Episode 1 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 1

Antiques challenge. Experts Christina Trevanion and Paul Laidlaw shop up a storm before heading to an auction in Market Harborough.


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It's the nation's favourite antique experts...

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I don't know what to do. SHE SOUNDS HORN

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..with £200 each,

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a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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Well, an old diamond.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game! Charlie!

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-There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

-Oh!

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today, we embark on a brand-new week road tripping with a fresh

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pair of intrepid antiquers.

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I haven't actually worked with you before.

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And it makes me quite nervous.

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No, seriously, you have forgotten more than I will ever, ever, ever.

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-Behave yourself.

-Whereas you are like the neuroscientist of antiques.

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Mmm, quite. Ha!

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Auctioneer Paul Laidlaw is also a specialist in militaria

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and knows more than a couple of things about antiques.

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He's also quite nimble.

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And sharp.

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You don't want to get me started about Georgian wine glasses.

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We've opened Pandora's box.

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His rival is auctioneer and valuer Christina Trevanion,

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whose charm is matched only by her optimism and determination.

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I could give it a new home. Would you like to pay me to give it a new home?

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Um, it is not the sort of thing I normally do.

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THEY LAUGH

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Today, our lovable duo start their awfully big journey with £200

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each, in a rather fetching 1951 Standard Phase 1 pick-up.

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The pick-up was manufactured before seat belts were mandatory, which is why our experts

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-aren't wearing any.

-What's this?

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-Is that the gear stick?

-That's the column...

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-IN AMERICAN ACCENT:

-That's the column shaft. Look over your shoulder.

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Just look out there.

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Get in! All cars should have these.

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That's amazing! PAUL LAUGHS

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The thing is, you know what is really cool, if I do it really quickly, you can actually take off.

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Woo-hoo!

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On their trip this week, our duo will be traversing the country,

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setting off from Clare, in Suffolk, before careering through Worcestershire and the

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West Midlands and twisting up through Staffordshire, before their

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journey culminates in Northwich, in Cheshire, over 600 miles later.

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On this first leg of their journey,

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are pair are starting in Clare, in Suffolk,

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and heading to their first auction in Market Harborough, Leicestershire.

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I don't mind telling you, I've no idea where I am.

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You're in Suffolk, actually. Ha! And our car seems to be doing funny things to Paul.

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-I've found my true self.

-THEY LAUGH

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I'm telling you, dungarees tomorrow.

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The agricultural style of our pick-up seems to be causing

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a few problems already.

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I think there's a gear problem.

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Oh, no, you haven't broken it already, Paul?

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I don't know about you, but I don't like the smell in here.

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It is really not smelling very healthy, is it?

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No, not a great start, this.

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-Wait a minute, how do we pop...

-Oh, I think you broken it!

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-Here we go.

-Oh.

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-Oh.

-Oh!

-HE LAUGHS

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-It's ruptured.

-That's really not good.

-OK.

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Just as well we're not in the middle of nowhere. Oh, wait a minute.

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-Um. There is a footpath.

-Can we head towards civilisation?

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-Nice knowing you.

-Don't worry, chaps, someone else will deal with the car.

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Keep your thumb out.

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THEY LAUGH

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Like the flappers.

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Having to rely on their own steam for while,

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the first stop is the wool town of Clare.

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Nestling in the rolling Suffolk countryside, it has more than its

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fair share of historic relics that might bode well for our antique hunters.

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-Here we go. I think we part company here, do we?

-Yes, that's the antiques over there.

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-That looks like your shop over there. I better go find mine, hadn't I?

-I shall wish you luck.

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-Take care, bye.

-And they're off!

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While Paul nips across the road, Christina is hoping to get

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her own adventure up and running at her first shop of the day.

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-Hello.

-Hi.

-Hello, hi, Christina.

-Hi, Christina, I'm David.

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Pleasantries over, it's time to get down to business,

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and there are four floors of furnishings and collectables

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from over 100 dealers to peruse.

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See, the temptation is to go to stick to the usual,

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stick to what you know, which is silver, jewellery, small things.

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But I feel like I want to go a bit wacky.

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Yeah, this should be interesting.

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Those look really sweet... Pickle forks. Scottish. Little pieces on top.

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Not that wacky, then. Ha! Specialised utensils like the pickle fork

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were commonplace at Victorian dining tables.

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Popular at a time when table manners increased

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and handling your food became taboo.

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Do you ever use a pickle fork, David?

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I haven't used one in quite a while, actually, to be fair.

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-Normally they are longer than that, aren't they?

-I was going...

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-Because you need them...

-To get into the jar. They sink, don't they?

-Yeah.

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-Like at the chip shop.

-Yeah.

-I'm a classy bird.

-Yeah, you are.

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Classy or not, the owner is looking for £22 for those pickle forks.

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-Is there any chance you might go for £15 on those?

-I can find out.

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I don't think he will, but let me phone him for you.

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While Christina waits for David to get hold of the dealer,

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Paul is rummaging around the shelves of Market Hill Antiques.

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Overseen by Robin Stone, this family run business

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specialises in Art Deco items, but the single room shop is

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packed full of interesting curiosities and collectibles.

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I'm just going to buy what tickles my fancy, in terms of interest

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-and price.

-Nice scent bottle there for you, look.

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-Which one are we looking at?

-The big one.

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-That one there.

-You can have for 30 quid.

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That's a fantastic discount from the original ticket price of 125!

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You know there's profit in that.

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You know how to tempt a man, there's no two ways about it!

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Uh, lovely, late Victorian... Do you call them grenade perfumes? I do.

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-Yeah, cos that's what it is.

-Yeah, yeah.

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Um, we've got a pleasingly-worked hinged lid,

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opening to reveal a ground-in stopper...

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No nasty surprises where... the neck's been chipped or cracked.

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-I'm going to leave that there...

-Yeah, no problem.

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Cos I just can't argue with the numbers, to be honest...

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You know I can't argue with the numbers! Um... But I'm...

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My eyes, I'm easily distracted.

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I'm seeing lovely things hither and thither.

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None of us are in this to come second in this race.

