Episode 17 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 17

Antiques challenge. It's the second leg for antique hunters Philip Serrell and Natasha Raskin as they take in the delights of south Wales before heading to an auction in Newent.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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I don't know what to do!

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HORN BEEPS With £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game!

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Charlie!

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There'll be worthy winners

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and valiant losers.

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SHE GASPS

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah.

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It's leg two of this week's epic road trip

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with dynamic duo Natasha Raskin and Philip Serrell.

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-I think we're a good match, do you know that?

-Yeah.

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Do you get tired being happy all the time?

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No, but do you know what I think you're doing?

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You're kind of chilling me out a little bit.

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Phil is a Road Trip veteran and an expert auctioneer

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with a reputation for being a bit of an old grump.

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-Have you got any idea where we are?

-No, no idea.

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-You don't have any idea where were going to?

-Er...Newport.

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Newport, we're in Newport and we are heading for Newport.

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I don't want to be picky but this is not Newport.

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Let's just establish roles here.

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Pilot, navigator.

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Novice Road Tripper Natasha is an auctioneer in Glasgow

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who specialises in Scottish contemporary art.

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I cannot think of a better way to spend a day than driving around

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Wales in a gorgeous Porsche with a handsome man like you.

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-Oh, what a girl, what a girl.

-SHE LAUGHS

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I'm so glad you've memorised that script I gave you.

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On this journey, our trippers are cruising

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in a classy 1957 Porsche 356 Coupe.

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I absolutely adore this car and, of all the road trips I've done,

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-this is the car I want to take home with me.

-Yeah.

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Natasha made a loss on the last leg.

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After starting with £200,

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she's ended up with £161.96 to play with.

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Meanwhile, old hand Phil played a stormer

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and made a great profit, so he has £275.90 to spend today.

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What are you going to be looking for today?

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Well, cheap things.

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I don't have much to spend but I think I'm going to go...

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slightly smaller, slightly more feminine this time.

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I've got a plan.

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What the plan?

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Just buy five totally different things.

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Our experts' mammoth mission began in Narberth in Pembrokeshire

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and will see them travel several hundred miles,

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covering Wales and southern England

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before finishing up in Salisbury, Wiltshire.

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Today's trip kicks off in Newport

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and will meander its way north towards the auction in Newent.

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Nothing like a relaxing drive in the British countryside, eh?

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-Oh, Lord. Have we got to go on that?

-I think we might have to!

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-You're joking. I do not fancy that at all.

-No.

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What? That thing hanging out of the sky?

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That thing is the Newport Transporter Bridge.

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Built in 1906, the Grade 1 listed structure is very rare,

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with only six operational transporter bridges worldwide.

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-This is a bit exciting.

-It depends on what you deem is exciting.

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Originally built to carry steelworkers across the River Usk,

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the mile and a half journey now costs just £1 per person,

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or £2.75 for those brave enough to climb the 270 steps

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up to the high-level walkway at the top of the structure.

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-It's moving. It's moving, it's moving, it's moving.

-Oh, my love.

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-Are you not enjoying this?

-No, I don't. I don't like this one little bit.

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-Why?

-Cos I don't like stuff like this.

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It makes me feel all...

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-HE GAGS

-Are you OK?

-yeah, just feeling very...

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Safely back on solid ground, it's time for our pair to part ways

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as Natasha's heading to her first pit stop.

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Hello?

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-Hello.

-Oh, hello. Hi, there. I'm Natasha.

-Hi, I'm John.

-Hi, John.

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-Lovely to meet you.

-Nice to meet you.

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This looks like an absolute treasure trove of a shop.

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Good name, too. Strawberry Water Junk Company. HE LAUGHS

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OK, OK.

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I don't really know where to start. There's so much everywhere.

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There are... I can't help but look up, cos there are so many pictures.

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I can't stop looking up, but I don't think we're going to look at pictures today.

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Look at stuff, look at stuff.

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Stuff, eh? Plenty of that in here.

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That is the best thing.

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Maybe that's by somebody.

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Oh. How excit... Oh, a Beswick.

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Oh, that's amazing.

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I do know the name Beswick, of course, because everyone does.

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It's probably 1970s. But it's in the form of a pheasant.

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It's probably for keeping eggs.

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It's hand-painted, which is really nice,

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and he's only 15 quid and if John would give me something off of him,

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come on, he's got to be a winner.

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There's only one way to find out.

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This has £15 on it

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and I think it's really sweet,

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and I wonder what would be your best price on the pheasant terrine?

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Oh, dear.

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-I'll be sweet to you, a tenner.

-A tenner, OK.

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Well, I think, for a tenner, it's a pretty good deal,

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but before we shake on it, there was another thing as well

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that I've just clocked as we walked past.

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Ah, she spotted a rather large glass carboy,

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which were primarily used to carry acids.

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What I know about these you could write on the back of a stamp,

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-but it's, I guess, a sort of molden glass. It wouldn't be blown, would it?

-No, no.

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So, it's a big bit of molden glass,

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but they're so decorative, aren't they? You can do anything with those.

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-Well, you put a garden inside, and have it growing...

-Yeah. They're really awesome.

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It would have been an acid holder, wouldn't it?

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Oh, really? I think it's a lovely lot.

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And I'm thinking... I haven't even seen the price.

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OK, so it got £28 on it.

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I really like the two.

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I think they're totally bizarre and disparate.

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-But, at the top end, their combined price was £43.

-Mm-hmm?

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Would you be open to an offer of £30?

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-Yeah, go on. It's near enough.

-Are you sure?

-Yes, I'm sure.

-SHE LAUGHS

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I feel awfully cheeky but, if you're happy with that,

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I'm going to grab your hand and go with it.

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So, with two lots bought, Natasha's off to a flying start.

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Phil, meanwhile, has motored his way 17 miles south

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to the Welsh capital, Cardiff.

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One of Britain's flattest cities,

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Cardiff also clocks up more hours sunlight then Milan.

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Surely that'll brighten up Phil's day?

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I'm, sort of, loathe to admit this, but I do really like Wales.

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I mean, as an Englishman who's mad keen on rugby, you know,

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Wales is our natural enemy,

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but I think Wales is... I love it. I really do.

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That's nice,

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but enough of the love-in, you've got some shopping to do.

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-Hi, how are you?

-I'm good, thank you. Welcome to The Pumping Station.

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-You've got a massive place here, haven't you?

-We have.

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It's on an industrial scale,

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with more than 35 different traders all under one roof.

