Episode 2 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 2

Antiques challenge. Christina Trevanion and Paul Laidlaw shop across Gloucestershire and Northamptonshire before going head to head at an auction in Evesham, Worcestershire.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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I don't know what to do!

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..with £200 each, a classic car,

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What an old diamond.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game! Charlie!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to the second instalment

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of the battle of our connoisseurs of collectables -

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Trevanion and Laidlaw - that's auctioneers Paul and Christina.

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Ah, this is the life, Paul Laidlaw.

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This is like a heavenly dream, the sun shining, the daffodils are out.

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-Is this what your world is like? The sun's always like that?

-Yeah!

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Sounds about right.

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Our delightful duo seem to be getting on swimmingly

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in their shiny 1999 HMC Mark IV.

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Yesterday you made money. You made money!

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-A small measure.

-Well, pfft, better than I did!

-Well, yes.

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This side of the fence ain't so rosy!

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Oh, come on, you pair. There's still a long way to go.

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I've moved nowhere, you moved nowhere

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but albeit in the wrong direction. It could be a psychological blow.

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All right, hang on a second. I think we can leave that there.

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I'm at neutral. I'm not in reverse, I'm at neutral!

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Our duo both set off with £200 and, after their first trip to auction,

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Christina's small loss of £17.16 means she has £182.84 today.

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Paul fared slightly better. His £40.24 profit edged him

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in front, giving him £240.24 to splash.

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If this was a parable, it would be the tortoise and the snail!

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Slowly, slowly it may be, but our pair are making good progress.

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On their trip this week, Paul and Christina will be

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covering over 600 miles,

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starting from Clare in Suffolk, through Worcestershire

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the West Midlands and twisting up to Staffordshire, before finishing

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up in Northwich in Cheshire.

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Today, they kick off in Tetbury, in Gloucestershire

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and head north towards the auction in Evesham in Worcestershire.

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Welcome to Tetbury,

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formerly a thriving market town central to the area's wool trade.

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It's now marks its history with an annual race,

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where participants charge up a local hill carrying sacks of wool.

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-Right, come on then. We've got shopping to do.

-Deary me.

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Gosh, they're keen this morning.

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Top Banana, baby.

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Our pair are headed for Top Banana Antiques,

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which has items from over 50 dealers,

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plenty to keep our experts occupied.

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-Well, good luck.

-See you later. And you.

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Miniature brass coal scuttle circa 1920.

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These are really sweet. Useless for coal, obviously.

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But, nonetheless, they're probably, sort of, little salts or

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something like that in the shape of coal scuttles.

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Rather large for salts, Christina.

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What's Paul up to?

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Welcome to my world. Step into my office. Oh, yes.

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This, as you know, is what lights my fire. This floats my boat.

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Honestly, that boy and militaria!

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A bit like Christina and silver.

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Game bird letter opener, WMF. WM?

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Oh, that's interesting.

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OK, WMF, so WMF was a German factory who, I think,

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opened around 1852/1853

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and originally opened as a sort of metalware repairing workshop.

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But, by 1900, I think they were the largest producer of household metalwares.

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Um, and that is really lovely.

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She's taken by that letter opener. Ticket price is £25.

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It's a nice thing. I'm going to need a basket soon, aren't I?

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Better still, manager Dan.

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Picked up those little scuttles there and that little letter knife.

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So, what would be your very best price on a pair of miniature

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-brass coal scuttles, Dan the man?

-Um.

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Come on, Dan the man, I need to win, I'm losing!

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We can do 28 for you on those.

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-28 on those, and how much on my letter knife?

-Um.

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-We can do 20 for you there.

-28 and 20, £48.

-Yes.

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I'm not sure those are going to make me a profit

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and I really need to think about profit at the moment.

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But you could potentially do... If I said 15 on that,

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would you hate me?

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I wouldn't hate you, but I wouldn't agree with you either. How about 18?

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-16?

-You're squeezing me for every penny, aren't you?

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-17.

-17? Brilliant, I'm happy.

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-Thank you very much, Dan. You're a star.

-Yes.

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So, Christina gets a silver letter opener for £17.

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Meanwhile, Paul has dragged himself away from the militaria

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and cornered Julian for some advice on a corkscrew he's spotted.

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This is one of the more ingenious but most common of the Georgian designs.

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Thomason's screw.

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It's a double action so that, with one action,

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you will wind the worm into the cork

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and then, when it's fully screwed in,

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keep turning and it will withdraw the cork,

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so none of this...

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GRUNTING

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Up here, a pleasingly turned bone handle

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and this of course is for dusting the top of one's bottle.

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It has been in the cellar for God knows how long.

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It comes out and it's all rather dusty.

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We don't want to taint our wine. Dust that off and away you go.

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It's nice but the ticket says £168.

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Tell me this guy has got some big margin in there

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and he could discount that heavily.

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135, just to get the day started.

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Right, I don't think it's dear.

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I think it's still too dangerous for me, to be honest with you.

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-I'm going to leave a cheeky little bid on that.

-Right, OK.

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It is cheeky.

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I'll stick 80 quid into that, but I'm going to keep walking

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and I'm not really holding out much hope.

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-Give me a minute and we'll see what we can do.

-No hurry.

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-Glad to see you're taking things easy, Paul.

-The bowels of the place!

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But Christina's hot on your heels.

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Antiques heaven for the Laidlaw but, for me, antiques hell.

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Perhaps Julian can help with something a bit more Christina.

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-What's that?

-That is actually fab.

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That's a French silver, probably about 1890.

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-It's got little French marks on the side, can you see?

-Oh, yes.

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-It's literally is a snuff box.

-What can you do that for?

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I actually have 280, so trade - 240.

