Episode 21 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 21

Antiques challenge. Auctioneers Thomas Plant and Mark Stacey begin their week's adventure in Kent, on the way to their first auction in Rye, East Sussex.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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-I don't know what to do.

-HORN TOOTS

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What a little diamond.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game. Charlie!

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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SHE GASPS

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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-or the slow road to disaster?

-Oh!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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Today heralds the start of a shiny new Road Trip

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with old hands Mark Stacey and Thomas Plant.

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-We're in Kent.

-Yes.

-The Garden of England.

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-It is rather beautiful.

-And we're two orchids,

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-so it's a good way of starting, isn't it?

-We're two what?

-Orchids.

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-Orchids?

-Yes.

-I've never been described as an orchid.

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I may be a Plant...

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Auctioneer Mark doesn't stand any nonsense.

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-Take a strong pill cos I'm quite a hard negotiator.

-I know.

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You know that, don't you?

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Snapping at his heels is lovable auctioneer Thomas,

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a man of many talents.

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I used to be a championship fencer.

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Our Road Trip pals have packed their suitcases

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and have £200 each to spend.

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They will zip around the country in the racy 1978 MGB GT.

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-GEARS GRIND

-Oh!

-Ooh!

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-Oh, dear, Thomas!

-Watch the gears, Thomas.

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Watch the reverse! Oh, no.

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I'm sure Thomas will get the knack.

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Mark and Thomas will be making a trip of over 500 miles

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from Sittingbourne, Kent and will wind all the way

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through the south-east of England

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through Norwich to finally land

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in Oakham in the East Midlands.

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Today's journey begins in Sittingbourne, Kent,

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and the auction will take place in Rye, East Sussex.

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-Right, Mark, here you are.

-Thomas, enjoy whatever you're doing next.

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Enjoy your first shop. Buy well, not too.

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-Bye.

-Bye.

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Mark's gearing up to spend some money in his first shop of the day.

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Nice to meet you, Richard. Now, tell me about this place.

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From the outside, it doesn't look anything,

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so I'm hoping it's going to be better inside.

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Charming as ever, I see, Mark.

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-Wildwinds is 18 months old.

-Oh, gosh!

-12 of us here.

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-Am I going to find a bargain?

-That's for you to discover.

-Oh!

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Well, look, I'll have a look round

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-and then I can negotiate with you, can I?

-Yes, that's right.

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Take a strong pill cos I'm quite a hard negotiator.

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-I know.

-You know that, don't you?

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Gosh, not had your toast and marmalade this morning, Mark?

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After a good old rummage, Mark finds something rather nifty.

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It could have been a conductor's baton or something like that.

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It has a lovely little plaque. I like things with dates on it.

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It says "Reverend Frank Jones, Christmas 1896"

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but it's priced at £120

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and that's too much of a risk. Lovely thing though.

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Mm. He looks a bit like a mature Harry Potter.

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Those eyes would put a spell on anyone.

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MUSIC: Harry Potter Theme Song

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This is quite an interesting thing. It's a brass candlestick.

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What is quite fun about it is that it has a little section here

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that you can pull out to keep your vestas, your matches in,

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and you can strike them on here.

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I haven't seen anything like that and I'm sure it's got a bit of age.

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I might ask Richard about that.

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Brace yourself, Richard.

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I've found a quirky little item which I think is rather charming.

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It's got a story to tell and it's had a bit of a life, like you and I.

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The problem is, I don't want to pay the ticket price.

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Do you think they'd take a really ridiculous offer?

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-I suspect not.

-Oh.

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This little item is owned by one of the 12 dealers here.

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The ticket price is £28.

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If they can let me have that for £10, I'd really love it,

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so have a little word with them for me,

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and I'm relying on you, Mr Richard.

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Will they accept Mark's cheeky offer?

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-How did you get on?

-Gwyneth says, "As it's you."

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-HE GASPS

-I rather like Gwyneth.

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I wonder if she's generous enough to negotiate over something else.

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Fuelled by Gwyneth's generosity, Mark has a go at the baton.

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Now, she might not be as happy about this but that's quite fun, isn't it?

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It is. It's a nice piece.

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Do you think you could find out what Gwyneth would let me have that for?

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What's your best offer?

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Well, she's not going to like it and she can beat me with it -

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as long as she lets me have it for that price, of course -

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but I've got to think of what the auctioneer will say.

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I'll whisper it to you.

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(£40.)

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Mark's offering £40 but it's priced at 120.

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Stand by.

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Gwyneth says that her best is £50.

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I've gone quite off Gwyneth, actually.

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Do you think she might do 45?

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-Arise, Sir Richard.

-45 it is.

-Are you sure?

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-Yes.

-So that's 55 in total?

-That's correct.

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I'll shake your hand. Thank you so much.

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Did he cast a spell on Richard?

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Lovely. Thank you very much.

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Mm. £10 for the Victorian brass chamberstick

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and a very generous deal of £45 for the magic wand.

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I mean, the Victorian conductor's baton.

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Meanwhile, young Thomas is motoring to his first shop, eight miles away,

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in the charming town of Faversham.

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This fine emporium is run by Ann and Conon.

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-Hello.

-Oh, hello.

-I'm Thomas.

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-How do you do?

-An old, traditional antiques dealer.

-Yes.

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God, you're a rare breed, aren't you?

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You're almost as rare as some of the antiques now.

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Mm. Not sure if that's a compliment.

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-You've got some nice hatpins here.

-Mm.

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Hatpins are funny things, aren't they?

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I think they need to come back into fashion.

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-Are these ones by the great one, the great maker?

-Yes.

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Charles Horner of Chester.

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The changing fashions of the late 19th and 20th centuries

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saw a trend for more and more elaborate headgear and Charles Horner

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was the market leader in good-quality hatpins for the masses.

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Ladies could always defend themselves with one of those

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-if...they had a problem.

-If they had an unsolicited advancement?

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-Yes. People wouldn't like to...

-No, they wouldn't, would they?