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Lovely.

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-How are you, good Sir? Are you well?

-I'm good, young man, yourself?

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Young man? I'm warming to you already.

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Hey, Phil's not been a young man for a long time.

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But, what's this he's spotted?

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-The intaglios, here.

-Yes.

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-Can I have a look at the group of them, please?

-Yes.

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It's a collection of 19th-century intaglio metal moulds and glass seals.

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Intaglios are designs or images that are cut into hard surfaces such as metal or stone.

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And back in the 18th and 19th centuries,

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they were collected by grand tourists

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as sophisticated keepsakes of classical antiquity.

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These are Grand Tour bits,

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so when you went on your Grand Tour in 1820 and you wanted a souvenir,

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-you didn't bring back a stick of rock or a piece of troika...

-Yes.

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You brought back books...

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and you opened the books out and the books would be full of intaglios.

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Phil's clearly interested, but can he strike a bargain?

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What would you take for those and what would you take those?

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£150.

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That's for all of it?

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See, I'm miles away from you on price.

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I've really got to try and get these under 30 quid.

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You're going to struggle.

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Could 25 quid buy them?

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Cash. The folding holding.

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Mmm...

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-Yeah, go on.

-Oh, you're an absolute gentleman. Thank you ever so much.

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So, a generous discount there from Paul has secured Phil his first purchase.

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Anything else float your boat?

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Oh, this is a little watercolour.

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It's of HMS Tidepool, which, one presumes, is that there.

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I just think it's a really interesting little watercolour.

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It's quite finely done. It's pencil and watercolour,

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but there's a great deal of depth to it.

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The ticket price is £28, but can Phil convince dealer David to take less?

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I think, at auction, that's going to make between, oh, I don't know...

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20 and 40 quid - that's what I think -

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which means I've got to try and buy it for between 10 and £15.

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-Now, this is what we call...

-WHISPERS

-..a pregnant pause.

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A long silence

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-Well, I'm going to shock you.

-Oh!

-I'm going to shock you.

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-Look at this.

-I'm going to shock you.

-Go on, then.

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You can have it for £14 and that's my final offer.

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-Thank you very much.

-You're a gentleman. Thank you very much indeed.

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That purchase puts Phil neck and neck with Natasha on the buying front,

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with both of them bagging two lots each in their first shops.

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Natasha's also made her way to Cardiff

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and has come to its indoor flea market for a scratch about.

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OK.

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This is really great.

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Wow.

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I think, actually, I want to find something vintage and retro. It's got that look, doesn't it?

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You can say that again.

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Look at the planter.

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That has to be the most ridiculous thing I've ever seen.

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What is going on with this?

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Planter, plant... 1970s tiger plant pot.

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I'll probably put this one down and move on.

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Yes, something a little less garish might be best.

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There's one thing I really like. It is quite unusual.

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It's this little coral and seed pearl brooch.

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What's going on with that? I don't have a clue what the motif is.

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Well, it is a riding crop.

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You can see the whip. You've got your handle up here...

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And the horseshoe is to represent hunting and all that sort of thing.

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-Good luck.

-Seed pearls and coral, is that right?

-Yes.

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Is this in nine carat gold?

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No... I still haven't found a mark on it.

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-Ah, OK.

-So I think it is gilded.

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-OK.

-I'm not pricing it as nine carat gold.

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What is your price on that then?

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I will do for £25 for you.

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It wouldn't be right if I didn't counter offer you.

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What if I said £20? What if I said that, what would you do?

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-£20. You're OK with £20.

-Can we shake on it?

-Definitely.

-Oh!

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That's excellent. Thank you so much. I think that is really cute.

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Nice deal done, knocking five pounds off the asking price,

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and it looks like Natasha's artistic eye has spotted

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another little treasure.

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This lovely little oil on canvas board painting is making me

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pretty misty eyed because it is the most nostalgic, really nicely

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executed painting of what I am guessing would be the artist's father.

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Signed Jan Fisher, so I am saying female artist,

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probably around the 1980s.

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It has a nostalgic feel to it and I think Jan Fisher has produced

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something that wasn't commercially commissioned,

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it is just a nice memory she has had that she's wanted to reproduce.

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It is just a lovely thing.

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Can she convince owner Pete to part with

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the painting for under the £50 ticket price?

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-What would be your best price?

-I can probably do it for 40.

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Oh, Pete. 40 quid, you reckon?

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You aren't going to mug me now, are you?

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I am not going to mug you, but here is what I'm going to do.

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I will lay my cards on the table.

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I was hoping that Peter, Pete, you would offer it to me for £20.

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-That is ludicrous, isn't it?

-Ludicrous! Oh, come on.

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-What can I say?

-What do you reckon? Am I being too cheeky?

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-No, go on, you can have it.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

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Oh, Pete, you're such a star. Thank you so much. Oh, my goodness.

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Come on! He is so cute. He is everyone's best friend.

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-Yeah, he is.

-And you are now mine!

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-Aw, another great deal done securing the painting for £20.

-Yes!

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She is off to a strong start.

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Phil, meanwhile, has taken a 20-mile trek west to Bridgend.

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This Welsh countryside was once host to a Second World War

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prisoner of war camp.

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The site held captured German military personnel both during

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and after the war, and it was the site of an infamous daring escape.

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Phil has come to meet Hut 9 Preservation Society member

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Brett Exton to find out more.

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-Hi.

-Hi, Phil. How are we doing?

-Good, how you?

-Fine, thank you.

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-This is an interesting building.

-It is.

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This is hut number nine of a prisoner of war camp.

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-Prisoner of war?

-German prisoner of war camp.

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Not a very big one, by the looks of it.

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Oh, it was huge. Yeah, yeah. There would have been another 30 huts.

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-Oh, not just this bit then.

-No, not just this one! This is all that remains.

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The site is almost unrecognisable now, but this 1950s footage shows

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the camp closer to how it would have looked during the war.

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There were over 1,000 prisoner of war camps across the UK with

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Island Farm, also known as Camp 198,

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holding almost 2,000 prisoners.

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-Wow, so this is our cell.

-Yeah.

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We are the Germans and this is our cell.

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-Yeah.

-What did we do? That is clearly where we slept.

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This obviously was where we slept,

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but we would have had to find things to amuse ourselves.

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We would have written letters to home,

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we would have made things, we would have crafted little things, toys.

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Mind occupation here must have just been,

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they would have gone stir crazy.

