Episode 20 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 20

Antiques challenge. On the last day on Natasha Raskin and Philip Serrell's road trip, they cover Berkshire and Hampshire.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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-I don't know what to do.

-HORN TOOTS

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game. Charlie!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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SHE GASPS

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So, will it be the high road to glory,

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or the slow road to disaster?

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-Oh!

-This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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It's the final leg of this week's adventure

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for Natasha Raskin and Philip Serrell.

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I don't know how to tell you this but I'm in love with you.

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-Well, do you know what?

-You don't seem too moved.

-No.

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You seem quite throwaway, casual about this.

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Well, you know, it happens all the time.

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You big fibber.

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As we all know, antiques expert Philip is a Road Tripping veteran

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who loves to lead the way.

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-I am of course the captain of this ship.

-Shortest way up.

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-BOTH:

-Longest way down.

-No, no, no!

-Oh, no!

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Longest way up, shortest way down.

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Lordy. Smiley auctioneer Natasha

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is still learning all the Road Trip rules.

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Away from the pots, away. Oh, they're so shiny.

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Our pair have been cruising across the country

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in this lovely 1957 Porsche Coupe

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and their competitive spirit is alive and well.

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Oh, I've got a sneaking suspicion that Serrell

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might just sneak another Road Trip under his belt.

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No, no, cos there's every likelihood with me that I will go

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and do something stupid like buy a sheep.

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BLEATING I say.

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It's been a bumpy ride for Natasha. After starting this trip with £200,

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a few losses along the way now has her total sitting at £165.64.

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Philip's faring much better. After starting with the same £200 stake,

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he's now in the lead with a fabulous £325.40 to spend on this last leg.

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Cheer up.

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I'm really, really sad cos we're just heading towards

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-our last auction. Isn't that sad?

-That is a bit sad, isn't it?

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It's a bit weird as well because I've got used to it now.

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Well, we'd better make this a good one then.

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Our two experts started out in Narberth in Pembrokeshire.

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From there, they've travelled several hundred miles,

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covering Wales and southern England

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and will end their trip today

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in Salisbury, Wiltshire.

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Before their final auction,

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they're kicking off this last leg in Eversley, Hampshire.

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SHE LAUGHS

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-Are you OK there?

-Yeah, good, thank you.

-Come on.

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First stop today is Eversley Barn Antiques.

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-Hello. Hi there. Hello, you must be Hilary.

-I am.

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I'm Tasha, lovely to meet you.

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-Hi, Philip. How are you?

-Nice to meet you.

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You have got a very tall barn full of stuff here.

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-It is rather full.

-It's beautifully appointed. Gosh!

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Everyone's looking for something different so you have to have it all.

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-We've all got different eyes.

-We do.

-Absolutely.

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-Which way are you going to take yours?

-I don't know. That way?

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-Are you going to go upstairs or...?

-I might just sneak outside.

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Ah. OK, I'll stay in.

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I'll leave you to it. You've obviously spotted something.

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While Phil hijacks Hilary, Natasha heads upstairs.

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Oh, this looks good up here. Yes! In the attic. A bit more my cup of tea.

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Tile-top coffee tables, modern. Yes, I'm into this.

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Oh, I actually thought I liked it up here cos it was modern

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but I love this cellarette.

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It's totally cool because in the very beginning of the 20th century,

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when this would have been produced, I reckon,

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this is taking the wine from the cellar

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and then bringing it to the dining room

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but keeping it cool in a cellarette. So a mini wine cellar.

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This looks more like a plant pot holder or jardiniere to me.

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Nice thing though.

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It's not perfect.

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It's a little bit worn, but it's got to be late-19th-century,

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early-20th-century so we'd expect that.

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This is £88 and as I'm saying that, I've actually just clocked the fact

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it's got blinking woodworm in it! That is...

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Oh! How did I not notice that?

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So, woodworm aside, I only really want to spend

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about £35 or £40 on it, which is a bit cheeky, I know,

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but it's what I want to spend. I want to make a profit at the end.

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As does Phil. Spotted anything yet?

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-That little rocker's sweet, isn't it?

-It is, isn't it?

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Good condition, too.

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-So this is what, 1950s, is it?

-Yes, I think so.

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And it's got this... little piggy and the bunny rabbit.

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That's quite sweet, isn't it? You've got 30 on it.

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What could you do that for, Hilary?

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I'm selling that for a friend, so probably about 24.

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-Would £20 buy it?

-I knew you were going to say that.

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Yes, £20. Yes.

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Hilary, I think that's lovely. I'm going to buy that off you.

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-Oh, lovely.

-I'm going to buy that.

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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So, that's the first lot bought on this final leg.

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Hopefully Natasha is faring well back inside.

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I love revolving bookcases and this looks like a really nice one.

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I'm hoping that underneath this jug...

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Yes, there is a really nice Edwardian inlaid cartouche,

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a little bit of marquetry, which is always good

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but what's really nice about it

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is that you've got books all the way around

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and it revolves, so let's check out... Oh.

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It's a little bit stiff actually. It's not quite got that slick... No.

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It's actually a bookcase that's a tale of two stories, really.

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You've got the early 20th century up here,

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with its lovely Edwardian motifs

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and then you've got late 20th century down here,

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with dodgy plastic casters that everyone is trying to forget.

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So, let's have a look at the price

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because that's probably reflected here. "Revolving bookcase", 55 quid.

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So, it's not quite a revolving bookcase.

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It's a book case that revolves, if you know what I mean?

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Uh... I think so. Another possibility.

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Downstairs, Phil's found a lovely set of boat steps,

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ticket price £165.

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I think they're fun things. There'll be one or two uses.

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They're either the sort of thing that someone is going to hang

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in a seaside cottage or they're the type of thing

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that someone might have in a library or, for me,

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they're the type of thing that you...

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Actually... I'll just work this out.

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Aren't those a cool set of shelves to hang up somewhere?

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-Brilliant. Yeah, they would hang on a wall.