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And somewhere, I guess just down the road,

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she is like a Terminator, a machine, rooting out that...

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That little Holy Grail that we're all seeking.

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Well, if the Holy Grail is a pickle fork! Ha!

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-Um, Christina, I've got the dealer on the phone...

-Hi, David.

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..he's not able to do £15...

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-Oh.

-..but he's willing to do £17.

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-Oh. Can I...

-As I say, I still have him on the phone.

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-Of course you can.

-(What's his name?)

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-Alan.

-Hello, Alan!

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Alan, I was just having a little look at these pickle forks here,

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and they're very, very sweet.

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Is there any chance you'd do 15 on them?

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It just gives me a fighting chance at auction, really, if possible.

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Oh, 15 would be better for me.

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Are you sure, Alan? That's really kind.

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That sounded like a deal to me, so Christina is up and running,

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picking up the pickle forks for £15.

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-OK, I'll keep wandering.

-Yeah, sure. Yep.

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See if there's anything else.

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Meanwhile, Paul's clapped an eye on something rather unusual.

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You...

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-..crank up this, drop a pellet in...

-Yeah.

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Open it up...

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And you have landed in trap.

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1, 2, 9 or B.

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-Do you know what that means?

-Not in the slightest.

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How interesting!

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You've got me with that.

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I hate a conundrum and, see, now I'm not going to sleep tonight.

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A bit stumped, eh, Paul? That doesn't happen often.

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-What's the price on that?

-I've got 65, ticket.

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-Mmm...

-You can always...make me an offer.

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My problem is, I've got five things to buy over the next two days

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-and I hope to buy one here...

-Yeah.

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One is looking like it's out the window.

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But I need to keep my powder dry! Deary me!

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It seems BOTH our experts are having a very productive morning.

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Ow!

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Isn't that lovely? I really like that.

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I mean, that... It's very...

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It's very Arts and Crafts, it's... It's copper. On the label...

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I wonder whether it's got the right label, actually, cos it says...

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It says brass, but that is definitely not brass.

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So if you think of the Arts and Crafts period,

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which is the late 19th, early 20th century,

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so sort of 1890-1900/1910, they used a lot of copperware

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and that is a bit bashed, but that...is fab.

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Love it.

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Really love it.

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£60, do I love it £60-worth? God, I've really got to...

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I've got to carry this down four flights of stairs now, haven't I?

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It's really heavy.

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No such trouble for Paul,

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who is still stalking the floor over at Market Hill Antiques.

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You could save yourself a lot of time and buy all five items here.

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-PAUL LAUGHS

-Don't encourage him, Robin!

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-What price is on the wounded soldiers?

-They can be about £25.

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-About £25.

-Aye.

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And they're Britain, so...

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We've got here, lead soldiers and nurses,

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and in the late 19th century,

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the best ones were made of die-cast lead,

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hand-painted back at the factory.

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-You've got the two nurses, you've got broken legs...

-Yeah!

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-You've got broken arms and bandaged heads, you see?

-Brilliant!

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These have literally been through the wars. £25, I am tempted.

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And he's noticed something else right up his street.

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This is very me.

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This is, of course...

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You know who that is?

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Admiral Lord Nelson, a truly GREAT Briton...

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And this is a commemorative made by Doulton & Watts

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in salt-glazed stoneware...

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Uh, you'd call it a Toby jug, I'd call it a character jug.

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Now, this is the smaller of the varieties.

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You say you had... The big one is the one everyone wants.

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-Yeah, everybody wants that.

-Big money.

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-800 to 1,000 every time.

-Yeah.

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Um... But we don't see so very many of them.

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Should be nicely impressed. That's everything you want...

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Don't need to be an expert to identify the manufacturer of that.

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Lambeth, London stoneware.

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Absolutely fantas... I mean, I really like this.

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I like the medium, I like the origin, and the subject matter?

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Well, don't even get me started.

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Hey, it looks like you've got started all by yourself, huh!

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While Paul is considering half the shop,

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Christina has made it down to ground floor level,

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where she is hoping David can convince the dealer

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to take her offer of £40.

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-£50, Karen? I understand.

-£50, do I like it £50?

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Is it going to make that at auction? Probably not, but I like it.

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-I think I'm happy with that, David.

-OK.

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That's the copper planter and the pickle forks for Christina

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for the grand old sum of £65.

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Good girl.

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But has her rival managed to sort out his own shopping-list conundrum?

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How many items have you clocked up now, Paul?

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One, two, three, four lots.

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I would be off my head to buy four lots here.

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If I'm going to be mad, give me the deal of deals on four lots

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and I take my chances, but it's got to be right.

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125.

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No negotiation.

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-Three are known quantities...

-PAUL GROANS

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-One's not...

-And one speccy piece!

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Yeah, three are known. You've got 'em!

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That's a bold start for Paul.

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With the perfume bottle...

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Pocket roulette wheel...

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The lead soldiers and stoneware of Lord Nelson...

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all for £125.

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Meanwhile, Christina has arrived in the picturesque village

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of Steeple Bumpstead in Essex,

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with a little bit of catching up to do.

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Just over the border from Suffolk, this delightful village is home

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to Bumpstead Antiques & Interiors, don't you love it?

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Maybe you could borrow their car, Christina.

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Writing table there...

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Owner Graham Hessell is showing Christina around.

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Beautiful, look at those guys.

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And that's rather lovely, isn't it?

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Nice Shelley mark on the bottom, wild pattern...

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Wild Flowers pattern, 13668. So, what have we got here, Graham?

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We've got four cups.

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So, originally, there probably would have been a set of six,

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wouldn't there?

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-Yes.

-So, and collectors would want it as a set of six.

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But nonetheless, it's very pretty, isn't it?

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And people do collect Shelley, it is very collectable.

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The Shelley name first appeared on English ceramics around 1910

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and remains a popular Staffordshire china.

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-What have you got on that, on our label?

-We've got 75...

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-Oh, yes.

-..for the set.

-Oof!

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-What... Can you do any...

-Of course I can.

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-Yeah?

-I'll knock £25 off.

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-25, so it's £50.

-£50 for the set.

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-OK.