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Well, they were very, very artistic, so in some of the rooms

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they drew some very intricate pictures.

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Many of the original paintings have been preserved,

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some of which are rather racy and there was a reason for this.

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These were the ones used to distract the guards from uncovering

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the secret tunnel the prisoners were digging.

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In 1945, March 10th 1945,

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70 Germans got out of this very hut, tunnelled to freedom,

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making it the largest escape from any POW camp in Great Britain.

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How did they know where they were?

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Because, you know, you're in the middle of Bridgend.

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You wouldn't know if you are in Bridgend or Bournemouth, would you?

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Well, the British military had been quite ingenious.

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They thought, "If we are going to be invaded by the Germans,

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"what can we do to make things a bit difficult for them?"

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So they had taken all the road signs down from every single

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street and road, but what the British had forgotten to do was take

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the maps down off the back walls of the railway carriages -

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the very train that brought the Germans here back in November 1944.

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So these Germans had seen these maps on the back walls

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of the railway carriages, and traced them onto

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their handkerchief and onto the tail pieces of their shirts.

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-This really is Colditz in reverse!

-Absolutely, yeah!

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It took the prisoners over four months of hard graft to dig the tunnel

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from Hut 9 out to freedom on the other side of the fence.

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It started in the room here and it went down about three or four

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feet in a curved shape underneath this path.

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-Underneath this path?

-This path would have been here in 1945

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and then, in length totally, about 30 feet in total.

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-And, I mean, that is an engineering feat.

-Absolutely.

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Vorsprung durch Technik, they say.

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And the tunnel is still standing today, 70 years on.

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-It has never collapsed after all this time.

-How did they do it?

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Well, the actual tunnel was dug using any type of instrument,

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anything that was sharp, the edge of a tin, spoons, knives,

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anything of that nature.

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But what's the interesting thing is how they shored the tunnel up.

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The beds in there, the bunk beds, were made of timber,

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so they cut equal lengths of wood off the bed lengths,

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all the bunks went down and nobody noticed

0:16:070:16:09

and that is what they used to shore the side walls of the tunnel.

0:16:090:16:12

What did they do about losing all the soil?

0:16:120:16:15

Inside the hut, on a corner shape part of the hut,

0:16:150:16:19

they extended the wall with plasterboard.

0:16:190:16:21

-They made a dummy wall.

-Yeah, to make a false wall.

0:16:210:16:24

They got the plasterboard and extended this false wall,

0:16:240:16:26

but they didn't have any screws, nuts, bolts to fasten the wall,

0:16:260:16:29

but what they did have was a plentiful supply of porridge.

0:16:290:16:32

-Porridge?

-Porridge.

0:16:320:16:34

They brewed up a real gloop-like consistency

0:16:340:16:37

and that is what they used to glue the wall together.

0:16:370:16:40

The irony of the glue being porridge is that on one of the walls

0:16:400:16:44

the prisoners drew a porridge man carrying a POW porridge bucket,

0:16:440:16:48

and that is a joke at the expense of the guards.

0:16:480:16:52

Although ultimately the joke was on the prisoners as their months

0:16:520:16:55

of hard labour were to end up in vain.

0:16:550:16:58

Some made it as far away as Birmingham and Southampton but,

0:16:580:17:01

within a week, all 70 of the escapees

0:17:010:17:03

were recaptured and imprisoned once more.

0:17:030:17:05

So, after the war,

0:17:050:17:07

did all the soldiers go home or did some of them stay?

0:17:070:17:10

Well, some of them settled down in the area.

0:17:100:17:14

-Really?

-They'd been out working on farms and been...

0:17:140:17:18

It became more like an open prison,

0:17:180:17:20

so they would have been allowed out under armed escort

0:17:200:17:23

to work in nearby places, and some of them befriended local women

0:17:230:17:27

and some of them settled down, married locally

0:17:270:17:29

and settled down locally in Bridgend.

0:17:290:17:33

That's fantastic, isn't it? A really good story.

0:17:330:17:35

This is very much part of Bridgend's history, isn't it?

0:17:350:17:38

Very much so and it is a history we would love to

0:17:380:17:40

see preserved, and hence why this is a Grade II listed building today.

0:17:400:17:44

It isn't the prettiest Grade II listed building I've ever seen!

0:17:440:17:47

-No, I agree with you.

-But it's the story.

-Absolutely.

0:17:470:17:52

A fascinating story.

0:17:520:17:53

Brett, you have been a star. Thank you for sharing.

0:17:530:17:56

Thank you. You had better make your escape, I think!

0:17:560:17:59

-Not by tunnel. By Porsche!

-All the best.

0:17:590:18:03

It has been a busy day all round.

0:18:030:18:05

It's time for our weary experts to head off for some well-earned rest.

0:18:050:18:10

Nighty-night!

0:18:100:18:11

It's the start of a brand-new day.

0:18:130:18:15

Natasha and Phil are back on the road enjoying the scenery.

0:18:150:18:18

Does it pull on your heartstrings, Phil,

0:18:180:18:21

when you see lambs gambolling around fields?

0:18:210:18:24

I quite like spring lamb...

0:18:240:18:26

Mint sauce, new potatoes, don't you?

0:18:260:18:30

-Phil, you're a cruel, hard man.

-Farmer's son.

0:18:300:18:33

Oh, that explains it.

0:18:330:18:35

-Farmer's son.

-Aw, there is nothing like a wee lamb gambolling...

0:18:350:18:38

-A wee lamb gambolling on to your plate.

-No, no!

0:18:380:18:43

So far, Phil has spent £39 on two items -

0:18:430:18:46

the 19th-century intaglio moulds and seals,

0:18:460:18:50

and the 1970s watercolour.

0:18:500:18:53

He still has a healthy £236.90 available to spend.

0:18:530:18:57

While Natasha's storming ahead on the buying front.

0:18:570:19:00

She has forked out £70 for four items - the Beswick egg tureen,

0:19:000:19:05

glass carboy, unmarked gold brooch

0:19:050:19:09

and the original oil painting -

0:19:090:19:11

leaving her £91.96 to play with today.

0:19:110:19:14

-Are you really pleased with your buys yesterday?

-Um... Reasonably so.

0:19:140:19:19

They got better as the day went on, I do believe.

0:19:190:19:21

How much did you spend?

0:19:210:19:23

-I have spent £70 in total.

-70?

0:19:230:19:25

I spent...

0:19:250:19:27

I spent £39.

