Episode 3 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 3

Antiques challenge. Auctioneers Paul Laidlaw and Christina Trevanion are halfway through their road trip, travelling through Hertfordshire, Buckinghamshire and the West Midlands.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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I don't know what to do!

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PARP!

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..with £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond!

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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Happy days!

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Ha-ha!

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There'll be worthy winners,

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-and valiant losers.

-Oh!

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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It's the third leg of this week's epic road trip

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for our treasure hunters, Paul Laidlaw and Christina Trevanion.

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-This is it! This is it! We're living the dream!

-Living the dream.

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What's not to love? The weather's amazing, the car's fabulous...

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-The company, the company...

-The sun is shining...

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HE COUGHS

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-The company!

-The company's amazing!

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Oh, it is, isn't it? I feel exactly the same way!

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CHRISTINA LAUGHS

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Paul is the leader of this pack and he's using every trick in the book.

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Whatever it takes.

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And if you need me crying, I can turn that on, just like that.

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Challenger Christina is keeping her eyes peeled in her bid to catch up.

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Ha-ha!

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Really, I can't see a price tag.

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But both our auctioneers are basking in profit.

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We're both in, in the black.

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-Yeah.

-Profit central.

-Yeah, seriously.

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Now, I think maybe just get some world leader on the phone

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because I think, by the end of this road trip,

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you are single-handedly going to be able to pay off world debt.

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Seriously! I'm not kidding!

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THEY LAUGH

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Christina started the trip with £200

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and has nudged her total up to £218.14.

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Paul started with the same amount

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but made a smashing profit, and has £427.04 in his pocket.

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Impressive? Much like their 1999 HNC MkIV.

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What's not to love, eh?

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Look at this buzzard, look at this buzzard in this hedge.

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Look at it. He's like you. Diving in for the kill!

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Just...crazy. Crazy, in fact.

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You, I mean, you're the most modest man I've ever met.

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Outside, you went, "Ah, behave yourself!"

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Inside, you're going, "Yes! Yes! Yes! Come on!"

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Paul and Christina started their journey in Clare in Suffolk.

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They are careering through Worcestershire

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and the West Midlands and twisting up through Staffordshire before

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their journey of over 700 mile culminates in Northwich in Cheshire.

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Our pair kicked off today's leg in the Herefordshire town of Leominster

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and head north for their next auction in Nantwich, Cheshire.

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Leominster is a beautiful, chocolate-box village in

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the heart of the rolling borderlands between England and Wales.

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It's also Paul's first pit stop.

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Meanwhile, Christina has toddled less than 25 miles

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along the road to Ledbury, where she is being

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shown around Rod's Curiosities, by none other than Rod himself.

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Now, this is nice. Tell me about this. That's quite fun, isn't it?

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-This is a British Thomas Houston Bakelite cone speaker.

-Speaker?

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-Yeah.

-Ooh!

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See, I don't really know huge amounts about these

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but that looks...I mean, it's so typical of its time, isn't it?

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-Oh, it's absolute, absolutely of its era.

-1930s?

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-Round about the '30s, yeah.

-Beautiful.

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And Bakelite, I'd imagine, at that time, was such a new material.

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It was the new plastic.

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The new plastic, so they could, it was one of the first things

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-they could really mould into quite wacky shapes, wasn't it?

-Absolutely.

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I like that. OK, what have we got on that, then, Rod?

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Well, at the moment, we've got £95 on it.

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Do you think £25-30 might be beyond the realms of possibility?

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-We might be able to do something.

-Do you think?

-Yeah.

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-That would be exciting.

-We might be able to.

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-Because I've virtually got it free, really.

-Brilliant.

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You're a man, you're a man of honour, Rod, I like that.

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I like that. Right, let's keep wandering

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and see what else we can find.

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Not a bad price for a speaker that doesn't work!

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Something to think about.

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Because so often now you see Staffordshire, don't you,

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and it's late Staffordshire that was mass-produced.

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And you can just tell, can't you?

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Look, the way the decoration's done is so much more hand-applied.

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That early Staffordshire figure has a ticket price of £35.

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What could you do on that?

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Bearing in mind I'm buying this with my heart, not with my head.

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It's not going to do particularly well at auction,

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but it's very sweet.

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-I really couldn't go below £20 on that, I'm afraid.

-OK.

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So if we said 25 on the speaker and 20 on this,

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could you do 40 for the two?

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-Since it's you...

-No, not since it's me!

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SHE LAUGHS

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-Could you do it?

-Yeah.

-Could you?

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-Yeah. We could.

-You're a legend, Rod.

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Thank you very much. You're a gentleman. I love it!

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Oh, God, no! I need to start thinking more commercially.

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Perhaps. But you do seem rather keen.

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I'm really, really pleased with this little figure.

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It's got this wonderful hole in the base here

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because, at this stage,

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porcelain or pottery was still very experimental,

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in the early 19th century, so basically, for it not to

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explode in the kiln, they couldn't make anything that was too thick.

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So that's a really good sign that it's a nice, early piece.

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And the piece de resistance for me

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is that I know that the auction house we're selling at,

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which is up in Cheshire, is really very good on early ceramics.

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So hopefully we're selling it in exactly the right place.

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Someone's done their homework!

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There we go. 10, 20, 30, 40 Great British pounds.

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£40 seals the Bakelite loudspeaker

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and the 19th-century Staffordshire figure for Christina.

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-Thank you.

-Bye!

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Meanwhile, back in Leominster...

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I recently bought a piece of WMF metalwork,

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which didn't inspire me at all, it wasn't real good WMF, as far as I was concerned.

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I think there's a good WMF group down there.

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Wurttembergische Metallwarenfabrik, or WMF, was one of the largest

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European manufacturers of metalwork in the late 19th century.

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They're not uncommon, so what's caught your eye here then, Paul?