-Yeah.

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I think on a bad day...

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..those are going to make £60 or £70.

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On a good day, they might make 120, 130. That's what I think.

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I'd like to try and buy them for somewhere between £80 and £90,

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if I could. I really like those.

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-How about 90?

-Are you sure?

-Smashing. Thanks very much.

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A very generous £75 off the ticket price.

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How's Natasha getting on?

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These are really sweet.

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These are a napkin rings and they are, I think, Bakelite,

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which is an early plastic and kind of dates them

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to probably the 1930s or '40s and they're novelty.

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The dog lovers would like them. But they're quite sweet.

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They're a tenner each.

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They are marked with this code - EBA, and so is the bookcase,

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so I don't know who the seller is but I reckon that's their initials

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and if they want to get rid of both these things, maybe they could do it

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in one fell sweep... One fell swoop! Ah!

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It turns out the jardiniere is marked "EBA" too.

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They're all owned by the same dealer.

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With a collective ticket price of £163,

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will Natasha try a cheeky offer for the three?

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I bet she does.

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All together 75, but that's my opening gambit, Hilary.

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-We know how it works.

-We do.

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-Hit me with your...

-I'd like 85.

-85?

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If that's possible because we do like to make a bit, a little bit.

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-Can you do 85?

-I definitely can

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-because that's still a massive chunk off.

-Brilliant.

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-If you're cool with that, I'm cool with that.

-Brilliant.

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A great deal for three interesting items. Well done, Natasha.

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Does anything else grab you, Phil?

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This is just an interesting tray.

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It's late 19th century. It's in mahogany.

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But all this decoration, which is inlaid into the mahogany base,

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is marquetry.

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Now, there's two issues with this.

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The first thing is condition cos we've got a bit of a crack there,

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and the second thing is

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it's completely and utterly out of fashion.

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So, a tray like this in good order, 15 years ago,

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would have been between £200 and £400.

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This is now priced up at £55.

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What's it going to make at auction?

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Well, in my eyes, it's going to be making 30-40 quid

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so I've got to try and buy it for around £20, £25.

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Cor. Better get your bartering head on, old bean.

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I'm hoping I can try and buy it off you for around the £20 mark.

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-How does that...?

-It's a bit low.

-Come on, tell me.

-A bit low.

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-It's the condition really, isn't it?

-Cos it's priced as damaged, but...

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Can you do...25?

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-Yeah, go on, you're an angel.

-All right, brilliant.

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-Thank you very much.

-So, Phil's also bought three lots in the first shop.

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Bold buying.

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After that storming start, Natasha's decided to take a break

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from shopping and has headed 20 minutes south to Aldershot.

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She's come to the Military Museum to find out about the American cowboy

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Samuel Franklin Cody, who became Britain's first aviator.

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Great moustache.

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She's meeting author of The Flying Cowboy, Peter Reese,

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to find out more.

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-And there's the man himself.

-There he is.

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He's looking pretty dapper, isn't he? Some style. My goodness!

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Well, he looks like Buffalo Bill

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because he modelled himself on Buffalo Bill.

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Ah, see, when I saw the surname Cody I thought of Buffalo Bill

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because that was HIS surname, was it not?

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It was, but Cody changed his name from Cowdery to Cody.

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-Ah, to be more like Buffalo Bill?

-To be more, yes.

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His dates are a wee bit later than Buffalo Bill's, is that right?

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They are. He's much younger than Buffalo Bill.

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Wannabe cowboy Cody left home at a young age,

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training horses and working the cattle trails across Texas.

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But, by the 1880s, the Wild West was disappearing.

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So, after Buffalo Bill started to tour Europe with a cowboy show,

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Cody followed with one of his own.

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Cody's act of the West is Cody himself.

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-His horse, his lasso, his gun, his pistol.

-A one-man show.

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-One-man show.

-Oh, wow. A one-man Wild West show.

-Absolutely.

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Cody's wild cowboy performances won him the love of the British public

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and, out of the limelight, he was becoming fascinated with aviation.

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A hobby of building big kites soon developed into something much more,

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and while working with the British Army,

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he designed the aeroplane that would see him fly for the first time.

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In this period, we are behind the Americans.

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The Wright brothers have flown at the end of 1903

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and the French are also getting into the air, so we are behind.

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Oh, no. And as an American, he must have been itching to get in front.

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-As Cody, he would.

-Ah-ha! Not just an American but as Cody.

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And on 16 October 1908,

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Cody actually makes his first flight and his first flight is successful.

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-It's 440 yards, 27 seconds.

-Oh, wow.

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Ends up with a crash and he gets cuts and bruises but he has flown.

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After being crowned the first man to fly a powered flight in Britain,

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Cody's aviation obsession grew.

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The following year, he became a naturalised British citizen

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so he could enter flying competitions,

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often with cash prizes, to help fund his passion.

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Before that, he was rejected because he was a foreigner.

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-So, this cowboy is now a Brit?

-He's a Brit.

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And he signed his papers on the town clerk's shoulders

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to the local band playing.

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-You see, Cody did it very quietly and modestly.

-Yeah, yeah.

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In 1910, the final flying competition of the year

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was the Michelin Trophy

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for the longest distance round a closed circuit.

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On 29 December, fellow aviation pioneer Thomas Sopwith,

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flew a seemingly unbeatable 150 miles non-stop.

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Two days left in the year, so he hasn't done it. He doesn't do it?

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The odds are against him and the weather's bad.

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But on New Year's Eve he's up very early in the morning.

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He's striding his lawn in the frosty grass and he decides to have a go.

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The first three hours, you can imagine, they're monotonous.

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He's frozen but he continues in this solid progress for three hours.

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-Pure adrenaline.

-His intake pipes are freezing up

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so he's getting an awful build-up of ice

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but he staggers on, staggers on, staggers on,

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and he doesn't give up until four hours 40 minutes

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-and he has flown 185 miles.

-Oh, my goodness.

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-He's really gone the extra mile.

-He has, he has.