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-However, I wouldn't normally do this, but I would do 100 quid.

-£100?

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-£100?

-£100.

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That's pretty much most of all of the money I've got left.

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Is there any way you could just nudge it under the 100?

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Because three figures really scare me.

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I never ever spend that sort of money. 90?

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-£95 and you're mad if you don't buy it.

-£95?

-Yes, job done.

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I think I love you! I'm just completely in love with this thing.

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-It is smashing.

-£95, I've just spent £95.

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Oh, I've just spent £95!

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Indeed she has, leaving her with just £70

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and a lot of shopping to do.

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Oh, I'm a bit hot. I'm really hot!

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That's what taking risks feels like.

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But will parting with most of her money

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in her bid to catch Paul pay off come the auction?

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Only time will tell, Christina.

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Meanwhile, Paul has clocked a rusty dress sword with a price of £120.

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-Julian, how are you doing?

-Hi, Paul.

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Sword hanging in your stairwell to the basement...

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Is there attraction in that?

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Tell me that's been sitting here for a while getting rustier

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and it can be cheap?

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Are we still talking about the corkscrew as well?

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Oh, I like the way you think.

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Different vendors but we could still, the more we spend,

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-the more traction we've got?

-It just helps.

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OK, I would be interested in buying both,

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-but I'm only offering you 50 quid for the rusty little boys' sword.

-OK.

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This happens to belong to my manager.

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-If you can just give me a couple of seconds.

-Hell, yeah.

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-I'll come back to me.

-A couple of minutes.

-You can do the business.

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I'll leave that with you.

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Fingers crossed. I would say the longer he is away, the better.

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An immediate response is generally, "You're having a laugh!"

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There's a chance Paul knows something about this sword

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he's just not letting on.

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Dan the man is saying 80 quid

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-and you're saying 80 on the other, that's 160.

-That's 80 on that?

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But obviously I have a bit of an uphill battle with the corkscrew.

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Without messing around, 150 on the two.

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-I think that's a good deal.

-Good man.

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Paul's not messing about.

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That's £150 for his two items in the first shop.

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So, come on, tell us what you know about this sword then.

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Well, this is called a levy blade - very slender dress piece.

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If this was plain, we would be no further forward.

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But, oh, no, it is etched.

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We have a whole host of scrolls and battle honours

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running all the way up that fuller,

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terminating in the Royal cipher of King George V.

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It is centred by a cartouche with the initials MHIJ

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and those of the initials of the officer that wore this sword.

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How many are unique to and identifiable to an individual?

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I don't know. One in 100? That's a good thing.

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Worth the money?

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Remains to be seen. I think so.

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After a successful first shop for all,

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Christina is weaving her way through a quiet Cotswold Valley.

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She's on her way to the site of a magnificent mansion.

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It was the brainchild of affluent Victorian gentleman William Lee,

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who was inspired by his newfound Catholic faith to build a mansion.

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But a series of misfortunes meant his masterpiece remains incomplete

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after 140 years.

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-Hello.

-You must be Terry.

-Yes. Welcome to Woodchester, come in.

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Thank you. Wow, I can't wait.

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After inheriting his father's fortune at the age of 13,

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Lee was educated at Eton and Oxford,

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but it wasn't until after his conversion

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into the Roman Catholic faith in his early 40s that he moved to

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Gloucestershire to build Woodchester Mansion.

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This wasn't just to be a family home and, as a staunch Catholic,

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Lee began building work with a monastery and a church.

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This is where the family would have been

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expected to be several times a day.

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And as a very devout family,

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this would have been really the heart of the house.

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Yes, and the religious orders would have been conducted by people

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coming up from the monastery that he'd built at the bottom of the valley.

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To capture the scale of his faith,

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he turned to pre-eminent architect and fellow convert Augustus Pugin,

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who was considered the leader of Gothic Revival -

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a movement which expressed faith through the arts.

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Although Pugin resigned the commission,

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work continued in this manner, and it is understood the

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final architect based his work largely on Pugin's designs.

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This is a glorious bit of the building.

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Victorian Gothic was about lifting your eyes to heaven,

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and this is what you do in here.

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And when you look up to heaven, you see these magnificent,

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beautiful carved bosses up in the top

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-and the carved top of the pillars.

-Gosh, yes.

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Driven by his quest to expand Catholicism in Victorian England,

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Leigh focused on the monastery and church,

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waiting for their completion before starting on the mansion.

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By this time, nearly ten years after he began on the estate,

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signs of financial strain started to show.

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So this would have been the family's dining room,

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and this is a room in the house where we can really see

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everything to do with how you build and make great big buildings that

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the Victorians were building,

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but it goes way back to the medieval period -

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it's exactly the same engineering techniques.

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Stonemasons were given space to create arches,

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doorways and fireplaces on each of the levels,

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before any of the floors were installed.

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But, in Woodchester Mansion,

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the day when those floors were laid never came,

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leaving a unique view of the work behind the building.

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It's very instructive because you understand how this works.

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You can go into Canterbury, Gloucester, Westminster Abbey, any of the cathedrals,

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and they're all working exactly the same way

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because one of the geniuses that drove Victorian Gothic revival architecture

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was to ape the glories of medieval lofty buildings.

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The time and love lavished on the religious buildings

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took their toll, and ultimately old age,

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ill-health and a lack of funds hampered the final years of work,

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and the building remained incomplete at William's death in 1873.

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The entire estate passed to his son, Willie.

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Well, shortly after his dad died, Willie Leigh did write to the architects

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-and say, "Can you tell me what this is going to cost to complete?"

-Right.

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And I'm afraid the answer he got was £8,000 to complete it,

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£6,000 to pull it down and put you up a new one.