0:19:270:19:30

How many items have you bought?

0:19:300:19:32

I have only bought two, but I am...

0:19:320:19:34

I was going to scold you for having got three or four.

0:19:340:19:37

This morning, our experts have steered the Porsche to the

0:19:380:19:42

popular market town of Evesham, where our Little Miss Sunshine is

0:19:420:19:46

-ditching Mr Grumpy.

-Have a really good day.

0:19:460:19:49

-Don't buy too well!

-No, I will try hard not to.

0:19:490:19:52

Flash some of your cash! Ha-ha. Bye!

0:19:520:19:56

Phil's first stop of the day is Twyford Antiques,

0:20:000:20:03

with an eclectic range of collectables set over two floors.

0:20:030:20:07

There's two quite nice wine labels that might be worth a look at.

0:20:070:20:12

In the 17th and 18th century

0:20:120:20:14

there were wine labels that were put onto whiskey, gin,

0:20:140:20:19

brandy, whatever, and it was a little silver tag that went around

0:20:190:20:23

the collar of the decanter or the bottle that told you what it was.

0:20:230:20:26

They actually did one for Worcester sauce.

0:20:260:20:29

I've been looking for one of those for about ten years.

0:20:290:20:32

It's just sherry and champagne that dealer Andy has on the menu today.

0:20:320:20:37

This is a sherry label

0:20:370:20:39

and it's silver. Hallmarked London.

0:20:390:20:42

And it's interesting because this one here

0:20:420:20:44

is twice the price of that one, isn't it?

0:20:440:20:46

-Hm.

-Why is that?

0:20:460:20:48

I suppose champagne will be a little bit...

0:20:480:20:50

Well, I suppose champagne's more expensive,

0:20:500:20:52

so the label's more expensive.

0:20:520:20:54

-Can't fault his logic, can you?

-Certainly not.

0:20:540:20:58

The ticket price on the cheaper sherry label is a hefty £136.

0:20:580:21:02

Can there be much movement on the price on that?

0:21:050:21:07

Normally...probably get away with about 100.

0:21:070:21:11

OK.

0:21:110:21:12

-And abnormally?

-Abnormally, might drop down below 100 for you.

0:21:120:21:17

It's a possibility. Can I leave that one out?

0:21:190:21:21

Yeah, certainly.

0:21:210:21:23

One to think about.

0:21:230:21:25

Anything else take your fancy?

0:21:250:21:26

This is just a really cool thing, isn't it?

0:21:260:21:29

This is a stationary engine.

0:21:290:21:30

And you've got the...steam engine here.

0:21:300:21:34

You then boil the furnace and the steam then operates...

0:21:340:21:38

..that punt there, like that.

0:21:390:21:41

I think that's a real good bit of fun.

0:21:410:21:43

-Andy?

-Yeah.

0:21:430:21:45

Could there be a bit of movement in the price on that one as well?

0:21:470:21:50

With a ticket price of £99 on the stationary engine

0:21:500:21:54

and £136 on the sherry label, what kind of deal can Phil work, eh?

0:21:540:21:59

What would be the best you could do on each of those?

0:21:590:22:01

Realistically, we'll probably be looking about sort of £60 on him,

0:22:010:22:05

£80 on him.

0:22:050:22:08

-I don't know what to do!

-Chop, chop.

0:22:080:22:11

If I can have the two...

0:22:120:22:15

for £90, I'd have them both of you.

0:22:150:22:17

-£95?

-Do it for £90 and I'll have a deal with you.

0:22:170:22:21

-Go on, then.

-Thank you.

0:22:210:22:23

That very generous deal bags Phil another two lots.

0:22:230:22:27

Natasha has taken a cruise south to one of the most unspoilt villages

0:22:270:22:32

in the Cotswolds - Snowshill.

0:22:320:22:35

She's come to visit Snowshill Manor.

0:22:350:22:37

This 16th-century house holds a unique collection

0:22:370:22:40

of extraordinary treasures that, back in the 1920s and '30s,

0:22:400:22:44

attracted both the famous and royalty.

0:22:440:22:47

-Hello. Hi, there. You must be Sue.

-I am.

-Hello. I'm Tasha.

0:22:470:22:50

Hi, Tasha. Lovely to meet you.

0:22:500:22:52

Thank you very much for having me along.

0:22:520:22:54

-This is the collection of Charles Wade, is that right?

-It is.

0:22:540:22:57

This is Snowshill Manor and this is place that Charles Wade

0:22:570:23:00

chose to house his collection of around 22,000 objects.

0:23:000:23:04

Charles Wade was an architect, artist,

0:23:040:23:06

craftsman and most famously a collector.

0:23:060:23:09

Inspired by his grandma's special cupboard of curios as a child,

0:23:090:23:14

at the age of seven, Charles starting building his incredible collection

0:23:140:23:18

of children's toys, clocks,

0:23:180:23:20

mechanical oddities another bizarre items.

0:23:200:23:23

In 1919, after stumbling across an advert for the sale

0:23:230:23:27

of Snowshill Manor, Charles knew he'd found the perfect place

0:23:270:23:31

to house his collection.

0:23:310:23:33

So this is our first port of call.

0:23:330:23:35

This room is called Zenith.

0:23:350:23:37

-Charles Wade named all his rooms...

-OK.

0:23:370:23:40

..depending on where they were in the house or maybe what was in them,

0:23:400:23:44

but the important thing about this room is that it contains

0:23:440:23:46

-granny's cabinet.

-I was just about to say.

0:23:460:23:49

This is a stunning lacquered cabinet.

0:23:490:23:51

So from when does this date, do you think?

0:23:510:23:52

It dates mid-19th century.

0:23:520:23:55

And my eyes are darting around because it's quite a collection.

0:23:550:23:58

Are these things that Charles collected,

0:23:580:24:00

or are these grandma's curios?

0:24:000:24:02

Well, these ones here are things that were in the cabinet

0:24:020:24:05

-when Charles was a child, so these were granny's curios.

-Amazing.

0:24:050:24:08

And she only opened this cabinet on Sundays, so it was quite a ritual.

0:24:080:24:13

Looking at granny's collection on a Sunday, that special day

0:24:130:24:18

that made Charles want to be a collector.

0:24:180:24:20

Bitten by the collecting bug and his love of hand-crafted objects,

0:24:200:24:24

Charles spent his life building an impressive catalogue of weird

0:24:240:24:27

and wonderful items, most of which he surprisingly uncovered in the UK.