-Which is about as far as I can go...

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-OK.

-..really, on that.

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That is pretty, I do like that.

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And from coffee service to something completely different.

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OK, so how much have you got on your record player, Graham?

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You can make me an offer on that.

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-I would be looking for something in the region of £35, £40 for it.

-Mm.

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But the problem is, it doesn't work.

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You can just imagine putting it into the back of your car,

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taking it down to the river on a nice, sunny day.

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Taking out the records, having a picnic...

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-And then finding it doesn't work.

-Yeah!

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BOTH LAUGH

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As one that isn't working,

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I would probably be looking at maybe £10 or £15 to sell it on at auction.

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What are your thoughts about that?

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-Well, I'm shocked.

-Oh!

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-But I'm still standing.

-Good, that's the main thing.

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You'll need to come up a little bit, I think.

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What about if we did £60 for the two?

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-No.

-Uh, Graham!

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-What would you want for the two?

-Uh, let's do 70.

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70. Will you meet me in the middle at 65?

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-And I'm taking a risk, but...

-You are, on that.

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-Yeah, I appreciate that. Fine, OK, we'll do that.

-£65 for the two.

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Indeed.

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For a record player that doesn't work and an incomplete coffee service.

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-That sounds a bargain to me, but...

-Yeah!

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-SHE LAUGHS

-..indeed.

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Thank you, I think.

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Long handshake!

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So, with the Shelley coffee service

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and the gramophone added to Christina's haul,

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both our experts have acquired quite a lot already.

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With the pressure off, Paul can forget about shopping -

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for a while, at least.

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Still, without the ailing pick-up,

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he has made his way north

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and is hotfooting through

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the hallowed streets of Cambridge.

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Amongst the famous university buildings,

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Paul is meeting Dr Jane Hughes at the Samuel Pepys Library

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to discover how one celebrated graduate

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helped shape our understanding

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of one of the most extraordinary periods in British history.

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-Hi, is it Jane?

-It is, hello, Paul.

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-Very nice to meet you.

-And you.

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So, this is Pepys Library?

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-It certainly is and we're going to go upstairs and have a look at the library itself.

-Oh, I can't wait.

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Born in London in 1633, Samuel Pepys was the son of a tailor.

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Despite his relatively humble beginnings,

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Pepys found himself at Cambridge University, where his library

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now sits with pride of place in his former college.

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What marked Pepys out from the 17th century crowd

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was his desire to record the events around him.

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At the age of 27, Pepys started a diary that would record

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a tumultuous decade in British history.

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-This is one of the six volumes of the diary.

-Yeah.

0:16:420:16:45

He kept it across ten years, but because paper was expensive,

0:16:450:16:49

you didn't stop the volume at the end of the year,

0:16:490:16:51

-you carried on until you'd completed the volume.

-Aye.

0:16:510:16:53

So, it covers six volumes.

0:16:530:16:55

And, in fact, although the diary is written in shorthand,

0:16:550:16:58

because there were quite a number of different shorthands,

0:16:580:17:01

it's difficult for people maybe 100 or 200 years after this

0:17:010:17:06

-to have read it.

-Right.

0:17:060:17:08

When this was being deciphered by a man called the Reverend John Smith

0:17:080:17:12

in the 1800s - 1818 he started - he didn't know that it was a shorthand.

0:17:120:17:19

However, had he looked in the shelf above where the diary was kept,

0:17:190:17:23

here in the library, he'd have found the crib...

0:17:230:17:25

-Oh!

-So, um...

0:17:250:17:27

Pepys, in fact, had the little booklet

0:17:270:17:28

-from which the shorthand came.

-Right.

0:17:280:17:31

Pepys's diary is possibly one of the most famous in the English language,

0:17:310:17:35

mainly because the rich descriptions detail everyday life

0:17:350:17:39

and some of the more tragic events in a turbulent period in history.

0:17:390:17:43

His writing gave a personal insight throughout the Great Plague

0:17:430:17:46

as it wiped out a fifth of London's population in just seven months,

0:17:460:17:51

and soon he was describing another disaster

0:17:510:17:53

as the Great Fire of London swept across the capital.

0:17:530:17:57

Here, in this particular part of it, he's recording how he was anxious

0:17:570:18:03

that the fire was, in fact, getting very close to his own house.

0:18:030:18:06

-Yeah.

-So he went to do whatever he could

0:18:060:18:09

to try and protect his belongings.

0:18:090:18:11

And first of all, he sent his books and his goods

0:18:110:18:14

and his furniture off to be taken up the river.

0:18:140:18:18

For the remainder of his prized possessions,

0:18:180:18:21

he came up with a rather interesting solution.

0:18:210:18:24

He and a friend dug a large hole, a pit in the garden,

0:18:240:18:28

and put many of their most precious possessions in,

0:18:280:18:31

which involved things you might expect, like important documents.

0:18:310:18:34

-Yeah.

-And he also put his wine into the pit,

0:18:340:18:37

and he very famously put his cheese in,

0:18:370:18:40

but this wasn't just a small piece of cheddar,

0:18:400:18:42

this was a large piece of Parmesan, an Italian cheese.

0:18:420:18:46

A man after my own heart, books and wine.

0:18:460:18:48

-That's right.

-Wonderful.

0:18:480:18:50

Samuel Pepys's diary didn't just capture large events

0:18:500:18:53

and personal details, it chartered his rise through the Royal Navy

0:18:530:18:57

and in his social standing.

0:18:570:18:59

Pepys had become an influential member of society,

0:19:000:19:03

even rubbing shoulders with royalty.

0:19:030:19:06

This is known as the Anthony Roll after the person who painted it...

0:19:060:19:11

-Right.

-..who was called Anthony Anthony.

0:19:110:19:13

Um, and he produced this wonderful roll

0:19:130:19:16

with the ships of the line of Henry VIII,

0:19:160:19:20

so it was already 150 years old

0:19:200:19:22

when it was given to Samuel Pepys by Charles II, as a gift.

0:19:220:19:26

Brilliant.

0:19:260:19:27

And then the ship at the top is a very famous ship,

0:19:270:19:29

-it's called the Mary Rose.

