping and has headed to Helston.

0:34:190:34:23

He's come to meet local museum curator Katherine to find out

0:34:230:34:26

more about Henry Trengrouse,

0:34:260:34:29

a local man whose invention has saved lives all round the world.

0:34:290:34:33

-Katherine, is that Henry Trengrouse?

-That's Henry Trengrouse, yes.

0:34:350:34:39

He was actually from Mullion but he then moved to Helston

0:34:390:34:42

and he was a local cabinet-maker.

0:34:420:34:44

But, of course, it's not his cabinet-making that he's

0:34:440:34:47

-famous for, is it?

-No, that's right, no.

0:34:470:34:50

He was actually inspired to invent a life-saving

0:34:500:34:54

apparatus for people at sea.

0:34:540:34:56

What actually triggered that off?

0:34:560:34:58

Just after Christmas in 1807,

0:34:580:35:02

he heard that a ship had gone aground off Loe Bar,

0:35:020:35:04

which is just outside Helston.

0:35:040:35:07

And he went down to the beach to see.

0:35:070:35:09

Unfortunately, many people were drowning.

0:35:090:35:12

The ship was actually beached just slightly off the shore, just

0:35:120:35:15

too far for people to get a rope across to it, to get people off.

0:35:150:35:18

About 100 people drowned in front of him

0:35:180:35:21

and the people watching on the beach.

0:35:210:35:23

It sounds like he was really affected by what he'd seen.

0:35:230:35:26

Are there any accounts of what actually affected him?

0:35:260:35:29

Yes, we know exactly how he was feeling because we do have

0:35:290:35:32

one of his notebooks where he describes the wreck.

0:35:320:35:35

"It was then and there the annihilation of this fine ship

0:35:350:35:38

"and so many of my fellow creatures most seriously

0:35:380:35:41

"arrested my reflections and sympathy.

0:35:410:35:43

"And freshened in my memory the premature

0:35:430:35:46

"destruction of about 50 fine fellows at the wreck of a transport

0:35:460:35:49

"ship only a few weeks preceding. And also near the same spot.

0:35:490:35:54

"These melancholy disasters continue

0:35:540:35:56

"to exercise my mind intensely day and night.

0:35:560:35:59

"And I was led to consider what means could have been applied to

0:35:590:36:02

"save those who had so miserably perished within hail of their

0:36:020:36:05

"countrymen and friends, and within a few yards of land and safety."

0:36:050:36:09

Wow, that really does...

0:36:090:36:11

That really does give you a sense of exactly what

0:36:110:36:14

-he must have been feeling.

-Yeah.

0:36:140:36:15

Traumatised after helplessly witnessing men,

0:36:150:36:20

women and children drown in front of him, Henry Trengrouse made

0:36:200:36:24

it his life's mission to help save people from shipwrecks.

0:36:240:36:28

And what did he actually do?

0:36:290:36:31

Well, he actually thought that there must be a way of getting

0:36:310:36:34

a rope across to the ship.

0:36:340:36:35

And he though about how could you actually get it there.

0:36:350:36:38

Actually, I think he had been to a fireworks display

0:36:380:36:42

to celebrate some royal event.

0:36:420:36:43

And the idea of the fireworks just gave him

0:36:430:36:45

the idea to actually fire a rocket.

0:36:450:36:47

So this rocket device, Katherine, how did it work?

0:36:470:36:51

I think his original idea was that every ship would carry this

0:36:510:36:54

apparatus with them. And then fire towards the shore.

0:36:540:36:57

The rocket would get a thin line across to the shore

0:36:570:37:01

which could then be pulled and attached to a larger rope.

0:37:010:37:04

Then once you got a large, substantial rope across, you could

0:37:040:37:07

then attach a seat to it which could be pulled backwards and forwards.

0:37:070:37:11

And that's the Bosun's chair that he invented.

0:37:110:37:13

And was he the first person to come up with this idea?

0:37:130:37:15

He was one of several people who came up with a similar

0:37:150:37:18

idea at the same time, yes.

0:37:180:37:19

It took Henry Trengrouse ten years to fully develop his rescue system.