0:24:270:24:32

What I'd love to see is something so exotic

0:24:320:24:34

that I just would never believe you that he purchased it here in the UK.

0:24:340:24:37

Is there anything of that ilk?

0:24:370:24:39

Well, I think, if you come and look at Charles Wade's collection

0:24:390:24:42

of samurai armour, you'll find that pretty amazing.

0:24:420:24:45

Housed in the Green room is one of Europe's largest collections

0:24:450:24:49

of samurai armour.

0:24:490:24:50

The 26 suits date from the 17th to the 19th centuries.

0:24:500:24:55

This is mad.

0:24:550:24:56

I'm speechless and a little bit terrified.

0:24:560:24:59

Where on earth did he find this collection

0:24:590:25:02

of samurai suits in the UK?!

0:25:020:25:04

There's actually quite an amusing story

0:25:040:25:07

about where he found some of the suits.

0:25:070:25:09

He needed a washer for a tap, so he took himself to the plumbers

0:25:090:25:14

and it was a tiny plumber shop apparently -

0:25:140:25:16

barely room for a sink in the window and a few washers -

0:25:160:25:19

and he went in and there was a suit of samurai armour.

0:25:190:25:23

And the man said, "If you want some more,

0:25:230:25:25

"there's a whole load underneath the tarpaulin in the yard."

0:25:250:25:28

And there were...I think six sets of samurai armour in total,

0:25:280:25:32

really laid out almost as scrap.

0:25:320:25:34

That's just bizarre.

0:25:340:25:36

And he was able to buy them for quite a small sum of money.

0:25:360:25:39

It's really fitting actually because didn't he have a saying

0:25:390:25:42

that he had a set motto, as it were, three words, "let nothing perish"?

0:25:420:25:47

Yes, indeed. That was what he said. His own motto.

0:25:470:25:50

It must have absolutely disgusted him when this tarpaulin

0:25:500:25:54

was thrown off and to see these things lying on the floor.

0:25:540:25:57

He must have thought, "They're perishing! I can save these!"

0:25:570:26:00

Absolutely. And that's what he loved to do.

0:26:000:26:02

He would have took them to his workshop at the back of his cottage

0:26:020:26:06

and spent many hours working on them.

0:26:060:26:09

Charles' motto also applied to the manor itself.

0:26:090:26:12

Completely run down when he bought it,

0:26:120:26:14

he spent three years restoring it to its former glory.

0:26:140:26:17

So impressive was the end result that both royalty

0:26:170:26:20

and celebrities came to visit, including writer Virginia Woolf,

0:26:200:26:24

who turned out to be one of Charles' few unhappy house guests.

0:26:240:26:28

Well, I think you either got Charles Wade or you didn't

0:26:280:26:30

and Virginia certainly didn't.

0:26:300:26:32

He loved his clocks... Many clocks throughout the house

0:26:320:26:37

and they're all set to different times,

0:26:370:26:39

and they'd all chime at different times.

0:26:390:26:41

Oh, not Virginia's cup of tea?

0:26:410:26:43

Not her cup of tea because she made the mistake of relying on

0:26:430:26:46

these clocks and missed her train back to London,

0:26:460:26:49

so she thought he was a bit of fraud and didn't get him at all,

0:26:490:26:52

so not a happy weekend.

0:26:520:26:55

After marrying late in life, Charles retired to St Kitts

0:26:550:26:58

and, in 1951, the estate was passed to the National Trust.

0:26:580:27:02

He regularly returned to his beloved manor, but on one such visit in 1956,

0:27:020:27:07

Charles sadly took ill and passed away in a nearby hospital.

0:27:070:27:11

So his life came full circle.

0:27:110:27:14

He was back in the manor that he loved and had created.

0:27:140:27:17

Yeah, well, he had a very busy life and a seriously interesting one.

0:27:170:27:21

-Yes.

-It has been a real thrill, a real dramatic thrill

0:27:210:27:25

to learn about Charles Wade and his fabulous legacy.

0:27:250:27:28

Thank you so much for showing me around.

0:27:280:27:30

-I'll never forget it.

-Oh, that's brilliant.

0:27:300:27:32

That's what Charles Wade would have wanted.

0:27:320:27:35

And so, the fascinating collection of a wonderfully eccentric man

0:27:350:27:38

will continue to live on at Snowshill Manor.

0:27:380:27:41

Phil, meanwhile, has made his way to the birthplace

0:27:450:27:48

of William Shakespeare - Stratford-upon-Avon.

0:27:480:27:51

He's heading to the very street Shakespeare was born in

0:27:510:27:54

and into Henley Street Antiques to meet owner Steve.

0:27:540:27:57

I'm a man with a mission.

0:27:570:27:59

I'm definitely going to buy something off you.

0:27:590:28:02

I don't mind what it is, you've got lots of really good stock.

0:28:020:28:05

What I want is something that's been either been here

0:28:050:28:07

for a long time that you need to get rid of.

0:28:070:28:09

-You're looking for a bargain.

-Yeah, you got it.

0:28:090:28:11

Nothing like cutting to the chase, eh, Phil?

0:28:110:28:14

That's looking like it's tried to be Mr Chip 'n' Dale?

0:28:200:28:22

Yeah.

0:28:220:28:24

-And how much could that come for?

-That could be 150.

0:28:240:28:27

Do you know what?

0:28:270:28:28

This is ridiculously cheap because what I find bonkers in this business

0:28:280:28:32

is, if you went to auction

0:28:320:28:34

and you saw a scrubby old painted pine chest of drawers,

0:28:340:28:37

it will make more money than this, which is really just good quality.

0:28:370:28:40

If you like brown furniture, it's fantastic value at the moment.

0:28:400:28:43

I think that's a nice thing, Steve, I do.

0:28:430:28:45

-OK. Anything else?

-Yep.

0:28:450:28:47

There's a bit more brown at the back in the form of a settle.

0:28:470:28:51

Now this is made out of oak, isn't it?

0:28:510:28:53

Top marks. Interested, Phil?

0:28:530:28:55

I have made a certain speciality...out of buying

0:28:550:28:59

things that have been nibbled by a bit of worm.

0:28:590:29:02

So, is it worth the £175 ticket price?

0:29:020:29:06

If you can shove your little pinkie in places that you shouldn't

0:29:060:29:09

shove your little pinkie, that is a problem.

0:29:090:29:12

Your little pinkie shouldn't go there.