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-Oh, that's amazing!

-So 35 miles more.

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Cody continued to win more prizes

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and by 1913 he was setting his sights on the aviation challenge of the era,

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a non-stop flight across the Atlantic,

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an extraordinary feat many thought impossible.

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Sadly, Cody would never get the chance,

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as on the morning of 7 August tragedy struck.

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He's flying at Aldershot.

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He's taking up a famous cricketer, WHB Evans,

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and they're coming down to land and suddenly the wings just fold up

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and the plane plummets to the ground.

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The two of them are thrown out and Evans breaks every bone in his body.

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Both are killed instantly.

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And it ends as Cody would like it to end - cleanly and in the air.

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Cody was buried with full honours at Aldershot military cemetery.

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Around 100,000 people paid their respects

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as the celebrated cowboy and amazing aviator was laid to rest.

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And so the world bid farewell to one of its most colourful pioneers.

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Phil, meanwhile, has headed half an hour north to Reading...

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# Fanny... #

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..hoping to uncover something special at his next shop.

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He's meeting Will.

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You must be Will. Phil, Will. Will, Phil. Phil, Will.

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-Please to meet you.

-How are you doing?

-Not too bad.

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-What did this use to be then?

-It used to be a old meat depot.

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-My dad used to be a butcher and my grandad.

-Well, there we are.

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Many people reckon I have it in me.

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Well, you're built like a butcher, if you don't mind me saying.

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Like a butcher? More like an athlete.

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And it's not long before something else catches Phil's eye.

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I love that. Originally it would have been one of a pair, wouldn't it?

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-Yeah, off a gatepost, I'd imagine.

-Yeah.

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What's the ticket price on that one?

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Well, I think the problem with that is it's been here so long

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that we had a bit of sort-out this weekend and it suddenly appeared.

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-Suddenly appeared. Oh, I like this.

-So, I think we can...

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If you make me a sensible price...

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-OK.

-And I mean sensible.

-The trouble with it is

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that a pair would be really, really saleable, wouldn't they? But one...

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But I still think it's quite fun. Would a £20 note buy it?

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Well...

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-If it gets rid of it, I suppose, yeah. Go on, £20.

-Oh, go on, then.

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So, that's a hefty lot bought. Now, how about a pig's trough?

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-This is cast-iron, isn't it?

-Yep.

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Pre-war. That's got to be the 1920s, I would imagine.

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Cos after a while they made them galvanised, didn't they?

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-Galvanised came in after the war.

-How much is that, Will?

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Well, we did have 75 on it.

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But what were you thinking?

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It's going to make 30 - 50 quid at auction, isn't it?

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It might make a little bit more.

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I'd have preferred the 50 to 80, really.

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I've got to give you somewhere between 20 and 25 quid.

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No, I'd have to have a little bit more than that.

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30 quid's my best.

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-Dear, oh, dear.

-You got your hand out quick earlier.

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HE SIGHS

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-That's a round 50, isn't it, really?

-Yeah. So, I owe you £50 for the two

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and I'm going to put the two as one lot in the auction.

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A great bit of bargaining secures another lot.

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And so the sun sets on a busy day for our road trippers

0:17:440:17:49

and all I can say is, nighty-night.

0:17:490:17:51

The next morning, our dynamic duo are back on the road.

0:17:550:17:59

Well, Phil, our last day of shopping.

0:17:590:18:02

Do you know, I do think that I've reduced you to my level.

0:18:020:18:05

-What does that mean?

-With some of the crud that I've bought.

0:18:050:18:08

Oh, stop it. You don't know me very well. I've always bought crud.

0:18:080:18:11

Do you remember where we started off? Woodworm and rust.

0:18:110:18:14

I'm not really allowed to tell you what I've bought, Phil,

0:18:140:18:16

-but I've bought something with woodworm.

-Really?

0:18:160:18:19

-That's my girl.

-Just to take us back to the beginning.

0:18:190:18:21

-You see, the Serrell influence is there.

-Not always for the good.

0:18:210:18:24

So far, Natasha has three lots - the wooden jardiniere,

0:18:270:18:31

a revolving bookcase and the Scottie dog napkin rings,

0:18:310:18:35

leaving her £80.64 to spend today.

0:18:350:18:39

Phil, meanwhile, has bagged himself four lots -

0:18:400:18:43

a children's rocking chair,

0:18:430:18:45

the boat steps,

0:18:450:18:47

a mahogany tray

0:18:470:18:48

and the pig trough and garden ball,

0:18:480:18:51

which means he still has £140.40 to play with.

0:18:510:18:56

First stop of the day

0:18:580:19:00

is the small seaside town of Bognor Regis,

0:19:000:19:03

where Natasha's hunt for more antiques begins. Go, girl!

0:19:030:19:07

-Hello. Good morning.

-Hi. Good morning.

0:19:080:19:09

-Hello. Hi, I'm Tasha.

-I'm Stephan.

-Stephan.

0:19:090:19:13

With owner Stephan's 35 years of antiques expertise,

0:19:130:19:17

he's sure to be harbouring some hidden gems.

0:19:170:19:20

-How cute is your Wemyss pig at the front?

-Right.

0:19:240:19:27

-I don't think it is Wemyss though.

-Oh, really?

0:19:270:19:30

-I think it's another make.

-OK, so in the style of?

-In the style of.

0:19:300:19:32

That would be quite nice. Can we have a look?

0:19:320:19:34

Wemyss Ware is probably the most collectable

0:19:340:19:37

and sought after Scottish pottery.

0:19:370:19:39

Ah, a cane.

0:19:390:19:41

Let's have a look. Hook the pig. Hook out the pig.

0:19:420:19:46

This piggy, however, is a piece of Plichta pottery,

0:19:460:19:50

which, though generally inferior in quality to Wemyss, is still popular.

0:19:500:19:54

It's super cute. Look at him face on.

0:19:550:19:57

He's got a bit of a wonky face, doesn't he?

