Episode 18 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 18

Antiques challenge. Philip Serrell and Natasha Raskin shop in Hertfordshire, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire before heading to West London for a crucial auction.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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I don't know what to do.

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..with £200 each, a classic car,

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game! THEY LAUGH

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Charlie!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah.

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It's the third leg of the road trip for old hand Philip Serrell

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and fellow tripper Natasha Raskin.

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Living the dream.

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-Why are you living the dream?

-It's a lovely day.

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I've got a lovely girl, lovely car and I am going out,

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spending money, buying antiques.

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You lucky man!

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Veteran auctioneer Philip may be a dab hand at selling

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from the rostrum, but he is still working on his bargaining technique.

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-Could you do 17 the two?

-No.

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HE LAUGHS

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Oh. His competitive companion is smart Scot Natasha.

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She loves old paintings and contemporary fashion.

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And also having a laugh.

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I was thinking that together that would go quite nicely.

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Our duelling duo had set off in a 1957 Porsche with £200 each.

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The auction score so far is one apiece.

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However, Philip's coffers have twiddled to £166.96.

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Poor chap.

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Natasha has a few pounds more in her handbag - £173.12.

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It is all to play for! Brighten up.

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-I am in good spirits, Phil.

-Why is that?

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Not because I am in the company of someone so wonderful as yourself.

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-Yeah.

-Not only that.

-Yeah.

-Because I've actually edged in front.

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I don't know if you have done the maths, but...

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My goal now is to try and get to Friday solvent.

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Philip and Natasha started their 900-mile drive in Pembrokeshire.

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Their journey will see them travel through the home counties,

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down to the south coast, before ending up in Salisbury, Wiltshire.

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The third stretch sets off in St Albans

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and winds down towards

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an auction in leafy Chiswick,

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West London.

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St Albans is named after Britain's first Christian martyr,

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executed by the Romans in the third century.

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It is also home to Natasha's first shop of this trip.

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-I will see you soon.

-Have a good day, lovely.

-Thank you so much.

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-See you later!

-Right.

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Bye!

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A keen Natasha gets straight to it.

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OK, there is quite a lot of stuff here that is very modern,

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super modern.

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I don't know if it is really what we are looking for, very antique-y.

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I think I'm going to look for something a bit more...

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a bit more age to it.

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I don't know. Maybe a bit more interest, a bit more quirk.

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Stuff like this is really weird. I love this.

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Is it a little bit morbid to like dead butterflies?

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I mean, it is a bit gruesome cos they are furry and you can get

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a close look at them and they just look a little bit crusty now.

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Quite. Step away, Natasha.

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What is she on to now?

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Some Scottish looking brooches, perhaps?

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Dealer Dee is on hand to help. Go, Dee.

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-The best thing for me has got to be that citrine.

-Yeah.

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That is just a beauty, isn't it?

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-Would you mind terribly if we take a closer look?

-No, not at all.

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Purely because... It's a bit of a whopper!

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It is obviously not in gold. Right, OK, so we can see that now.

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So it is just a metal that has been gilded, right?

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I mean, I like the fact that it is exactly what you would wear for

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sort of Highland dress, but maybe you could wear that in a more modern way?

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-Oh, absolutely.

-Do you reckon? Yes, yes. Would you wear that?

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Maybe pair it with these here?

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-Oh.

-I was thinking that together that might be quite a nice look.

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-THEY LAUGH

-A good night out.

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Right, stick that back.

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-What do you think? I am going to make an offer for it.

-OK.

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-If that is OK with you.

-Yes.

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It is £12 ticket, what if I say eight?

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Ten?

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-Could we make it single figures and go nine? Do you reckon?

-Yes.

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-Quite happy with that?

-Yes.

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Dee, I'd like to shake on that, cos I think it's really cool.

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And I think for a genuine citrine in a nice, decorative mount,

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-you can't really go wrong at nine quid.

-No.

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Oh, deal done, Dee.

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But Natasha has spied another potential purchase

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when she first arrived.

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So we drove in here, and the first thing

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I saw was this lovely Belfast sink, but it is really big.

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Looks really heavy, too.

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I'm going to try... I don't think I can shift it.

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Arrrgh!

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-Between us, Dee.

-Girl power.

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Right. So if we have a little look in the basin,

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it looks to be in pretty...pretty good order, actually.

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-I don't see any...any scary bits.

-No, there is no cracks.

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Dee is asking £40 for the old sink. But think carefully,

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Natasha, you don't want your profits going down the old plughole.

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What if I said to you I would like to buy it from you at £20?

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-I don't know. 30?

-What if I said you 28?

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-Deal.

-But do you still get something out of that?

-Yes.

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She is managing very well so far on limited means.

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I think that is it. I think two items at Alley Cats and I'm done.

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Meanwhile, Philip has taken to the road and travelled to Hertford.

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In 1712, the county town saw the last person to be convicted

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for witchcraft in England. Ha!

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Philip is heading for his first shop

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and meeting owner Bonnie,

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who may bewitch him.

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Now...

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Gah, you've got some things in here, haven't you?

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What is your speciality?

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-Jewellery.

-Jewellery.

-Yeah.

-So have you got any really good

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bits of jewellery you can show me?

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-I do.

-Really?

-Come along.

-Things are looking up, aren't they?

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Don't get ahead of yourself, Philip.

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-My favourite piece...

-Yeah.

-..is this opal and diamond ring.

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Ha, ha, I think that might be out of my price bracket!

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Yes, I think you might be right.

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-Is that opal or topaz?

-That is opal.

-How do you tell the difference?

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-I'll show you a topaz.

-OK. They look the same to me.

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Yeah. Call yourself an expert?

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-Topaz are transparent and quite blue.

-Oh, right!

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Yeah, yeah.

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-Opals can vary in colour.

-There you are, you can see. It is quite...

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-Almost iridescent in a way.

-Yeah.

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-Whereas that is a clear colour, isn't it?

-That's correct.

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You see, I've learned something now.

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I'm about to learn something else as well. So how much is that?

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Please.

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This is...

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-£180.

-All right.

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And how much is that?

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This is £950.

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Right. I think I'm just going to have a quick look around

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and I'll be with you in a moment, Bonnie. Thank you for that.

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That ring is nearly six times Philip's budget.

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Perhaps Bonnie has some cheaper stock?

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These are cool things, aren't they?

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These sort of stork thread pullers or whatever they are.

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-They are ribbon pullers.