-Indeed, yes.

0:19:290:19:31

Before it sank, leading the attack on the French fleet in 1545,

0:19:310:19:35

the Mary Rose saw 34 years of service

0:19:350:19:38

as the flagship to Henry VIII.

0:19:380:19:40

-And this is the only contemporary image of the Mary Rose...

-Is it?!

0:19:400:19:44

-..from when it was actually sailing.

-PAUL GASPS

0:19:440:19:47

Pepys worked tirelessly to add to his collection of books

0:19:470:19:50

and manuscripts, but the titles in his possession show

0:19:500:19:53

that he was more than just a 17th century aficionado.

0:19:530:19:57

This is the Principia Mathematica by Isaac Newton

0:19:570:20:01

-and it's one of the great books of the Royal Society.

-Yeah.

0:20:010:20:05

-And it has Samuel Pepys's name on the front.

-So it does.

0:20:050:20:09

So, "Imprimatur S Pepys,"

0:20:090:20:11

so Pepys gave permission for it to be published,

0:20:110:20:15

and the reason was that he was the president of the Royal Society...

0:20:150:20:18

Oh, I see.

0:20:180:20:19

..and the president had to give the licence to any book to be produced.

0:20:190:20:23

Newton's law of motion formed the foundation of classical mechanics

0:20:240:20:28

and with Pepys as the president of the Royal Society,

0:20:280:20:30

he was an integral part of this time of social and intellectual change.

0:20:300:20:35

So, somebody like Pepys, who didn't come from a good background,

0:20:350:20:39

-could nevertheless rise up in this new kind of world.

-Mm-hm!

0:20:390:20:42

And I think he probably enjoyed the prospect of meeting people,

0:20:420:20:47

who perhaps, in a previous generation,

0:20:470:20:50

-he would never have had the opportunity to get to know.

-Yeah.

0:20:500:20:53

Pepys embodied a period of social change in the same way

0:20:530:20:56

that his diary captured it for generations to come

0:20:560:20:59

and the 3,000 articles that lie in the handcrafted shelves

0:20:590:21:02

of the Pepys Library remain his enduring legacy.

0:21:020:21:07

It's been a long and eventful first day for our intrepid antiquers,

0:21:070:21:11

but not for their car and it's time for all to say goodnight.

0:21:110:21:15

Sweet dreams.

0:21:150:21:16

Another day and miracle of miracles,

0:21:200:21:23

a new lease of life for the classic car.

0:21:230:21:26

So, hang on a second, the car broke down yesterday

0:21:260:21:29

and now suddenly I'm driving the car?

0:21:290:21:31

Both our experts are delighted to be back on the open road

0:21:330:21:36

with a 1951 pick-up.

0:21:360:21:38

There? No.

0:21:380:21:40

-Shall I go and pick up those gears?

-Yeah.

0:21:410:21:43

You're OK to your left.

0:21:430:21:44

-You're good, you're good...

-Keep rolling, keep rolling, go, go, go-o-o-o!

0:21:440:21:48

-Come on, car!

-Down there!

-Steady!

0:21:480:21:50

-What the...?!

-BOTH LAUGH

0:21:500:21:52

-What?!

-Sorry. Sorry!

0:21:520:21:55

-I was just about on your lap there!

-Why were you sitting on my lap?!

0:21:580:22:01

Yesterday, Paul had plenty to smile about after his bold start,

0:22:040:22:08

grabbing a perfume bottle, the miniature roulette wheel,

0:22:080:22:11

some lead soldiers and the stoneware of Lord Nelson, all for £125,

0:22:110:22:17

leaving him with £75 to play with today.

0:22:170:22:20

Christina picked up a pair of pickle forks.

0:22:210:22:25

A copper planter and stand.

0:22:250:22:27

A Shelley coffee service.

0:22:270:22:29

And a gramophone, totalling £130.

0:22:290:22:31

So, she has £70 for the day ahead.

0:22:310:22:35

And the competition seems to be hotting up - in the car at least!

0:22:350:22:40

Would you like to drive?

0:22:400:22:41

-No, you're doing great!

-Yeah!

0:22:410:22:43

-That's what I said...

-Back in your box, Laidlaw.

0:22:430:22:46

With a set of refurbished wheels to carry them,

0:22:470:22:49

our pair are motoring their way

0:22:490:22:51

towards their first auction of the week in Market Harborough.

0:22:510:22:54

But there's plenty of shopping to do before that

0:22:540:22:57

and we're back in Cambridge where the structure of DNA was discovered,

0:22:570:23:00

where Isaac Newton and Francis Bacon studied,

0:23:000:23:04

and where Paul is now trying to relieve himself

0:23:040:23:06

of his remaining cash.

0:23:060:23:07

And Gabor Cossa Antiques seems like the perfect place to start.

0:23:070:23:11

David Theobald is overseeing the petite surroundings.

0:23:110:23:14

-Hello, there. Is it David?

-Yes, good morning. Nice to meet you.

0:23:170:23:20

-And you, I'm Paul.

-Paul. Hello, Paul.

0:23:200:23:22

Oh, my word! If you hear a clatter, call the cavalry.

0:23:280:23:33

Careful, Paul, there might be some antiques in here(!)

0:23:330:23:35

I'm wedged, I feel like a pot-holer.

0:23:350:23:38

It certainly is cosy back there.

0:23:380:23:40

(Deary me!)

0:23:410:23:43

Mmm... Have you attributed your little...Cotswolds-esque...?

0:23:430:23:48

It's anonymous, I'm afraid.

0:23:480:23:50

-Is it expensive?

-Oh, no.

-BOTH LAUGH

0:23:500:23:53

-Well, I loved the way you said that, David.

-Of course not. Let me see.

0:23:530:23:56

Uh, that's £20.

0:23:560:23:58

Well, it does... It actually says, "To Dad."

0:23:580:24:02

-Oh, my word.

-June 24, '49,

0:24:020:24:04

-so presumably that's 1949...

-Yeah.

0:24:040:24:06

..but was it new then? I don't know.

0:24:060:24:08

It's not without charm. I'm not dismissing that.