0:37:190:37:25

Putting much of his own money into his big life-saving invention.

0:37:250:37:29

How long was it used for?

0:37:290:37:30

In actual fact, the basic idea of firing a rocket with a line

0:37:300:37:34

was used up into the early 1980s.

0:37:340:37:36

-Oh, wow.

-And sort of search and rescue helicopters still carry them.

0:37:360:37:40

He must have been a very rich man, then.

0:37:400:37:42

Unfortunately not, no.

0:37:420:37:44

He only made about £50 out of his idea from the Navy.

0:37:440:37:47

Because unfortunately, he didn't patent his idea.

0:37:470:37:50

And the other people who'd come up with a similar device

0:37:500:37:53

patented theirs. So he missed out.

0:37:530:37:55

-So no real recognition for his invention?

-Unfortunately not. No.

0:37:550:37:59

And he actually died in poverty, which is very sad,

0:37:590:38:02

really, considering the amount of lives he actually helped to save.

0:38:020:38:06

Trengrouse's rocket-powered rescue system is estimated to

0:38:060:38:10

have saved over 20,000 lives.

0:38:100:38:12

So while he may not have made money from his ingenious invention,

0:38:120:38:17

Henry Trengrouse did exactly what he set out to do -

0:38:170:38:20

save people's lives.

0:38:200:38:23

It's a bit of a sad ending, really, isn't it?

0:38:230:38:25

I'm afraid so, yes.

0:38:250:38:27

Well, at least it's good that you have recognised,

0:38:270:38:30

and local people have recognised him.

0:38:300:38:32

It's just a shame that, you know, the world's stage didn't.

0:38:320:38:36

But it's been a fascinating story.

0:38:360:38:39

Thank you very, very much for showing me around.

0:38:390:38:41

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:38:410:38:43

-After you.

-Thank you.

0:38:430:38:45

Charles, meanwhile, has hit the road

0:38:460:38:48

and is headed for the city of Truro

0:38:480:38:50

with his remaining haul of just over £405.

0:38:500:38:54

-Are you open to a discount?

-Yeah, I can always say no!

0:38:560:39:00

THEY LAUGH

0:39:000:39:02

Sounds like dealer Gary might need some sweet talking, Charles.

0:39:020:39:07

That's if you find something you fancy.

0:39:070:39:09

These are quite decorative, aren't they? These beakers.

0:39:090:39:13

-And in fact, Gary, you have called these Lalique.

-Mm-hm.

0:39:130:39:17

Pair of Lalique tumblers with black enamel poppy design.

0:39:170:39:22

And all-importantly here, on the bottom,

0:39:220:39:27

is the mark for R Lalique, as in Rene, who died in 1945.

0:39:270:39:32

And some of his most important Art Deco glass

0:39:320:39:36

can fetch small fortunes.

0:39:360:39:38

So, something to think about. Anything else, Charles?

0:39:380:39:42

I quite like the vases up there.

0:39:420:39:44

A nice pair of what appear to be Crown Ducal -

0:39:440:39:47

they could be Crown Devon - vases

0:39:470:39:51

with a blush ivory ground,

0:39:510:39:53

of maybe 1910.

0:39:530:39:55

They are only £15, but it notes, Gary,

0:39:550:39:59

-one has damage. May I have a look at them?

-Yeah.

0:39:590:40:03

It all depends on how serious the damage is. Thanks, Gary.

0:40:030:40:06

They're a good pair, aren't they?

0:40:060:40:08

Oh, I say, they are cracked.

0:40:080:40:10

They're priced at 15. What is the best on them?

0:40:100:40:15

Yeah. As that one is not really worth anything...

0:40:150:40:18

-Yeah, a fiver.

-OK. Yeah. Put it there.

0:40:200:40:24

Oh, sorry, Gary.

0:40:240:40:26

You need to work on that handshake, Charles. What about those tumblers?

0:40:270:40:31

Is there any margin

0:40:310:40:34

for you to give me a bit more off?

0:40:340:40:36

25.

0:40:390:40:40

-20?

-Five.

0:40:400:40:42

-Meet me halfway?

-25.

-20?