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Look at the aesthetic here.

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Some would be tempted to say Art Deco

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because the nature of the decoration is very geometric, a box grid,

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and that sounds pretty industrial and pretty harsh,

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but it is an aesthetic that I, for one,

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would associate with the designer Hoffman, Koloman Moser.

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These are giants, and I see their Wiener Werkstatte

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influence in this little christening set here.

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I'm pretty excited. That coming across?

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Certainly is, old bean!

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And with a ticket price of £25, time to call on Angela.

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Ha-ha!

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Now that is a bunch of keys if ever I saw one.

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They're for the cabinet round here.

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Right, Angela, so I spotted this early on.

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It's a pretty little WMF christening set. I don't see any,

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but I was just worried that there would be a problem.

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I think your only problem with a christening set is when it's been

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engraved, as this has, but otherwise I think that's fine and dandy.

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She already reduced it? I'll just check for you.

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Nope.

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We can knock you 10% off, actually.

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I'm happy to take 10% discount on that. I think that's not bad.

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-That's lovely, yeah.

-Yeah, I really like that.

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For a total of £22.50,

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Paul has secured his first purchase of the day.

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-That's great.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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-All the best to you. Thanks, Angela. See you.

-Bye.

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Meanwhile, Christina's heading for Great Malvern

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to discover how the water that springs from the nearby hills

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helped spark a Victorian health craze and put the town on the map.

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She's meeting curator Cora at the Malvern Museum.

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So why is Malvern so famous for its water?

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It's because most places that are famous for water are famous

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because their water has got minerals in it, but Malvern water

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is famous because it's hardly got any minerals in it at all.

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The dense, granite rocks that make up the eight-mile ridge of the

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Malvern Hills strip the minerals from the water flowing through it.

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In early medical treatments, it was understood that

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different minerals could be used for different ailments.

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By having so few minerals, Malvern's water was considered to be purer and

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was used by two pioneering doctors in their own brand of water cure.

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In the 19th century, we had two water cure doctors, Dr James Wilson

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and Dr James Gully, who came to Malvern

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and they set up hydropathic practices.

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And they encouraged wealthy people to come here

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because wealthy people had the sort of problems

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that could be treated with Malvern water.

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During Wilson's European travels,

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he encountered the work of a ground-breaking individual,

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Vincent Priessnitz, who had started to develop water cures

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based on his observations of animals

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submerging their injured limbs into water.

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Wilson, suffering from his own ailment,

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stayed at the pioneering clinic and was astounded by his work.

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He stayed about six months. He drank about 2,500 tumblers of water.

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He walked about 200 miles, and he got better.

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And he thought it was so surprising and dynamic,

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he decided he would like to set up a hydropathic institution in England.

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So he came back here, collected his friend, Dr Gully,

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inspired him with hydropathy and then the two of them came to Malvern.

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Wilson and Gully opened their establishment in 1842

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and were among the first to create such a centre in Britain.

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Malvern's pure water already had a reputation for healing properties,

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but Wilson and Gully's patients did not simply drink it.

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They were prescribed various bathing treatments

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to treat ailments as diverse as eye, skin and digestive disorders.

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Forgive me for being a cynic

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but was there any science behind this theory

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-that Wilson and Gully had got together?

-Oh, yes.

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It...you have to know

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just one or two rudimentary things about the body.

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If you get into a hot bath, your skin turns pink.

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That's because, without you doing anything, the body is

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naturally trying to cool itself down

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by bringing the blood to the surface.

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I thought I'm just turning into a lobster!

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THEY LAUGH

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If you get into a cold bath,

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without you doing anything, your body has the opposite effect

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and that is for the blood to go inwards

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-to keep your internal organs warm.

-Yeah.

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So once you know that, then you know that you can move the blood

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around in the body just by the application of warm and cold water.

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Water therapy was used to stimulate the flow of blood

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and was combined with strict regimes of exercise and diet.

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-This is a hip bath?

-This is a hip bath.

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So, if you'd got some sort blockage in the lower

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bit of you around here...

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So digestive problems, right?

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Yes, in the lower digestive tract, this would be ideal for you.

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In the tub. It's cold, remember.

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To treat abdominal complaints, patients would

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sit in the bath with cold water and be wrapped in cold, wet towels

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to encourage blood vessels to contract.

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Water cures caught the imagination of Victorian society

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and Malvern flourished.

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Trade in bottled water from the town increased

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and grand hotels were built

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to accommodate the tourists brought by the new railway.

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Thanks to the craze of water cures,

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the town became known across the country

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and the water that flows from its granite hills

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became the stuff of legend.

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How long am I prescribed to sit here? How long until I get better?

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Well, you've got 15 minutes in the tub twice a day, but actually, your

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complete treatment, seeing what state you're in, three to six months.

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-Three, six months?

-I'm going to leave you to it.

-OK.

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All right, then. Right, three to six months? Am I in that bad shape?!

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Might be a year.

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Looking better already! Ha!

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While she indulges her ailments,

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Paul is just a few steps along the road.

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-Hello!

-How you doing, all right?

-Yes, I'm fine, thank you.

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That's the lovely Bridget, who's on hand to help.

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-How much have you got to spend?

-You see, that would be telling.

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-That would be a rookie negotiating mistake from the off.

-Right, OK.

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COUGHS: £300!

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-No, it's 400! 400, I've got.

-Gosh.

-You going to extract that from me?

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Yeah. Hopefully!

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PAUL LAUGHS

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-I'll take him into that back room!

-Ha-ha!

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Get medieval on me! Like it!

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Watch yourself, Paul!

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Right, let's get spending some of that money.

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What we have here is one of a family of clocks that were made to

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government contracts in the 1930s, '40s.

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And they have certain features in common.

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The first and most important one, from a horological point of view,

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is that they have fusee-driven movements.