0:19:570:19:59

He doesn't have quite the fine execution of Wemyss, does he?

0:19:590:20:02

-No, he doesn't.

-But he does have the look. It's hand-painted, is it not?

0:20:020:20:06

It is hand-painted and no damage.

0:20:060:20:08

Oh, Stephan, I think there is a wee bit of damage.

0:20:080:20:11

-I think there's a wee bit of a curly tail option.

-Oh, there is.

0:20:110:20:14

-And I'm the one wearing glasses.

-I'm just keeping my eyes peeled.

0:20:140:20:19

So, she's really sweet because the little holes in her snout

0:20:190:20:23

are mimicked all the way across her body, her ears, all over the place.

0:20:230:20:27

-Maybe it's for hatpins!

-Yes, hatpins.

-Oh, cos it's quite big.

0:20:270:20:30

Maybe it is for hatpins.

0:20:300:20:32

I love this! The more I hold it and learn about it, the more I love it.

0:20:320:20:35

Now, I've touched it, which means apparently I've got to buy it,

0:20:350:20:38

-but...

-We were asking £15, but you pointed out the damage on the tail,

0:20:380:20:43

-so now it's a crisp £10 note.

-A £10 note?

0:20:430:20:47

What do you reckon?

0:20:480:20:49

I think I can deal with this little piggy for a tenner.

0:20:490:20:51

-Shall we go for it?

-I think you ought to.

0:20:510:20:53

Oh, Stephan, that was quick! I wasn't expecting that.

0:20:530:20:56

I'm glad I spotted her. I'm chuffed.

0:20:560:20:59

Here's hoping this little piggy makes a profit at auction.

0:20:590:21:02

Philip, meanwhile, is easing into the day, taking a trip to Portsmouth,

0:21:070:21:11

home to one of the most famous warships in the world - HMS Victory.

0:21:110:21:16

Best known for her role in Britain's greatest naval success,

0:21:160:21:20

the Battle of Trafalgar, Victory was the flagship of Admiral Nelson

0:21:200:21:25

and was the vessel where he drew his last breath.

0:21:250:21:29

Philip's meeting curator Andrew Baines to find out more.

0:21:290:21:33

-This room that we're in now, this is Nelson's?

-This is Nelson's.

0:21:330:21:36

This is a great cabin, which is divided into four sections.

0:21:360:21:39

His steerage, his anteroom, if you like, the dining place,

0:21:390:21:43

the day cabin, where we are now, and then his bed place.

0:21:430:21:46

-You can just feel history coming out of the walls, can't you?

-Yeah.

0:21:460:21:50

-Nelson pacing back and forth.

-Oh, just unbelievable.

0:21:500:21:53

In her 34 years of service, Victory fought in five naval battles

0:21:540:21:59

but it was the 1805 defeat of the French and Spanish

0:21:590:22:03

at the Battle of Trafalgar she became most famous for.

0:22:030:22:07

You've got the palatial surroundings that we just left

0:22:070:22:11

for the one person,

0:22:110:22:14

and the other 820 are spread throughout this ship...

0:22:140:22:17

and this is the cooking range?

0:22:170:22:19

For everyone onboard, whether it's Nelson, an admiral,

0:22:190:22:22

or the lowest of the ratings onboard, the boy seamen.

0:22:220:22:26

All the cooking is done here.

0:22:260:22:27

But that just strikes me as being a fairly strange mix, really

0:22:270:22:31

cos we've got a timber wooden ship and a fire in the middle of it.

0:22:310:22:36

Yeah. Well, men need a hot meal, so if you look, the stove sits on tiles

0:22:360:22:42

and we're very careful.

0:22:420:22:44

This is the only place you're allowed fire onboard the ship,

0:22:440:22:48

but actually on the morning of the battle, this had been dismantled

0:22:480:22:52

so there's no hot meal and the guys fight the Battle of Trafalgar

0:22:520:22:56

-on a lunch meal of raw pork and wine.

-Oh, great.

0:22:560:23:02

Food is incredibly important as a part of morale

0:23:030:23:06

so everybody onboard gets exactly the same ration.

0:23:060:23:10

Nelson's advantage is, as a man of some means,

0:23:110:23:14

he is able to supplement that ration,

0:23:140:23:17

so he will bring onboard his own pantry of stores, if you like.

0:23:170:23:21

However, the men here can do just the same.

0:23:210:23:24

You eat and live as part of a mess, as four, six or eight men.

0:23:240:23:27

You'll pay into a kitty

0:23:270:23:29

and that kitty will be used to buy things like mustard and spices,

0:23:290:23:33

and indeed live animals you might choose to bring onboard

0:23:330:23:36

that are YOUR animal

0:23:360:23:38

that you will then slaughter and eat as you go through.

0:23:380:23:41

To keep up with the hard physical work onboard,

0:23:410:23:44

each crew member consumed around 5,000 calories a day,

0:23:440:23:49

a good portion of which came from alcohol.

0:23:490:23:52

These chaps are getting about half a pint of rum

0:23:520:23:59

per man per day, when we're on rum,

0:23:590:24:02

and the proof of their rum is about double what we call strong now.

0:24:020:24:08

So it's firewater.

0:24:080:24:10

On the 21 October 1805, Nelson led the British fleet

0:24:100:24:16

into battle against the French and Spanish.

0:24:160:24:19

It was 27 vessels versus 33.

0:24:190:24:23

Some 1,700 British men were killed or wounded

0:24:230:24:27

including the great Nelson himself, who was shot on the quarterdeck.

0:24:270:24:31

Below deck, the ship's surgeon, Mr Beatty,

0:24:310:24:34

knew Nelson wouldn't survive.

0:24:340:24:37

Captain Hardy came to bid his Admiral farewell.

0:24:370:24:40

He knows he's going to die.

0:24:400:24:42

He could really, although he's surrounded by people, be very alone.

0:24:420:24:46

He craves human touch and that's why he says, "Kiss me, Hardy."