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The next two generations of the family struggled with

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financial strain, and the mansion was sold in the early 1920s.

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Although he never realised his dream, a trust was created

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in 1989 to preserve the house and ensure that it remains

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a dramatic memorial to William Leigh's faith and vision.

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Meanwhile, with two pieces under his belt already,

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Paul is on his way to Stroud, with £90.24

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burning a hole in his pocket.

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The antique store is housed

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in a former industrial building packed with two floors of antiques,

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which certainly gives Paul a chance to stretch his legs.

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But has he come up with anything that takes his fancy?

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Victorian gentlemen's walking gear.

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No. No, none of that.

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Stop telling me lies, Paul.

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It originated in South Africa.

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This is, probably, what the Zulu would call ironwood.

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These staffs were carried

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almost as a badge of rank by Zulu chiefs.

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And that's the common form of such - a shaft, a pommel -

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and then this spiral decoration.

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Sometimes the pommel modelled as a fist.

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You get variations on the theme.

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If you hold it up to the light you will see, primitively,

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but charmingly, scratched into the pommel the date 1884

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and the initials IY.

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Ah, don't you just love this stuff?

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Price on that, £40.

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History. History for four £10 notes.

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Well, that was a find.

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Paul seems to be in the swing of it now and, believe it or not,

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he seems to making a quick dash towards another

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item of a military persuasion.

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Check out my friend.

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I like that, but I'm deeply frustrated by it.

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Described as a 19th-century original watercolour,

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I can't argue with that.

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But it's way more than a 19th-century watercolour because that,

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I think, is a not half bad portrait of an officer of the

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British Army of the middle years of the 19th century.

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1840-1850?

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At the moment, all I can tell you is he's almost certainly

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an infantry officer of about 1840-1850 and that's it.

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My biggest issue is it's lost its integrity

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insofar as that's in a new frame.

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antiqued gild,

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yes, but nevertheless new.

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So, my issues - the later frame,

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no further detail about the subject, and then a price of £85.

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A few things to talk about then.

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Perhaps time to involve assistant manager Andy.

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-On the one hand, we've got this rustic cane.

-Yep.

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On the other, we got the 19th-century portrait.

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-How flexible can you guys be on price with these?

-40 at the moment.

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-Yeah.

-I could go to 25 on that.

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OK, I like the way you think.

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This is the biggie.

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Could that be cheap, or does that have to be a lot of money?

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-I could do 60 on that.

-That's not going to cut it.

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I thought you'd maybe go there.

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-Can I make you an offer on that?

-Fire away.

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Well, I think it's worth 30 to 60 quid under the hammer.

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Is that dead in the water or is there any chance?

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I'll do 40 on the paint.

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Stick-in-hand, I'm going to try and beat you down some more.

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20 quid and 35, and I'll buy the two things.

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-OK. Yeah, we'll go with that.

-Good man.

-No problem at all.

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-Two things out of nowhere. That's great. I'm delighted with them.

-Yes. Good, good.

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Thanks to Andy's generous £70 discount,

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Paul gets the Zulu staff for £20 and the portrait for £35.

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Well, it's been a productive day.

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Time for our chaps to get some rest.

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Nighty night.

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Next day, and curiosity is getting the better of Christina.

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-Did I see you looking at that corkscrew?

-Mmm-hmm.

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Did you get that?

0:19:210:19:23

Oh, my God. You would be so bad at poker.

0:19:240:19:26

Did you buy that?

0:19:260:19:27

No.

0:19:290:19:30

-Not at all. Definitely not.

-We really need to play cards.

0:19:330:19:36

Cor, Paul was busy yesterday as he grabbed a dress sword,

0:19:400:19:43

a 19th-century corkscrew, a portrait of a British Army officer

0:19:430:19:47

and a 19th century carved Zulu staff, for a total of £205,

0:19:470:19:51

leaving him with £35.24 left to spend.

0:19:510:19:57

Christina picked up a French silver snuffbox

0:19:570:20:00

and letter knife for a total £112,

0:20:000:20:03

so has £70.84 for the day ahead.

0:20:030:20:07

Oh, don't lie down, horse. Stand up.

0:20:130:20:17

-Seriously? Is that an omen or something?

-It's going to rain.

0:20:170:20:20

If the horses are lying... Oh, no, maybe that's cows.

0:20:200:20:23

Good weather or not, Christina is on her way to the gorgeous

0:20:240:20:28

Cotswolds town of Winchcombe.

0:20:280:20:31

Once home to a Benedictine abbey that was once

0:20:310:20:35

a site of pilgrimage and, in the 17th century, the town was

0:20:350:20:38

home to the first man to write a list of British birds.

0:20:380:20:43

Winchcombe Antiques Centre is housed in this Grade II listed building,

0:20:430:20:47

and Christina is being shown around by owner Richard.

0:20:470:20:50

I come to you with very empty pockets, Richard.

0:20:500:20:53

-Oh, that's not good.

-I know. I'm sorry, I'm sorry. I'm sorry already.

0:20:530:20:56

There's nothing quite like laying your cards on the table to get

0:20:560:21:00

things off to good start.

0:21:000:21:02

Really beautiful.

0:21:020:21:04

-Again, it's got about three figures more than my budget, sadly.

-Yeah.

0:21:040:21:09

That's quite nice.

0:21:110:21:12

That's very nice.

0:21:140:21:16

Little brass and copper bucket.

0:21:160:21:18

OK, I'm a bit worried about this price tag already.

0:21:180:21:20

Ticket price of £69.

0:21:200:21:22

Well, at least you would have a pound or two left over.

0:21:220:21:25

Expensive for a bucket, isn't it? Has it got a hole in it?

0:21:250:21:29

-It's got a hole in it.