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A fusee was a technical advancement that regulates

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the power from the mainspring.

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This technology helped keep the clock accurate,

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but this one has a ticket price of £275.

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They gave them to, for instance, army and air force officers' messes.

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And they were used as smart, accurate,

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for the officers' mess, you could set your watch at seven o'clock,

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and then, "Shall we retire for dinner?"

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So that's one for the shortlist. And he's already onto another timepiece.

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This time, it's a mid-20th century pocket watch with a ticket price of £68.

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To be honest with you, I think that's an unusual

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and not unattractive watch.

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Could you possibly... now, that, for my purposes,

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is a country mile off £68.

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But I don't know what slack's in that.

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Could you do me a massive favour and just see

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if there's any giveaway price on that?

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-I doubt that.

-And I'll just keep rummaging.

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There's no stopping Paul.

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He's already on to something else.

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That's...

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..some size of a perfume bottle, isn't it?

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It's not a perfume bottle. It's...

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This is saddlery, or this will be carried in saddlery.

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The discerning person's choice for taking refreshments on horseback,

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the flask would have been held on a gentleman's saddle

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by a leather pouch, which is sadly missing.

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The ticket price is £48.

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In this instance we have got a silver-mounted glass flask.

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What on earth are you going to do with that?

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I'd need a horse and a lot of leather-work

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and an estate before I could use it.

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What price on that? What could that be?

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-Make it cheap. Can something be cheap? Come on!

-48.

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-Tell me this came in, it was inexpensive.

-48.

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-40, that would be the best.

-Oh!

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I do like clocks and watches

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and I am still thinking about that pocket watch.

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The unusual but high quality,

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the fusee-driven mantel clock in the oak case.

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That's a hell of a lot of my budget,

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but is there slack in the price of that? It's 275 squids.

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The one facing the door, aye.

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Can that be cheap?

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Is there SOMETHING can be cheap?

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We're selling that for someone so...

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-Oh, a private...

-No, it is another dealer. We'll give him a call.

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-No harm in it. I've no self-respect.

-OK.

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OK, whatever it takes.

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And if you need me crying, I can turn that on just like that.

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It may come to that.

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I love the flask. I LOVE the flask.

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I wish I had the leather pouch, that's its Achilles heel.

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It does look a bit like another perfume bottle.

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You put the leather pouch on that, you've got something good.

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-175 for the clock.

-175.

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A good discount for the mantel clock and Bridget also offers

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£50 for the pocket watch and £40 on the saddle flask,

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but can Paul get a deal for all three from owner Nigel?

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On what he was quoted before.

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It's 175, 40 and 50 - 265 at the minute.

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230.

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That's a good offer.

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At £230 it certainly is, even if it was haggled across the room.

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It's a great discount and Paul snaps it up to secure all three items.

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Bold move, Paul.

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-Thank you very much. Next time, I hope.

-Bye-bye.

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And after a hard day of antique acquisition,

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it's time for some rest.

0:17:410:17:42

Sweet dreams, you two.

0:17:420:17:44

The next morning, our curio crackerjacks are headed through

0:17:500:17:53

the West Midlands, just to the south of Coventry.

0:17:530:17:57

My granny used to say, used to terrify me going to Coventry,

0:17:590:18:01

because she'd always say, "I'll send you to Coventry,"

0:18:010:18:04

-and it was just the worst possible.

-What? What? But what's in Coventry?

0:18:040:18:09

Yeah, sort of the worst thing.

0:18:090:18:11

And where does it come from? Why would you get...?

0:18:110:18:13

Well, I always thought it was a military thing.

0:18:130:18:16

-Of course I think everything is a military thing.

-Yeah!

0:18:160:18:19

Paul spent big yesterday, landing four items for a total of £252.50.

0:18:190:18:24

Christina pocketed a Bakelite speaker

0:18:280:18:31

and Staffordshire figure, shelling out £40.

0:18:310:18:33

Today they're continuing northwards

0:18:350:18:38

and heading for the village of Balsall Common,

0:18:380:18:40

where their ways part once more.

0:18:400:18:42

-Have a lovely time.

-See you later.

0:18:420:18:45

-See this afternoon.

-All the best.

-Bye.

0:18:450:18:47

-Good morning.

-Hello. Nice to see you.

0:18:480:18:50

-Nice to see you. How are you? Are you well?

-Fine.

0:18:500:18:52

Antiques In A Barn is housed in a 200-year-old barn, funnily enough.

0:18:520:18:57

With a lot of ground to cover, perhaps owner Diane can help out.

0:18:570:19:01

I would quite like to have a look in this cabinet, if that's all right.

0:19:010:19:04

-Are you as much of a sucker about Georgian paste as me?

-Terrible.

0:19:060:19:09

Nobody buys it, though, apart from me!

0:19:090:19:12

But it's just...

0:19:140:19:15

I mean, you can see why people just fell in love with it, can't you?

0:19:150:19:18

-It's very effective as simulating diamonds.

-It looks the part, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:19:180:19:21

In Georgian society, diamonds were rare and expensive,

0:19:210:19:25

as they are today, so glass was cut to imitate diamonds

0:19:250:19:28

and called paste. This one has a ticket price of £25.

0:19:280:19:33

So, unless you had the budget of the Queen, and you couldn't

0:19:340:19:36

really afford diamonds, then this was the best next option.

0:19:360:19:40

Right, OK, let's think about that. I do love that.

0:19:400:19:43

I was looking at this fan.

0:19:430:19:45

-Now, is that the box for it there?

-Yes.

0:19:450:19:48

-Can I give you that then, my love? OK.

-Isn't that pretty?

0:19:480:19:54

So, we need to have a look at the leaf and see if the leaf

0:19:540:19:57

is in good condition, which it is.