0:24:460:24:51

And Hardy bends and kisses him on the forehead,

0:24:510:24:54

stands up, then actually goes down,

0:24:540:24:56

bends and kisses him on the cheek this time

0:24:560:24:58

before apparently, overcome with emotion, he leaves the scene.

0:24:580:25:02

Not long afterwards, Nelson died.

0:25:020:25:05

With Nelson's death... He must have been a national hero before,

0:25:070:25:13

and afterwards he must have almost achieved superstar status.

0:25:130:25:17

The funeral is huge.

0:25:170:25:20

It's the biggest state funeral ever to take place up until that time

0:25:200:25:24

and the funeral procession is so long that it leaves Whitehall

0:25:240:25:29

and Nelson's body arrives at St Paul's Cathedral

0:25:290:25:33

before the rest of the procession has finished leaving Whitehall.

0:25:330:25:36

It's that big.

0:25:360:25:37

In 1922, HMS Victory was placed into dry dock.

0:25:390:25:43

Millions have since flocked to visit

0:25:430:25:45

the oldest commissioned warship in the world

0:25:450:25:48

and remember one of Britain's greatest heroes,

0:25:480:25:52

Admiral Nelson.

0:25:520:25:53

Our pair have reunited to make their way to Birdham,

0:25:550:25:59

where they'll share their final shopping experience of this Road Trip

0:25:590:26:02

at Whitestone Farm Antiques.

0:26:020:26:04

-Here we are. This is off the beaten track.

-It is indeedy-doody.

0:26:040:26:09

-OK, let's do it. Our last items.

-This is sad, isn't it?

-Ugh, what?

0:26:090:26:15

Here we go. I'm ready for it, Phil, are you?

0:26:170:26:19

-Well, my eyes are watering, but, yeah, let's go.

-Come on.

0:26:190:26:23

-Our final foray.

-Come on, darling, after you.

0:26:230:26:26

-Hello, you must be Jo.

-I am Jo.

-I'm Tasha. Lovely to meet you.

0:26:260:26:29

-Hi, Tasha.

-Jo, we met before. How are you?

-Philip! Great to see you.

-Yeah, you too.

-Oh, no, a reunion.

0:26:290:26:33

-Does that mean he's going to get a better deal than I am?

-Just old friends, old friends.

0:26:330:26:37

-Never. You're much prettier.

-That's not hard, is it? To be fair.

0:26:370:26:40

-Are you going to take that?

-I can't argue with him, really.

0:26:400:26:42

Packed to the rafters with goodies.

0:26:440:26:46

So, what's going to tickle Natasha's fancy in here then?

0:26:460:26:50

Let's have a look.

0:26:500:26:51

OK, so, ghouls to the front. They're not hand-painted, right? They're transferred on.

0:26:510:26:55

-No, it's transfer, but...

-Is the colour done by hand?

-..hand-painted over the top.

0:26:550:26:59

OK, so hand-finished I guess we can say.

0:26:590:27:01

So, I'm not so up on Carlton Ware

0:27:010:27:03

but that looks like a post-1930s mark, doesn't it? It's quite crisp.

0:27:030:27:07

This is very 1930s but of course it could be as late as 1950.

0:27:070:27:11

Oh, look! "A Dorset Litany. From ghoulies & ghosties..."

0:27:110:27:15

Ah! "..and long leggetty beasties

0:27:150:27:19

"and things that go bump in the night - Good Lord deliver us."

0:27:190:27:23

-That's got a real nice Scottish feel to it.

-It does.

0:27:230:27:27

Ghoulies and ghosties. Oh, my goodness.

0:27:270:27:29

I've met a few of those up north, believe me.

0:27:290:27:31

It's marked up at £50, which scares me a little bit.

0:27:310:27:34

Not as much as the ghoulies and ghosties, which are terrifying.

0:27:340:27:38

-Do you want a tempting price though?

-A tempting price? Oh, I don't know.

0:27:380:27:42

How tempting?

0:27:420:27:43

-30?

-30. That's quite a chunk off. that is a very generous offer, Jo.

0:27:430:27:48

Phil is just eavesdropping. He's so bad!

0:27:490:27:52

What if I made you a cheeky offer, and it is really cheeky

0:27:520:27:55

but it's my last chance to be cheeky, of £20?

0:27:550:27:59

-£20.

-What would you do?

0:27:590:28:01

-25 and it's yours.

-25 and it's mine?

0:28:030:28:05

I'm going to put it down carefully and say, "Jo, thank you so much."

0:28:050:28:09

Because at £25 it does have a real chance, doesn't it?

0:28:090:28:12

I think it's got a real good chance.

0:28:120:28:14

Well, it won't be long before we find out. Now, has Phil found anything?

0:28:140:28:19

That could be quite interesting, couldn't it? Actually...

0:28:210:28:25

No, it couldn't be. As tables go, that's not what you're looking for.

0:28:270:28:33

No, indeed.

0:28:330:28:35

Those leather chairs look a bit more stable though.

0:28:350:28:37

When you're looking at a chair, you just need to make sure

0:28:380:28:41

that there's no breaks. People lean back on chairs,

0:28:410:28:44

particularly people of my size lean back on chairs,

0:28:440:28:48

and if you lean back on a chair, it breaks there.

0:28:480:28:52

So, whenever you look at a chair, you want to make sure

0:28:520:28:54

that there's no breaks just there

0:28:540:28:56

cos that is just not a good thing.

0:28:560:28:59

I quite like these.

0:28:590:29:00

The pair have a ticket price of £110 but generous Jo has indicated

0:29:010:29:07

he'd be willing to drop to 60. Wow.

0:29:070:29:10

I know that you've said these at 60. 60, that is too much for me.

0:29:100:29:15

Can you come down any more at all?

0:29:150:29:17

Cos I want to try and buy something off you

0:29:180:29:21

and I really, really like these.

0:29:210:29:22

I've also got another question to ask you.

0:29:230:29:26

If I buy them, have you got any polish?

0:29:260:29:27

Cos I just want to try and...