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Well, laws were passed in 1908 to limit the length of hatpins

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due to concern that suffragettes would use them as weapons.

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It almost looks like a giant humbug sweet, doesn't it?

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I think a little collection of hatpins, three of them in a lot,

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would be quite a nice lot to sell at auction.

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We'll have a look at those,

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-see what we can do price-wise on those.

-Right.

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The original combo ticket price is £141.

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This is a Japanese bead.

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It's got some age to it, as well.

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It's a Meiji, isn't it? Meiji period, so about 1860s to 1900s.

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Samurai were banned from wearing their swords

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and so all the craftsmen had to make other things,

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and that's the kind of thing they made.

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-Do you think £20 is a reasonable...?

-I think that's immensely fair.

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-Do you?

-I do. I think it's really fair.

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Well, you would say that, wouldn't you, Thomas?

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And then you've got these two little things.

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He's also uncovered an Arts and Crafts brooch

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-and a little Celtic cross.

-Could we do both of those for 15?

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15 for those and 20 for that one.

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What have you thought about these? These are quite expensive, aren't they?

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They are quite dear. What do you want to do, 100 for the three?

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It's a lot of money to spend, £100.

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Is there any chance that you would possibly...?

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-If I gave you £100 for the lot, that would be a deal.

-Erm...

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-No, I don't think so.

-No?

-No.

-I had to ask.

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I'm only charging you £25 each, and I do think that's really cheap,

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and £50 for the very traditional looking Horner.

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120 and you've got a deal.

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No, I don't want to cos they're just so nice.

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-I say meet him halfway.

-Yeah?

-125?

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God, that's wonderful. You're a star. Thank you very much.

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-No, he is.

-Well done. Thank you for that.

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That's really good. That's brilliant.

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-I'd better give you some money.

-OK.

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What have I done? £125 within the first shop. Thank you very much.

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Right, OK. Cheerio.

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Ann and Conon have been very generous.

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£90 for the collection of hatpins, £20 for the brooch,

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and the Celtic cross and the Japanese bronze bead for £15.

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A bold start for Thomas.

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Mark is also in Faversham in Medway Antiques.

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-Hello.

-Good afternoon.

-I'm Mark.

-Good to see you.

-Nice to meet you.

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Chris is the owner of this fine establishment.

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Well, I'm on the hunt for bargains.

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I've got to buy something to take to auction.

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There's plenty of little bits and pieces to have a look at.

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I've just sold this piece, which is quite nice.

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-So you're feeling in a very generous mood?

-I am in a generous mood.

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-I like the sound of that.

-Sounds promising, Mark.

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-Well, I'll have a little look round if I can.

-Yeah.

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That picture's really weird.

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The wood has supposedly come out of a church in the north

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and I think it's one of the great and good of the church.

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-Is it for sale?

-It's for sale.

-Is it a lot of money?

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No, it's very little money.

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How much is very little?

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I think I could let him go for £45.

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Good Lord. It does sort of remind me of someone.

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I was thinking of Thomas Plant. I think it's rather fun, actually.

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This painting is almost 400 years old, but it could be a gamble

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because it's a small section salvaged from a much larger work.

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Well, shall I throw a figure at you and then you can ask me to leave?

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-OK.

-Don't look so upset. I haven't said it yet.

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What about 30?

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-40 would leave me a small profit.

-Would it?

-Yeah.

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-How would that do?

-I think I'll take a chance for 40. I like him.

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-Excellent.

-If it doesn't make a profit I can blame Thomas

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cos I'm sure it's a long-lost relative.

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Enough, Mark. Now, give the man some money.

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I'm quite pleased with that, actually. Why have I bought it?

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Well, because I think it looks quirky.

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It's interesting, it's got age to it...

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I mean, he does look like a puritan.

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The face is so full of character and life.

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Well, hailing from the late 17th century,

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it's certainly steeped in history.

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So, somewhere, Chris, I've got the 40 quid here for you.

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-Excellent.

-There we are. Thank you again.

-Thank you very much.

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-Wish me luck.

-Good luck.

-Thanks.

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I think you might need it.

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Thomas, meanwhile, is back in the car

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and tootling 27 miles east to the seaside town of Ramsgate in Kent.

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Its coastal location made it a vulnerable target during wartime

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so, perhaps unsurprisingly, it's home to the largest air-raid shelter

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in the UK - the Ramsgate Tunnels.

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I had no idea Thomas' fan base was quite so huge.

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Thomas is meeting volunteer guide Derek Smith to find out more

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about the tunnels that saved thousands of lives

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during World War II and, over 75 years later,

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are once again open to the public.

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-Hi, Derek. It's good to see you.

-Good to see you too.

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-You're going to need one of these.

-Oh!

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-My own hard hat with my name on - Tom.

-Absolutely, yes.

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-So, an air-raid shelter in a tunnel.

-Yes.

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-Here in Ramsgate, on the coast...

-Yup.

-Why?

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Well, it was built by the London, Chatham and Dover Railway

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to serve the great big terminal station that was outside

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the entrance you've just come into.

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The Victorian railway tunnel was built here in 1863

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but, as it closed in 1926, it was the perfect starting point

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for a massive underground shelter.

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In the lead-up to World War II,

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local mayor Arthur Kempe headed a campaign to construct the ambitious

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new tunnel system that would provide shelter for what was to come.

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The tunnels made up a system

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of over three miles and had

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a capacity for sheltering 60,000 people.

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The plans were given the green light in 1939

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and cost around £40,000 to construct, around £3 million in today's value.

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There were 80 men working shifts, just using the basic tools,

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and you can see from the way the walls are,

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just the way they were hewn out of it, really.

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That's a real feat, isn't it?

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It is, yeah, to do three and a quarter miles.

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In the time, March to October.

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That's right, and all the entrances as well. There are 12 entrances.

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By June 1939, the first section of the tunnels was complete.

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Three months later, on September 3, war was declared.

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-RADIO BROADCAST:

-We shall not call a halt until the oppressor is beaten.

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The tunnels were built to shelter the entire town,

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but little did Mayor Kempe realise how vital the tunnels would become.