0:19:570:19:59

So often you find that they perish along these creases, don't they?

0:19:590:20:02

And that actually looks as if it's got a little bit of damage on there.

0:20:020:20:07

It's got this ivory...

0:20:070:20:09

..obviously what they call the sticks here,

0:20:110:20:14

and it's actually carved in there as well.

0:20:140:20:17

Now, ivory is quite controversial, isn't it?

0:20:170:20:20

But as long as it's pre-1947 it is legal to sell ivory in this country,

0:20:200:20:24

and I would say this is certainly 19th century French.

0:20:240:20:28

Yes. Not to everyone's taste, but Christina seems smitten by it.

0:20:290:20:35

I love the subject matter, these beautiful birds in flight here

0:20:360:20:40

and the cornflowers and the wheat, it's obviously very summery.

0:20:400:20:43

It's beautiful. And that tassel is something else. Look at that!

0:20:430:20:47

Lovely. OK.

0:20:470:20:48

So, what have we got on this, Diane? 19th century fan, £78 on there.

0:20:480:20:54

What could be your death on that? For a trade buyer?

0:20:540:20:57

I'll do you £50.

0:20:570:20:59

-£50 on it. And that...

-That includes the box. Yes.

0:20:590:21:02

That's a £28 discount, one to hang on to and to carry on rummaging.

0:21:040:21:09

This is interesting and it's got "Macintyre & Co, Burslem" on here.

0:21:120:21:15

James Macintyre founded a successful Staffordshire pottery in 1860.

0:21:170:21:22

You've got "at fault" on there. Is that...?

0:21:220:21:25

-Yes, there's a crack, unfortunately.

-Oh, yes.

0:21:250:21:29

Oh, what a shame.

0:21:290:21:32

Damaged or not, it's priced at £55.

0:21:320:21:35

Because of the... I mean, perfect - 200, something like that?

0:21:360:21:41

-Mmm.

-But because of the damage...

-It's not perfect, is it?

0:21:410:21:44

No, it's not perfect.

0:21:440:21:45

I do really like that and I think there would be a market for it

0:21:450:21:48

at auction, but I think they do want them in good condition, don't they?

0:21:480:21:52

I mean, what if we did a bit of a deal on the two

0:21:520:21:56

because I do worry about condition here, what did we say on the fan?

0:21:560:22:00

-We said 50 on the fan.

-We said 50 on the fan.

0:22:000:22:03

For the two, could we come up with like a combined price for the two?

0:22:030:22:06

-£70 for the pair.

-For the pair, for the two?

0:22:080:22:10

I mean, £50 on that is fine.

0:22:100:22:13

Could you meet me in the middle at 65? For the two?

0:22:130:22:16

For the fan and the little...perfume bottle at 65?

0:22:180:22:21

Yes, I'll do you 65.

0:22:210:22:23

-Yeah?

-Yes, yes.

-OK. It's a deal. Brilliant.

0:22:230:22:25

You're an angel, thank you, very much.

0:22:250:22:27

Obviously I've bought with my heart again.

0:22:270:22:29

Two shops down and Christina's heart has won in both.

0:22:290:22:33

Oh, nice till!

0:22:340:22:36

£65 bags Christina the scent bottle and the 19th century silk fan.

0:22:360:22:41

Just a few miles away, Paul is making his way to Kenilworth

0:22:460:22:50

to find out how the town's castle was shaped by

0:22:500:22:53

one man's desire to woo the Queen of England.

0:22:530:22:56

-Is it Holly?

-It is indeed.

0:23:000:23:02

-Man alive!

-Welcome to Kenilworth Castle.

0:23:020:23:04

In the 16th century it was home to Robert Dudley

0:23:040:23:07

and was the centrepiece of a tale of unrequited love.

0:23:070:23:10

Right, come on through, I'll bring you through to the drawing-room.

0:23:110:23:15

Oh, my word!

0:23:150:23:17

So, this is what we refer to as the Oak Room in the Gatehouse.

0:23:170:23:22

I wonder why.

0:23:220:23:24

That looks like that was commissioned by quite a man, I assume.

0:23:240:23:29

-Yes, it was.

-Who is this?

0:23:290:23:31

It was Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester.

0:23:310:23:33

What's his back story, then - where does he come from,

0:23:330:23:35

how does he get the wealth to do this?

0:23:350:23:38

Well, he actually comes quite poor.

0:23:380:23:40

His father, John Dudley, Earl of Northumberland,

0:23:400:23:44

was actually beheaded for treason,

0:23:440:23:47

particularly for his part in trying to get Lady Jane Grey on to the throne.

0:23:470:23:52

With Dudley also imprisoned in the Tower of London for a year,

0:23:530:23:57

the family's reputation was in tatters.

0:23:570:24:00

But it's believed this may be where he met the future Elizabeth I,

0:24:000:24:04

who was being held in the Tower by her sister Mary.

0:24:040:24:08

When Elizabeth takes the throne in 1558, Dudley's fortunes soar.

0:24:080:24:13

Obviously he's rising through the ranks

0:24:130:24:15

and as he starts to rise through, he becomes a favourite

0:24:150:24:18

-of Elizabeth I and she gives him Kenilworth Castle in 1563...

-Right.

0:24:180:24:24

-..and a few other properties.

-That's a favourite indeed.

0:24:240:24:27

That is a favourite indeed.

0:24:270:24:29

Dudley was an active suitor to the Queen.

0:24:300:24:32

He was free to pursue Elizabeth after his wife died,

0:24:320:24:36

but the suspicious circumstances of the death cast a shadow over him.

0:24:360:24:41

His rise in influence and wealth was also treated with suspicion.

0:24:410:24:45

Despite his reputation, the Queen continued to show him favour.

0:24:450:24:49

To be perfectly honest,

0:24:510:24:53

the massive majority of his money came from Elizabeth,

0:24:530:24:55

so she's almost funding her own property and house.