0:40:420:40:44

-No.

-Gary, you know what, I just like these

0:40:440:40:47

-because they carry that magic name. Oh-la-la.

-Lalique.

-Exactly.

0:40:470:40:52

And I think for that reason...

0:40:520:40:54

£25, it is worth a gamble.

0:40:540:40:57

-Gary, put it there. That's a deal. Thank you.

-No problem.

0:40:570:41:01

Appreciate it. Thanks a lot, I am really pleased.

0:41:010:41:04

So, with two lots bought, that is day one done.

0:41:040:41:09

Nighty-night, chaps.

0:41:090:41:11

The next morning,

0:41:110:41:13

the boys are soaking up the scenery at Cape Cornwall.

0:41:130:41:16

First stop of the morning is the nearest town to Land's End -

0:41:160:41:19

St Just.

0:41:190:41:21

Raj has come to Bygones, hoping to uncover something special.

0:41:210:41:25

-Good morning.

-Good morning to you.

-Hello, I'm Raj.

-Vicki.

0:41:250:41:29

-Vicki, lovely to meet you.

-And you.

0:41:290:41:31

In no mood to mess about today,

0:41:310:41:32

Raj has already sniffed out something he is cuckoo about.

0:41:320:41:36

This is a very nice little...

0:41:400:41:44

bronze dog.

0:41:440:41:46

It's...cold-painted bronze.

0:41:460:41:50

And it is... I'm trying to...

0:41:500:41:52

I'm not exactly sure what kind... It's a pug.

0:41:520:41:54

It's painted.

0:41:540:41:55

And then rubbed down.

0:41:550:41:58

And it has got a really nice little finish to it.

0:41:580:42:00

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries,

0:42:000:42:03

there were a number of bronze foundries in Austria

0:42:030:42:05

specialising in these cold-painted figurines.

0:42:050:42:08

This is a modern reproduction, but it is real bronze and could

0:42:080:42:12

pull in K-9 collectors.

0:42:120:42:14

The ticket price says 60.

0:42:140:42:17

Make me an offer I can't refuse.

0:42:190:42:21

Make you an offer you can't refuse...

0:42:240:42:26

I could probably make you a few that you could refuse. £25.

0:42:270:42:31

No.

0:42:330:42:34

-No? You didn't even think about it.

-No. I can't do it.

0:42:340:42:37

-You can't do it for 25?

-No.

0:42:370:42:40

Look, 35. Still a bargain for you.

0:42:400:42:43

Hello, Raj!

0:42:450:42:47

I tell you what we'll do, how about we split it?

0:42:470:42:49

30, and it will be cash.

0:42:490:42:51

You drive a hard bargain.

0:42:540:42:57

-We have a deal?

-Yeah.

0:42:570:42:58

-OK, we have a deal.

-You've got a deal.

0:42:580:43:01

And just like that, deal's done for Raj.

0:43:010:43:04

A little further along the coast,

0:43:060:43:08

Raj has made an unscheduled stop, as he has spotted local

0:43:080:43:12

fisherman Steve, who is surrounded by a load of lobster pots.

0:43:120:43:16

-This is an old lobster pot.

-This is an old lobster pot.

0:43:160:43:19

-How old would that be, Steve?

-Is about five or six years old.

-OK.

0:43:190:43:24

-The problem is, the bottom rubs on the hard seabed.

-Ah-ha.

0:43:240:43:28

Rubs the plastic off and then the saltwater rusts it.

0:43:280:43:31

-OK.

-But for what you want...

0:43:310:43:34

What would people do? I mean, that looks ideal to put a plant in.

0:43:340:43:37

-Yep.

-A flower in the garden or something.

-Trailing plants, whatever.

0:43:370:43:40

You are not actually going to buy one of those, are you?

0:43:400:43:43

So if I were to offer you... If they are worth 20 quid at auction,

0:43:430:43:46

-if I were to offer you a fiver, would you be happy with that?

-No.

0:43:460:43:49

-You wouldn't be.

-No.

-No. God, you are a hard man already.

0:43:490:43:52

I could tell. OK... OK, how about ten?

0:43:520:43:56

-That has got to be fair.