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The German bombers dropped something like 500 bombs in five minutes

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on the town of Ramsgate,

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so it was the very, very first civilian bombing raid.

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You would expect hundreds of casualties

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but, in fact, 29 civilians and two service personnel

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were killed during that raid cos everyone else was down here.

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With 1,200 homes left in ruins, local people not only used the tunnels

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as a makeshift shelter, they began to move in.

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At the end of 1940, the census said that there were 1,000 people

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who were giving their permanent address as the Ramsgate Tunnels.

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Any interesting stories?

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I do like the little line that says

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on the permit that you use to get...

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Underneath it said, "For sleeping purposes only."

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Oh, right. Do you think there might have been a bit of...erm...?

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Well, we did hear a rumour that there were

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a couple of children born in the tunnels.

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I just wondered whether you'd like to look at one of the loos.

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Now, there's an offer you don't get every day, Thomas.

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How many of these were there?

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There were 500 individual loos amongst potentially 60,000 people,

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so it was probably best to go before you came down.

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-Who emptied them?

-Well, there were two men who used to come round

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-every morning from Margate.

-Two men? 500 lavatories?

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Yeah. I think en suite would not be quite the word you could use

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about these tunnels first thing in the morning.

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Well, it certainly wasn't the lap of luxury but, over the four years,

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the tunnels' occupied living arrangements

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became ever more elaborate.

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They would start off with something like this.

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The council donated the deck chairs, but the idea was

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that people would just come here and they would just use them

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as they were more comfortable than the benches.

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But there was no privacy, so what they did then

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was to look at this sort of thing,

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which was a bit more private.

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-Did they have post delivered here?

-Yes, they did.

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Yeah, they had post delivered and newspapers,

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and people set up businesses down here,

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a barber and all that sort of thing.

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Did any families, here living in tunnel town, want to stay?

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No, I don't think so.

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-I think everyone was quite pleased to get out.

-I'd imagine.

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-There were no wannabe hobbits?

-Oh, no, no, no.

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Not that we've ever found, anyway.

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The tunnels' legacy isn't just that they saved countless lives,

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as their impact was seen across the entire country.

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When Winston Churchill saw the devastation of the town,

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he was moved to revisit national policy,

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rebuilding homes destroyed in the war.

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From those dark days until the present,

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the town below lives on as an important chapter in British history.

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Back together again, our couple of rascals are heading

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for a well-earned rest. The adventure continues tomorrow.

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SHEEP BLEAT

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It's a beautiful morning, here in the county of Kent.

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-So, Mark, you're driving me.

-How's it going?

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So far I haven't had to hold on to the front cos I'm so scared

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and also I'm not using the pedals as my feet, you know, the break.

0:17:050:17:09

Are you worried when I drive you?

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I was a bit nervous, a bit apprehensive.

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Not so with the shopping yesterday though.

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Mark had a rare old time of it.

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He bought the Victorian Art Nouveau chamberstick,

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a Victorian baton

0:17:240:17:25

and a late-17th-century oil painting.

0:17:250:17:28

He totted up a bill of £95, leaving him with a nice wodge

0:17:290:17:33

of £105 to splash today.

0:17:330:17:36

Thomas went for a collection of hatpins,

0:17:380:17:42

an Arts and Crafts brooch and Celtic cross,

0:17:420:17:46

and a Japanese bronze bead.

0:17:460:17:48

He's still got £75 for the day ahead.

0:17:480:17:51

Thomas is beginning his day in the village of Barham, in Kent.

0:17:540:17:58

BELL RINGS

0:18:000:18:02

That's quite loud!

0:18:040:18:06

Yes, it's meant to be, Thomas, honest.

0:18:060:18:09

-Hi.

-Good morning.

-Thomas.

-How are you?

0:18:100:18:13

-On a day like this, it's perfect, Thomas.

-So this is it, is it?

0:18:130:18:16

-This is it.

-This is the showroom.

0:18:160:18:19

This fine establishment is family run and jam-packed with curios.

0:18:190:18:23

It's quite a... That's a big one, isn't it?

0:18:240:18:28

We love a big candelabra.

0:18:280:18:31

Now, what Mark doesn't know...

0:18:310:18:33

CLATTERING Oh, careful!

0:18:330:18:35

-..is that I used to be a championship fencer.

-Really?

0:18:350:18:40

En garde, Mark. Maybe I can be a cut above you.

0:18:400:18:43

Maybe you should concentrate on some shopping.

0:18:430:18:46

Quite a nice decorative propeller, this.

0:18:490:18:53

-Christian?

-Yes.

-What do you know about this?

0:18:530:18:56

I know it's a lot smaller than it used to be

0:18:560:18:58

and I think it would be something that maybe

0:18:580:19:01

you'd put a clock face in, hang it. It would be a decorative piece.

0:19:010:19:08

Upcycling wooden propellers like this one into decorative clocks

0:19:080:19:12

-is a bit of a trend, so this could be a savvy buy.

-What can you do on that?

0:19:120:19:16

-You've got 95 on it.

-Right.

-So, deal of the century, Christian.

0:19:160:19:21

-Well, make me an offer.

-Oh, I don't know. How does 30 quid grab you?

0:19:210:19:25

-Oh, £30. That's a fair old whack off.

-It is, isn't it? I know that.

0:19:250:19:30

What about £50?

0:19:300:19:32

Chocks away at 42.

0:19:320:19:34

-Chocks away.

-Chocks away?

-Well done.

-You're a good man.

0:19:360:19:39

-A smooth landing there for Thomas' fourth item.

-There's 40...

0:19:390:19:44

-Many thank yous.

-..and I've got £2.

-A little gold one.

0:19:440:19:48

A little gold one, yeah.

0:19:480:19:50

A rather decorative aeroplane propeller for £42.

0:19:500:19:54

What will he buy next?

0:19:540:19:56

-Time to fly home.

-Yeah.

0:19:560:19:58

Mark, meanwhile, has travelled on to the White Cliffs of Dover...