0:29:270:29:30

-As long as you don't want me to do them.

-No, I'll do it!

0:29:300:29:32

I'll do it. But at auction I see these...

0:29:320:29:34

What do you think these would make at auction honestly?

0:29:340:29:37

-40-60.

-OK.

0:29:370:29:39

Easily 40-60.

0:29:390:29:42

Can you do them for 40 and a bit of polish and I'll shake your hand?

0:29:420:29:47

How about 50 and a bit of polish? I'll even help you if you like.

0:29:470:29:51

No, no, I'll do it on my own. 45 and I'll do it myself.

0:29:510:29:54

-Go on, then.

-You're a gentleman, Jo. Thank you very much indeed.

0:29:540:29:58

Another lot bought and Phil's putting in a bit of elbow grease

0:30:000:30:04

to prepare them for the auction.

0:30:040:30:05

The thing is, you've got to remember that leather

0:30:070:30:12

is a bit like me really, it needs feeding.

0:30:120:30:15

Thanks for the insight, Phil.

0:30:150:30:18

With that last buy, it means our Road Trippers are all bought up.

0:30:180:30:23

Natasha spent £120 on five lots.

0:30:230:30:26

The wooden cellarette,

0:30:260:30:28

a revolving bookcase,

0:30:280:30:30

the Scottie dog napkin rings,

0:30:300:30:33

a piggy hatpin holder

0:30:330:30:35

and the ghoulish Carlton mug.

0:30:350:30:37

Phil spent £230 buying the children's rocking chair,

0:30:390:30:43

the boat steps,

0:30:430:30:45

a mahogany tray,

0:30:450:30:46

the pig trough and garden ball,

0:30:460:30:49

and the pair of newly buffed up leather chairs.

0:30:490:30:52

What do they make of each other's lots?

0:30:550:30:59

I'm going to bow to Tasha's knowledge

0:30:590:31:01

with that Carlton Ware mug.

0:31:010:31:03

I think it's a cool thing but at £25, it might be a problem.

0:31:030:31:07

But if it's rare, it should just see it through.

0:31:070:31:10

On the very last leg, Phil had to buy something salvage,

0:31:100:31:14

he had to do it, and he's come away

0:31:140:31:15

with a huge spherical gate finial and a pig's trough.

0:31:150:31:19

My pig item is a little ceramic dainty thing, his is a pig's trough.

0:31:190:31:23

It just explains the difference between Phil and I

0:31:230:31:26

and why opposites attract.

0:31:260:31:28

After starting this leg in Eversley,

0:31:290:31:32

they're now hurtling towards

0:31:320:31:34

their final destination, Salisbury.

0:31:340:31:37

You are a such a fake grump!

0:31:370:31:40

You're the fakest grump I've ever met in my entire life.

0:31:400:31:44

No, I like being miserable.

0:31:440:31:45

And you're just like, "Oh, I'm Philip Serrell. I'm so grumpy.

0:31:450:31:49

"I'm in Malvern. Come and sell your Worcester with me

0:31:490:31:52

"because I'm a grumpy man." No, you're not.

0:31:520:31:55

-You are the nicest guy of all time.

-Oh, get out of here.

0:31:550:31:58

Let's swiftly move on.

0:31:580:31:59

I think, "infectious, bubbly Natasha".

0:32:000:32:03

-That's what I'm going to miss.

-I'm not infectious. That sounds awful!

0:32:030:32:06

-I sound contagious!

-You are because you've actually made me smile.

0:32:060:32:10

On that bombshell, it's auction time.

0:32:110:32:15

The final sale is taking place at Netherhampton Salerooms.

0:32:170:32:20

Presiding over today's events is Richard Petty.

0:32:210:32:25

What does he make of our experts' lots?

0:32:250:32:27

Revolving bookcase.

0:32:270:32:28

It's an interesting 1970s upgrade with the casters on the bottom,

0:32:280:32:33

which may put some people off.

0:32:330:32:35

£80-£100 perhaps, but it needs a bit of work.

0:32:350:32:37

I would buy the pig trough because I think it's an interesting piece.

0:32:370:32:41

It would look absolutely fabulous in my garden for the plants.

0:32:410:32:44

Sadly, I have no pigs.

0:32:440:32:46

Some good buys on both sides then. Right, on with the auction.

0:32:460:32:52

-Ah, Philip.

-Here we go then.

-Here we go.

0:32:520:32:55

Here we go indeed. First up - Phil's mahogany tray.

0:32:560:33:00

I'll start the bidding at £10. At £10, £10, £10, £10...

0:33:010:33:05

£12, 15, 18, £20

0:33:050:33:08

22, 25 from me. 25 my bid.

0:33:080:33:11

28. I've got 30.

0:33:110:33:13

32, 35, 38, £40 from me.

0:33:130:33:17

45 and I'm out. 45, 45, 45...

0:33:170:33:19

-45!

-You were bang on.

-..In the room then at 45.

0:33:190:33:21

Anybody else? Being sold this time at £45.

0:33:210:33:25

-GAVEL BANGS

-Oh! Phil, that's excellent!

0:33:250:33:27

First lot and he's pulled in a profit. Well done, Philip.

0:33:290:33:32

-That is a good start.

-Yeah.

0:33:330:33:36

Can Natasha's ghoulish mug keep up the profits?

0:33:370:33:40

At £12 I've got. 15, 18, 20, 22,

0:33:420:33:46

-25. I'm out. 28...

-Oh, yay!

-..£30.

0:33:460:33:49

£30. 32? 32. 35?

0:33:490:33:53

-35.

-Oh.

-Another for you? 38.

-Oh, keen crowd!

0:33:530:33:57

£40, 42, 42.

0:33:570:34:00

45. Gentleman's bid then at 45.

0:34:000:34:02

48. On my left at 48. Anyone else want to join in?

0:34:020:34:07

At 48. Being sold this time then at £48.

0:34:070:34:11

GAVEL BANGS By Jove!