0:24:550:24:58

There were lots of discussions whether or not it was a love match

0:24:580:25:01

or whether or not this is a man aiming for the power

0:25:010:25:04

and to get to the very top and to the crown.

0:25:040:25:06

No-one knows the full extent of their relationship,

0:25:080:25:11

but Dudley was romantically interested in the Queen

0:25:110:25:14

and she granted him land and titles that kept him close at hand.

0:25:140:25:18

He is kind of the Master of the Garter, so to speak,

0:25:180:25:21

which to me or you meant that he looked after all the horses

0:25:210:25:25

and all of her progressions and all her travel,

0:25:250:25:28

which was really important, which meant that he could

0:25:280:25:30

never really leave her side so everywhere she went, he went.

0:25:300:25:33

During her reign, Elizabeth made 25 Royal Progresses,

0:25:350:25:39

touring the country for weeks at a time.

0:25:390:25:43

Those graced with a visit went to extreme lengths

0:25:430:25:46

to prepare for the Queen and Dudley was no exception.

0:25:460:25:49

He lavished money on Kenilworth Castle,

0:25:490:25:51

including the creation of an ornate private garden.

0:25:510:25:54

It is a Renaissance garden and this is one of the first ones

0:25:540:25:59

that's in the UK at that time.

0:25:590:26:01

And when you look down on the garden, there's going to be

0:26:010:26:04

a lot of flowers in there that people would recognise.

0:26:040:26:08

-So he would have put wild strawberries into the garden.

-I see.

0:26:080:26:11

-A sign of righteousness.

-I see there is symbolism in these.

0:26:110:26:14

And the cherry's a sign of her virginity.

0:26:140:26:17

And most particular, we've got carnations and marigolds,

0:26:170:26:21

and they're all about marriage.

0:26:210:26:23

Dudley's intent was clear.

0:26:250:26:27

In 1575, Elizabeth enjoyed 19 days of celebrations at Kenilworth,

0:26:270:26:33

the longest stay of any tour.

0:26:330:26:36

It was Dudley's opportunity to woo Elizabeth

0:26:370:26:40

and to show the world and the Queen his accumulated wealth.

0:26:400:26:43

We are currently in Elizabeth's bedroom which is in Leicester's building

0:26:450:26:49

and these were her state apartments that Robert Dudley built for her.

0:26:490:26:52

-These windows are huge. Is that normal for the time?

-Not at all.

0:26:520:26:56

This was really the beginning of the Renaissance influence

0:26:560:27:00

coming across and the want for light and also a sign of extravagance,

0:27:000:27:04

so glass was hugely expensive, so he's making these really

0:27:040:27:08

ornate large windows, full of glass, showing his wealth.

0:27:080:27:12

Without explanation,

0:27:130:27:15

Dudley's pursuit of the Queen waned after this grand visit,

0:27:150:27:18

and a few years later he married Elizabeth's cousin.

0:27:180:27:21

But despite this, the Queen used Dudley's role at court

0:27:210:27:25

to keep him constantly at her side,

0:27:250:27:28

and on her deathbed, Elizabeth's affection towards him was clear.

0:27:280:27:32

And when she died, she had his last letter in her hand

0:27:330:27:37

and the ring that he gave her as well.

0:27:370:27:40

To this day, the truth behind his relationship with Elizabeth

0:27:410:27:44

remains a mystery.

0:27:440:27:45

Whether for love or ambition, the sandstone ruins at Kenilworth Castle

0:27:470:27:51

stand as a measure of his efforts to win the Virgin Queen.

0:27:510:27:54

Reunited, back in the car,

0:27:590:28:01

our twosome are travelling through some of Northamptonshire's

0:28:010:28:04

finest countryside towards the village of Weedon Bec.

0:28:040:28:08

Shall we just abandon the wheels here?

0:28:100:28:12

THEY LAUGH

0:28:120:28:14

I'm not entirely sure this is a parking space.

0:28:140:28:16

Neither am I.

0:28:160:28:18

It's the last chance to shop on this trip.

0:28:180:28:21

Christina still has over £113,

0:28:210:28:24

while Paul is holding over 170.

0:28:240:28:28

Oh!

0:28:300:28:31

-Oh, this looks good.

-Is it big enough for both of us, do you think?

0:28:310:28:34

You take that side, I'll take that side.

0:28:340:28:37

What I find quite fascinating is that both Paul and I will

0:28:400:28:43

walk in here and we'll both go for entirely different things.

0:28:430:28:47

He will go for stuff that I probably wouldn't even look at

0:28:470:28:50

and I will go for stuff that he probably wouldn't even look at.

0:28:500:28:53

It is like we're yin and yang, isn't it?

0:28:530:28:54

Yeah. And Paul's already yanging on to something.

0:28:540:28:57

How far am I from the door?

0:28:590:29:01

Three paces.

0:29:050:29:06

And that's what I'm buying.

0:29:060:29:08

OK?

0:29:080:29:09

Hold on!

0:29:100:29:12

Wait a minute, you may be wanting to know why and what.

0:29:120:29:14

-That would be nice.

-OK.

0:29:140:29:16

It's that.

0:29:160:29:18

And it's going to cost me that.

0:29:180:29:21

And it dates to 1740,

0:29:220:29:25

1750,

0:29:250:29:27

and it's an incredibly scarce little Georgian English glass...

0:29:270:29:35

For all the world...

0:29:350:29:37

..it's like a tiny little sweetmeat dish, OK,

0:29:390:29:42

or a miniature tazza. We would call a tazza, a cake stand.

0:29:420:29:48

And you've got a little shallow bowl there,

0:29:480:29:50

this abs...trust me -

0:29:500:29:52

absolutely delicious little knopped stem

0:29:520:29:56

and it sits on a domed and folded foot.