0:29:150:29:17

-Best to have a word with Steve, eh?

-I'm thinking...

0:29:170:29:21

which has got more leeway, this or the chest of drawers?

0:29:210:29:26

Tiny more margin on this maybe.

0:29:260:29:28

Best on the chest of drawers could be 150.

0:29:310:29:34

Perhaps one last look at the chest of drawers will help decide.

0:29:340:29:38

-So the death on this is 150.

-Yes.

0:29:380:29:41

-And on the settle?

-140.

0:29:410:29:44

-Can we split it and do 130?

-130, yep, let's do it.

0:29:440:29:47

You're a gentleman, thank you.

0:29:470:29:48

Deal done on the damaged oak settle.

0:29:480:29:51

Sold for a pricy £130, but has Phil bitten off more than he can chew?

0:29:510:29:56

I just hope that I'm sitting on a fortune now

0:29:560:29:59

and not in the poor house.

0:29:590:30:01

Hm. Only time will tell, Phil.

0:30:010:30:03

But before we find out,

0:30:030:30:05

Natasha's still got a bit of retail therapy to do,

0:30:050:30:09

so she's made her way to the pretty town of Deddington.

0:30:090:30:13

She's on the hunt for one last lot at Deddington Antiques.

0:30:140:30:18

There's certainly plenty to choose from, Natasha.

0:30:210:30:24

A million items and only one to buy,

0:30:240:30:28

so could be anything. Glass, silver...

0:30:280:30:32

..sculpture.

0:30:330:30:35

Seems to be quite expensive, this shop.

0:30:350:30:39

I really need to spot the sleeper and I really need to do it fast.

0:30:390:30:43

Well, you've only got £91.96 to play with.

0:30:430:30:47

Better ask owner Brenda for a helping hand.

0:30:470:30:50

OK. Now you say you've got a piece of Beswick.

0:30:500:30:52

-I do already, yes.

-And it's a tureen.

0:30:520:30:55

It's in the form of a pheasant. It's for eggs.

0:30:550:30:57

-Would you like a penguin?

-Sort of because they're very saleable, aren't they?

0:30:570:31:01

-Yeah.

-This little feathered friend is priced at £33.

0:31:010:31:05

OK, so it's got the exact same stamp as my pheasant,

0:31:050:31:08

-so we're talking about 1970s.

-That's right.

0:31:080:31:11

-Is he holding a cane?

-Yes.

-He's the dad.

-Yeah.

0:31:110:31:15

-He's dad penguin.

-Big daddy.

0:31:150:31:18

Big Daddy - that's what I call Phil.

0:31:180:31:20

Does Phil know you call him that?

0:31:200:31:22

What else were you thinking? Cos I do love pottery

0:31:220:31:24

and it's always good to go outwith your comfort zone, isn't it?

0:31:240:31:28

Again, it all depends on how much money you've got.

0:31:280:31:31

-They are fabulous.

-They are pretty cool, aren't they?

0:31:310:31:34

Ah, but with a £58 price tag, are the piggies worth a punt?

0:31:340:31:38

-I love penguins.

-You prefer the pigs.

0:31:380:31:40

But I think I prefer the pigs.

0:31:400:31:42

And I think Philip will be devastated you've got the piggies.

0:31:420:31:47

-Do you reckon?

-Yes. I think he'll be so jealous.

0:31:470:31:49

What if I offered you £25?

0:31:490:31:52

What if you offered me £35?

0:31:520:31:54

-35.

-Hm.

0:31:540:31:56

What if I offered you 30?

0:31:560:31:57

What if you offer me...

0:31:570:32:00

-32?

-This is fun, isn't it?

-Come on. 32.

0:32:000:32:04

-Are you forcing it?

-32.

-Oh, go on, then, Brenda.

0:32:040:32:06

-Well done.

-Nice bit of negotiation there, girls.

0:32:060:32:10

-Do you know what Phil told me to do?

-Yeah.

0:32:100:32:13

-He told me to buy something I loved.

-Yeah. Do you love it?

0:32:130:32:15

When you brought that out, I thought, "That's the one."

0:32:150:32:18

What? You say Phil when you saw this?!

0:32:180:32:21

Poor Phil.

0:32:210:32:23

Poor Phil indeed.

0:32:230:32:25

And, with that, they're all bought up.

0:32:250:32:28

So Natasha bought the Beswick pheasant tureen,

0:32:290:32:33

the piggy back, also stamped Beswick, the decorative carboy,

0:32:330:32:38

the oil painting and the coral and seed pearl broach.

0:32:380:32:42

That little lot cost her £102.

0:32:420:32:46

Meanwhile, Philip bought the stationary model,

0:32:460:32:50

the collection of intaglios, the silver sherry label,

0:32:500:32:54

the watercolour and the costly oak settle.

0:32:540:32:58

He spend a mighty £259 in total.

0:32:580:33:01

So, what do they think of each other's lots?

0:33:010:33:04

This is going to be the battle of the late 20th-century paintings.

0:33:040:33:07

I've gone oil, Phil's gone watercolour.

0:33:070:33:10

They couldn't be more different, but I think that Phil has won a watch.

0:33:100:33:14

At £14, that watercolour is stunning.

0:33:140:33:17

What I absolutely love is that portrait.

0:33:170:33:21

That's very her, that's a really cool thing,

0:33:210:33:24

and I think that's absolutely lovely.

0:33:240:33:26

With a woodworm-infested antique oak settle,

0:33:260:33:29

he's determined to shoot himself in the foot, but guess what?

0:33:290:33:33

I'm going to predict it's going to be his star lot.

0:33:330:33:35

I really love that settle.

0:33:350:33:37

I think the patenation on it is absolutely fantastic.

0:33:370:33:39

The problem for me is the woodworm.

0:33:390:33:41

Have you seen the size of those holes?

0:33:410:33:44

Those woodworm, they must be this big!

0:33:440:33:46

Scary thought.

0:33:460:33:48

So, from starting this leg in Newport in Wales, our experts are now

0:33:480:33:53

hurtling towards the auction in Newent in Gloucestershire.

0:33:530:33:57

And I'm wearing my lucky tartan.

0:33:580:34:00

-Really?

-I do have matching trouse,

0:34:000:34:02

but I thought that might be a bit much.

0:34:020:34:05

I was going to wear mine. Black death.

0:34:050:34:07

Oh, dear. Something playing on your mind, Phil?

0:34:070:34:10

I'm sort of OK with most of my lots,

0:34:100:34:12

but I threw 130 quid into a settle.