0:24:080:24:10

And I think it's priced right, thank you.

0:24:100:24:13

Paul seems keen on the Arts and Crafts-style copper plaque.

0:24:140:24:18

But there's plenty more to consider.

0:24:180:24:20

Your caddy spoon there, who's that?

0:24:200:24:23

-It's Keswick.

-Is it Keswick?

0:24:230:24:25

I've not seen the long-stemmed one before.

0:24:250:24:27

-No, no, but it's not silver, it's nickel.

-Staybrite.

0:24:270:24:29

Staybrite is a form of stainless steel

0:24:290:24:31

successfully used by the Keswick School of Art from around the 1930s.

0:24:310:24:37

The school, established in 1884,

0:24:370:24:39

has long been a proponent of the Arts and Crafts movement.

0:24:390:24:44

Look at the skill here.

0:24:440:24:45

You've got an asymmetric planar tapering stem...

0:24:450:24:50

In profile - there's a great line, is there not?

0:24:500:24:55

And then we've got, I think we could call that "wriggle work",

0:24:550:24:58

post-war wriggle work.

0:24:580:24:59

The planishing works the light.

0:24:590:25:02

And it shimmers.

0:25:020:25:03

Planishing tempers the metal,

0:25:040:25:06

it gives it rigidity at a molecular structural level.

0:25:060:25:12

Here endeth the science lesson.

0:25:120:25:13

Smitten by science...and a spoon.

0:25:130:25:17

So, you've got me with that, David.

0:25:180:25:20

I love it to bits. And your price is absolutely fantastic.

0:25:200:25:25

The £10 ticket price has really worked its charm on Paul.

0:25:250:25:29

That's a real sweetie.

0:25:290:25:31

The speculative piece is the copper plaque.

0:25:310:25:35

What's the very best you could do for me...

0:25:350:25:38

..the two Arts and Crafty pieces?

0:25:390:25:41

Well, I'd like 30... for the two, but...

0:25:410:25:45

25, that would have to be, sort of...

0:25:450:25:47

David. You are a joy to do business with.

0:25:470:25:50

-I'm not going to be silly.

-Thank you.

0:25:500:25:52

-That's a great price and I'm going to shake your hand.

-I hope so.

0:25:520:25:54

A great price indeed. £25 and another two items bought.

0:25:540:25:58

Let's leave Cambridge and our speedy shopper behind.

0:25:590:26:03

Now, what's Christina up to?

0:26:050:26:07

Enjoying some time alone with the pick-up as she winds her way

0:26:070:26:11

towards the village of Burwell in Cambridgeshire.

0:26:110:26:13

This flat, fertile fenland is home to a relic of an industry

0:26:150:26:20

that was once a vital part of life in Britain.

0:26:200:26:23

Christina's visiting Stevens' Mill

0:26:230:26:25

to find out about the often dangerous

0:26:250:26:28

and infamous lives of millers,

0:26:280:26:30

with the help of local volunteer, Colin Marshall.

0:26:300:26:33

-Hello!

-Hello, Christina.

0:26:330:26:35

-So, how long's the mill been here?

-It was built in 1820...

0:26:370:26:39

-Mm-hm.

-..and has been built on the site of an earlier mill.

0:26:390:26:42

Under your feet here, there's the foundations of an earlier mill.

0:26:420:26:45

The development of windmills allowed communities to share resources,

0:26:450:26:50

helping to increase the population.

0:26:500:26:52

They didn't appear in Britain until the 12th century

0:26:540:26:57

and technology quickly advanced so that the mill, or part of it,

0:26:570:27:00

was able to rotate depending on wind direction.

0:27:000:27:04

This made them more efficient, but the basic principle

0:27:040:27:07

of grinding grain has remained the same for thousands of years.

0:27:070:27:11

-So, a handful of wheat, put it into there.

-Yeah.

0:27:110:27:14

So, round and round and round.

0:27:140:27:16

-Oh!

-It's hard work.

-HE CHUCKLES

0:27:160:27:19

-Goodness me!

-Yes.

0:27:210:27:23

-Oh!

-You OK?

0:27:230:27:24

I can quite see why they wanted to build a mill.

0:27:240:27:26

Mills were at the heart of rural communities.

0:27:260:27:29

With Britain's population increasing, there was a need

0:27:290:27:32

for larger quantities of food and mechanised mills became a necessity.

0:27:320:27:36

Around the time that Stevens' Mill was built, the population

0:27:360:27:40

in England was exploding, reaching 16.6 million in 1850.

0:27:400:27:45

And to meet demand, millers had to work

0:27:450:27:48

whenever the weather conditions were right.

0:27:480:27:50

Most moved into houses attached to the windmill

0:27:500:27:53

to ensure they could work around the clock.

0:27:530:27:55

It was a relentless and dangerous occupation.

0:27:550:27:58

-This trap door and this chain...

-Yeah.

0:27:580:28:00

..are for lifting the sacks of grain up into the grain store

0:28:000:28:03

-on the next floor.

-Oh, OK, yes.

0:28:030:28:05

Cos they would have been jolly heavy, wouldn't they?

0:28:050:28:07

-They're very heavy.

-Yeah.

0:28:070:28:08

Um, the original sacks that millers used to use

0:28:080:28:11

-weighed 200 weight each.

-Oof!

0:28:110:28:13

That's equivalent to 16st per bag!

0:28:130:28:17

Millers endured gruelling physical labour

0:28:170:28:20

with a constant threat of injury or even death from open machinery,

0:28:200:28:24

or breathing problems from the dusty environment.

0:28:240:28:27

It was also a cut-throat business

0:28:270:28:29

and competition amongst millers was fierce.

0:28:290:28:31

There were four wind-powered mills in Burwell alone.

0:28:310:28:35

Now, you may have heard stories in the past about how dishonest

0:28:350:28:39

-some millers were.

-Surely not!

0:28:390:28:42

I'm afraid there is more than a modicum of truth in that.

0:28:420:28:45

-Really?

-Yes.

0:28:450:28:46

By law, millers were allowed to keep the flour that became stuck

0:28:460:28:50

in the wooden casings, called tuns.