0:29:560:30:01

A folded foot is one in which the glass has been

0:30:010:30:06

turned back on itself to give a double thickness at the edge.

0:30:060:30:11

That is serendipity.

0:30:110:30:14

It's also a colossal bargain.

0:30:140:30:17

The truth of the matter is I think that's worth,

0:30:170:30:21

to a specialist collector...

0:30:210:30:22

£100 of anyone's money.

0:30:230:30:26

I kid you not, three paces from the door,

0:30:260:30:28

second shelf down on the bric-a-brac stall - ta-da!

0:30:280:30:32

Incredible find, Paul.

0:30:320:30:34

Hurry up, Christina, would you? Come on! Christina!

0:30:340:30:38

How long is this going to take? I'm done! Come on!

0:30:380:30:41

Hang on a second, you're not supposed to heckle me from across an antique shop!

0:30:410:30:45

-No pressure.

-What are you doing?

0:30:450:30:47

-Seriously?

-Done. Done.

0:30:470:30:51

I hadn't even started looking. What?!

0:30:520:30:55

He was quick.

0:30:550:30:57

Would you be Lawrence, by any chance?

0:30:570:30:59

-I would be, and I presume you're Paul.

-Good to see you, my friend.

0:30:590:31:02

-Are you all right?

-Very well indeed.

0:31:020:31:03

-This it is going to be the quickest visit I've ever had to an antique shop.

-Really?

0:31:030:31:07

I found it within two paces of the door. I ain't going to haggle,

0:31:070:31:11

funnily enough, so I will give you all of... £1!

0:31:110:31:16

-Would you believe it, Lawrence?

-That's very kind of you indeed.

0:31:180:31:21

I am going to shake your hand and run.

0:31:210:31:24

Can I have my glass?

0:31:240:31:26

Thank you.

0:31:260:31:27

Paul's eagle eye strikes again and no haggling indeed.

0:31:270:31:32

What a spot, eh?

0:31:320:31:33

What a little diamond?

0:31:350:31:36

A pound note.

0:31:360:31:39

A pound note. Three steps in from the door.

0:31:390:31:43

Right, Christina, the pressure's on now.

0:31:440:31:46

-Alison, could I have a look in this cupboard here?

-Of course you may.

0:31:480:31:52

-We're selling in Cheshire.

-Oh, right?

0:31:540:31:57

So, I'm thinking footballers' wives, bit of bling.

0:31:570:32:01

Yes. And that's so unusual on the setting of the diamond.

0:32:010:32:03

Yes, I mean it looks it almost looks sort of Boodles or Chopard

0:32:030:32:06

or something like that. It's quite sweet.

0:32:060:32:08

It's a modern diamond and white gold pendant and chain.

0:32:080:32:11

Ticket price £150.

0:32:110:32:14

To be perfectly honest, it's the kind of thing that leaves me cold

0:32:140:32:17

but in Cheshire, I'm thinking that modern jewellery is probably very popular.

0:32:170:32:20

-So what could your best trade price on that be?

-£120.

0:32:200:32:24

Ah.

0:32:250:32:26

OK.

0:32:260:32:27

Is there any chance we could go £100 on it?

0:32:280:32:31

Not really.

0:32:320:32:34

-Cos I haven't got £120 left!

-Oh, dear.

0:32:340:32:37

How much have you got left?

0:32:370:32:39

Not that much.

0:32:390:32:40

I was really hoping to sort of secure that for about £100

0:32:400:32:44

if that's at all possible. What's your thoughts on that?

0:32:440:32:47

Let me go and have a word with John that works for me

0:32:470:32:51

because it's one of his pieces.

0:32:510:32:53

Oh, OK, all right, brilliant.

0:32:530:32:54

110 he said, he can't do 100.

0:32:590:33:02

-He can't do 100.

-No, unfortunately not.

-Oh.

0:33:020:33:05

Oh.

0:33:070:33:09

-Would he go 105?

-No, I can't.

0:33:090:33:12

-Are you sure?

-Positive, sorry.

0:33:120:33:14

-£110's the absolute death on that.

-It is.

-OK, 110.

0:33:140:33:18

-110, thank you very much, that's great.

-You're welcome.

0:33:180:33:20

I owe you some money. That's beautiful.

0:33:200:33:22

And with that, Christina's shopping is complete.

0:33:220:33:24

She's spent £215 on the Bakelite speaker,

0:33:260:33:29

the 19th century pearlware figure,

0:33:290:33:31

the scent bottle, the silk fan

0:33:310:33:34

and the diamond pendant.

0:33:340:33:36

Paul bought the WMF christening set,

0:33:360:33:39

the pocket watch,

0:33:390:33:40

the glass flask,

0:33:400:33:42

mantel clock

0:33:420:33:43

and his bargain buy of the Georgian tazza,

0:33:430:33:46

all for a total of £243.50.

0:33:460:33:50

So, what do they make of each other's items?

0:33:510:33:54

The little perfume, well, you see when I first saw that I panicked,

0:33:550:33:58

I thought, "Oh, she's bought a Macintyre silver-mounted egg perfume."

0:33:580:34:03

I thought I'd lost it all.

0:34:030:34:04

Praise the Lord, it's damaged and I have been let off the hook.

0:34:040:34:09

The guy is a genius, I mean buying a beautiful piece of very,

0:34:090:34:13

very early glassware like that for £1 is just amazing

0:34:130:34:17

and I was in the same shop as him.

0:34:170:34:19

That's quite depressing.

0:34:190:34:20

Do you know? You're right.

0:34:210:34:23

Our pair have trundled their way north

0:34:230:34:25

from Leominster in Herefordshire

0:34:250:34:26

and are headed for their last stop of this leg in Nantwich in Cheshire.