0:34:110:34:13

That's some profit on the mug. Nicely done, Natasha.

0:34:130:34:16

But will her Bakelite Scottie dog napkin holders prove as popular?

0:34:180:34:23

Maybe they'll fly and do really well.

0:34:240:34:26

-Who's got 10? Thank you, £10 I've got.

-10!

-£10, £10, £10, £10...

0:34:260:34:30

-Who else wants it? £12.

-I want them. I want them.

0:34:300:34:33

-15, 18...

-Yay!

-..£20. At £20. Gentleman's bid at £20.

0:34:330:34:38

-Oh, I want them.

-£20, £20, 20. Anyone else want them at 20?

0:34:380:34:40

Shout if we don't see you. Being sold this time then at £20.

0:34:400:34:44

-GAVEL BANGS

-Relax! Ooh! Yes!

0:34:440:34:46

The Scottie doggies have done our Scottish lass proud.

0:34:460:34:50

That's good. That's good, that's good, that's good. Double the money.

0:34:520:34:56

-Yeah.

-Right, Phil, the battle is well and truly on.

0:34:560:34:59

Up next is your set of boat steps.

0:34:590:35:01

I've got three lots of instructions.

0:35:030:35:04

I'm going to start the bidding at...

0:35:040:35:06

-£40.

-Ooh.

-£40 I've got. £40, £40, £40, £40...

0:35:060:35:11

45. I've got 50. 55. I've got 60.

0:35:110:35:15

Another one for you? 65. I've got 70.

0:35:150:35:17

-70...

-You know, that's a result, as far as I'm concerned.

0:35:170:35:20

Oh, keep going. Someone's got to come in. Got to.

0:35:200:35:23

Last chance. Being sold this time then at £70.

0:35:230:35:26

-GAVEL BANGS

-Oh, Phil, that was close!

0:35:260:35:29

Ah, a bit of a loss there.

0:35:290:35:32

Someone in Salisbury got a great deal.

0:35:320:35:35

Natasha's still in pole position at this auction.

0:35:360:35:38

Can she edge further ahead with the piggy hatpin holder?

0:35:380:35:42

-£10 I have. £10, £10, £12...

-That's because of the...

0:35:420:35:45

-..15, 18...

-Oh! Get in!

-..20, 22, 25, 28.

0:35:450:35:49

-I'm out.

-Oh, don't be out.

0:35:490:35:51

-£30. 32...

-I'm in trouble here.

-..35, 38?

0:35:510:35:55

-I'm in trouble.

-£40, 42...

-I really am in trouble here.

0:35:550:35:59

..45, 48, £50.

0:35:590:36:02

£50. Lady's bid then at £50. Anyone else at 50? Your last chance.

0:36:020:36:06

-Being sold this time then at £50.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:36:060:36:10

-Yes, madam!

-# There may be trouble ahead. #

0:36:100:36:13

You could well be right, Phil.

0:36:140:36:16

A fantastic return on that little piggy.

0:36:160:36:19

The bookcase is up next.

0:36:210:36:23

-It's nice.

-I like it because...

-And the people round here

0:36:230:36:26

are forward planning. Bonfire Night is not that far away.

0:36:260:36:29

-Unbelievable.

-100? 70 or 80? 50 if we have to. It's here to be sold.

0:36:320:36:36

-Who's got 50? Thank you.

-Yes!

-£50 I have. £50, £50, £50...

0:36:360:36:39

-I just cannot believe that.

-..£50, £50, £50, £50...

0:36:390:36:42

Join in when you're ready but be very, very quick. 55.

0:36:420:36:44

-55?

-That chap thought he said 15.

0:36:440:36:47

..£70, 75, £80, 85, 85...

0:36:470:36:53

-Are you OK?

-..85. Don't think tomorrow. Tomorrow will be too late.

0:36:530:36:58

85. 85. Anybody else? Being sold this time then at £85.

0:36:580:37:03

GAVEL BANGS

0:37:030:37:05

Fantastic! Now that's a profit!

0:37:050:37:09

That is a top job, isn't it?

0:37:090:37:10

I'm so glad that someone else saw what I saw in it, Phil.

0:37:100:37:13

Someone else had the vision that you just simply lack.

0:37:130:37:16

Yeah. I'm going to go get all the books out and start again, I think.

0:37:160:37:19

Well done, you. Well done, you.

0:37:190:37:21

Right, Phil, if you've any chance of winning this leg,

0:37:210:37:25

you need to make a profit with your pig trough and garden ball.

0:37:250:37:29

Would it have been useful if you'd had two gate finials, do you reckon?

0:37:290:37:32

I would never have bought them. They'd be a couple hundred pounds.

0:37:320:37:35

-Too logical.

-What do you want with one finial?

0:37:350:37:37

-Who's ever going to buy one finial?

-I don't know.

-Except me.

0:37:370:37:40

Is there a guy with half a house or...?

0:37:400:37:43

So, with the instructions I've been given,

0:37:430:37:45

I need to start the bidding at £35.

0:37:450:37:47

35 I've got. 35, 35, 40.

0:37:470:37:49

45, 50, 55, 60, 65 with me.

0:37:490:37:55

65. The bid's with me at 65. How's the phone looking, Gem?

0:37:550:37:59

-65.

-I think he's got the speaking clock. I think he's gone out.

0:37:590:38:02

-Oh, they're out. They're out.

-65. Is he back in yet?

0:38:020:38:06

-He's gone out.

-Oh, no, he's gone out to the shops!

0:38:060:38:09

He shakes his head. At £65.

0:38:090:38:11

-70.

-New bidder!

-75, 80. Now I'm out.

0:38:110:38:15

80 in the seats then. £80. 80, your last chance.

0:38:150:38:18

Anybody else? Being sold this time then at £80.

0:38:180:38:22

-GAVEL BANGS

-Phil!

0:38:220:38:25

-That was good, that.

-That is so good. £80.

0:38:250:38:28

Phil's random garden lot has put him back in the game. Great stuff!