0:28:500:28:53

But it seems not all millers

0:28:530:28:55

were satisfied with this little bit of extra.

0:28:550:28:57

Some millers decided that they would like to keep

0:28:570:29:01

a bit more flour behind

0:29:010:29:02

and they built tuns like this, which are octagonal...

0:29:020:29:06

-Yeah.

-..and leave a lot more gaps in there to collect the...

0:29:060:29:10

-Oh!

-..grain.

0:29:100:29:11

-That's a bit naughty.

-It is a bit.

0:29:110:29:13

-So they'd gather more than they probably should have done?

-Yes.

0:29:130:29:16

So it became sort of slightly accidental to...

0:29:160:29:18

Yeah, and some made it even more accidental,

0:29:180:29:21

they had a thing called a "devil's hole",

0:29:210:29:23

which was an extra little chute that was hidden in the floor

0:29:230:29:27

and went across to their own private sack buried in the wall.

0:29:270:29:31

-No?!

-Oh, yes.

0:29:310:29:33

While some millers may have earned themselves

0:29:330:29:36

a dishonourable reputation, it was undoubtedly hard work.

0:29:360:29:39

It could take seven years of training to become a miller

0:29:390:29:42

and they had to constantly adapt to the changing times.

0:29:420:29:45

Over the course of around six centuries, wind-powered mills

0:29:460:29:50

had become an integral part of society,

0:29:500:29:52

but ultimately, it was the Industrial Revolution

0:29:520:29:55

and the introduction of huge factories that spelt their decline.

0:29:550:29:59

-Welcome to the best view of the Fens!

-Oh, wow!

0:29:590:30:03

-Just...I mean, you can really see, you can get an idea of how completely flat it is, can't you?

-Yes!

0:30:030:30:09

Stephens Mill was owned by three local families throughout its history.

0:30:090:30:13

It outlived the other local mills and continued operating until 1955.

0:30:130:30:19

Now fully restored, it serves as a memorial to the contribution

0:30:190:30:23

that the mills made and the millers who brought them to life.

0:30:230:30:28

With a fine haul of items under his belt, Paul has made

0:30:280:30:32

the 25-mile journey from Cambridge to the beautiful Risby in Suffolk.

0:30:320:30:36

The Risby Barn Centre features two antique shops,

0:30:390:30:43

one of which is housed in this spectacular 16th century barn.

0:30:430:30:47

With the pressure off, it's time for a leisurely perusal for Paul.

0:30:490:30:54

Meanwhile, Christina has already arrived

0:30:550:30:58

but is nipping into the other antique centre.

0:30:580:31:01

Ah, only one more thing to get and I'm running out of time,

0:31:010:31:05

so I'd better get cracking!

0:31:050:31:07

Good Lord, can you imagine the house that came out of?

0:31:070:31:09

I mean, that is a vast, isn't it?

0:31:090:31:11

Not sure that even THAT would go in the back of my pick-up truck, though, would it?

0:31:110:31:15

The pressure is on, Christina. Perhaps you should

0:31:150:31:18

concentrate on something you could actually buy, love.

0:31:180:31:22

I love that. That's lovely. Nice in oak as well. A really nice thing.

0:31:220:31:27

£250, I really haven't got anywhere near that left, have I?

0:31:270:31:31

No. You only have £70 left to spend, Christina.

0:31:310:31:35

Let's see what Paul's up to.

0:31:350:31:37

-Oh, thanks for that!

-Thank you very much.

0:31:370:31:39

Wonderful, thank YOU.

0:31:390:31:41

Things seem to have slowed down from amble to a complete stop.

0:31:410:31:45

I am only sitting here happy as Larry

0:31:450:31:48

until I start thinking about Christina.

0:31:480:31:51

Because she'll be feeling as happy as I am. She will have done well.

0:31:510:31:55

Don't be so sure... Before she can do well, she has to finish shopping.

0:31:550:32:00

And she's found something unusual outside.

0:32:000:32:04

Where would you find another one of those?

0:32:040:32:06

I mean, it's beautiful, cast iron and it would have

0:32:060:32:08

been on the side of a building here, bolted through,

0:32:080:32:10

and you would have had your sign suspended from there,

0:32:100:32:13

obviously swinging, maybe a pub sign...

0:32:130:32:16

I mean, I personally, I can see an antique sign swinging from there.

0:32:160:32:19

I just think it's rather lovely.

0:32:190:32:21

How much has he got on it? Ooh, it's in the sale!

0:32:210:32:25

Oh, it is a bit bent, isn't it?

0:32:250:32:27

Well, I'll get it for a good price. It can't be bad, can it?

0:32:300:32:33

I just quite like it! Where do you find another one?

0:32:330:32:35

I've never seen another one before.

0:32:350:32:38

I think I'll go and ask about that.

0:32:380:32:40

£45...

0:32:400:32:42

Time to involve owner Joe Aldridge.

0:32:420:32:45

Oh! It looks even more bent now from this angle! Ta-da!

0:32:460:32:51

-That's part of the character!

-Is it? Is that what it is?

-Yes!

0:32:510:32:55

-Is it fixable?

-Yes, with heat.

-OK. It's in the sale.

0:32:550:33:00

And I'm assuming before it went in the sale it was £45.

0:33:000:33:04

-What is it now that it's in the sale?

-No!

0:33:040:33:06

Before it was in the sale, it was £80. It's been reduced to £45.

0:33:060:33:10

-Oh, OK.

-As a special treat, I'll do it for £40.

0:33:100:33:13

Oh, no, come on, Joe! It's broken!

0:33:130:33:17

But that's all part of the character!

0:33:170:33:19

-I was thinking £20, £30...

-Ooh...

-Come on!

0:33:190:33:23

Oh... Give me £30.

0:33:230:33:25

I'd rather give you £20. £20 and you have a deal.

0:33:250:33:28

-Yeah, OK...

-Yay! Thank you, Joe. You're a star!

0:33:280:33:32

-Do think I'll make any money on it?

-Depends who's at the sale.

0:33:320:33:35

-Yeah. Wish me luck!