-Oh, come on, really?

-Yep, look.

0:21:290:21:32

Did you just put that in there?

0:21:320:21:34

-HE LAUGHS

-Well, it's meant to have coal in there,

0:21:340:21:37

-so no coal is going to get through that hole.

-Dust might.

0:21:370:21:40

-What could you do on that? That's quite smart.

-The very best death

0:21:400:21:43

on it is, I should think, £40.

0:21:430:21:46

I like that.

0:21:460:21:48

I mean, you can see it's obviously hand beaten, which is quite nice.

0:21:480:21:51

The rivets are lovely. OK, I'll carry my bucket around.

0:21:510:21:54

-Let's keep wandering.

-All right.

-Show me the rest of your wares, Richard.

0:21:540:21:58

Right, let's have a look in these cabinets.

0:21:590:22:01

I know I said I was going to steer clear...

0:22:010:22:03

-Do you mind if I put my bucket down?

-No, feel free.

-I'll pop it down just there.

0:22:030:22:07

That's pretty. The vesta case...

0:22:090:22:14

with a sort of little Ruskin plaque on it.

0:22:140:22:17

That looks like it was a silver plate at one point,

0:22:170:22:19

-but somebody's polished it off.

-Looks like it's just been heavily polished, yeah.

0:22:190:22:23

Christina's found a matchbox holder with a ticket price of £58.

0:22:230:22:28

These were popular, not to carry around,

0:22:280:22:31

but to conceal ugly matchboxes in a decorative sleeve.

0:22:310:22:36

So, it's time to strike a deal.

0:22:360:22:38

So, I would be looking at securing,

0:22:400:22:43

potentially, both of those for £40.

0:22:430:22:48

-Yeah, I can't do it, basically.

-What can you do?

-What can I do?

0:22:480:22:51

What can you do me for those two?

0:22:510:22:53

-Well, this one, as I say, I need to speak to the owner about that.

-Yep.

0:22:530:22:58

-And your bucket with a hole in it?

-And the most beautiful bucket.

0:22:580:23:02

-With a hole in it.

-30 is the absolute bottom.

0:23:020:23:04

-Well, see what you can get that for.

-OK.

0:23:040:23:07

After some discussion with the dealer on the phone,

0:23:070:23:10

Richard's willing to let the matchbox holder go for £49.

0:23:100:23:14

Let negotiations commence.

0:23:140:23:16

£50 for the two.

0:23:160:23:18

-Did we say that? What did we say?

-No, we didn't say that. No, no, no.

0:23:190:23:23

Me being nice, it's 60 for the two.

0:23:230:23:25

You know that's a good deal.

0:23:280:23:30

That's a £67 discount,

0:23:300:23:32

but would leave Christina with just over £10 with one shop still to go,

0:23:320:23:36

so she's playing hard to get.

0:23:360:23:39

-55.

-No, no, no. Come on, 60.

0:23:390:23:42

Because that is 49 and that's working out at £11.

0:23:420:23:45

58.

0:23:450:23:46

And I'll shake your hand now.

0:23:460:23:48

-Are you that desperate for the £2?

-Yes. Yes.

0:23:480:23:51

-Every penny counts. Thank you very much, Richard. Well done.

-No problem at all.

0:23:510:23:54

There you go, £2 for the hole.

0:23:540:23:56

So, a copper bucket and matchbox holder for £58

0:23:560:24:01

leaves Christina with just over £10.

0:24:010:24:03

Meanwhile, Paul is winding his way through the country roads

0:24:080:24:12

of Gloucestershire, en route to a grand and historic castle

0:24:120:24:14

with royal connections spanning over 1,000 years.

0:24:140:24:19

-Good morning.

-Is it Derek?

-It is.

-Good to see you.

0:24:220:24:25

That's as fine an entrance...

0:24:250:24:28

It's quite impressive, isn't it?

0:24:280:24:30

So welcome to Sudeley Castle.

0:24:300:24:31

Sudeley Castle is famous as it was the home of a

0:24:310:24:34

great number of kings and queens.

0:24:340:24:36

From Edward IV through to Charles I, there is an illustrious

0:24:360:24:41

list of monarchs, including Richard III and Henry VIII.

0:24:410:24:45

However, it is perhaps a lesser-known member of royalty

0:24:450:24:49

who can claim to have left the biggest legacy here Sudeley.

0:24:490:24:53

Tell me more.

0:24:550:24:56

Well, Catherine Parr is possibly our most famous inhabitant.

0:24:560:25:00

I see. As every schoolboy knows, she's the last of Henry's wives -

0:25:000:25:04

the one that survives Henry.

0:25:040:25:06

And that's how she's often dismissed,

0:25:060:25:07

but she is much, much more than that.

0:25:070:25:11

Born in 1512, Catherine Parr was widowed twice

0:25:110:25:14

before the age of 30 and became Henry's sixth wife in 1543.

0:25:140:25:20

She was regarded as an accomplished woman with

0:25:200:25:23

an intellect that the King clearly valued.

0:25:230:25:26

She ran the country when Henry was attacking the French,

0:25:260:25:29

she looked after the young Elizabeth,

0:25:290:25:32

later Elizabeth I, and Lady Jane Grey,

0:25:320:25:34

she was trusted with their upbringing.

0:25:340:25:37

She was an intellectual powerhouse,

0:25:370:25:39

very important religiously, and, for that time, unheard of,

0:25:390:25:45

she actually wrote and published books which we have copies of down here.

0:25:450:25:49

My word. You say, "Unheard of," do you mean literally unheard of?

0:25:490:25:53

-No woman was allowed to publish at that sort of time.

-Is that a fact?

0:25:530:25:56

And here we have a Queen of England writing her own books,

0:25:560:26:00

religious tracts and getting them published.