0:38:280:38:33

-This is getting exciting.

-It is, isn't it?

0:38:330:38:35

Edge of your seat stuff here.

0:38:370:38:39

Can Phil bag another profit with his pair of buffed up leather chairs?

0:38:390:38:43

Who's got £20 then? Here to be sold. Who's got 20?

0:38:450:38:48

How many? 10? Thank you. £10 I have. £10, £10, £12, 15,

0:38:480:38:52

-18, £20, 22, 25...

-It's all go, it's all go. 25.

0:38:520:38:56

-..28, £30. £30 I have then.

-Phil, it's getting there.

0:38:560:39:00

-32, 35, 38, £40...

-Slowly but surely.

-It's like pulling teeth.

0:39:000:39:05

42? 42? What a shame. 42. Anybody else got 42?

0:39:050:39:08

-One more.

-Last chance on this lot. Being sold at 42...

0:39:080:39:11

-One more. Help this man break even.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:39:110:39:13

-Yours, sir.

-I'm so disappointed with that

0:39:130:39:16

after all that effort I put in polishing the wretched things.

0:39:160:39:19

Aw, hard luck. But it's only a little loss so your elbow grease

0:39:190:39:23

wasn't an entire waste of time.

0:39:230:39:25

And now for Natasha's final lot.

0:39:270:39:30

The romance of a cellarette is going to set this saleroom on fire.

0:39:310:39:36

At £30 I've got. £30, £30, £30, £30...

0:39:360:39:39

32, 35, 38, £40.

0:39:390:39:43

-£40, £40...

-Come on. No, no, no!

-Anybody else want in at £40?

0:39:430:39:47

-Last chance 40...

-I need one more.

0:39:470:39:49

-No, I don't. Drop the hammer.

-No, no, no, no.

0:39:490:39:51

-£40!

-Aw, no!

-Drop the hammer.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:39:510:39:55

A small loss there, but Natasha's still in the lead.

0:39:550:39:58

There doesn't seem any justice really

0:39:580:40:00

that that was probably worth a bit more than that, wasn't it?

0:40:000:40:03

It was worth more but I have to take the rough with the smooth

0:40:030:40:05

-cos so many things today have made money that I did not expect to make money.

-Yeah.

0:40:050:40:09

Yeah. Talking of making money, to win this auction,

0:40:090:40:12

Phil will need a romping result on the rocking chair.

0:40:120:40:16

Tenner for you, sir, thank you. £10 I have...

0:40:160:40:18

-It's started.

-15, 18, 20, 22,

0:40:180:40:21

25, 28, 28, 28.

0:40:210:40:25

I have £30.

0:40:250:40:27

£30. First bid has it at £30. £30. Last chance...

0:40:270:40:31

32. 32. Anybody else at 32? Your last chance on this lot.

0:40:310:40:35

£32. Anyone else? Being sold then at £32...

0:40:350:40:40

GAVEL BANGS

0:40:400:40:42

-Aaah!

-Aaah!

-THEY LAUGH

0:40:420:40:44

So, there we have it. This week-long Road Trip ends on a profit.

0:40:450:40:50

Marvellous.

0:40:500:40:51

What a brilliant week we've had, haven't we?

0:40:510:40:54

It's been so good. It's been so good.

0:40:540:40:56

-Shall we go outside and have a little cry?

-Yeah, who's driving?

0:40:560:40:59

-The winner.

-Oh, really?

-The winner drives us off. Come on, Philip.

0:40:590:41:04

Well, we'd better find out who that winner is then.

0:41:040:41:07

Natasha began with £165.64 and after paying auction costs

0:41:080:41:14

she's made a pretty profit of £79.26, making her today's winner,

0:41:140:41:20

with a final total of £244.90.

0:41:200:41:25

Phil started with £325.40. After paying auction costs,

0:41:270:41:33

he suffered a little loss of £9.42.

0:41:330:41:37

This means he may have lost this leg, but he's won the trip

0:41:370:41:41

with a fabulous final tally of £315.98.

0:41:410:41:46

Well done, old bean.

0:41:460:41:47

All profits go to Children in Need.

0:41:470:41:50

-Oh, Phil, well done!

-Well, yeah, but you won the evening.

0:41:500:41:54

It doesn't matter. The winner overall drives away.

0:41:540:41:57

-Oh, come on, then.

-I've just got to sit here and cry

0:41:570:41:59

-in the passenger seat.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:41:590:42:01

No tears, no tears. It's too good. It's too good!

0:42:010:42:05

# Thank you for being a friend

0:42:050:42:09

# Travelled down a road and back again... #

0:42:100:42:13

What a week it's been for a perfect new partnership.

0:42:140:42:18

-There have been highs...

-That's a bit exciting.

0:42:180:42:21

You and I can be Tom Cruise and Kelly McGillis.

0:42:210:42:25

..and lows.

0:42:250:42:26

I find your constant smiling, cheerfulness

0:42:260:42:30

and happiness absolutely wears me out.

0:42:300:42:33

Oh, Phil!

0:42:350:42:37

Oh, that's really horrific.

0:42:370:42:38

There's been a little bit of love...

0:42:380:42:41

I cannot think of a better way to spend a day

0:42:410:42:44

than driving in a gorgeous Porsche with a handsome man like you.

0:42:440:42:47

Oh, what a girl! What a girl!

0:42:470:42:49

..and a whole lot of laughter.

0:42:490:42:51

Next time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:010:43:03

it's fun and games when old favourites...

0:43:030:43:05

-You're a lot older than me.

-..Mark Stacey...

0:43:050:43:08

-I hope I haven't shot myself.

-..and Thomas Plant...

0:43:080:43:10

-This looks like a female bottom.

-..hit the road.

0:43:100:43:14

THEY LAUGH

0:43:140:43:15

On the last day on Natasha Raskin and Philip Serrell's road trip, they cover Berkshire and Hampshire, but who will win the week at the final auction in Salisbury, Wiltshire?