0:34:260:34:31

You walk into a shop, the same shop as me, might I add,

0:34:310:34:34

you walk into a shop, within two paces you have picked up

0:34:340:34:38

the most beautiful 18th-century glass

0:34:380:34:42

-for a pound!

-PAUL LAUGHS

0:34:420:34:45

Jealousy will get you nowhere, Christina.

0:34:450:34:48

It's off to the auction, which today is being held in Nantwich.

0:34:480:34:52

Once the stopping point on a coaching route from London to Wales,

0:34:520:34:55

it was famed for its salt and leather production.

0:34:550:34:57

For the last 60 years the town has been home to Peter Wilson Auctions,

0:34:570:35:02

and very nice it is too.

0:35:020:35:04

Come on, then.

0:35:040:35:05

So, what does auctioneer Chris Large make of our duo's offering?

0:35:050:35:10

In vogue at the moment is quirky items.

0:35:100:35:13

People like different things, you know the Bakelite speaker

0:35:130:35:16

that's in the sale, although historically has not done well,

0:35:160:35:19

it's just the sort of thing that might attract people's interest

0:35:190:35:22

and, you know, take off.

0:35:220:35:23

The little Georgian sweetmeat dish.

0:35:230:35:25

Really lovely early piece, cos it's got the folded foot around the foot rim

0:35:250:35:29

and a lovely grey colour in the glass which shows it's very early.

0:35:290:35:32

It would be so much more valuable

0:35:320:35:33

if it was a drinking glass or wine glass.

0:35:330:35:36

I think it will still sell for about £80-£120.

0:35:360:35:39

It could be Paul's lucky day.

0:35:390:35:42

To me the main event, it's all about your glass.

0:35:420:35:45

I think it doesn't matter what happens today.

0:35:450:35:49

We'll have to wait for that.

0:35:490:35:50

Christina's Bakelite speaker is up first.

0:35:500:35:53

I'm bid £30 straight away on commission for this lot

0:35:530:35:55

and I'm selling.

0:35:550:35:56

Internet's in here. 50.

0:35:560:35:58

50's bid on the internet.

0:35:580:36:00

Five on the internet?

0:36:000:36:01

Any further bids?

0:36:010:36:02

-I'll take that, I need it.

-More than doubled your money.

0:36:040:36:07

That broken old speaker's given Christina is a fantastic start.

0:36:070:36:12

Next up is Paul's mantel clock he fell in love with.

0:36:140:36:19

-My prediction?

-Yes.

-250 to 350 quid.

0:36:190:36:22

I have £65 now straightaway.

0:36:220:36:25

70, 75.

0:36:250:36:26

-80.

-In the booth.

0:36:260:36:27

90, against the commission.

0:36:270:36:29

95, 100, and ten now.

0:36:290:36:31

120.

0:36:310:36:33

120. 130.

0:36:330:36:35

140.

0:36:350:36:36

40, 50.

0:36:360:36:37

160. 160's bid on the internet.

0:36:370:36:41

Another internet bidder.

0:36:410:36:43

170. 180. 190. 190, 200.

0:36:430:36:45

I'm safe now, come on.

0:36:450:36:47

200. 220, now?

0:36:470:36:49

It's still cheap.

0:36:490:36:51

-£220.

-Not expensive but I'll take it.

0:36:510:36:52

At £220, I'm going to sell. If you're all happy now, at £220.

0:36:520:36:56

-I'll take it. I'll take that.

-Well done.

0:36:560:36:59

I'll just mop that brow.

0:36:590:37:02

Not quite your prediction, Paul, but still a strong profit.

0:37:030:37:07

I wonder what's coming up next.

0:37:090:37:11

It's Christina's 19th-century silk fan.

0:37:120:37:15

£35, the bid's going to be. 40, thank you.

0:37:160:37:18

40 in the room. At £40.

0:37:180:37:20

45 I'm looking for. At £40,

0:37:200:37:22

I'll sell if you're all happy. At £40 only.

0:37:220:37:24

Sadly, the room doesn't love it quite as much as you did, Christina.

0:37:240:37:29

That's great! No, I mean, no, no, what a disappointment.

0:37:290:37:32

Now the hour has come for Paul's second time piece of the day.

0:37:340:37:38

His pocket watch.

0:37:380:37:39

Now we've got your really sweet little Art Deco pocket watch.

0:37:390:37:42

And £20 I'm bid on commission here. With me I'm selling.

0:37:420:37:45

25's on the internet, takes my bid out.

0:37:450:37:48

At £25 the internet bidder has it.

0:37:480:37:50

-30 I am looking for.

-I'm making a loss.

0:37:500:37:52

-£25.

-It is an outrage!

0:37:520:37:53

If you're all happy at £25 only.

0:37:530:37:56

-This is an outrage.

-Oh. Oh!

0:37:560:37:58

-I demand a recount.

-Lost it, you've lost it.

0:37:580:38:01

Is there a chink in Paul's armour, after all?

0:38:010:38:04

Still, only a small loss.

0:38:040:38:06

Can Christina's Staffordshire figure land another blow?

0:38:060:38:11

This lot I have £20 bid straightaway on commission

0:38:110:38:13

for this lot and I'm selling.

0:38:130:38:15

-Don't sell it straightaway!

-25 versus the commission.

0:38:150:38:17

At £25 my commission's out and it's on the internet.

0:38:170:38:20

It's got a little cheeky smile.

0:38:200:38:21

£25, I'm going to sell to the internet bidder

0:38:230:38:26

if you're all happy, £25 only.

0:38:260:38:28

A small profit, but Christina has another chance to catch Paul.

0:38:290:38:33

Her scent bottle is next.

0:38:330:38:36

-It's sweet.

-That does it for me.

0:38:360:38:40

20 is the bid in the room. At £20 with the lady. 25 I'm looking for.