0:26:000:26:04

And we have three copies of different books that she wrote.

0:26:040:26:07

Catherine Parr was a ground-breaking individual of the age,

0:26:070:26:10

not only writing in her own name,

0:26:100:26:12

the religious nature of her text put her at odds with

0:26:120:26:15

the King on many occasions,

0:26:150:26:17

but Henry maintained his respect for her, making her regent when he left

0:26:170:26:20

to fight in France, and entrusting her to raise the future queen.

0:26:200:26:25

This isn't just another castle. When you paint this picture of

0:26:250:26:29

Parr bringing up her stepdaughter within these walls,

0:26:290:26:33

and then Parr the intellectual, the publisher,

0:26:330:26:37

it's inevitable that it's informative on Elizabeth.

0:26:370:26:40

Very much a strong, independent thinking woman.

0:26:400:26:43

Very much a strong, independent thinking woman,

0:26:430:26:46

but she had one unfortunate blind spot -

0:26:460:26:49

Thomas Seymour.

0:26:490:26:51

After the death of King Henry, Catherine was, within a month,

0:26:510:26:54

married to her old flame, who became the new owner of Sudeley Castle -

0:26:540:26:58

the notorious Thomas Seymour.

0:26:580:27:01

History remembers Seymour as a power hungry individual,

0:27:010:27:05

but letters from Parr to him show

0:27:050:27:07

the clear affection she had towards her fourth husband.

0:27:070:27:11

"I can say nothing, but as my Lady Sussex saith,

0:27:110:27:14

"'God is a marvellous man.'

0:27:140:27:16

"In her that is yours, to serve and obey during her life.

0:27:160:27:19

Catherine, the Queen."

0:27:190:27:20

Still signing herself Catherine the Queen,

0:27:200:27:23

even though she's technically not a queen any longer.

0:27:230:27:25

It moves me beyond belief to think that the

0:27:250:27:27

hand of Catherine Parr lent on that document as she wrote.

0:27:270:27:33

That's an astonishing document and yet you get

0:27:330:27:36

the sophistication in the prose,

0:27:360:27:39

as it were, and indeed the love.

0:27:390:27:42

Catherine fell pregnant aged 36 and gave birth to a daughter,

0:27:420:27:47

but Catherine died just seven days later.

0:27:470:27:50

She was buried at Sudeley and her service was the first time

0:27:500:27:54

Protestant funeral rites were said in English.

0:27:540:27:58

This first is perhaps fitting for a queen who wrote

0:27:580:28:01

so strongly on religious matters

0:28:010:28:04

and is a true testament to a pioneer, who deserves a reputation

0:28:040:28:07

far greater than simply being remembered as the last of Henry's wives.

0:28:070:28:12

Meanwhile, Christina is making her way to the historic

0:28:140:28:17

town of Brackley in Northamptonshire.

0:28:170:28:20

Brackley Antique Centre has been open for 15 years

0:28:200:28:23

and it seems Christina is making a welcome return to old ground.

0:28:230:28:27

I have been here before, I'm sure I have.

0:28:280:28:31

This is certainly jogging some memories.

0:28:310:28:33

And it's huge, so I better crack on.

0:28:330:28:35

She's not kidding.

0:28:360:28:37

There's over 30,000 square feet of shop floor here -

0:28:370:28:40

it's underneath a supermarket -

0:28:400:28:42

so lots to see and plenty that would catch the eye of a certain Mr Laidlaw.

0:28:420:28:47

I mean, his knowledge is quite amazing.

0:28:470:28:51

I mean, literally, he could pick up this piece of paper and go,

0:28:510:28:53

"I happen to know that that piece of paper was used by Nelson

0:28:530:28:57

"the night before the Battle of Trafalgar. And, oh, £1.50, £1.50.

0:28:570:29:02

"£1 it is. Fantastic."

0:29:020:29:04

Auction. 20, 30, £40,000 later.

0:29:040:29:07

Now, Christina,

0:29:070:29:09

you're starting to sound bitter, love.

0:29:090:29:11

SHE SIGHS He's got the Midas touch

0:29:110:29:13

and I do not have a good Scottish accent.

0:29:130:29:16

Blimey, that was supposed to be a Scottish accent?

0:29:160:29:18

HE LAUGHS

0:29:180:29:20

Perhaps you should stick to hunting out antiques, girl.

0:29:200:29:22

-Remind me what you have left to spend, Christina.

-Oh, £12.

0:29:220:29:27

Why did I only leave myself with £12?

0:29:270:29:29

Too late to worry about that now.

0:29:290:29:31

Time to look for a little help.

0:29:310:29:33

Thankfully, Penny is on hand. And you know what to say,

0:29:330:29:36

"Look after you pennies."

0:29:360:29:37

-HE LAUGHS

-Never mind.

0:29:370:29:39

I am looking at some lovely things,

0:29:390:29:41

and if you're thinking that it's nowhere near my price bracket,

0:29:410:29:44

and my price bracket is about £10, then just steer me away.

0:29:440:29:50

-OK.

-OK?

0:29:500:29:52

-All right?

-Will do.

-Ready? Ready to steer?

-Ready to steer.

-OK.

0:29:520:29:55

£34 on it. Is that a steer, or is that OK?

0:29:590:30:01

I think that's a steer, I'm afraid.

0:30:010:30:03

The other thing I saw was this little bamboo cabinet here.

0:30:030:30:07

Oh, yeah.

0:30:070:30:08

Are we thinking that might be a goer?

0:30:080:30:11

No, sadly. Sadly, another steer, I think, I'm afraid.

0:30:110:30:15

-Really?

-Yes, afraid so.