0:20:010:20:05

..ready to be illuminated by the history of South Foreland Lighthouse,

0:20:070:20:12

a stunning landmark on the White Cliffs.

0:20:120:20:15

The lighthouse was built in the middle of the 19th century

0:20:150:20:18

to warn mariners of shifting sands

0:20:180:20:20

and guide them through the treacherous waters.

0:20:200:20:23

A place of innovation and science,

0:20:240:20:26

and the first ever lighthouse in the world to shine an electric light.

0:20:260:20:30

-Curator Ellie Watson is Mark's guide.

-Good morning, I'm Mark.

0:20:350:20:39

-Good morning. Nice to meet you.

-What a lovely morning for coming to look at a lighthouse.

0:20:390:20:42

I know, it's incredible. Welcome to South Foreland.

0:20:420:20:45

Thank you. Now, why is there a lighthouse situated

0:20:450:20:47

-on this foreland?

-It's a very busy area of the coast.

0:20:470:20:50

The sandbank is particularly treacherous.

0:20:500:20:53

Up to 2,000 ships have actually been lost on the Goodwin Sands.

0:20:530:20:57

For most of the time, it's covered by sea and ships can run aground.

0:20:570:21:00

-Can run aground.

-Yeah, exactly.

-Of course.

0:21:000:21:03

And what makes this lighthouse so special?

0:21:030:21:05

There's been a light on this site, probably since the 14th century...

0:21:050:21:08

-Gosh, really?

-Yes. ..with the first light that you would recognise

0:21:080:21:11

as a lighthouse being built in about 1635.

0:21:110:21:14

That seems a good point to go in and learn more.

0:21:140:21:16

The first lighthouses would have had constantly-burning fires

0:21:160:21:20

to shine onto the seas below.

0:21:200:21:22

Basically, the first lighthouses were brick chimneys

0:21:220:21:24

with a fire on top, and it would have been someone's unlucky task

0:21:240:21:27

-to keep the fire going all night.

-In all weathers, as well?

0:21:270:21:31

-Yes, all weathers, yeah.

-There's no covering to it?

0:21:310:21:33

No. No cover, so it wouldn't have been the nicest job

0:21:330:21:36

when there was a storm.

0:21:360:21:37

The use of fires was both dangerous and unreliable,

0:21:380:21:42

so scientists set about trying to find another way.

0:21:420:21:46

Michael Faraday was one of the most influential scientists in the world.

0:21:470:21:52

In 1836, he was appointed scientific adviser for Trinity House,

0:21:520:21:56

an official lighthouse authority.

0:21:560:21:58

It must have been such an exciting time then,

0:22:000:22:03

learning all about radio waves and electricity.

0:22:030:22:08

Michael Faraday is a really interesting character.

0:22:080:22:10

He didn't actually have the most auspicious start in life.

0:22:100:22:13

-He wasn't from a very wealthy family.

-It must have been difficult.

0:22:130:22:17

It was a long process to get the experiment to take place at all

0:22:170:22:20

and they originally set out two months and £400.

0:22:200:22:24

-Gosh, £400. A lot of money in 1853.

-Yes, exactly.

0:22:240:22:28

21 years before the world was to see Edison's light bulb,

0:22:280:22:32

Faraday was already experimenting on a monumental scale.

0:22:320:22:36

His ground-breaking work with generators made him

0:22:360:22:39

the perfect person to bring electric light into practical use

0:22:390:22:43

for the first time ever.

0:22:430:22:45

The beam emitted by South Foreland was a historic achievement.

0:22:450:22:50

It must have been quite an event locally.

0:22:500:22:52

I mean, the local villagers and people from miles around.

0:22:520:22:55

It must have been awe-inspiring. Lighthouse keepers on this side

0:22:550:22:58

of the coast, and across the Channel in France,

0:22:580:23:00

were keeping logs on the light -

0:23:000:23:01

what it was doing, how well they could see it -

0:23:010:23:04

so it was a real collective effort.

0:23:040:23:06

It wasn't just Michael Faraday here, at the lighthouse, on his own.

0:23:060:23:10

Wonderful.

0:23:100:23:12

Ground-breaking though his work was,

0:23:120:23:14

it was still 68 years before technology caught up

0:23:140:23:18

because it wasn't until 1926 that the majority of homes in the UK

0:23:180:23:23

saw the benefit of mains electric light.

0:23:230:23:25

But even with the convenience of electricity,

0:23:250:23:28

a lighthouse keeper's job still required some elbow grease.

0:23:280:23:32

What is this fierce-looking crank thing here?

0:23:320:23:35

This is the mechanism that turns the optic,

0:23:350:23:37

so it's not actually the light that flashes.

0:23:370:23:39

The optic rotates around with the panes of glass causing the flash.

0:23:390:23:42

-So am I able to have a go at this?

-Yes, you can do.

0:23:420:23:45

-So, which way do I turn it?

-You need to turn it clockwise.

0:23:450:23:48

Put your back into it, Mark.

0:23:500:23:52

-They'd have to be quite fit, these lighthouse keepers.

-Yes, exactly.

0:23:520:23:55

And no lighthouse has the same flash pattern for 100 miles.

0:23:550:23:58

-It's going. It is, look.

-Yeah. It's really going now.

0:23:580:24:02

-That's wonderful, isn't it?

-It's brilliant. It's amazing.

0:24:020:24:05

Ellie, thank you so much. It's been a wonderful visit.

0:24:050:24:08

-I've learned so much.

-Thank you, Mark.

0:24:080:24:10

South Foreland Lighthouse - a great example of pioneering ingenuity

0:24:100:24:15

and the views are breathtaking. Not a bad life, is it, Mark?

0:24:150:24:19

Back together again,

0:24:260:24:27

Mark and Thomas are snaking their way

0:24:270:24:29

to sunny Sandgate, near Folkestone.

0:24:290:24:31

-So, we're going to share a shop today.

-We are.

0:24:310:24:33

I'm looking forward to that, Tom.

0:24:330:24:35

-Are you?

-Yeah, I am, actually.