-How does that work, then?

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Well, in the old days...

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"In the old days..." I was there. I was there!

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Yeah, go on.

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They knitted baby's garments rather than mass produced them.

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And they were always adorned with ribbons and things.

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And to try and get the ribbons through the holes of booties

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-or bonnets...

-They pulled that.

-..it was difficult.

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-You've got another one here.

-I do.

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-So that is silver.

-It is.

-And what is this made from?

-Silver-plate.

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-That is £95. And how much is the other one?

-£250.

-OK, fine.

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You haven't got any chairs in here, have you? I mean, I just...

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No, just feeling... I'm become a bit faint.

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Right.

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Is he really?

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He's fine.

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You don't know how low he'll stoop.

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-Steady, Bonnie. Steady.

-You're winding me up.

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You nearly knocked me over there, Bonnie.

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Philip puts the expensive ribbon puller back in the cabinet

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and the cheaper pair to one side to think about.

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I love that. This is...

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This is a desk seal that would have sat on a gentleman's desk.

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And you have got an agate ball that is held by this claw, bird's claw.

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And then you have got this seal here.

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This would have sat on the desk.

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And when he wrote to someone, he would have got his sealing wax

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out, sealed the letter or the envelope with his seal.

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And then to give it his own personal seal, as the wax was hot,

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he just dunk that in there. And off it came.

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These are quite collectable. That is quite fun.

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The ticket price is £65.

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But will Bonnie the blonde bombshell be kind to Philip?

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Being as it is you,

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-and I'd like you to do well...

-Things are looking up. Yeah.

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-If you took both of them...

-Yeah?

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I would do them for 80.

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Very generous, Bonnie, that is £70 knocked off.

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-Could you do 70 the two?

-FIRMLY:

-No.

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HE LAUGHS

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She is not so keen on you now, Phil.

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Would you just like to pull that knife...

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Just in the middle of my shoulder blades,

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I think there is a sharp object sticking out at the minute.

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Just there.

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-All right.

-SHE LAUGHS

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That's my girl!

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Philip may have met his match here.

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But Bonnie is not one to miss out on a sale.

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Oh, no, she offers a second Victorian seal to make up a job lot.

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Is there a deal to be sealed?

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Can I give you £80 for that lot? And I can't go any more,

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-honestly.

-Yes, go on, then.

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-Are you sure?

-Yeah, that's fine.

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-Are you happy with that, honestly?

-I'm not really happy,

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but I will accept that.

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You are an angel, thank you very much. Thank you.

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-You're welcome.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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Philip seems very happy.

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£35 for the two seals, and the ribbon puller for £45.

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-Cheers now!

-Bye!

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Natasha has made her way to Central London

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to find out more about

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A British institution that played a vital role in winning

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the First World War.

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The British Postal Museum and Archive is home

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to 2.5 miles of vaults charting the history

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of the General Post Office,

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the forerunner to our modern Postal Service.

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At the start of the war,

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one quarter of a million people were working for the GPO,

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making it the largest single employer of labour in the world.

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The manpower was needed not only to deliver the mail,

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but the GPO was also responsible for telecommunications

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and offered a banking service.

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Natasha's host is Head of Collections Chris Taft.

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So, when the war broke out, all this huge number of employees,

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we are talking a quarter of a million people here, who I presume

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-most of whom were men, must have been taken away to the war efforts.

-Yeah.

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I mean, the Post Office were to supply many

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thousands of men to the war effort.

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By December 1914,

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nearly 30,000 GPO employees had enlisted.

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And many found themselves putting their expert knowledge

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of the Postal Service to good use.

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At the outbreak of the war, one of the most important things was

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to maintain the morale of the troops and of the people at home,

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and so postal communication was absolutely essential to that.

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The government and Army chiefs

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knew that the delivery of post from home to those serving

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on the front line was vital,

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as it was one of the few comforts and distractions to the men.

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The volumes of mail that by the peak of the war were being

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handled by the Post Office were phenomenal.

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I mean, you were looking at 12 million letters a week

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being moved to the Western Front.

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You are talking billions over the course of the war.

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Oh, yeah, absolutely.

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So efficient was the service, letters took just two to three days

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to get from the front line to the front door of soldiers' families.

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But the Postal Service wasn't just delivering the mail,

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they were reading it, too.

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Every piece of correspondence to

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and from the front line was read by an official.

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The government claimed censorship prevented intercepted mail revealing

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military secrets to the enemy,

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but this wasn't the only reason.

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For morale purposes,

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they didn't want the full kind of horrors of what was going on to get

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back to affect people's morale both at home and in the theatres of war.

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The things that people must have read,

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it must have been really heartbreaking for the censors

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to sit there and read these letters

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and then to effectively have to, you know, score them out.

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It must have been...taken a certain type of person

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to take on the role of censor.

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Yeah. Letters deemed to contain inappropriate information

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were simply destroyed.

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Censorship was so time-consuming,

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the Field Service Post Card was introduced to speed things up.

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On the front, you would write simply the address of the person

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to whom it was going.

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And then on the reverse, there was a multiple-choice.

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If you wrote anything on the card beyond what was permitted,

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the card would be destroyed.

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Yeah, bold. That is a sort of three-line whip.

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"If anything else is added, the postcard will be destroyed."

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-It is awfully impersonal, isn't it?

-Very impersonal.

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All you are permitted to do is score out that which doesn't apply.

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As impersonal as it is, it is actually rather ingenious.

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Yeah. And it's important.

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The archive holds a number of letters from riflemen Harry Brown.

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He served under the King's Royal Rifle Corps

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and fought in the trenches in western France.

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The story we hear from Harry Brown is quite an emotional story,

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actually. He writes regularly to his mother.

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But then one of the letters his mother sends is sent back to

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her, so it is presumed that Harry has been killed.

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Quite often, letters would be returned to

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sender before official news of their loved one's fate had reached them.

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It would mean an agonizing wait to find out

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if they had been injured, captured or tragically killed.

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But eventually, she gets a letter back from her son,

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from Harry Brown, who's being held in a German prisoner of war camp.

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So now she realises that in fact he is alive.

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He is actually wounded, he has been injured, and he was captured.

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But he is alive.

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In August 1917,

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while interned in a prisoner of war camp in Germany, Harry writes

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to his mother, "Don't worry about me, I am finished with the war."

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But sadly, even though

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Harry survived to see the end of the war, he never made it home.