0:30:150:30:16

Oh, dear, I'm sensing a theme here, Christina.

0:30:160:30:20

What about something, like, would something like this be all right?

0:30:200:30:24

-What do you think on that?

-What's she actually got on it?

0:30:240:30:26

Yeah, let's take these off and have a little look.

0:30:260:30:29

Have a little look.

0:30:290:30:30

I mean, that would be really quite useful

0:30:310:30:34

for a sort of trader or a dealer.

0:30:340:30:35

That's like a tabletop cabinet, isn't it?

0:30:350:30:37

A tabletop one, that's where it needs to go, isn't it?

0:30:370:30:40

Yeah, like that.

0:30:400:30:41

And then you could stand here if you were, for example,

0:30:410:30:44

a jewellery dealer or with some small bits of silver,

0:30:440:30:46

you could open it up like that, couldn't you? And then...

0:30:460:30:49

-That's right, hand under, pick the item, couldn't you?

-Yes.

0:30:490:30:52

It's a good strong thing, isn't it?

0:30:520:30:54

Ticket price says £35. Will it be another steer?

0:30:540:30:58

I literally have £12 left.

0:30:580:31:00

Do you think she'd be open to, like, that sort of offer?

0:31:010:31:05

-Yes. I know the dealer, I know she'd...

-Do you think?

0:31:050:31:09

-Yeah, I'm sure she will.

-Really?

0:31:090:31:10

-Yes.

-Is she going to kill me?

-Hopefully not.

0:31:100:31:13

-Penny, I'm very grateful.

-You're welcome. £12. It's a deal.

0:31:130:31:16

£12 for the display cabinet and Christina's purchases are complete.

0:31:160:31:20

But the same cannot be said for Mr Laidlaw,

0:31:230:31:26

who has arrived in the Northern Cotswold town of Chipping Camden.

0:31:260:31:30

Stuart House Antiques has been around for 27 years and the shop,

0:31:320:31:36

including its vast selection of ceramics, is overseen by owner Jim.

0:31:360:31:41

-Good afternoon.

-Hi, Paul.

0:31:410:31:42

-Is it Jim?

-Yes, Jim.

-Good to see you, sir.

0:31:440:31:46

-I like your taste in jackets.

-Ah, yes, I like yours!

0:31:470:31:50

Sartorial elegance aside, Paul is off to the task of trying

0:31:520:31:56

to uncover something glamorous that he can sell at auction.

0:31:560:31:59

I know it's a daft question, sitting in there, is that cheapy, Jim?

0:32:030:32:07

-Is that cheapy?

-Yes.

-How cheap?

-A tenner.

0:32:070:32:11

Not cheap enough, Jim! Could it be a fiver?

0:32:110:32:13

Just a wee throwaway piece.

0:32:130:32:15

-Yeah.

-Good man. Thank you very much, Jim.

0:32:150:32:17

My word, that was a quick deal. Paul clearly couldn't wait.

0:32:180:32:22

So, what is it that made you so keen, Paul?

0:32:220:32:25

That's no ordinary bracelet strap...

0:32:260:32:29

..because it's marked with patent numbers and so on,

0:32:300:32:33

but also, the word army.

0:32:330:32:34

So, it ain't a granny watch strap after all.

0:32:370:32:40

It's actually a trench watch strap.

0:32:400:32:44

The First World War was largely responsible for wrist watches

0:32:440:32:47

becoming the time piece of choice, as it was easier for soldiers to

0:32:470:32:51

check in a hurry than a pocket watch.

0:32:510:32:53

And now, he is on to another military themed item to go with it.

0:32:530:32:57

Jim, how are you doing?

0:32:570:32:58

If I may, I'd like to buy the little watchstrap and that badge, there.

0:32:580:33:04

The LG and the wreath, a tenner the pair?

0:33:050:33:07

I'll do you deal on that, aye.

0:33:070:33:08

You're a good man, Jim.

0:33:080:33:10

I'll shake your hand. A gentleman.

0:33:100:33:12

Swift business. The military badge makes purchase number two here,

0:33:120:33:17

and Paul is planning to combine the two together into a single lot,

0:33:170:33:20

all for a total of £10.

0:33:200:33:22

As well as his military lot, Paul's picked up the dress sword,

0:33:260:33:29

corkscrew, 19th-century portrait and a Zulu staff,

0:33:290:33:32

spending a total of £215.

0:33:320:33:34

Christina's spent £182 on a letter opener,

0:33:350:33:40

silver snuff box,

0:33:400:33:42

copper bucket, matchbox holder and display cabinet.

0:33:420:33:45

So, let's see what our antiques aces think of each other's objects.

0:33:460:33:51

I think, in this instance, I think

0:33:510:33:52

we've both been complete creatures of habit.

0:33:520:33:55

Looking at what he's bought,

0:33:550:33:56

it's just got Paul Laidlaw written all over it.

0:33:560:33:59

In the round, interesting little group of purchases there.

0:33:590:34:03

Anything that's scaring the pants off me?

0:34:030:34:07

Nah! Me, on the other hand...

0:34:070:34:09

Yeah, I mean, militaria, and wine-related ephemera,

0:34:090:34:12

that is Paul Laidlaw, isn't it?

0:34:120:34:15

I think I've got the stronger hand here.

0:34:150:34:17

Well, we shall see.

0:34:190:34:20

After starting off in the Gloucestershire town of Tetbury,

0:34:200:34:23

this leg concludes at auction in Evesham in Worcestershire.

0:34:230:34:27

Right, here we go, the second auction.

0:34:290:34:32

-Yeah.

-I've got the nerves again.

-Have you?

0:34:320:34:35

The knee's not going yet, but it will be.