-Yes.

-Thanks!

-Pity it's bent.

0:33:350:33:41

Thanks to Joe's generosity, that's a reduction of £25 off the sale price.

0:33:420:33:47

Let's remind ourselves of what they've bought.

0:33:480:33:51

Along with the bracket, Christina has a pair of pickle forks,

0:33:510:33:54

a copper planter and stand, a Shelley coffee service and a gramophone.

0:33:540:33:59

She spent £150 on all five items.

0:33:590:34:01

Paul picked up the grenade perfume bottle,

0:34:030:34:06

the wooden roulette wheel, the lead soldiers,

0:34:060:34:10

the stoneware character jug of Lord Nelson,

0:34:100:34:12

and the caddie spoon and copper plaque.

0:34:120:34:15

He too spent £150.

0:34:150:34:19

So, our pair have come out even on the spending stakes,

0:34:190:34:22

but what do they think of each other's offerings?

0:34:220:34:24

I love the fact that he has bought Arts and Crafts,

0:34:240:34:27

sort of copper and his little Keswick caddie spoons.

0:34:270:34:30

We've almost made our own little Arts and Crafts section unwittingly in the auction, which is great

0:34:300:34:34

because it will hopefully attract more buyers, so that's good.

0:34:340:34:37

Holy moley! It's a hell of a lump of wrought iron metalwork.

0:34:370:34:41

I don't know that I understand that purchase, to be honest with you.

0:34:410:34:44

Oh, no, wait a minute, I do! It was £20! NOW I get it!

0:34:440:34:49

I don't see anything, to be perfectly honest, in his selection of items, that is going to make a huge profit.

0:34:490:34:54

-So, it'll be interesting.

-Of course it's going to be an interesting auction.

0:34:540:34:58

It really is. And I cannot wait!

0:34:580:35:01

So, it's off to the auction, but sadly,

0:35:010:35:03

after yet another incident, the pick-up has bitten the dust.

0:35:030:35:07

And they've traded in for something with a bit more...style!

0:35:070:35:13

Look at this, you've got gears, you've got brakes.

0:35:130:35:15

I am slightly nervous, though, that we've actually just got into somebody else's car and driven off!

0:35:150:35:20

No, this rather racy 1999 HMC MkIV is DEFINITELY yours.

0:35:200:35:25

Just don't break it, eh!

0:35:250:35:28

And with their new transport,

0:35:290:35:31

it's off to the first auction of the week in Market Harborough.

0:35:310:35:34

Are you looking forward to the auctions? I...

0:35:360:35:39

-I am not cool with these things.

-Oh, really?

0:35:390:35:41

No, I don't get excited. I get nervous.

0:35:410:35:43

I know you shouldn't have preconceptions about people

0:35:430:35:45

but I always thought of you being big, strong,

0:35:450:35:48

Scottish, you know, manly man...

0:35:480:35:51

I can wrestle bears and wolves, so don't get me wrong!

0:35:510:35:53

But you're terrified of heights and nervous at auctions? THEY LAUGH

0:35:530:35:57

Well, we'll soon see if Paul's fears are warranted.

0:35:570:36:01

As our duo pull up at the family-run film of Gildings Auctioneers.

0:36:010:36:05

-Into the fray, Paul Laidlaw.

-Oh, don't! Don't pile it on!

-Our first auction...

0:36:050:36:12

Are you really nervous? It's there, darling. SHE LAUGHS

0:36:120:36:15

And the man with the gavel today is auctioneer Will Gilby,

0:36:150:36:19

Who has cast his expert eye over Christina and Paul's picks.

0:36:190:36:23

The Doulton and Watts commemorative jug of Lord Nelson is,

0:36:250:36:30

you know, that's in good condition. They typically fare well at auction.

0:36:300:36:34

There's still a good collectors' market

0:36:340:36:36

for items in good condition there.

0:36:360:36:38

Shelley, it's got a good name but it's just missing the mark

0:36:380:36:41

in terms of its really Art Deco shape and style.

0:36:410:36:45

It's a little floral. Very British, of course,

0:36:450:36:47

but not what the real Deco enthusiasts are looking for.

0:36:470:36:51

Paul and Christina are both presenting

0:36:530:36:55

five lots at the auction today.

0:36:550:36:58

So, let's get started.

0:36:580:37:00

-First up, Paul's lead soldiers.

-£20 here, please. At £20.

-Right, go!

0:37:030:37:08

22 online.

0:37:080:37:10

22, 25. 25, 28.

0:37:100:37:11

-Online bidders at £28. At 28...

-Come on, you're into a ballpark!

0:37:110:37:17

More bidders at £30 online.

0:37:170:37:19

30, for 32. Are there any further bids? You're out online. Both out.

0:37:190:37:22

That's £7 profit on Paul's first lot.

0:37:250:37:28

Let's see if Christina can fare any better with her pickle forks.

0:37:280:37:32

There they are, nice little pair of pickle forks

0:37:320:37:34

for the man who has everything.

0:37:340:37:36

And let's open the bidding, please. At £20? £10 bid. Thank you.

0:37:360:37:39

Great, £10.

0:37:390:37:41

£12 online. 12 online... At £12, inset bidder at 12.

0:37:410:37:43

15. At £15, at 15, thank you, £15 bid. £18 online.

0:37:430:37:48

You're there...

0:37:480:37:50

£18 Internet bid at 18. You're out in the room at £18.

0:37:500:37:53

So, ignoring the auction costs, they scrape home with a £3 profit.

0:37:540:38:00

Paul has combined his caddie spoon and plaque into a single lot

0:38:010:38:05

and they're up next.

0:38:050:38:06

This is going to be my nemesis. You're going to do well with this.

0:38:060:38:09

Thank you, sir, £30 bid. Straight in at £30...2, 5, 8...

0:38:090:38:13

£40...2, 5, 8...£50...

0:38:130:38:18

300!

0:38:180:38:19

50...5, 60, standing at 60...

0:38:190:38:23

That's a fantastic £35 profit, stretching Paul's lead.

0:38:260:38:30

I'm going from just that little limbering up stretch,

0:38:310:38:34

-I've got a little bit of a jog on.