-Ten sounds better.

-We shake on it?

-Yep.

0:43:560:43:59

We have a deal.

0:43:590:44:00

Cor, pretty unconventional auction lot,

0:44:000:44:03

but I do love the fact that Raj is getting into the road trip spirit.

0:44:030:44:06

Aren't you?

0:44:060:44:08

While Raj has been taking in the sea air, Charles has travelled

0:44:090:44:12

40 miles northeast to Redruth, with some serious shopping to do.

0:44:120:44:17

Hats off.

0:44:170:44:19

-Charles!

-How are you?

-How are you doing?

0:44:190:44:21

-You got the name.

-You got here eventually.

0:44:210:44:23

We have met before, have we?

0:44:230:44:25

-No, no, I've seen you on TV loads of times.

-Oh, thanks.

0:44:250:44:28

-There we go.

-I just couldn't wait to see you.

0:44:280:44:30

Could we do a deal today, do you think?

0:44:300:44:32

-Hopefully. It would be lovely, I need the money.

-Get out of here!

0:44:320:44:36

Get out of here! I like your necklace, by the way. Goodness me.

0:44:360:44:39

-You carry the gold well.

-Brass.

-Is it?

0:44:390:44:41

You have a look round, Charles. I'll just be behind here.

0:44:410:44:45

-What is your name?

-Walter.

-Walter.

-Yeah, my friends call me Wal.

0:44:450:44:48

-Hey, Wal.

-Right on.

0:44:480:44:50

Yeah, man! Charles, what are you after?

0:44:500:44:53

Well, I quite like... Walter, follow me over here.

0:44:530:44:56

There is one thing I have seen that I quite like.

0:44:560:44:58

-Lots of glass, lots of pottery but I quite like...

-Oh, right.

0:44:580:45:02

-..the bottle.

-It is certainly different,

0:45:020:45:04

a wooden bottle, isn't it?

0:45:040:45:06

I don't think it is overly old.

0:45:060:45:08

-I...

-It definitely isn't Louis XIV.

0:45:080:45:12

The Sun King. Where is our sun today? I quite like this.

0:45:120:45:16

-Interesting, isn't it?

-Yeah. What is your very best on that?

0:45:160:45:20

-I'll do it for a tenner.

-You wouldn't.

-Yeah, why not?

-Look at me.

0:45:200:45:23

I'm looking at you. You look like a nice man.

0:45:230:45:26

Firm friends already,

0:45:260:45:27

Wal is offering up a little titbit for Charles.

0:45:270:45:31

The little pot is different, at the top there, Charles.

0:45:310:45:33

-Is that peculiar?

-Strange, yeah. I have no idea what it is.

0:45:330:45:37

What does it look like to you?

0:45:370:45:39

I would have said a portable inkwell, but maybe not.

0:45:390:45:42

If it was an inkwell, I would have thought it would have had...

0:45:420:45:46

A seal of some sort maybe?

0:45:460:45:48

Some remnants inside of maybe where a glass liner was.

0:45:480:45:51

And I just wonder whether it is to do with

0:45:510:45:56

maybe a nipple cover

0:45:560:45:58

if you were perhaps... What is the phrase? When you feed a baby.

0:45:580:46:05

Breast-feeding.

0:46:050:46:07

Also if you'd fill a bottle, what do you call it?

0:46:070:46:10

What is the phrase?

0:46:100:46:12

What are you on about, Charles?

0:46:120:46:14

-Express.

-Oh, right.

-You've had a baby and you are expressing.

0:46:140:46:17

I just wonder whether maybe there was some sort of nipple cover...

0:46:170:46:22

-In the box?

-In the box.

0:46:220:46:23

You might be onto something there, Charles.

0:46:230:46:26

I could believe that.

0:46:260:46:28

It is marked London.

0:46:280:46:29

I think you've quite rightly dated it to Edwardian.

0:46:290:46:32

It is decorative, it's not got much weight to it.

0:46:320:46:35

But it is quite a dainty object.

0:46:350:46:37

What could you do it for, do you think, Wal?

0:46:370:46:39

Um... I would let you have that for 25.