0:34:350:34:37

I love auctions, but I know that you have absolutely stuck

0:34:390:34:42

within your comfort zone,

0:34:420:34:43

you have only bought stuff that you know full well is going to

0:34:430:34:46

-make you a lot of money.

-No, no.

0:34:460:34:49

Today's battleground is Littleton Auctions.

0:34:490:34:53

Crikey, it's clear you two have been let loose in the countryside.

0:34:530:34:58

The car is now actually considerably heavier

0:34:580:35:00

than it was when we started out!

0:35:000:35:01

Did I do that, really? Did we do that?

0:35:010:35:05

Well, it's your navigation skills!

0:35:050:35:07

Before the off, auctioneer Martin Homer

0:35:080:35:10

has some thoughts on our experts' offerings.

0:35:100:35:13

The Thomason brass barrel

0:35:150:35:17

double action corkscrew is very collectable -

0:35:170:35:19

I think we'll see a lot of interest in that.

0:35:190:35:22

A nice little French snuffbox which, again, is very collectable.

0:35:220:35:26

Though, I think, of the ten lots we've got today,

0:35:260:35:29

I think we'll do quite well with them.

0:35:290:35:31

Our duelling duo are both presenting five lots.

0:35:320:35:36

So, if you're all quite settled in, let's get this show on the road.

0:35:370:35:42

£20 anywhere? Give me 10, then?

0:35:420:35:44

First up is Christina's letter opener.

0:35:460:35:49

Here we are, nice piece there, you can see that picture.

0:35:490:35:51

Bid me on that? Where shall we go? 20, and I'm bid.

0:35:510:35:53

Thank you, the room has it at 20.

0:35:530:35:54

I'll take two. At £20, are we done? 22, I've got. At 22.

0:35:540:35:58

-At 22, and five, sir? 25.

-Yes!

-At £25?

0:35:580:36:02

All done, at the back of the room? At 25, are we done then?

0:36:020:36:04

At £25. Fair warning at 25.

0:36:040:36:07

-Ooo, net! Net!

-25.

-Internet!

0:36:070:36:10

-27. £27, than you.

-Oh, thank God.

-Thank you.

0:36:110:36:13

Blimey, Christina, well spotted.

0:36:130:36:15

30 at the back. £30, the room has it at £30. All done?

0:36:150:36:18

£30 fair warning. At £30.

0:36:180:36:19

You took five years of that poor auctioneer's life!

0:36:200:36:23

You verbally assaulted him there! Internet, oi!

0:36:230:36:26

Well, always nice to get involved, isn't it?

0:36:280:36:30

Paul's double action corkscrew is up next.

0:36:300:36:33

Where shall we go with that?

0:36:330:36:35

£100? Looking for £100.

0:36:350:36:37

We'll go 50 for it then, come on. Surely, £50?

0:36:370:36:40

Internet straight in at £50.

0:36:400:36:42

There we go. Straight away. Go on.

0:36:420:36:44

At 50 I'll take five. 55.

0:36:440:36:46

60 on the net. Five.

0:36:460:36:49

At 65 in the room, looking for 70 now? The net has 75.

0:36:490:36:53

I've not even broken even yet.

0:36:530:36:55

£80 I've got. In the room at 80. And five. 90 on the net.

0:36:550:36:59

Net's now at 90.

0:36:590:37:00

-90. At £90. Looking for five. At £90.

-Come on!

0:37:000:37:03

Are we done then, at £90?

0:37:030:37:05

Fair warning, we're selling at £90.

0:37:060:37:09

Yep, cheap corkscrew! Cheap corkscrew!

0:37:100:37:15

Not what you were hoping for, but still a profit, Paul.

0:37:150:37:18

Christina fought hard to secure a good price for her

0:37:180:37:20

copper and brass bucket, was it worth it?

0:37:200:37:23

-We've got some interest on commission I can start off at £50.

-Ah!

0:37:230:37:27

-Bid's with me at 50.

-How much?

0:37:270:37:29

£50, I'm looking for 55 now.

0:37:290:37:32

At 50 the bid is here, 55, 60.

0:37:320:37:34

Five, 70. Five.

0:37:340:37:36

Oh, my God.

0:37:360:37:37

80. Are you out? At £80, the bid is still with me on the book at 80.

0:37:370:37:40

At £80, are we all done, ladies and gentlemen? I'm selling at £80.

0:37:400:37:44

-This never happens to me!

-£80.

0:37:440:37:45

-Did you just get 80 quid for that?

-Yeah!

0:37:450:37:48

You might not believe it, Christina,

0:37:490:37:51

but that holey bucket has done the business, with a £71 profit.

0:37:510:37:56

-Oh, my word!

-Is this what winning feels like?

0:37:570:37:59

Paul will be hoping to close the gap with his military lot.

0:38:010:38:04

-On commission, with me at 10.

-Commission £10.

-10, 12 I've got.

0:38:060:38:11

Back to me at 15, 17. Back to me at 20. Are you out at 20?

0:38:110:38:16

-Are we done then? I'm selling at £20.

-Double your money.

0:38:160:38:20

-Sold at £20.

-Well done, well done.

-It's all right, a small step.

0:38:200:38:23

Despite a 100% profit for Paul,

0:38:230:38:25

Christina is still out in the lead on today's auction

0:38:250:38:29

and it's her display cabinet up next.

0:38:290:38:32

£20. On the net at 20.

0:38:320:38:33

Are you joking?

0:38:330:38:34

20, 22. 25. At 27.

0:38:340:38:36

What's happening to me?

0:38:360:38:38

£30, £32, At 32, with you, sir.

0:38:380:38:42

Net comes in at 35, 37. At 37, 40 on the net.

0:38:420:38:47

45, sir? 45 in the room.