0:24:350:24:38

Well, I haven't got any money, really, to be spending.

0:24:380:24:40

Indeed. £33, to be exact, compared to Mark's 105 big ones.

0:24:400:24:46

I will hopefully see things that you will be buying

0:24:460:24:49

at huge amounts of money and I'll just swoop in,

0:24:490:24:52

and they'll feel so good about taking money off you

0:24:520:24:56

that I'll get a real bargain on something.

0:24:560:25:00

Mm. This could be interesting.

0:25:000:25:03

Oh, well done.

0:25:030:25:05

-We've got here.

-We've got here.

0:25:050:25:07

First one in the shop gets first dibs.

0:25:070:25:11

-I'm like a gazelle!

-Oh, you are wicked, Thomas.

0:25:110:25:13

Come on, Mark. Come on!

0:25:130:25:16

It's like dealing with an old man.

0:25:160:25:18

Yeah, he is taking his time.

0:25:180:25:20

Well, Gabrielle, if I find anything, can I shout for you?

0:25:240:25:27

-I think you can.

-Lovely. See you in a moment.

-OK.

0:25:270:25:30

I don't mind being in a shop with Thomas cos I sent him downstairs,

0:25:300:25:34

as I think he's very much a downstairs sort of person,

0:25:340:25:36

-and I'm more the upstairs.

-If you say so, Mark.

0:25:360:25:40

He tells me he's bought four items

0:25:400:25:43

and spent nearly the entire budget, and he wants to spend everything.

0:25:430:25:47

I've got £105 to spend and, if I can't find anything,

0:25:470:25:50

I won't spend anything.

0:25:500:25:52

But quickly Mark spots a little something.

0:25:520:25:55

This is quite wacky, isn't it? Really jazzy and colourful.

0:25:550:25:59

Poole Pottery and they've marked it there

0:25:590:26:01

with their dolphin mark in England. This is very 1970s, '80s.

0:26:010:26:06

The only thing is, it doesn't have a ticket price.

0:26:060:26:10

Gabrielle, could I have a word with you?

0:26:100:26:12

I've got a limited budget as usual.

0:26:120:26:14

-Right.

-I did find this, this Poole Pottery vase,

0:26:140:26:17

which does look a bit out of place amongst all these lovely pieces.

0:26:170:26:21

Yeah, you'd be doing Gabrielle a favour, wouldn't you?

0:26:210:26:24

Well, I can do it at £30.

0:26:240:26:28

Gabrielle, you're breaking my heart. You're breaking my heart.

0:26:280:26:31

-I think that's what it would make.

-You love it.

-I do like it,

0:26:310:26:34

but I've got to be sensible cos actually it WAS very popular,

0:26:340:26:37

it isn't so popular these days.

0:26:370:26:39

-Who said that?

-I'm saying it and I always tell the truth.

0:26:390:26:43

I can see your nose growing, Mark.

0:26:450:26:47

Well, let's make it 25.

0:26:470:26:49

-You're a lovely, lovely person.

-No, don't be creepy.

-Oh, I will.

0:26:490:26:54

I've got to try. I think 20.

0:26:540:26:58

-Oh, get away. All right.

-Are you sure?

0:26:580:27:00

-Yeah, but only because you're a friend.

-Oh.

0:27:000:27:04

That Poole Pottery vase for £20 makes a total of four items for Mark.

0:27:040:27:08

How's Thomas getting on downstairs?

0:27:090:27:12

-CREAKS

-Hello, nice to meet you.

0:27:120:27:14

Would you be a better travelling companion than Mark?

0:27:150:27:18

Yeah, I think you would. You just wouldn't answer back, would you?

0:27:190:27:22

You wouldn't shout at me, you wouldn't have a go at me

0:27:220:27:24

about my driving and you wouldn't moan, so thank you.

0:27:240:27:28

The mind boggles.

0:27:280:27:29

What's he got his eye on now?

0:27:320:27:34

A riding crop.

0:27:340:27:35

That's quite a fun thing, really. I could give Mark a good...

0:27:350:27:39

Ouch! Ow!

0:27:390:27:42

Steady on.

0:27:420:27:44

-Hi, Warren.

-Hello, there.

-What do you know about this?

0:27:440:27:46

This has no price tag on. Does it belong to you? Is it free?

0:27:460:27:50

All these questions.

0:27:500:27:51

Well, this is actually used for turning our lights on and off

0:27:510:27:54

-when we can't reach them.

-Oh, really?

0:27:540:27:56

HE LAUGHS Unusual but practical.

0:27:560:27:58

-Is it for sale?

-I'm sure it is.

0:27:580:28:01

-Is it expensive?

-I don't think so.

-No?

0:28:010:28:03

-No, I don't think it is at all.

-What could it be?

0:28:030:28:06

I haven't got very much money. I'm very, very poor.

0:28:060:28:09

How much do you want to spend...

0:28:090:28:11

for our baton for switching the lights on?

0:28:110:28:14

That's wonderful.

0:28:140:28:15

You can't even make that up. That's a fabulous story.

0:28:150:28:18

I can see the switch now.

0:28:180:28:20

And that's probably where these little dings have happened.

0:28:200:28:23

-Probably.

-Oh, dear.

0:28:230:28:26

Could I be cheeky and offer you a tenner for it?

0:28:260:28:29

-20 is probably more...

-20. Is it really?

0:28:290:28:32

-You're going to say, "OK, well, 15."

-Yeah, OK, 15.

-So 15 is fine.

-Yeah?

0:28:320:28:36

-OK.

-Deal, sir. So £5 would be absolutely delightful.

0:28:360:28:40

-I shall get you your change.

-Thank you.

0:28:400:28:42

That's wonderful. Fifth item done. Over the moon.

0:28:420:28:46

Thomas has got himself a 19th-century riding crop-cum-light switcher

0:28:480:28:52

for only £15, so the pressure's off.

0:28:520:28:56

Thomas? What are you doing?

0:28:580:29:01

Well, I'm imagining directing an international film

0:29:010:29:05

cos I am the international film director.