0:46:390:46:42

It is a shame the marks are rubbed. I think it is an interesting box.

0:46:420:46:45

-You wouldn't do it for 20, would you?

-Go on, go for it.

0:46:450:46:48

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

-Put it there. Thanks a lot.

0:46:480:46:50

So that's a box and a bottle bought. Anything else, Charles?

0:46:500:46:54

What I quite like is...

0:46:540:46:56

-I've stuck that on the second shelf.

-Right.

0:46:570:46:59

Four nice pendants. You've got cycling, that is all the rage.

0:46:590:47:03

And that is a pendant from 1931.

0:47:030:47:09

So early cycling interest.

0:47:090:47:11

Then you've got an interesting little pendant here,

0:47:110:47:15

which appears to be in the form of a sundial.

0:47:150:47:18

Then you've got soccer, football as we call it all over here,

0:47:180:47:22

with a beautiful little blue...

0:47:220:47:24

-Enamel, yeah.

-..enamelled football.

-Lovely.

0:47:240:47:27

Which is 1950s.

0:47:270:47:29

And then, are you a darts player?

0:47:290:47:31

-No, not at all.

-No?

0:47:310:47:32

As a sporting lot, what will be the best price on all four?

0:47:320:47:37

-As a one-hit.

-I'd go £40.

0:47:370:47:41

-For the whole lot?

-For the lot.

0:47:410:47:42

You wouldn't do a bit less, would you, Walter?

0:47:420:47:44

-Is there another one we could throw in?

-Get out of here!

0:47:440:47:47

If that is the case, Walter... You have got one here.

0:47:470:47:51

I think you have picked the dearest one, Charles.

0:47:510:47:54

Well, now you've got five, I will do the five for 50.

0:47:540:47:57

You wouldn't do them for...

0:47:570:48:00

Not a bit less?

0:48:000:48:02

-Oh, Charles...

-£45?

0:48:020:48:03

-Go on, have a go.

-Are you sure?

-Go for it.

-Happy?

-No.

0:48:050:48:07

-Have you been here a while?

-Yes.

-Look at me. You've got to be happy.

0:48:070:48:11

You have upset me now.

0:48:110:48:12

-Don't say that.

-Have you ever seen me cry?

-We have done so well.

0:48:120:48:16

-The journey was well and truly on. Are you sure?

-Yeah.

0:48:160:48:18

Is there a margin in it for you?

0:48:180:48:21

-Not a lot.

-No, but is there a bit of a margin?

-Just a bit.

-OK, sold.

0:48:210:48:24

Thanks a lot. Put it there. Sold.

0:48:240:48:27

Our dapper dandy is all spent up with three final lots bought.

0:48:270:48:31

Raj isn't done yet, though.

0:48:320:48:34

He has made his way to the ancient town of St Columb Major

0:48:340:48:37

and is off to his final shop with his remaining £185.86.

0:48:370:48:42

-Hello.

-Hello there.

0:48:420:48:45

-I'm Raj.

-I'm Tina.

-Tina, lovely to meet you.

-And you.

0:48:450:48:48

It is a pack shop,

0:48:480:48:49

so you'll need to use your head to find your final lot.

0:48:490:48:53

Hello, Charles.

0:48:530:48:54

Oh, suits you, sir. Right, anything looking good, Raj?

0:48:540:48:59

This is really, really quite nice.

0:48:590:49:01

It is a copper inkwell which is slightly different

0:49:010:49:05

because it is very Art Nouveau-y, and it looks like it might be

0:49:050:49:10

from the Newlyn School, which is obviously not very far from here.

0:49:100:49:14

The Newlyn School started around the 1880s and went on

0:49:140:49:19

until the early 20th century.

0:49:190:49:22

It is where a lot of artists went from the cities down here

0:49:220:49:26

because they... They became a colony.

0:49:260:49:28

I can't see a signature on this at all, but it would've sat...

0:49:280:49:32

it would've sat on a desk.

0:49:320:49:33

It's missing its liner, which it would've had.

0:49:330:49:37

But it's definitely got age to it.

0:49:370:49:39

In fact, it has got here "Possibly Newlyn".