0:38:470:38:48

I was just trying to spend the money.

0:38:480:38:51

50 on the net. At £50, I'm selling at £50.

0:38:510:38:55

I'm really sorry.

0:38:550:38:57

It seems to be Christina's lucky day.

0:38:580:39:01

Paul is pinning his hopes of a comeback

0:39:020:39:04

on his 19th-century portrait.

0:39:040:39:06

I have some interest on this one

0:39:060:39:08

and I can start this at £100 on commission.

0:39:080:39:11

-£100?

-See, £100!

-I'm back in the game.

0:39:110:39:14

I'm looking for 110 now.

0:39:140:39:17

I'm looking for 110 as well!

0:39:170:39:20

110, 120.

0:39:200:39:21

At 130, 140. With me on the book at 140...

0:39:210:39:25

£100 clear profit.

0:39:250:39:26

-..£140.

-That's brilliant!

0:39:260:39:28

Well done.

0:39:300:39:31

That fantastic profit brings our experts almost neck and neck.

0:39:310:39:35

Next up is Christina's matchbox holder.

0:39:360:39:38

I've got commission interest.

0:39:380:39:40

I can go in at £35 on this.

0:39:400:39:42

Straight in. You're clear.

0:39:420:39:44

40, five, 50, same as the book, but you take preference.

0:39:440:39:47

It's in the room at 50. Fair warning at £50.

0:39:470:39:51

I'm afraid that's a loss after auction costs,

0:39:520:39:56

which leaves the door open for Paul and his Zulu staff.

0:39:560:40:00

At £30 start me then. Come on, surely? 30 I'm bid. Thank you, sir.

0:40:000:40:04

At £30, bid's in the room.

0:40:040:40:05

The net flashed. Internet bidders.

0:40:050:40:07

37, 40. The net's running with this.

0:40:070:40:09

The net IS running with it.

0:40:090:40:11

We'll sit and relax for a minute while the net...

0:40:120:40:15

LAUGHTER

0:40:150:40:16

55 on the internet, ladies and gentlemen. I'm looking for 60 now.

0:40:170:40:20

Are we done then? Fair warning at £55.

0:40:200:40:23

A new bidder in the room now.

0:40:230:40:25

Good God, bless you.

0:40:250:40:27

-Really? No.

-Come on net.

0:40:270:40:29

65 on the net, at 65, £70.

0:40:290:40:31

Back in the room at £70.

0:40:310:40:34

-Good man!

-Someone kick him!

0:40:340:40:36

I'm selling at 70.

0:40:360:40:38

Sold at £70.

0:40:380:40:39

Paul has turned it around and moves ahead.

0:40:390:40:43

But Christina has one item left - her silver snuff box.

0:40:430:40:46

What shall we say, £30 to start me then?

0:40:460:40:48

-Ah!

-Oh, no! Net's in! The net's off. The net's just taking off.

0:40:480:40:52

I can't watch!

0:40:520:40:54

50. On the internet at £50.

0:40:540:40:57

At 50, it comes back into the room, at 55.

0:40:570:41:00

Quite rightly so. It's a lovely thing.

0:41:000:41:03

55 in the room.

0:41:030:41:04

Are we all done, ladies and gentlemen, at £55?

0:41:040:41:06

Oh, my God, no!

0:41:060:41:07

-No!

-Sold 55.

0:41:090:41:10

Like a dagger through my heart.

0:41:100:41:12

That's a tough one to take...

0:41:130:41:15

..and Paul still has his dress sword to go.

0:41:180:41:21

I've got some interest on this on the book

0:41:210:41:23

and I can start this at £50.

0:41:230:41:26

No, you're joking. It's a country mile off,

0:41:260:41:28

this is what I'm telling you.

0:41:280:41:30

-The net is running now with this.

-80, 85, 90, 95(!)

0:41:300:41:36

100, 10...oh...I'm redundant!

0:41:360:41:38

The internet bidders have come alive.

0:41:380:41:41

170.

0:41:410:41:42

170, ladies and gentlemen, on the internet. At £170, are we done then?

0:41:440:41:47

Fair warning and I will sell at £170, all done?

0:41:480:41:51

Sold at £170.

0:41:530:41:54

Well done(!)

0:41:560:41:58

What a fantastic way to end the auction,

0:41:580:42:00

as Paul completes his comeback with his second

0:42:000:42:03

three-figure profit of the day.

0:42:030:42:04

Wow!

0:42:040:42:06

I'm done. I resign. Has anyone resigned after two days? Have they?

0:42:060:42:10

Here we go, that's me.

0:42:100:42:11

Christina started this leg with £182.84.

0:42:110:42:14

After auction costs are deducted, she has made £35.30 in profit.

0:42:140:42:18

Taking her total to £218.14

0:42:240:42:26

After auction costs, Paul made £186.80 profit, taking the day

0:42:300:42:37

with a total of £427.04. Wow!

0:42:370:42:40

-Goodness me!

-Look at that filthy car, where's ours?

0:42:450:42:48

I will drive because then I will take responsibility for the filthy car.

0:42:480:42:51

You'll drive because you're taking it to have it valeted!

0:42:510:42:54

Cheerio, 'till next time.

0:42:560:42:57

Next time, the pressure gets to our experts

0:43:020:43:04

as Christina gets overwhelmed...

0:43:040:43:06

Chocka-chocka-chocka-block, isn't it?

0:43:060:43:08

..and the badgering begins.

0:43:080:43:10

Christina, how long is this going to take? I'm done, come on!

0:43:100:43:14

It's the second leg for antique hunters Christina Trevanion and Paul Laidlaw as they shop across Gloucestershire and Northamptonshire before going head to head at an auction in Evesham, Worcestershire.