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What then subsequently happened is he takes ill, again,

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this time with an illness rather than an injury.

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And sadly, just after the war has ended, he dies.

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-In the camp?

-In the camp.

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Harry had inflammation of the lungs

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and was too poorly to make the journey home.

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He died just 16 days after the armistice was signed,

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on 27 November, 1918.

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Poor Harry Brown. Gosh, can you imagine what he endured?

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That story of Harry Brown was charted through

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the correspondence, the letters.

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And that is why the collection is so important,

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because it charts that social history story.

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It's not about the military history,

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it's about this social history, about what happened to that

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individual and his family and the impact on that family.

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It is now almost impossible to imagine life on the front line

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other than to understand what a huge comfort a letter from

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home would be to the often young

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and scared but honourable men like Harry.

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Thank you so much for showing me around.

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I feel like I have learned a lot.

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-Thank you very much.

-You're very welcome.

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Philip has made his way to Hemel Hempstead.

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His next shop is in the Old Town district,

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on a street claimed to be one of the prettiest in Hertfordshire.

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Cherry Antiques is run by dealer Scott.

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-Hello!

-Hi there.

-Hi, Philip.

-I'm Scott.

-Scott, how are you?

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Yeah, nice to meet you.

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This is the sort of place where you think you are going to find

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-something.

-Here's hoping.

0:15:260:15:28

-Yeah, well, all we got to do is start looking now.

-Yeah.

0:15:280:15:30

Spend that £86 wisely, Philip.

0:15:300:15:33

He is onto something, though, already.

0:15:330:15:36

The Silver Fox at work.

0:15:360:15:38

Those are quite cool. How much are those?

0:15:380:15:40

-I'll do you a good price on those.

-Can you?

-Yeah.

0:15:410:15:44

Philip has found some 1920s Art Deco burr walnut chairs.

0:15:440:15:48

They are priced at £90 for the four. Wow.

0:15:490:15:52

And what could you do those for, then?

0:15:520:15:54

Very, very, very best would be 60.

0:15:540:15:57

One to think about. While he is thinking...

0:15:580:16:01

What I'm going to try and do is to see if I can

0:16:010:16:04

make up a job lot of prints.

0:16:040:16:07

How much is that print?

0:16:070:16:09

-A couple of pounds.

-OK.

0:16:120:16:14

I think that is quite nice, you know. So, how much is that?

0:16:160:16:19

-Is that another pound or two?

-Yes.

0:16:200:16:22

-Philip has picked out a selection of five prints.

-Could I bid you...?

0:16:240:16:28

-Yep.

-Could I bid you five pounds and £45?

0:16:290:16:32

-Yeah, happy with that.

-You are a gentleman, sir.

0:16:320:16:35

Thank you very much indeed. Thank you.

0:16:350:16:37

That is a cracking deal on the four chairs.

0:16:370:16:39

Philip's got them for half their ticket price.

0:16:390:16:42

Scott, you've been very kind to me, I better pay you.

0:16:420:16:44

And he has paid a pound apiece for the five prints.

0:16:440:16:47

Let's hope there's a dog lover at the auction. Ha!

0:16:470:16:50

One day down, one to go for our duelling duo.

0:16:520:16:56

Time for a well-earned rest all round.

0:16:560:16:58

OK, night-night, you two.

0:16:580:17:00

It's day two of the road trip.

0:17:040:17:07

Let's get down to business, here.

0:17:070:17:08

I am six quid in front, and I want to keep it that way.

0:17:080:17:11

I still can't believe how I didn't come out

0:17:110:17:15

of the last auction another 100 quid up.

0:17:150:17:17

Phil, you need to get over it.

0:17:170:17:19

Yesterday, Natasha spent £37 on two items -

0:17:190:17:23

a Scottish plaid brooch

0:17:230:17:25

with a large oval citrine

0:17:250:17:27

and a big sink -

0:17:270:17:28

leaving her with £136.12.

0:17:280:17:32

Philip spent £130 on a folio of prints,

0:17:330:17:36

four Art Deco walnut chairs, two Victorian letter stamps

0:17:360:17:40

and a pair of silver-plated ribbon pullers, as you do.

0:17:400:17:44

After that spending spree, Philip has £36.96 left for today.

0:17:440:17:49

Our pairs' next stop is just a few miles from Aylesbury.

0:17:500:17:54

Philip has come to Stoke Mandeville's sports stadium

0:17:540:17:57

to find out how a small patch of land behind a hospital became

0:17:570:18:00

the birthplace of the world's second biggest sporting event.

0:18:000:18:04

I am so looking forward to this.

0:18:040:18:05

-I think...

-I am really, really looking forward to it.

0:18:050:18:08

-..you're going to be very inspired, Mr Serrell.

-Very humbled.

0:18:080:18:10

-Humbled and inspired.

-Very, very humbled.

-Here we are.

0:18:100:18:13

-You take care.

-You too, bye.

0:18:130:18:15

Have a really lousy day!

0:18:150:18:17

Thanks, Phil(!)

0:18:170:18:19

-Bye.

-Bye!

0:18:190:18:22

Stoke Mandeville Hospital is home to one of the largest

0:18:220:18:25

and the oldest spinal injuries centres in the world.

0:18:250:18:29

It was founded by a neurologist in 1944 who had a radical

0:18:290:18:32

approach to rehabilitation.

0:18:320:18:34

And Philip is meeting former hospital patient Martin McElhatton

0:18:340:18:38

to find out how Dr Ludwig Guttmann's ground-breaking treatment work.

0:18:380:18:44

He introduced a comprehensive medical model of treatment

0:18:440:18:48

for people coming back from the war with spinal injuries.

0:18:480:18:51

In what way exactly was he different to the way everybody else

0:18:510:18:55

treated spinal injuries?

0:18:550:18:56

Well, he brought all the knowledge from around the world together

0:18:560:18:59

into, you know, his treatment.

0:18:590:19:01

And he treated the patients really in a fantastic way.

0:19:010:19:05

And they even called him Poppa.

0:19:050:19:07

You know, a very affectionate name of how much they felt about him.

0:19:070:19:10

Before Dr Guttmann, unthinkable though it is now,

0:19:100:19:15

the paralysed were considered untreatable.

0:19:150:19:18

Up until the mid-1940s, eight out of ten spinal injury patients

0:19:180:19:23

died within three years of paralysis.

0:19:230:19:25

However, Dr Guttmann's visionary approach changed

0:19:250:19:29

the course of thousands of lives.