0:49:390:49:42

It has got a price on it of £79.

0:49:420:49:45

For POSSIBLY being Newlyn, 79 is quite a heavy ticket.

0:49:450:49:49

Better see if there's a deal to be had with Tina.

0:49:490:49:52

-I see you've got £79 on the ticket.

-I have.

-Now, what could you do?

0:49:520:49:57

-OK.

-I don't want to have to get down on my knees, yet.

0:49:570:50:01

-OK.

-But I will.

0:50:010:50:02

How about if we said...

0:50:020:50:06

65?

0:50:060:50:07

65...

0:50:080:50:10

-I'll tell you what I'd like to pay for it...

-OK.

0:50:110:50:13

..that might give me a chance. I'd like to pay £40 for it.

0:50:130:50:17

Right. Do you think we could do 42?

0:50:180:50:22

-And you could have a deal.

-Are you happy at £42?

0:50:220:50:25

-Yes, I'll be happy with 42.

-You sure?

-Yes.

-Tina, we have a deal.

0:50:250:50:29

Great, thank you.

0:50:290:50:31

And with that, the boys are all bought up.

0:50:320:50:35

Raj spent £162 on six lots.

0:50:370:50:40

The cribbage board,

0:50:400:50:41

the serpentine lighthouse,

0:50:410:50:44

the magnifying glass,

0:50:440:50:45

the lobster pot,

0:50:450:50:47

the bronze pug

0:50:470:50:49

and the Art Nouveau inkwell.

0:50:490:50:51

Charles spent £123,

0:50:520:50:55

buying the trio of vases,

0:50:550:50:57

the wooden coopered bottle,

0:50:570:50:59

the unusual silver box,

0:50:590:51:01

the selection of sports pendants,

0:51:010:51:04

the moulded glass beakers

0:51:040:51:05

and the pair of Crown Devon vases.

0:51:050:51:08

So, what do they make of each other's lots?

0:51:090:51:11

What I really, really like and what might be my Achilles heel,

0:51:110:51:16

it's only got three letters - the pug. It might just go...

0:51:160:51:19

-HE HOWLS

-..at auction.

0:51:190:51:21

Charles has bought well. He hasn't spent a lot of money.

0:51:210:51:24

He has played it very, very safe.

0:51:240:51:26

It is never over until the auctioneer for the last time

0:51:260:51:29

says, "Going, going, gone."

0:51:290:51:30

After starting this leg in Lostwithiel,

0:51:320:51:34

our experts travelled all around the Cornish coast

0:51:340:51:37

and are now off to the very last auction in Crewkerne.

0:51:370:51:41

Presiding over the auction today at lovely Lawrences

0:51:410:51:45

is Richard Kay.

0:51:450:51:46

So, for one last time, our boys are getting ready to head-to-head.

0:51:460:51:51

First up is Raj's mahogany and brass cribbage board.

0:51:520:51:55

Bids here, start me at 20. 25, 30 is bid.

0:51:550:51:58

-Well done, profit.

-It's 35, I'm out.

-Keep going.

0:51:580:52:03

40, new bidder. 45.

0:52:030:52:05

Are you bidding? 50. 55.

0:52:060:52:09

-£55 now.

-Excellent.

-That is awesome, Raj.

0:52:090:52:13

At £55...

0:52:130:52:15

Storming start there for Raj.

0:52:150:52:17

Will Charles be as lucky with his pair of Linthorpe-style

0:52:170:52:20

vases together with the blue Brannam vase?

0:52:200:52:24

What shall we say, £10 for all three?

0:52:240:52:26

-10 is bid.

-Come on.

-12 now.

0:52:260:52:27

15. 18. 20. Five.

0:52:270:52:30

25, lady's bid at £25.

0:52:300:52:33

-Uh-oh.

-30, new bidder. 35.

0:52:330:52:35

40. 45.

0:52:350:52:37

-Selling this one at 45.

-Oh!

0:52:370:52:39

That's good!

0:52:390:52:41

It is indeed, more than doubling your money there.

0:52:410:52:44

Well done, Charles.