0:29:050:29:07

I can tell you what, you're not. You're looking very relaxed.

0:29:070:29:10

-What's happened?

-Well, I'm done.

-You're done?

-Yeah.

0:29:100:29:12

-What do you mean, you're done?

-Well, I've bought all my items.

0:29:120:29:15

-Five items.

-And how much have you spent?

0:29:150:29:17

-I've got the grand total of £18 left.

-So you've spent £182?

0:29:170:29:21

-Oh, yeah.

-Thomas!

0:29:210:29:23

-That's not bad.

-That's not bad, so I've got the rest of the day for me.

0:29:230:29:27

Not so for Mark though.

0:29:270:29:28

This is rather interesting.

0:29:310:29:33

It says, "Napoleonic War period cannonball.

0:29:330:29:37

"18-pounder.

0:29:370:29:39

"Used in Blomefield Pattern cannons circa 1800."

0:29:390:29:44

But it is priced up at £130.

0:29:440:29:46

-Warren, is this yours?

-Yes, it is, yes.

0:29:490:29:51

I have to say, I've never dreamt of buying a cannonball before.

0:29:520:29:57

-You're sure it's Napoleonic?

-Pretty much.

0:29:570:30:00

-The research that I have done on it, yeah.

-I think it's quirky.

0:30:000:30:04

I think, if it was going into a sale on the internet,

0:30:040:30:09

then it would be actually quite a good buy because people would

0:30:090:30:13

find it on the internet, but in a general sale it could just be lost.

0:30:130:30:17

You're right, Mark. As the auction isn't online,

0:30:170:30:20

this specialist item could be a risky buy.

0:30:200:30:23

What sort of price could it be?

0:30:230:30:25

It could be...

0:30:270:30:28

It's 130. I could...

0:30:290:30:31

95, only because it's you.

0:30:320:30:35

Yes, I know. I know that.

0:30:350:30:37

-I know that and it's very generous.

-Well, if it helps, 90.

0:30:370:30:41

We couldn't get it to 80?

0:30:440:30:46

I think, if you said 80, I'd be mad enough to have a go at it, actually,

0:30:480:30:53

just because I think it's interesting and it's historical.

0:30:530:30:56

-Sure. OK.

-So £80 then?

-OK.

0:30:560:30:59

Oh, gosh. I can't believe this, Warren.

0:30:590:31:02

I don't know how you've managed to do this, but you've managed

0:31:020:31:06

to persuade me to part with all my money except a fiver.

0:31:060:31:10

-Well, thank... Good.

-So I've now spent more than Mr Plant.

0:31:100:31:15

-Thank you very much.

-Oh, gosh. Well, I hope I haven't shot myself.

0:31:150:31:19

No, but you have blasted a hole in your budget.

0:31:210:31:24

The cannonball is Mark's fifth and final item, bought for £80.

0:31:270:31:31

He also has the Victorian chamberstick, the Victorian baton,

0:31:340:31:38

the 19th-century oil painting

0:31:380:31:41

and the 1970s Poole Pottery vase.

0:31:410:31:44

In total, he spent £195. Bravo.

0:31:440:31:49

Thomas went for it, buying a huge bag of treasures -

0:31:510:31:54

the collection of hatpins, the Arts and Crafts brooch

0:31:540:31:58

and Celtic cross, the 19th-century Japanese bronze bead,

0:31:580:32:02

the aeroplane propeller

0:32:020:32:05

and the riding crop.

0:32:050:32:06

Thomas managed to buy the lot for £182.

0:32:080:32:11

So, what do the boys make of each other's purchases?

0:32:180:32:22

He's bought the cannonball for £80 and I bought my hatpins for 90,

0:32:220:32:26

so it's all about those two big buys.

0:32:260:32:29

I like the hatpins. They're not really my sort of thing.

0:32:290:32:32

I think some of them are very decorative -

0:32:320:32:33

I like enamelled ones. But he's got a good name in there,

0:32:330:32:37

Charles Horner, one of the best names. 90 quid.

0:32:370:32:41

That's a gamble, Thomas, and I do like you when you take a gamble.

0:32:410:32:44

It's neck and neck. I really can't call this one.

0:32:440:32:48

It all depends on how the ball does and how the pins do.

0:32:480:32:52

I think Thomas does have a bit of a whisker though.

0:32:520:32:55

He does have a bit of an edge on me. I'm a little bit worried.

0:32:550:32:58

Thomas and Mark are heading to their first auction of the trip

0:33:010:33:04

in the fortified hilltop town of Rye in East Sussex.

0:33:040:33:08

-Well, Mark, auction day.

-Oh, don't, Thomas.

-Auction day! Rye!

0:33:120:33:17

-A-day is here.

-A-day is here.

0:33:170:33:20

A-day in Rye.

0:33:200:33:22

It's been good fun, Tom, and, whatever happens...

0:33:220:33:27

we'll carry on smiling.

0:33:270:33:28

Here we are, Thomas.

0:33:320:33:34

-Thank you, Mark. Yes, we are.

-Can I just say something?

-What?

0:33:340:33:38

-Well-driven.

-Oh, it was, wasn't it? I was well-driven.

0:33:380:33:41

-Well-driven, Tom.

-Right, who can get out first?

0:33:410:33:45

-I can't wait, can you, Mark?

-I think I probably can, actually.

0:33:450:33:48

Enthusiastic as usual, Mark(!)

0:33:480:33:51

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to Rye Auction Galleries.

0:33:510:33:55

Our auctioneer today is Kevin Wall.

0:33:550:33:58

What does he think of Mark and Thomas' offerings?

0:33:580:34:01

The thing I do like in the auction room today most of all

0:34:010:34:04

would be the early 1900s wooden propeller.

0:34:040:34:08

Shame that the tips have been clipped.

0:34:080:34:11

They do fetch very, very good money when they're complete.

0:34:110:34:14

The oil on canvas portrait,

0:34:140:34:15

we've had our expert look at it, she's gone through it.