0:19:290:19:31

He made sure they had the right medical care.

0:19:310:19:34

You know, the right physiotherapy.

0:19:340:19:37

But he also felt that there was something missing in the treatment.

0:19:370:19:40

And he loved sports.

0:19:400:19:41

He felt that sport would add that dimension of comradery

0:19:410:19:45

and psychological wellbeing for the injured servicemen and women.

0:19:450:19:50

This pioneering notion led to the world's first sporting

0:19:500:19:54

competition for disabled people - the Stoke Mandeville Games.

0:19:540:19:58

The brainchild of Dr Guttmann,

0:19:580:20:00

it took place on the hospital lawns on the very same day

0:20:000:20:03

as the Opening Ceremony of the 1948 London Olympics.

0:20:030:20:07

How wonderful.

0:20:070:20:09

Presumably, I mean, this wasn't here then.

0:20:090:20:11

No, there was nothing here, just green fields and a car park

0:20:110:20:16

and the old huts that are behind us.

0:20:160:20:18

14 men and two women, all injured military personnel, competed.

0:20:180:20:24

Well, initially, they did things

0:20:240:20:26

like archery, because the chairs were very big and cumbersome.

0:20:260:20:30

So, you know, doing other sports that involve propelling

0:20:300:20:34

the wheelchair was probably more difficult.

0:20:340:20:36

But athletics was done. And they did javelin.

0:20:360:20:40

The referees were made up of doctors and nurses.

0:20:410:20:44

It was nothing more than a glorified sports day.

0:20:440:20:47

But Dr Guttmann had started something remarkable.

0:20:470:20:50

We had 16 in the first games in 1948.

0:20:510:20:55

And by 1956, that had grown to 130 competitors.

0:20:550:21:00

And in London 2012,

0:21:000:21:02

around 5,000 athletes from all over the world.

0:21:020:21:06

The Stoke Mandeville Games were the forerunner to the Paralympic Games.

0:21:060:21:10

Today, a modern stadium sits alongside the hospital.

0:21:100:21:14

And what would Guttmann have thought of all of this?

0:21:140:21:17

I think he would have been amazed. I think he would be really proud.

0:21:170:21:20

And I think, you know, he would have wanted more.

0:21:200:21:24

Because he was a guy who, I think, always wanted to push

0:21:240:21:28

the boundaries.

0:21:280:21:29

And by pushing those boundaries, he enabled so many men

0:21:290:21:34

and women around the world to achieve their sporting dreams.

0:21:340:21:37

He always had the vision there would be

0:21:370:21:39

an Olympics for the paralysed or a parallel Olympics,

0:21:390:21:43

and that is where the term Paralympics comes from.

0:21:430:21:46

Dr Guttmann's legacy has helped

0:21:460:21:48

Martin achieve his sporting dreams too.

0:21:480:21:51

Aged 18, he was hit by a lorry and left paralysed.

0:21:510:21:55

He was treated at Stoke Mandeville Hospital

0:21:550:21:57

and had to learn how to adjust to life in a wheelchair.

0:21:570:22:01

What was your sport, Martin?

0:22:010:22:02

Well, I played wheelchair basketball in the 1984 Paralympic Games,

0:22:020:22:06

which happened to be here, in Stoke Mandeville.

0:22:060:22:08

-So you have pulled your Olympic vest on?

-Yes!

-What did that feel like?

0:22:080:22:11

Well, it was an inspirational moment and something you feel hugely

0:22:110:22:16

honoured and proud to represent your country.

0:22:160:22:18

When Dr Guttmann died in 1980, his dream of a Paralympic Games being

0:22:180:22:24

held in parallel with the Olympic Games

0:22:240:22:27

was still yet to happen.

0:22:270:22:28

It wasn't until Seoul in 1988 that both games happened together.

0:22:280:22:33

So, Martin, you've got some ephemera here.

0:22:330:22:36

Is this all one person's?

0:22:360:22:38

No, it is a selection from our archive here, at Stoke Mandeville,

0:22:380:22:42

which tells the story of Dr Guttmann

0:22:420:22:46

and the Paralympic movement

0:22:460:22:49

and, you know, really about some of the individual athletes who

0:22:490:22:52

have been inspirational as part of that story.

0:22:520:22:56

I bet he didn't realise what he was creating, did he?

0:22:560:22:59

For me, personally, if he hadn't done what he did,

0:22:590:23:03

I wouldn't have had the opportunity to take part in Paralympic sport.

0:23:030:23:07

I don't think Dr Guttmann is on his own in being an inspiration,

0:23:070:23:11

-really, you know.

-Thank you.

0:23:110:23:13

Natasha's motored the Porsche to Tetsworth, in Oxfordshire.

0:23:210:23:25

She is heading for The Swan Antiques Centre

0:23:260:23:29

with her remaining £136.

0:23:290:23:32

Housed in a historic Grade II listed Elizabethan coaching inn,

0:23:340:23:38

there are not many prettier places to shop in.

0:23:380:23:41

Paul is the man in charge.

0:23:410:23:43

I recognise you!

0:23:430:23:44

How lovely to see you. Thank you very much.

0:23:440:23:46

Look at these surroundings, you are not slumming it around here, are you?

0:23:460:23:49

We certainly are not slumming it. It is absolutely fantastic.

0:23:490:23:52

Elizabeth I stayed here, Queen Victoria stayed here.

0:23:520:23:54

Do you know what?

0:23:540:23:55

-You play your cards right, you might be able to stay here.

-Oh.

0:23:550:23:59

Now, there is an offer!

0:23:590:24:01

Maybe see how the shopping goes first, eh?

0:24:020:24:05

I think I am going to

0:24:050:24:07

work my way to the top

0:24:070:24:10

and then work my way back down again.

0:24:100:24:12

There is plenty of stock, but Natasha needs to

0:24:120:24:14

focus on finding something in her price range.

0:24:140:24:17

OK, I'm going to go this way. No, no, that looks like...

0:24:170:24:20

serious oil paintings. I'm going to go this way.

0:24:200:24:22

No oil paintings, please.

0:24:220:24:24

This is a nice wee room, this.

0:24:270:24:29

I'm going to have more of a look cos there are trinkety things.

0:24:290:24:32

Trinkety things is what I am after.

0:24:320:24:34

She is drawn to a French hand-painted pin dish.

0:24:340:24:38

And it is porcelain. It is actually on a little porcelain dish.