0:52:440:52:45

Right, Raj, let's see how

0:52:450:52:46

your Cornish serpentine stone lighthouse fares.

0:52:460:52:49

£10 for it. 10 is bid. Opening at 10. Selling at 10 only?

0:52:490:52:52

-Come on.

-Are we done? £10?

0:52:520:52:55

At £10.

0:52:550:52:56

-Let's go.

-All done at 10? I'm selling.

0:52:560:52:58

Last time.

0:52:580:53:00

That loss means Charles is still in the lead.

0:53:000:53:03

Can he pulled further ahead with his oak and brass-coopered bottle?

0:53:030:53:08

£20 for that. £20 is bid.

0:53:080:53:10

That's good. Come on. Let's move.

0:53:100:53:13

£20, then. And selling this one. 25.

0:53:130:53:16

30. 35.

0:53:160:53:19

40. No? £40.

0:53:190:53:21

-It is the lady's bid at 40.

-Cost me how much?

-Ten.

-That's good.

0:53:210:53:24

The champagne's on ice, the show is almost over...

0:53:240:53:27

-Brilliant, well done.

-Thank you.

-That's a good one.

-Thank you.

0:53:270:53:30

Another top profit there for Charles.

0:53:300:53:33

Next up is Raj's magnifying glass.

0:53:330:53:37

£10 for that. £10 for it.

0:53:370:53:40

-£10, surely.

-Is that a profit?

-5, then. 5 is bid.

0:53:400:53:43

I saw the lady's bid first.

0:53:430:53:44

£8, sir. Are you bidding?

0:53:440:53:47

10. 12. £12 now.

0:53:470:53:50

Selling at 12. At £12, last time.

0:53:500:53:53

So, although it is a £2 profit, after auction costs,

0:53:530:53:57

it means Raj actually made a bit of a loss there.

0:53:570:54:00

Up next is Charles' unusual silver box.

0:54:000:54:03

-£25 for it. 20, then.

-Interesting box.

-£20.

0:54:030:54:06

£15, anywhere?

0:54:060:54:08

-15 is bid.

-Come on.

-18.

0:54:080:54:10

20. £20. I am selling this one at 20. All done?

0:54:100:54:15

Interesting.

0:54:150:54:17

Again, after auction costs, although he broke even,

0:54:170:54:20

that actually results in a bit of a loss for Charles.

0:54:200:54:23

Next, Raj's lobster pot.

0:54:230:54:25

£10 for that?

0:54:250:54:27

5 anywhere? 5 is bid.

0:54:270:54:29

-8 now. 10. 12.

-Well done. Well done, Raj. Profit.

0:54:290:54:33

12. 15. 18. £18.

0:54:330:54:36

Selling at 18.

0:54:360:54:37

-All done at 18?

-Well done!

0:54:370:54:40

-Very good. You gave it all that.

-I gave it all that, and it worked.

0:54:400:54:43

And you got all of that.

0:54:430:54:45

So, a pretty profit there for an old lobster pot.

0:54:450:54:48

Can Charles' collection of silver sports pendants perform as well?

0:54:480:54:53

-What shall we say, £15 for them?

-Oh, dear.

-18. 20.

-There we go.

-Five.

0:54:530:54:57

30. Five. 35. By the pillar at 35.

0:54:570:55:01

Selling this one at £35. Last time.

0:55:010:55:04

All done.

0:55:040:55:05

£10 down.

0:55:050:55:07

No sports fans in the house today, it seems.

0:55:070:55:10

What about dog fanciers?

0:55:100:55:12

A profit on the pug would give Raj a healthy lead.

0:55:120:55:15

Very charming little piece. Bids here start me up at 40. 45. £50.

0:55:150:55:19

-Well done.

-£50 is bid. 55. 60.

0:55:190:55:23

Five. 70. Five. 80. Five. 90.

0:55:230:55:27

-Wow!

-£90, the bid is still with me.

-Wow!

0:55:270:55:29

At 90, I am selling this one at 90.

0:55:290:55:32

£90, then. All done?

0:55:320:55:35

-Put it there.

-Yes?

-Wonderful, wonderful.