0:34:150:34:18

She's not very keen on it, shall we say.

0:34:180:34:21

We think that could be the major flop of the day.

0:34:210:34:23

Oh, crikey. Don't let Mark hear you. Now, quickly, take your seats.

0:34:230:34:28

-The auction is about to begin.

-OK.

0:34:280:34:31

First up is Thomas' 19th-century riding crop.

0:34:320:34:36

-Lot number 120.

-This is it.

0:34:360:34:38

I've got 12, 15. I've got 15. Who's got 18 now?

0:34:380:34:42

-You've covered your money.

-I've covered my money.

0:34:420:34:44

18 is with you, sir. I am out. 18, 20. At £20.

0:34:440:34:47

-No, only £20.

-Do I see 2?

0:34:470:34:49

-At £20 and selling then.

-It's a work-in...

-You've done it.

0:34:490:34:54

-You've got out a profit there, Tom.

-VERY small.

-A work-in profit.

0:34:540:34:58

Nice start, Thomas. A good profit from the get-go.

0:34:580:35:03

Next up, it's Mark's unusual little chamberstick.

0:35:030:35:06

Very quirky little item here. I've got conflicting bids

0:35:060:35:10

and I've got to start them both at 22. 22 I'm bid.

0:35:100:35:15

At 25. 25. 28, sir?

0:35:150:35:18

-28. 30?

-30.

-35, 38...

0:35:180:35:22

-Get in there!

-..38, 40? At 38 with the new bidder.

0:35:220:35:26

-At 38. Do I see 40 now? At £38 on my right.

-Well done, Mark.

0:35:260:35:30

-That's all right, isn't it?

-Well done.

-45?

0:35:300:35:33

-At 42 on my right still.

-Is it still going? 42.

-It's not bad, is it?

0:35:330:35:38

-42.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:35:380:35:40

-Yes! Well done, you.

-That's all right, isn't it? £32 profit.

0:35:400:35:43

-Oh, I'm so pleased!

-Cracking start, Mark.

0:35:430:35:46

More than doubled your money there.

0:35:460:35:48

I'm just hoping that might help save me on some of the other ones.

0:35:480:35:51

So pleased. It's such a nice thing. I'm so pleased.

0:35:510:35:54

It is such a nice thing. I'm so glad I found it.

0:35:540:35:56

Can Mark's 1970s Poole Pottery vase put more winnings in the kitty?

0:35:580:36:02

-£10 for it?

-MARK GASPS

0:36:020:36:04

-You can't go £10, Tom!

-£10 I'm bid. £10. Who's got 12 now?

0:36:040:36:08

At £10 it's away.

0:36:080:36:09

-At £10. Do I see 12?

-Ooh, 12.

-12, new bidder.

0:36:090:36:12

15? At £12 on my left with the young lady here.

0:36:120:36:15

-At £12. Do I see 15?

-Oh, no, Tom!

-That's terrible.

0:36:150:36:20

-At £12. Are you sure and finished?

-Oh, come on.

-At 12...

0:36:200:36:23

-GAVEL BANGS

-I feel like weeping for you.

0:36:230:36:26

-Go on, then, weep.

-HE SNIFFS

0:36:260:36:29

Hang on. It's not that bad, fellas, and it's still early days.

0:36:290:36:33

Next, Thomas' Japanese bronze bead.

0:36:350:36:38

-Fortunately, you can't see it very well.

-No, you can't, can you?

0:36:380:36:41

Lot 169. It's 10 then. Let's get going. 10 I've got.

0:36:410:36:43

-12, 15, 18, 20, 22, 25?

-That's more like it.

0:36:430:36:48

22 is at the back. At 22 with you, sir. At 22. Do I see 25?

0:36:480:36:52

-At 22. Don't miss it.

-Any more?

-At £22 then, are we all done?

0:36:520:36:56

-That's it?

-Are you sure? At 22.

0:36:560:37:00

-GAVEL BANGS

-I am shocked at that, Thomas.

0:37:000:37:02

-Why are you shocked?

-Because it's worth 30, 40, £50.

0:37:020:37:06

It is, it is, but we are in a general sale in Rye, not online.

0:37:060:37:11

-And it's a profit.

-It's a profit.

-It's a profit.

0:37:110:37:13

That's the spirit, boys. And a small profit for Thomas.

0:37:130:37:17

Next up, it's Mark's Victorian conductor's baton.

0:37:200:37:24

I'm hoping, Tom, this might do all right. I'm hoping.

0:37:240:37:27

-20 we have. 20 here. 2 is it now?

-Oh, my word.

0:37:270:37:31

-At 22. At 28. It's very, very cheap, this.

-That is cheap.

-It is.

0:37:310:37:35

Are you all done? Are you sure? And finished at 28.

0:37:350:37:40

-GAVEL BANGS

-Mark.

0:37:400:37:43

I can't help but be a little disappointed at that, Tom.

0:37:430:37:46

Commiserations, Mark. Not the best performance,

0:37:460:37:50

but it's not over yet.

0:37:500:37:51

Everything to play for with Thomas' Arts and Crafts brooch

0:37:530:37:56

and the little Celtic cross.

0:37:560:37:58

-Should be somewhere round about £50.

-Oh, my gosh.

-No?

-No.

0:37:580:38:02

I daren't look.

0:38:020:38:03

Somebody start me at 20 then. Let's get going.

0:38:030:38:06

-Oh, you've got 20.

-22, 25, 28?

0:38:060:38:07

25 is with me. At 25. Do I see 28 now?

0:38:090:38:13

At 25, at 25. It's Ruskin. At 25. Do I see 28?

0:38:130:38:19

-28, new bidder.

-28. Good.

-At £28. I've got to sell it then.

0:38:190:38:24

-It's a small profit. Very small.

-At £28...

0:38:240:38:27

-GAVEL BANGS

-640.

0:38:270:38:29

-You're making profits on everything.

-Creeping.

-You're a creeper.

0:38:290:38:33

No need to be personal. Ha!

0:38:330:38:35

It's Mark's late-17th-century oil painting up next.