0:24:380:24:42

And you can see it has got a little bit of crazing on it. Not really.

0:24:420:24:45

It is in nice condition overall.

0:24:450:24:47

I think that is a really sweet little stand.

0:24:480:24:51

This pretty little dish dates from the late 19th century.

0:24:510:24:55

It sports a ticket price of £80.

0:24:550:24:57

It is just a decorative thing, but it is absolutely beautiful.

0:24:570:25:01

There certainly won't be two of these at the auction.

0:25:010:25:04

But this would be a gamble piece.

0:25:040:25:06

Lovely though it is, it is not going to have wide appeal.

0:25:060:25:09

It is £80.

0:25:090:25:10

But I would quite like to get it for half that price.

0:25:100:25:13

So I reckon if I could maybe push Paul a little...

0:25:130:25:18

Good luck with that!

0:25:190:25:20

I think that is a nice thing.

0:25:210:25:22

-That is French, 19th century, the papillon, the butterflies.

-Yeah.

0:25:220:25:25

-What do you reckon?

-A symbol of the soul.

-A symbol of the soul set free.

0:25:250:25:28

What do you reckon?

0:25:280:25:29

Natasha was hoping to get this for half the ticket price.

0:25:290:25:32

If I knocked you a tenner off... So what has it got on it? 80.

0:25:320:25:35

-If I said 70?

-We could round it down to 70. Do you know what?

0:25:350:25:38

I love the little papillon.

0:25:380:25:40

For 70 quid, shall we shake on it?

0:25:400:25:42

-Let's shake on it.

-Yay!

-Merci, madame.

-Merci and thank you.

0:25:420:25:46

Tres bon! A deal done for the French hand-painted dish.

0:25:460:25:50

-Make sure you come back now.

-I will, thank you.

0:25:500:25:52

She has made a good impression there.

0:25:520:25:54

The next shop for both our road trippers is the picturesque

0:25:540:25:58

town of Wendover.

0:25:580:25:59

Phil has stolen a lead on Natasha,

0:25:590:26:02

so he is getting first pick at the local antiques centre.

0:26:020:26:05

Hopefully, dealer Mike knows where the bargains can be found.

0:26:050:26:08

Have a look in this room. There is a cabinet full of curiosities.

0:26:080:26:12

And lots of bits and bobs.

0:26:120:26:14

EARLY 1900S PIANO MUSIC

0:26:140:26:18

Oh, I like that.

0:26:180:26:19

Yes, I do like that.

0:26:220:26:24

Labelled as a fireman's hose nozzle and priced at £35.

0:26:240:26:28

-What could that be?

-As it is you, and all that old gag.

0:26:280:26:33

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

-27.

0:26:330:26:35

Seeing as it was me, I was hoping for like 15 or 20.

0:26:360:26:39

25 quid is the bottom line.

0:26:390:26:43

That is ten pounds off the asking price

0:26:430:26:45

and within Philip's remaining budget of £36.96.

0:26:450:26:49

Anything else catch your eye?

0:26:510:26:53

People think of antiques as being perhaps furniture and porcelain

0:26:550:26:58

and bits of silver. But now, you know, it is

0:26:580:27:02

all garden implements, it is all this sort of ephemera that

0:27:020:27:07

relates to our social history, in a way, and I just love it.

0:27:070:27:11

And I love these, look at these.

0:27:110:27:13

These are fantastic. Now...

0:27:130:27:15

These are for fitting on the hooves of ponies.

0:27:160:27:22

If you can imagine in the 19th century,

0:27:220:27:25

a big country house with a croquet lawn at the front.

0:27:250:27:27

When it was mowed,

0:27:270:27:29

there wasn't any cylinder lawnmower or whatever.

0:27:290:27:32

Your mower was pulled by a team of ponies or horses.

0:27:320:27:36

You didn't want the horses' hooves to sink in

0:27:360:27:38

to your lovely, beautifully manicured

0:27:380:27:41

croquet lawn. So the ponies had little booties. Aren't they cool?

0:27:410:27:45

They are also 160 quid.

0:27:460:27:49

And the only thing that just confused me a little bit,

0:27:490:27:52

there is only two there. I don't know that many two-legged ponies.

0:27:520:27:57

With the horse shoe back on the shelf,

0:27:570:27:59

Phil has settled on the hose nozzle.

0:27:590:28:02

Time to shout for Mike.

0:28:020:28:04

Mike! Come into my office.

0:28:040:28:06

-Do have a seat.

-Thank you.

0:28:060:28:08

-Maybe some wax fruit would be nice.

-Absolutely right.

0:28:080:28:12

-Now, I really like that.

-Mm-hm.

0:28:120:28:14

I'm not sure, actually,

0:28:140:28:16

whether it was a fireman's nozzle or it was just a big country house type

0:28:160:28:21

of thing because that ain't going to put out much of a fire, really.

0:28:210:28:24

And all of this is me working around to the fact

0:28:240:28:26

-that I do want to buy it off you.

-But? I can hear but.

0:28:260:28:29

Yeah, no, you have been very, very kind to me, but... 20 quid.

0:28:290:28:32

-23, bottom line.

-That won't get us anywhere, that.

0:28:340:28:37

The dealer has got TWO ex-wives to keep.

0:28:370:28:40

Thank you very much.

0:28:420:28:43

Thank goodness he hasn't three divorces!

0:28:430:28:46

Even so, that is a generous settlement off the ticket price.

0:28:460:28:49

Oh, look! Natasha has finally arrived in Wendover.

0:28:530:28:58

Look out.

0:28:580:28:59

Oh, it is Serrell.

0:29:010:29:03

What a lovely way to shove it in my face, as you stuff your face,

0:29:030:29:07

that I've still got things to buy.

0:29:070:29:09

Finish that off. It is rude to speak with your mouth full.

0:29:090:29:12

I'm glad you're... You've been minding your manners.

0:29:120:29:15

But you are awfully cheeky for starting without me.

0:29:150:29:18

I will remember this. Thanks, Phil.

0:29:180:29:20

-See you in a sec.

-This really is very, very good, honestly.

0:29:200:29:23

It really is.

0:29:230:29:24

Wasting no time, Natasha delves deep to find a bargain...or two.

0:29:260:29:30

Phil has had a little look.

0:29:330:29:35

He has had first dibs, so he will probably have singled out

0:29:350:29:38

the best thing at the best price,

0:29:380:29:39

and I will be left with everything else, but come on, there is

0:29:390:29:42

so much stuff in here, I reckon I can find something.