0:34:120:34:16

-All in.

-And that thing's got more worm...

0:34:160:34:19

than Ilkla Moor bar tat.

0:34:190:34:21

I'm a big fan of statement pieces of furniture.

0:34:210:34:23

-Yeah.

-You've got to make one.

-This statement is, "Help!"

0:34:230:34:26

Too late for that, Philip,

0:34:260:34:28

as you've now arrived at today's saleroom -

0:34:280:34:31

Smiths of Newent Auctions.

0:34:310:34:32

-Are you stuck? Come on, my love.

-I'm struggling.

0:34:320:34:35

Oh, you've done it.

0:34:350:34:37

Right, are you ready for me to play some serious catch-up?

0:34:370:34:40

-Absolutely.

-This way.

-This way.

0:34:400:34:43

There are two auctioneers wielding the gavel today -

0:34:430:34:45

Barry Meade and Rita Kearsey.

0:34:450:34:48

Before they start, let's see what Rita makes of their lots.

0:34:480:34:50

The egg tureen, that's quite nice.

0:34:500:34:52

I haven't seen that particular model before.

0:34:520:34:54

I think it's a little bit of an unusual one

0:34:540:34:56

and so hopefully we'll pick up some Beswick collectors.

0:34:560:34:59

I think my favourite item is probably the sherry decanter label,

0:34:590:35:02

just because it's a very nice quality piece.

0:35:020:35:04

I like the steam engine.

0:35:040:35:06

It's a collectible and it's in very good condition,

0:35:060:35:08

so hopefully that will do well on the internet.

0:35:080:35:11

The auction's about to begin...

0:35:110:35:14

and it's a busy one, with bidders in the room, online and on the phone.

0:35:140:35:19

First up is Natasha's 1960s Beswick animal group piggy back.

0:35:220:35:27

I'm looking for 20 for that one.

0:35:270:35:29

-20.

-Oh, no.

0:35:290:35:31

Can I have at ten? 12.

0:35:310:35:32

12. Make it 14.

0:35:320:35:34

14 bid. 16. Make it 18.

0:35:340:35:36

18. Make it 20.

0:35:360:35:38

18, sitting down.

0:35:380:35:39

20 anywhere else?

0:35:390:35:41

Selling at 18.

0:35:410:35:43

297.

0:35:430:35:44

Unlucky, Natasha, but plenty still to come in this auction.

0:35:460:35:49

Shall we walk in again and just pretend that didn't happen?

0:35:510:35:54

Yeah, that'd be nice. Yeah.

0:35:540:35:56

No time for that though, as Phil's silver sherry label's up next,

0:35:560:35:59

which was fancied by auctioneer Rita.

0:35:590:36:02

£40 for the sherry label.

0:36:020:36:03

40 I'm bid. Looking for 42.

0:36:030:36:05

I've got 40 now.

0:36:050:36:07

-Looking for 42 on the net.

-Come on, creep up.

0:36:070:36:09

-44. At 42 on the internet.

-Cheeky fox. You've got a net bidder.

0:36:090:36:13

At 42. At 42. Looking for 44.

0:36:130:36:16

44 in the room. 46. 48.

0:36:160:36:19

46 on the net. Looking for 48.

0:36:190:36:21

At £46.

0:36:210:36:23

You all done? You all finished?

0:36:230:36:25

I'm selling at 46.

0:36:250:36:26

That really isn't very expensive, that.

0:36:260:36:29

Ouch.

0:36:290:36:31

A shock loss there for Phil.

0:36:310:36:33

Not ouch. That's not an ouch situation.

0:36:330:36:36

That's a gentle bump.

0:36:360:36:38

It's a gentle knee in the nether regions, isn't it?

0:36:390:36:43

Can Natasha fair any better with her second bit of Beswick?

0:36:430:36:47

This time it's a 1970s pheasant.

0:36:470:36:49

-20.

-Yes.

-20 for that one.

0:36:490:36:52

-We're off.

-22. At 20.

0:36:520:36:55

Any advance on 20? I'll take 22.

0:36:550:36:57

At 20 in the middle there.

0:36:570:36:59

22 anywhere else?

0:36:590:37:00

Selling at 20 in the middle.

0:37:000:37:02

That's all right, but it could have done better.

0:37:030:37:06

A profit's a profit and that's the first of the day.

0:37:060:37:09

Can Phil score a profit with his Wilesco

0:37:090:37:13

working model of a stationary engine?

0:37:130:37:15

I've got interest on commission. Starts me at £24.

0:37:150:37:17

I'm looking for £26.

0:37:170:37:20

At 26 now. Looking for 28.

0:37:200:37:22

£28 now. Looking for 30.

0:37:220:37:25

At 28.

0:37:250:37:26

At £28. Looking for 30.

0:37:260:37:28

You all done? At £28 you finish.

0:37:280:37:32

Selling at £28.

0:37:320:37:33

Clearly there are no engine enthusiasts in the saleroom today.

0:37:350:37:39

Will a spot of jewellery be more to their taste?

0:37:400:37:43

It's Natasha's unmarked yellow metal seed pearl and coral brooch next.

0:37:430:37:47

I think this will do well. This will do well.

0:37:470:37:50

£20 for this one.

0:37:500:37:51

Can I see 20 for it?

0:37:510:37:53

20 I'm bid. On the net at 20.

0:37:530:37:55

-Thank you.

-At 22. At 20 now.

0:37:550:37:57

Come on.

0:37:570:37:58

At £20. 22 online.

0:37:580:38:00

Two online bidders. Looking for 24.

0:38:000:38:03

Looking for 26.

0:38:030:38:04

Come on. The battle of the bidders.

0:38:040:38:07

At 26 now.

0:38:070:38:08

£28 now. Looking for 30.

0:38:080:38:11

At 30 now. Looking for 32.

0:38:110:38:13

-Come on.

-At 32. Make it 34 online. At 32.

0:38:130:38:17

At 32. 34 now. Looking for 36.

0:38:170:38:20

At £36. You all done?

0:38:200:38:22

Selling at £36.

0:38:220:38:24

-Oh.

-That's a tiny little profit.

0:38:240:38:26

-That's OK.

-It deserved a bit more than that.

0:38:260:38:29

It did deserve a bit more.

0:38:290:38:31

A good profit nevertheless.

0:38:310:38:34

Phil's turn again. Can his watercolour secure his first profit?