0:38:400:38:44

£20 is bid. Any further bids?

0:38:440:38:46

I'm going to sell if you're all happy. In the room at £20.

0:38:460:38:49

That damage on the scent bottle seems to have been a problem

0:38:500:38:53

and Christina makes a small loss.

0:38:530:38:56

Next up is Paul's silver and glass saddle flask.

0:38:560:39:00

I'll start the bidding off at £60 here with me.

0:39:000:39:02

65 I'm looking for to continue.

0:39:020:39:04

At 65, 70's there on commission, 75.

0:39:040:39:07

75's on the internet. 80's on commission, 85.

0:39:070:39:10

-Someone's got the leather case for this, haven't they?

-Yeah.

0:39:100:39:13

At £80.

0:39:130:39:16

At £80, and I'm going to sell if you're all happy at £80.

0:39:160:39:20

Even without its leather pouch, Paul more than doubles his money.

0:39:200:39:25

Now, Christina has one last chance to catch Paul.

0:39:250:39:29

It rests on her diamond and white gold pendant.

0:39:290:39:32

-I can start the bidding at £135 here with me.

-Oh.

0:39:320:39:36

£135, the bid's here with me on commission and I'm selling.

0:39:360:39:40

-140, do I hear?

-Come on!

0:39:400:39:41

I'll sell to the commission bid if you're all happy at £135 only.

0:39:410:39:44

Any further bids?

0:39:440:39:46

It's a good profit,

0:39:460:39:48

but not enough to catch Paul, who still has two items to go.

0:39:480:39:51

Paul was passionate about the WMF christening set,

0:39:540:39:57

but will it set the auction alight?

0:39:570:39:59

A lovely lot this. I'm only bid £40 on commission.

0:39:590:40:02

It's a one-horse race, this.

0:40:020:40:04

If you're all happy, at £40 only.

0:40:040:40:06

45 just at the last minute.

0:40:060:40:08

£45 the bid. At £45, 50 still on commission.

0:40:080:40:12

55, can I tempt you, sir?

0:40:120:40:14

-He's getting greedy now!

-£55.

0:40:140:40:17

At £55, the bid's in the room. Any further bids?

0:40:170:40:20

That's, again, a great profit.

0:40:220:40:24

A great profit.

0:40:240:40:26

It is yet another profit.

0:40:270:40:29

And now it is Paul's incredible find, his Georgian glass.

0:40:320:40:35

Estimate, would you like to tell everyone what they've estimated?

0:40:370:40:40

-What is the estimate?

-Estimate...

0:40:400:40:42

How much did you buy it for?

0:40:420:40:44

-I think, a pound.

-100 pence.

0:40:440:40:46

And estimated at £80-£120.

0:40:460:40:50

Sorry, what was that? I missed that. Say it again.

0:40:500:40:53

£8-£12!

0:40:530:40:55

For this lot I have two conflicting bids straightaway.

0:40:550:40:58

-I can start the bidding at £110 and I'm selling.

-Well done!

0:40:580:41:01

120 I'm looking for to continue.

0:41:010:41:04

All right, the internet is running away with us. At 160 we're up to.

0:41:040:41:07

160's bid on the internet, 170.

0:41:070:41:10

-180.

-It is still going.

-180, 190.

0:41:100:41:13

Tell me when it stops.

0:41:130:41:15

200. £200. 220. At 240.

0:41:150:41:18

At £240. 260. At £260.

0:41:180:41:22

-280.

-£280. Two conflicting internet bidders.

0:41:220:41:25

Please join in in the room.

0:41:250:41:27

-300. 300!

-Oh, yeah.

0:41:270:41:30

320. At £320.

0:41:300:41:32

At 320. 340, do I hear?

0:41:320:41:35

At £320 is bid.

0:41:350:41:37

At 320, 340 now.

0:41:370:41:39

-At 340 now.

-360.

0:41:390:41:41

OK, I'm just a passenger at this point.

0:41:410:41:44

At 360, 380, do I hear?

0:41:440:41:46

At £360.

0:41:460:41:48

Slightly over estimate.

0:41:480:41:51

Any further bids?

0:41:510:41:53

Bravo. Well done. Well done.

0:41:540:41:58

Absolutely outstanding.

0:41:580:42:00

An unbelievable profit.

0:42:000:42:02

-Oh!

-Wow, seriously.

0:42:020:42:04

-I am not worthy, Paul Laidlaw.

-That was my moment.

0:42:060:42:09

Would you like a piece of cake?

0:42:090:42:12

Christina started this leg with £218.14.

0:42:130:42:18

After costs she's made a profit of £6.40,

0:42:180:42:22

raising her total to £224.54.

0:42:220:42:26

But, today's win makes it a hat-trick

0:42:270:42:30

of auction success for Paul. He had £427.04

0:42:300:42:34

and after costs he's run up an amazing profit of £353.30,

0:42:340:42:41

taking his total to a whopping £780.34.

0:42:410:42:47

I'll be the scout.

0:42:470:42:48

It's a whopping great big coffee shop with more buns

0:42:480:42:51

-than you can shake a stick at.

-It sounds good.

0:42:510:42:54

Cheerio.

0:42:560:42:58

Next on Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:000:43:02

Crying.

0:43:020:43:03

Aaaah!

0:43:030:43:05

Havoc.

0:43:050:43:06

-I can't sing!

-You just said!

0:43:060:43:09

And a dog, what's more?

0:43:090:43:10

Bye, Murphy! Bye.

0:43:100:43:12

Bye. Bye.

0:43:120:43:15

Auctioneers Paul Laidlaw and Christina Trevanion are halfway through their road trip. Travelling through Hertfordshire, Buckinghamshire and the West Midlands, Paul uncovers a hidden gem that could win him the trip on day three. All will be revealed as they auction their lots in Nantwich, Cheshire.