0:29:420:29:46

Search and ye shall find.

0:29:460:29:48

Dealer Sarah is ready to help.

0:29:480:29:51

-I saw a really cute thing in here.

-Oh!

0:29:510:29:53

It is ridiculously cheap and it is a sweet little thing.

0:29:530:29:56

And I am guessing that it is not silver.

0:29:560:29:58

But it is a little sewing machine.

0:29:580:30:00

But seeing as I have very little money,

0:30:000:30:02

things with a five-pound price tag

0:30:020:30:04

-are starting to appeal.

-Appealing to you.

0:30:040:30:07

Yeah. Out of the cabinet, it actually looks better in the light.

0:30:070:30:13

-It looks really sweet.

-I think it is rather sweet.

0:30:130:30:15

-It is unusual, isn't it?

-Yeah, cos it is really well worked.

0:30:150:30:17

All the parts are there of the sewing machine.

0:30:170:30:19

You've even got the sort of wheel at the back doing all the turning.

0:30:190:30:23

And it is a really cute thing.

0:30:230:30:24

Can Natasha get this tiny bracelet charm for a tiny price?

0:30:240:30:28

If I were to offer you three pounds for it,

0:30:280:30:30

how would you feel about that?

0:30:300:30:32

-I think that'd be fine.

-You think you can deal with that?

0:30:320:30:34

I think that will be absolutely fine.

0:30:340:30:36

-Let's shake on the three quid.

-Yes, absolutely.

0:30:360:30:38

Another deal sewn up, and for three pounds!

0:30:380:30:41

I'd say there is hope of a little profit.

0:30:410:30:44

-But Natasha isn't finished yet.

-I just caught this.

0:30:440:30:47

And, you know, this is something that has caught my eye for one

0:30:470:30:50

particular reason - because everything about it is quite pretty.

0:30:500:30:53

It is lovely. On a distance, on a shelf, you would just say,

0:30:530:30:57

"Oh, that is so sweet."

0:30:570:30:58

You have got lovely hand-painted decoration on this very

0:30:580:31:01

sort of Bristol blue glass with a nice kind of frilly top

0:31:010:31:05

and what looks to be the original stopper.

0:31:050:31:07

Let's have a wee look, let's see if we can see the pontil mark.

0:31:070:31:09

Yep, you know, it's nicely hand-blown.

0:31:090:31:13

It is just a good thing.

0:31:130:31:15

But what is not particularly pretty is the fact that whoever

0:31:150:31:18

has taken the time to paint this,

0:31:180:31:20

they have not done the best job with her sweet little face.

0:31:200:31:23

She has got sweet little hands with a pointing finger,

0:31:230:31:26

dainty little feet, a sweet little waist and a cute little haircut.

0:31:260:31:29

And on the face, they have just been a wee bit sloppy.

0:31:290:31:32

She's right.

0:31:320:31:33

The label only indicates this decanter MIGHT be painted

0:31:330:31:37

by Mary Gregory, who was an American woman and fine enameller of glass.

0:31:370:31:41

This story is told that she was an old lady who painted

0:31:410:31:44

the children she never had.

0:31:440:31:46

Whether this tale is true is questionable,

0:31:460:31:48

but without a doubt, her pieces are very collectable. But!

0:31:480:31:52

She was a perfectionist

0:31:520:31:53

and would certainly never have painted ugly chops like that.

0:31:530:31:56

Now, it has got that age-old motif written on their - A/F.

0:31:560:32:01

So sold as found.

0:32:010:32:03

So there has got to be some damage somewhere.

0:32:030:32:06

So see if we can source it.

0:32:060:32:07

Yeah, there is a little bit of a crack where the handle meets

0:32:090:32:12

the neck of the decanter.

0:32:120:32:14

It has a fair ticket price of £28.

0:32:140:32:18

Sarah, out of all the lovely things in the shop,

0:32:180:32:20

I have been attracted to this sort of glistening blue decanter.

0:32:200:32:23

-Isn't it lovely?

-It is a little bit damaged, it is noted on the label.

0:32:230:32:27

So I was thinking of making an offer, it's a wee bit cheeky.

0:32:270:32:30

-OK.

-But I thought, seeing as we have become such good friends...

0:32:300:32:33

-You wouldn't be offended.

-It is worth a try.

0:32:330:32:35

You would take it in good humour and you wouldn't slap me across the face.

0:32:350:32:38

I'm going to offer 18. And see what you can do for me.

0:32:380:32:42

Sarah needs to put Natasha's cheeky offer to the dealer

0:32:420:32:45

selling the decanter.

0:32:450:32:46

Time for a quick phone call.

0:32:460:32:48

-She said if you make it 20, then you could have it.

-Oh...

0:32:480:32:52

-Two pounds more.

-What about if I said 19? Just for a laugh.

0:32:520:32:56

Oh, how about 19 for a laugh?

0:32:560:32:58

Yeah, you sure?

0:33:000:33:02

OK. Great. Thanks, Chloe. Thanks very much.

0:33:020:33:05

Natasha has haggled hard,

0:33:050:33:07

getting around a third of the ticket price

0:33:070:33:09

knocked off the decanter, plus the bracelet charm for three pounds.

0:33:090:33:13

Could these be the lots to get Natasha a big profit?

0:33:130:33:17

As this leg of the journey draws to a close, here's

0:33:190:33:22

a rundown of what Philip and Natasha bought on their travels.

0:33:220:33:25

Natasha started the road trip by picking up a Scottish plaid

0:33:250:33:28

brooch and a large Belfast sink.

0:33:280:33:31

As you do.

0:33:310:33:32

She also bought a hand-painted pin dish, a white metal bracelet

0:33:320:33:36

charm and a blue glass decanter depicting a Victorian girl.

0:33:360:33:39

The five lots cost Natasha £129.

0:33:390:33:44

Philip's purchases include a folio of prints,

0:33:440:33:48

a set of four Art Deco burr walnut chairs,

0:33:480:33:51

two Victorian letters seals,

0:33:510:33:53

a silver-plated ribbon puller in the shape of a stork

0:33:530:33:57

and a 19th-century copper and brass nozzle.

0:33:570:34:00

All that lot cost him £153.

0:34:000:34:03

What did they think of each other's buys?

0:34:030:34:05

Phil has done a great job.