0:55:350:55:37

HE HOWLS

0:55:370:55:39

HE BARKS

0:55:390:55:41

A delightful doggy profit for the pug.

0:55:410:55:44

Charles is playing catch-up with his Art Deco glass beakers.

0:55:440:55:47

What shall we say, £40 for them?

0:55:470:55:49

-£40 for them? 30, then?

-Oh. Uh-oh.

-£30 is bid. 35 now.

0:55:490:55:53

40. 45.

0:55:530:55:55

Any more? It is 45. At the cabinets at 45. All done?

0:55:550:55:59

Nice little earner there for Charles.

0:56:000:56:02

But a good result on Raj's

0:56:020:56:04

last lot could see him win this final leg.

0:56:040:56:07

It's the copper inkwell.

0:56:070:56:08

-Charming piece. Bids start me at 50 on this one.

-Oh, my goodness!

0:56:080:56:11

-He's in.

-55. 60. Five, 70. Five, 80.

0:56:110:56:14

Five. At £85 now. I'm out in the room.

0:56:140:56:18

90, new bidder. 95. 100.

0:56:180:56:21

-Are you bidding? 110. 120.

-You've done it!

0:56:210:56:23

It is 120. It is your bid, madam. At 120. And selling at 120

0:56:230:56:28

-if you are done elsewhere. Last time.

-I think you have done it.

0:56:280:56:30

Are we done?

0:56:300:56:32

I think you bought a wonderful object and I think

0:56:320:56:34

you're flying high.

0:56:340:56:36

Fantastic result, but it is not over yet.

0:56:360:56:39

You have still one last chance, Charles.

0:56:390:56:41

It is the final lot of the trip - his Crown Devon vases.

0:56:410:56:45

Come on, auctioneer.

0:56:450:56:47

-I am going to call the room out.

-Blush ivory vases.

-Come on.

0:56:470:56:49

No, no, no, stop that.

0:56:490:56:51

What shall we say, £10 for the two, quickly, for them?

0:56:510:56:55

-£10 here.

-Come on!

-£10 anywhere?

0:56:550:56:57

-Five?

-I need some help.

0:56:570:56:59

-£5. It's awful!

-£2 anywhere?

0:56:590:57:02

It's only a pound each.

0:57:020:57:03

-£2 is bid.

-Help! Help!

0:57:030:57:07

At £2. Only 2? Selling at 2? Are we done with them?

0:57:070:57:10

And £2 only... Four, just in time.

0:57:100:57:13

-One more!

-Six. Selling at six.

-Thank you!

0:57:130:57:16

You made a profit!

0:57:160:57:17

After auction costs, that means a teeny-tiny loss there for Charles.

0:57:170:57:22

-Come on.

-After you. No, you go first, I salute you.

0:57:220:57:25

Well done, chaps, but who is this road trip's overall winner?

0:57:280:57:32

Raj started out with £305.86 and made,

0:57:340:57:37

after paying auction costs, an incredible profit of £88.10.

0:57:370:57:42

Making him today's winner and leaving him

0:57:430:57:46

with an impressive final total of £393.96.

0:57:460:57:50

Well done, that, man.

0:57:500:57:52

Charles began with £423.64.

0:57:530:57:58

And after paying auction costs, also made a profit of £33.62.

0:57:580:58:04

That means he may have lost this leg,

0:58:040:58:06

but he has won the overall trip with a fabulous final tally of £457.26.

0:58:060:58:13

All profits go to Children In Need. Well done, Charles.

0:58:130:58:16

-For the last time.

-For the last time.

-Foot on brake.

0:58:160:58:19

-It is a bit of a sad moment.

-Now, go to first gear.

0:58:190:58:22

-I can say, "Going, going..."

-Gone.

-There we go. That whole time.

0:58:220:58:26

Watch it, watch it.

0:58:260:58:28

It's been a pleasure, boys. Until next time, cheerio.

0:58:280:58:31

Auctioneers Charles Hanson and Raj Bisram take their road trip through Devon. Raj takes a big risk on the way to auction in Exeter. Will his bold bid to catch up pay off before their last shopping trip in Cornwall and that decisive final auction in Crewkerne, Somerset?


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