-Mm.

0:38:340:38:37

Oh, wait a minute, is that a cliff edge?

0:38:370:38:39

Ever the optimist, Paul! Time for Christina's gramophone.

0:38:410:38:45

-£20.

-Commission already!

0:38:450:38:47

£20...2, 5, 8...£30...

0:38:470:38:49

-Come on!

-32, 35... £35 my bid absentee. At £35.

0:38:490:38:54

At £35... £38 bid. Thank you.

0:38:540:38:57

The absentees are lost, at £38 in the room. At £38, all done.

0:38:570:39:02

-Sweet!

-Happy days!

0:39:040:39:06

So, all that hard bargaining paid off in the end,

0:39:060:39:10

giving Christina a £23 profit.

0:39:100:39:13

The next lot is Paul's perfume bottle.

0:39:130:39:16

Any bids at £30? Thank you. At £30, bid. At £30, I have bidders.

0:39:160:39:20

-There's a maiden bid of £30.

-Oh, it's going to be cheap

0:39:200:39:23

if it sells at that. No, it's too cheap...

0:39:230:39:25

Modest but selling at £30...

0:39:250:39:27

Cheap, though. Man alive! Oof!

0:39:280:39:31

A profit is a profit, Paul.

0:39:310:39:33

Next up is Christina's wrought iron bracket.

0:39:350:39:38

-£10, then - let's start low at £10.

-No!

0:39:380:39:41

As low as I go, at £10, can I see 10? I do. Thank you.

0:39:410:39:43

£10, bid at £10.

0:39:430:39:45

£12, here's the bid. £12, second row. 15, £15. £18...

0:39:450:39:48

-Come on!

-Somebody'll make a lot of money on this!

0:39:480:39:51

At £18, any further bids? You're out online.

0:39:510:39:53

I would round that up.

0:39:530:39:55

18, that's virtually 20. We might as well round up to £30!

0:39:550:39:58

You've actually made profit on that.

0:39:580:40:00

Aha, there's that optimism again, Paul. Or is it cheek?

0:40:000:40:05

It's time for the auctioneer's pick.

0:40:070:40:08

Paul's stoneware character jug of Nelson.

0:40:080:40:11

£50 to start them. £50, at 50. Thank you. £50 bid, at 50.

0:40:110:40:14

It's with me online, I'm afraid. At 55? 60 in the corner...

0:40:140:40:19

65, online at 70. 80 they bid.

0:40:190:40:23

-At 80, 85, still going.

-Fire their imagination.

-Come on!

0:40:230:40:27

Are we all done? I'll sell.

0:40:270:40:28

Paul has almost doubled his money there, with a £40 profit.

0:40:310:40:35

Less brackets, more jugs! Less brackets, more jugs!

0:40:350:40:38

A fine lesson for life...

0:40:380:40:40

-Now it's over to Christina's Shelley coffee service.

-£30 I bid. £30 here.

0:40:400:40:45

-£30 I bid.

-More than that!

0:40:450:40:47

£30, at 32, 35, 38 now bid in the room. And I'm out at 38.

0:40:470:40:51

Any other bids? I'll sell at £38.

0:40:510:40:54

Don't worry, Christina. You still have another lot to go.

0:40:550:40:59

Is that angels singing or is that just on the inside?!

0:40:590:41:02

You seem to have lost your nerves, Paul.

0:41:040:41:06

Well, here comes the roulette wheel.

0:41:060:41:08

£20 then, at £20, we open the bidding at £20,

0:41:080:41:10

Thank you. £20 bid at 20.

0:41:100:41:12

At £20, is there any further bid?

0:41:120:41:14

-At £20?

-It's going to sell for 20 quid! No way!

0:41:140:41:16

Ouch!

0:41:190:41:21

£5 down but still out in front.

0:41:210:41:23

Christina has one last chance to pull it all back

0:41:250:41:27

and it comes down to the copper planter and stand.

0:41:270:41:31

-There are bids coming in here at £40. 40, I bid.

-Did he say £400?

0:41:310:41:38

45, 48, 50... My bid at 50, the absentee is at 50, at £50.

0:41:380:41:43

-You're out in the room at £50. With me at 50...

-More, more, more!

0:41:430:41:48

That's just to break even, I think...

0:41:480:41:50

At £50!

0:41:500:41:51

Christina breaks even on her planter

0:41:510:41:54

although it's a loss after auction costs, I'm afraid.

0:41:540:41:57

Christina set off with £200, enough to pay auction costs.

0:41:570:42:01

She has lost £17.16, leaving her with £180.84 for next time.

0:42:010:42:08

Paul also started today with £200, and after auction costs,

0:42:090:42:13

he is up by £40.24, nudging his budget up to £240.24

0:42:130:42:20

and giving him the lead after the first leg.

0:42:200:42:23

So, what just happened? Wait a minute. Where am I?

0:42:240:42:27

You're positively glowing! Positively glowing!

0:42:270:42:30

-Will you behave yourself! There's nothing in it.

-Please may I drive?

0:42:300:42:33

-You love that, don't you?

-I love it! It's just beautiful! Go on, let me!

0:42:330:42:38

Let me! Please! Go on, you're the winner. I'll chauffeur you. Go on!

0:42:380:42:41

-I am happy to be chauffeured. You go ahead.

-Please! Oh!

0:42:410:42:44

ENGINE REVS This is the kind of car that needs sunglasses. Whoo!

0:42:460:42:52

Ta-ta for now.

0:42:520:42:54

Oh, my God! I love it.

0:42:540:42:57

Next time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:010:43:03

Paul gets hot and bothered over a stick...

0:43:030:43:06

Don't you just love this stuff?

0:43:060:43:08

..while Christina just gets all hot and bothered.

0:43:080:43:12

Ooh, I'm a bit hot!

0:43:120:43:13

I'm really hot!

0:43:130:43:15

Antique experts Christina Trevanion and Paul Laidlaw kick off a new trip in Suffolk and Cambridgeshire. Armed with £200 each and an ailing pick-up, they shop up a storm before heading to an auction in Market Harborough.