0:34:050:34:06

It doesn't matter how poor the condition of those prints is

0:34:060:34:10

because they are not foxed, so it is salvageable.

0:34:100:34:13

And for a fiver, they'll do fine.

0:34:130:34:15

I really, really love that oval dish.

0:34:150:34:17

I think it is pure Victorian. But it is such a lovely, lovely thing.

0:34:170:34:21

And if you can find two people at the auction who really want that

0:34:210:34:24

and covet it, it could go and make a lot of money for her.

0:34:240:34:27

£45 for four Art Deco chairs could be all the money. I'm not sure.

0:34:270:34:31

They could make 100, they could make 20,

0:34:310:34:33

such is the story with furniture these days.

0:34:330:34:35

So not too sure, but I think he has got the balance just right.

0:34:350:34:38

He will do fine with those.

0:34:380:34:39

The sink, however, there is an exception to every rule.

0:34:390:34:43

I think she might just go down the plugger with that.

0:34:430:34:46

It's time now to turn those lots into a profit

0:34:480:34:51

and head to auction in Chiswick, in West London.

0:34:510:34:54

This is my Mecca. This is my Mecca!

0:34:540:34:57

Natasha is enjoying her time in the capital already.

0:34:570:35:00

I don't think she gets out much.

0:35:000:35:01

I think you think this is a fairground ride, honestly.

0:35:010:35:05

Scream if you want to go faster!

0:35:050:35:06

Aaaah!

0:35:060:35:08

Almost there, Philip. Hold on tight.

0:35:080:35:11

High Road Auctions is the venue for today's sale.

0:35:110:35:15

Ross Mercer is our auctioneer today. He knows his stuff.

0:35:150:35:18

But what does he think about our items?

0:35:180:35:20

My favourite has got to be the Art Deco chairs.

0:35:200:35:24

The last of the good quality furniture.

0:35:240:35:25

They are newly upholstered.

0:35:250:35:27

They should attract quite a lot of bidders.

0:35:270:35:29

One of the items that may struggle is the costume jewellery brooch.

0:35:290:35:35

Coloured piece of glass looking like a citrine but not quite the quality.

0:35:350:35:40

As Ross takes to the rostrum - ha - our experts take their seats.

0:35:400:35:44

-First up, lovely, is your brooch.

-I know.

0:35:440:35:46

Our Glasgow girl was quite taken

0:35:460:35:49

with this brooch.

0:35:490:35:50

Hopefully, someone in the room

0:35:500:35:51

is just as keen.

0:35:510:35:53

I've got a bid here at five pounds.

0:35:530:35:55

Oh, off to the races.

0:35:550:35:57

At eight pounds, bid me ten.

0:35:570:35:58

12 now. 15, do I hear?

0:35:580:36:01

15 now on the telephone. At £15.

0:36:010:36:04

A phone bidder!

0:36:040:36:05

From Scotland.

0:36:050:36:07

Last chance, going to sell it now

0:36:070:36:09

to my colleague on the telephone at £15.

0:36:090:36:12

-That's all right.

-It's £15.

-I'll take that.

0:36:120:36:16

A steady start.

0:36:160:36:17

First up for Philip, his folio of prints.

0:36:190:36:21

Maybe this chap wants to get his paws on dog pictures.

0:36:210:36:24

Let's find out. Arrr!

0:36:240:36:26

I've got bids here at ten pounds.

0:36:260:36:28

Against you at ten.

0:36:280:36:29

15, I will take. 15. 20 now.

0:36:290:36:32

20 bid on the phone. I'll take five.

0:36:320:36:33

25. 30 now.

0:36:330:36:35

£30 bid with my colleague, left-hand side. 30. Last chance.

0:36:350:36:39

Going to sell it now

0:36:390:36:40

to the telephone at £30.

0:36:400:36:43

That's remarkable, isn't it?

0:36:430:36:45

That is excellent!

0:36:450:36:47

I'm please with that.

0:36:470:36:48

Very pleased, very pleased.

0:36:480:36:50

Five prints, bought for a pound each

0:36:500:36:52

and turning a £25 profit.

0:36:520:36:54

Now that is how to do it.

0:36:540:36:56

Next to go under the gavel is Natasha's big Belfast sink.

0:36:560:37:00

Just the job for London.

0:37:000:37:02

Ten pounds surely for it. Five I will take.

0:37:020:37:04

It has got to make a pound.

0:37:040:37:06

-A pound on bid.

-A pound?

-Two. Three.

0:37:060:37:08

Five pounds bid. Eight. Ten. 12.

0:37:080:37:11

15 I have. At £15. 20 bid on the phone.

0:37:110:37:14

At £20. Probably broken a record here somewhere.

0:37:140:37:17

-At 20.

-Hey!

-All done?

0:37:170:37:20

Bad luck, the first loss of the day.

0:37:220:37:24

But there is still time to claw it all back.

0:37:240:37:27

Philip's fire hose nozzle is next.

0:37:270:37:30

Ten pounds, it's no money.

0:37:300:37:32

Ten pounds bid. At ten. 12. £12. Bid me 14.

0:37:320:37:36

-14.

-OK.

-16 bid. 18 now.

0:37:360:37:38

20 bid. And two.

0:37:380:37:40

-At £22 I'm bid. The gentleman stood in front, at 22.

-So close.

0:37:400:37:44

Clearly, I paid the right price for it.

0:37:440:37:46

£22.

0:37:460:37:48

24, may I say? £24 bid.

0:37:480:37:50

-Profit!

-At £24, then.

0:37:500:37:53

At £24...

0:37:530:37:55

Sadly, after commission is deducted,

0:37:550:37:57

Philip is going to be a little out of pocket.

0:37:570:38:01

Now, Natasha's blue decanter,

0:38:010:38:03

enamelled with a face that looks

0:38:030:38:06

as if it launched 1,000 ships.

0:38:060:38:08

Will she appeal to any bidders?

0:38:080:38:10

Five pounds? At five pounds. Bid ten.

0:38:100:38:11

-15. 20. New bidder at 20.

-Why?

0:38:110:38:14

Five now.

0:38:140:38:15

-£20. 25.

-OK, OK.

0:38:150:38:18

£25. £25, lady's bid.

0:38:180:38:20

Sitting in the front row at 25.

0:38:200:38:24

Thank you!

0:38:240:38:26

-Well done.

-You bought a nice thing.

0:38:260:38:29

Oh, yes. Decent profit for Natasha there.