0:38:360:38:40

£20.

0:38:400:38:41

20 for it. 20 anyone?

0:38:410:38:45

Someone start me at £10 for it.

0:38:460:38:48

-£10 for the watercolour.

-Phil.

0:38:480:38:51

Must be worth £10.

0:38:510:38:53

10 I'm bid. Looking for 12.

0:38:530:38:55

-At £10.

-That's a bit of a relief, really.

0:38:550:38:57

Looking for 12. At 10.

0:38:570:39:00

At £10. Are you all done?

0:39:000:39:02

I'm selling at £10.

0:39:020:39:05

Talk about an unlucky street, but at least it wasn't a big loss.

0:39:050:39:09

I just want you to know that I'm not warped or bitter in any way at all.

0:39:090:39:14

Next up, Natasha's oversized carboy.

0:39:140:39:16

£20 for it.

0:39:180:39:19

-Oh, gosh.

-£20 anyone?

0:39:190:39:21

Not a hand in sight.

0:39:210:39:22

20 I'm bid. on the net at £20.

0:39:220:39:24

Looking for 22.

0:39:240:39:26

At £20 on the net.

0:39:260:39:27

Go on.

0:39:270:39:29

That's plus two quid.

0:39:290:39:30

At £20.

0:39:310:39:33

Are you all done? Selling at £20.

0:39:330:39:38

I reckon you're about minus oomph pence for that.

0:39:380:39:41

Phil's right.

0:39:410:39:42

The £2 profit will resolve him a small loss

0:39:420:39:45

after auction costs are deducted.

0:39:450:39:47

Right. Come on, Phil.

0:39:470:39:48

Let's get you that first profit with your 19th-century intaglio

0:39:480:39:52

moulds and seals.

0:39:520:39:53

Interest in this

0:39:530:39:54

starts me on the internet at £32.

0:39:540:39:56

Yes, profit!

0:39:560:39:58

I'm looking for 34.

0:39:580:39:59

At 34 now. Looking for 36.

0:39:590:40:02

At £34.

0:40:020:40:06

Are you all finished?

0:40:060:40:08

Oh, come on.

0:40:080:40:10

Selling on the net at £34.

0:40:100:40:11

-You'll take a profit.

-You're absolutely right I will.

0:40:130:40:15

He's done it.

0:40:150:40:17

Great little profit there for Phil.

0:40:170:40:19

Wish I hadn't spent all that money on that settle.

0:40:190:40:23

Settle down, Phil.

0:40:230:40:25

Next up, it's art expert Natasha's final buy,

0:40:250:40:28

the modern British original oil painting.

0:40:280:40:30

-Telephone bid on this item.

-Stop it!

0:40:300:40:33

-Can I see 20 for it?

-Yes, you can. Go on.

0:40:330:40:36

20 I'm bid.

0:40:360:40:38

20 on the telephone.

0:40:380:40:39

-Well done, you.

-Come on, online.

-At 20 on the phone.

0:40:390:40:42

Looking for 22.

0:40:420:40:43

At 22. 24. Looking for 26.

0:40:430:40:48

28. Looking for 30.

0:40:480:40:50

-Yes.

-30. Looking for 32.

0:40:500:40:52

It's worth it.

0:40:520:40:54

Looking for 34.

0:40:540:40:56

36.

0:40:560:40:57

-Yes.

-Well done, you.

-Looking for 38. 40.

0:40:570:41:01

Looking for 42. 44.

0:41:010:41:04

Looking for 46.

0:41:040:41:05

At £44 on the telephone.

0:41:050:41:07

Are you all done at 44?

0:41:070:41:10

Selling then at £44.

0:41:100:41:12

Great profit there for Natasha,

0:41:120:41:14

but she hasn't won yet as the there's still one lot to go -

0:41:140:41:17

Phil's big risk, the antique oak settle.

0:41:170:41:20

Would someone like to start me at £100 for this?

0:41:200:41:23

Looking for £100.

0:41:230:41:25

Looking for 100.

0:41:250:41:27

Looking for £100.

0:41:270:41:29

Start me at £60.

0:41:290:41:31

60 for the settle.

0:41:310:41:33

60 I have. £60 online. Looking for 65 now. At 65.

0:41:330:41:38

You coming back in, online?

0:41:380:41:40

I'm going to sell then at £65.

0:41:400:41:43

You all done?

0:41:430:41:45

-You've got to laugh, haven't you?

-At £65.

0:41:450:41:47

You've got to laugh cos, if you didn't, you'd cry.

0:41:470:41:49

-Oh, Phil.

-That's 991.

0:41:490:41:52

Bloomin' 999, not 991.

0:41:520:41:55

Someone's got a nice settle there for a great price - Lucky devil.

0:41:550:41:59

Onwards and upwards, Phil. Shall we go?

0:41:590:42:02

-Yeah.

-Loser drives?

-I'm in no fit state.

0:42:020:42:06

I need nurturing and looking after gently here.

0:42:060:42:09

I might even need a darkened room.

0:42:090:42:11

Come on, let me drive you home.

0:42:110:42:13

Well done.

0:42:130:42:15

Phil was down on his luck today, resulting in a loss of £108.94.

0:42:150:42:21

But he's still got a healthy £166.96 to spend on the next leg.

0:42:240:42:29

Natasha faired better,

0:42:310:42:33

giving her an overall profit of £11.16 after auction costs,

0:42:330:42:37

which means she takes the lead going into the third leg

0:42:370:42:40

with £173.12 to play with.

0:42:400:42:44

You're in a state of shock. I'm in a state of shock, but in a good way.

0:42:440:42:47

In a good way, but I feel sorry for you.

0:42:470:42:50

-Really?

-Yeah.

-You look it.

0:42:500:42:52

-Right, here we go.

-Now, now, Philip, nobody likes a sore loser.

0:42:520:42:55

-Go, go, go.

-And they're off.

0:42:550:42:57

Next time on Antiques Roadtrip,

0:43:000:43:02

Natasha struggles to find the right way...

0:43:020:43:05

That looks like serious oil paintings. I'm going to go this way.

0:43:050:43:08

..and Philip gets on the wrong side of a dealer...

0:43:080:43:10

Would you just like to pull that knife,

0:43:100:43:12

just in the middle of my shoulder blades?

0:43:120:43:15

It's the second leg for antique hunters Philip Serrell and Natasha Raskin as they take in the delights of south west Wales before crossing into England and heading to an auction in Newent, Gloucestershire.