0:38:350:38:39

-30 to 40 is the estimate.

-What did you pay?

-40, I paid.

0:38:390:38:42

Somebody start me at £30. Let's get it going.

0:38:420:38:46

30 for it.

0:38:460:38:47

-Killed it.

-Damn.

0:38:490:38:50

Silence. Deathly silence.

0:38:500:38:52

Somebody start me at £10 then. £10 I'm bid. At £10 on my right.

0:38:520:38:57

-At £10. This does seem very cheap.

-That is cheap.

-Cos it is.

0:38:570:39:01

At £10. Are you sure? At £10.

0:39:010:39:05

15, 18, 20, 22, 25.

0:39:050:39:10

At £25 and selling, then.

0:39:100:39:12

-GAVEL BANGS

-I've only made one profit.

0:39:120:39:15

-But it's a healthy one.

-Yeah, £32, but I lost...

0:39:150:39:18

-Oh, yes, you've lost, yeah.

-I've just lost...

0:39:180:39:21

How much did they sell it for? ..£15 on that.

0:39:210:39:23

Mm. The losses are stacking up for Mark.

0:39:230:39:25

Maybe his last item, the cannonball, will launch him back into the game.

0:39:270:39:31

-Lot 232.

-There it is, a lump of old metal.

0:39:310:39:33

It's the circa 1800 20lb cannonball there.

0:39:330:39:36

Somebody start me at £50 for it. Let's get going. £50 to start.

0:39:360:39:40

-Oh, no.

-£50?

0:39:400:39:43

It'd make a good doorstop. Oh, dear. We are coming down.

0:39:450:39:49

I'll take your £10, sir. It's a bid. I will take it.

0:39:520:39:55

Now we've got them going. 12, 15?

0:39:550:39:58

12 is there. 15 I have here. 18, sir?

0:39:580:40:01

-18. The bid is with you, sir, at 18.

-He's working. He's working.

0:40:010:40:04

Do I see 20 now? At 18. £18. At £18 only.

0:40:040:40:09

At £18 are we all done?

0:40:090:40:10

-I knew it.

-Absolutely terrible.

-Why did I buy that?

0:40:100:40:14

-GAVEL BANGS

-18 buys it.

0:40:140:40:16

Do you know, as soon as I bought it, I thought, "Why did I do that?"

0:40:160:40:19

-Oh, no.

-Ouch. That's a heavy loss for Mark.

0:40:190:40:22

It's all resting on Thomas now. The pricey hatpins are next.

0:40:240:40:29

I've got 30 to start. 30 with me. 35, is it?

0:40:290:40:33

35 is here. 35. Do I see 38 now?

0:40:330:40:35

-At 35...

-A lot paid. A lot paid.

-At £35.

0:40:350:40:39

Where's all the hatpin buyers this week?

0:40:390:40:41

At £35 on my right. Are we all done and finished?

0:40:410:40:45

-At 35.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:40:450:40:48

-Gone.

-£65 loss.

-That was a bargain.

0:40:480:40:51

-That was a big loss.

-That was a bargain for somebody.

0:40:510:40:55

Great price for the buyer but a big risk that didn't pay off, Thomas.

0:40:550:40:59

Can he recoup on his loss with the aeroplane propeller?

0:41:020:41:06

I can start the little ones.

0:41:060:41:07

We'll get the little ones out the way first at 25, 30, 35, 40,

0:41:070:41:12

75, 80, 5 and 90. 5, 100, 110...

0:41:120:41:16

-Yes!

-..is with you, sir.

0:41:160:41:19

110. I am out with both of you, but you are leading with 110.

0:41:190:41:24

-110. Do I see 120? At 110 on my right.

-Go on!

0:41:240:41:29

A bit more. We need to make some money back.

0:41:290:41:31

At 110. This is still very cheap. At £110, have we all finished? At £110.

0:41:310:41:38

-Wow.

-All sure and finished?

0:41:380:41:42

-110 is 16...

-I'm pleased about that.

-I'm so utterly pleased for you, Tom.

0:41:420:41:46

That's very kind.

0:41:460:41:48

I can't tell you how thrilled I am by that whole experience.

0:41:480:41:51

Very sporting, Mark.

0:41:510:41:53

I'm going to keep buying cannonballs until one of them makes a profit.

0:41:530:41:57

Quite right. A thrilling result for Thomas,

0:41:590:42:01

but who will be the winner of leg one? Let's work out the sums.

0:42:010:42:05

Both chaps started this Road Trip adventure with £200 each.

0:42:050:42:09

After paying auction costs, Mark made a loss of £92.50,

0:42:090:42:15

leaving him with £107.50 for the next leg.

0:42:150:42:19

Thomas made a small loss of £5.70, which crowns him today's winner.

0:42:210:42:26

He has a lovely £194.30 to carry forward.

0:42:260:42:32

-Thomas, congratulations.

-Oh.

-No, to the victor, the spoils.

0:42:320:42:36

-I shall drive.

-I'm being driven!

-I shall be your chauffeur, Thomas.

0:42:360:42:40

-A man of your standing needs it.

-Well, yeah. My limited means.

0:42:400:42:44

They're not less limited than mine, Thomas.

0:42:440:42:47

-ENGINE REVS

-I lost £92.50.

-Oh...

0:42:470:42:51

-It's a big'un.

-That is a big'un.

0:42:510:42:53

Until next time then, chaps. Cheerio.

0:42:530:42:56

Next time on Antiques Road Trip, Mark is a stickler for detail...

0:43:010:43:05

Ooh, tea time. No cake, I noticed.

0:43:050:43:08

..and Thomas wows us with his expertise.

0:43:080:43:11

What do you think that looks like?

0:43:110:43:13

A bottom.

0:43:130:43:15

Auctioneers Thomas Plant and Mark Stacey begin their week's adventure in Kent. Along the way, Thomas visits the life-saving underground world of Ramsgate, and Mark finds out about the science behind a lighthouse in Dover. They then hit the road and head to their first auction in Rye, East Sussex.