0:38:290:38:32

Philip has received some bad news about his next lot.

0:38:320:38:35

-Do you remember those two seals?

-Mm-hm.

0:38:350:38:37

There was the bone one and the agate one.

0:38:370:38:39

-Ah-ha, yeah, they were pretty nice.

-Yeah, one of them has gone astray.

0:38:390:38:43

-Oh, no! Has it been lost?

-Yeah. Don't know where.

0:38:430:38:46

Philip paid £35 for the two seals.

0:38:460:38:49

An insurance valuation for the lot was given at £65.

0:38:490:38:53

If the one remaining seal sells for less,

0:38:560:38:58

Philip will get the insurance valuation.

0:38:580:39:01

But if it makes more in the sale, Philip is even better off.

0:39:010:39:05

Ten pounds on bid in the books. At ten pounds. 15 now.

0:39:050:39:08

20 there. At 20. 25. 30.

0:39:080:39:11

30 bid. 35.

0:39:110:39:13

Sure? At £30, through to the back, at 30.

0:39:130:39:15

Do you know what? It has done all right on its own.

0:39:150:39:18

Stood at the back of the seating, at £30. I'm going to sell it.

0:39:180:39:22

So, the gavel is down at £30.

0:39:220:39:24

And Philip's insurance valuation is £65,

0:39:240:39:28

which means he has actually made a £30 profit.

0:39:280:39:31

Natasha paid just three pounds for this bracelet charm.

0:39:310:39:35

Five pounds starts me.

0:39:350:39:36

-Five pounds I'm bid. At eight.

-Get in, girl, get in.

0:39:360:39:39

12 in the centre. At 14?

0:39:390:39:41

£12, I have.

0:39:410:39:42

In the centre of the seating at 12.

0:39:420:39:44

14.

0:39:440:39:45

16. At £16.

0:39:450:39:46

Do you know what? You should have bought the whole charm bracelet

0:39:460:39:50

and chopped them up.

0:39:500:39:51

Last chance. Going to the gentleman at £16.

0:39:510:39:55

So, five times what Natasha paid

0:39:550:39:58

for it, that really is charming. Ha!

0:39:580:40:00

Next up, Philip's ribbon puller.

0:40:000:40:03

£20 starts.

0:40:030:40:04

20 bid. 25. 30.

0:40:040:40:07

Five with you, sir. At 35.

0:40:070:40:09

Straight in now 40. Left-hand side at 40.

0:40:090:40:12

At £40.

0:40:120:40:14

-Lady's bid at £40 only. I am going to sell them on at 40.

-Oh, Phil.

0:40:140:40:18

-Don't make a loss, don't make a loss, no!

-At £40...

0:40:180:40:21

Yes, it is a loss. But only a small one.

0:40:210:40:24

The auctioneer expected Philip's chairs to do well. Was he right?

0:40:240:40:28

We have got bids at £40. Straight in at 40.

0:40:280:40:31

Five now. At 45.

0:40:310:40:33

50 bid. 50. Five now. 55. 60.

0:40:330:40:36

Oh!

0:40:380:40:40

65. At £70 bid now.

0:40:400:40:43

Come all this way, sir. 75.

0:40:430:40:45

£75 now. 85. Still worth it.

0:40:450:40:49

£85. At 85.

0:40:490:40:52

90 bid.

0:40:520:40:54

Come along. At £85.

0:40:540:40:56

-Gentleman in the seating at 85.

-This is exciting.

0:40:560:40:58

I'm going to sell it to the gentleman.

0:40:580:41:00

-You should say thank you to your man behind you.

-He is a good chap.

0:41:000:41:05

Philip has almost doubled his money.

0:41:050:41:07

Excellent stuff.

0:41:070:41:09

The pressure is on for Natasha.

0:41:090:41:11

And next up is her gamble buy.

0:41:110:41:13

She spent £70 on this little pin dish.

0:41:130:41:16

But will it bring big bids?

0:41:160:41:19

I've got bids here at ten pounds.

0:41:190:41:21

Bid on the books at ten.

0:41:210:41:22

Take 12 from you. At £12.

0:41:220:41:24

Bid me 14. 14. 16. At 16.

0:41:240:41:27

Why is he going in twos?

0:41:270:41:29

A minute ago he was moving in fivers.

0:41:290:41:31

-Now with Rachel, 20 bid.

-It is not looking good.

-With the lady at 20.

0:41:310:41:35

-In the seating at £20.

-Say 25, don't say 22.

-I'll take five from you.

0:41:350:41:39

-It is a lovely item.

-Yeah.

-At £20. Last chance at £20.

0:41:390:41:43

We are going to sell it to the lady at 20...

0:41:430:41:45

-Oh, that is really horrific.

-Oh, that is a big, big ouch.

0:41:450:41:50

That is sort of physically sore as well as mentally bruising.

0:41:500:41:54

I know, Natasha, such a disappointing end. Bad luck.

0:41:540:41:58

Do you know what, lovely? I think I had a bit of luck there.

0:41:580:42:01

In auction terms, well, it is two on to me, isn't it?

0:42:010:42:04

Onwards and upwards. Come on, you OK?

0:42:040:42:07

(Well done.)

0:42:070:42:09

Natasha started this leg with £173.12.

0:42:100:42:15

After paying auction house fees, she is down £50.28. Oh, dear.

0:42:150:42:21

As a result, Natasha has £122.84 to start next time.

0:42:210:42:27

Philip has stolen the lead, starting with £166.96.

0:42:270:42:32

And after costs, he is up £47.08,

0:42:320:42:36

leaving Mr Serrell with £214.04 in his kitty to carry forward.

0:42:360:42:42

All right, go, go, go! Before the bus comes.

0:42:420:42:45

-Where are we off to, guv'nor?

-Well, Brighton, darling, Brighton.

0:42:480:42:52

-I am getting farther from home and so are you.

-We can see the sea.

0:42:520:42:55

-There is every chance we might.

-Woo-hoo! Whoo!

0:42:550:42:57

# Let's go to the seaside! #

0:42:570:43:00

Next time on Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:020:43:03

As Natasha does her best not to upset the dealers...

0:43:030:43:07

I only want to be honest, not offensive.

0:43:070:43:09

..Philip is busy offending our ears.

0:43:090:43:11

I don't know any more.

0:43:140:43:16

It's halfway through the trip for Philip Serrell and Natasha Raskin. They shop in Hertfordshire, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire before heading to West London for a crucial auction.