Episode 23 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 23

Antiques challenge. Thomas Plant and Mark Stacey are halfway through their road trip. They shop in Essex and Suffolk before making their way towards an auction in Cambridge.


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Transcript


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

-I don't know what to do.

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SHE SOUNDS HORN

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With £200 each, a classic car and a

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goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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What an old diamond.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Back in the game. Charlie!

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There will be worthy winners... and valiant losers.

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Oh!

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-Oh!

-This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's another day out on the road trip for our old pals Mark Stacey

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-and Thomas Plant.

-If we were in a

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-film...

-Yes.

-..what would our theme tune be?

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Oh, gosh, that's a tricky one, isn't it?

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I'd think we'd be like Thelma and Louise.

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THOMAS LAUGHS

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Well, hold on to your headscarves then, boys,

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because this competition is hotting up.

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I've woken up this morning with a steely determination

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to find, sniff out those profits and bargains

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and wipe that smug little smile off your chops.

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I am never smug.

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Antiques dealer Mark is always putting a smile on people's faces.

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This has always been my problem, I'm too generous.

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Whilst auctioneer Thomas is always on the lookout for new tactics.

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-HE BLOWS THE WHISTLE

-Yes, that works. Maybe I will be able to call Mark.

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HE BLOWS THE WHISTLE

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HE CHUCKLES

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And they're travelling the country in style in this delightful

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1978 MGB GT.

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-I had one of those.

-I have to say, Mark, you are driving it very well.

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I have been driving a lot longer than you.

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Well, I know you have because you are a lot older than me.

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-Do you remember starting it by hand? Cranking it.

-I never had a hand-crank.

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Both Mark and Thomas started the road trip with £200.

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After a disastrous start, Mark managed to claw back some cash

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at yesterday's auction and has £171 for the third leg.

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Thomas remains in the lead with a hefty £309.96 to play with.

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The boys' trip will cover over 500 miles from Sittingbourne, Kent,

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winding along the south-east of England through Norwich

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and finally to Oakham, and the East Midlands.

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Today's leg begins in the town Halstead, in Essex,

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and the auction will take place in Willingham, in Cambridgeshire.

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The name Halstead comes from the Old English word "hald",

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which means safe place or refuge.

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-Mark's first shop of the trip is Halstead Antiques Centre.

-Hello.

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-Hello.

-I'm Mark.

-I'm James.

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Mark has trailed behind Thomas in the past two auctions

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and has a lot of catching up to do.

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-Are they negotiable, the dealers?

-Yes.

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-Can you do me a good deal?

-Probably not, but I can do you a deal.

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I don't like the sound of that. I need all the help I can get.

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I'll be back. That's a warning.

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It's a bit early in the day to be making threats.

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Let me just remind you of the dire situation I'm in.

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I am £100-and-odd behind Thomas Plant.

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I've got to find things that are going to give me substantial profits.

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Doesn't have to be old, might have to be decorative, but they've

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got to give me substantial profits to help me catch up.

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Well, get on with it, then.

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This is quite charming.

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This is a little pig. Pigs are very popular.

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Lots and lots of people collect piggy items.

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And I do sometimes often nastily refer to Thomas as a little porker.

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So... Doesn't that look like Thomas, do you think?

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Definitely.

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We'll have a little think about him, I think.

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Come on, little piggy, get to market.

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Now then, what's this he's found?

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Oh, that's quite interesting, isn't it?

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It is quite fun. We've got two columns here.

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This has got a Corinthian mound to it, and it has got this

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sort of globe at the top, which represents the earth.

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And then you've got another one here,

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but this is representing the heavens.

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These globe columns are a central part of the iconography

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of the Freemasons and were used to decorate their lodges.

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Masonic items often do very well at auction.

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So this could be a good find.

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They are priced at £14 each.

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Yes, £14.

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-James...

-Have you found something, then?

-I have.

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I found those rather... I think they are very decorative, actually.

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I think they are rather nice, actually.

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I need to get things as inexpensively as possible.

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Because I'm behind Mr Plant,

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which I don't like.

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-I don't like Thomas Plant being on top.

-You have my sympathy.

-Exactly.

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How about ten each?

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You see, I thought you might say that. What about 15 for the pair?

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As I think they might make about 40 or £50 in the saleroom.

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-And that would help you, wouldn't it?

-Oh, it would help me hugely.

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-OK, 15.

-Ah! James, thank you.

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So Mark's on top of the world with this pair of globe columns for £15.

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But he's not finished yet.

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Now, that's a very decorative piece.

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You can tell exactly what period it comes from.

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It could only be one period, and that is the Art Deco movement.

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I mean, this is priced up at...

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£35. You get a lot for your money, don't you?

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You get a lot of colour and pattern and original design for 35 quid.

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I mean, I have just noticed...which might explain the price.

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There is a crack running into that body there,

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and I think that will make a big difference.

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Oh, do you know, I'm so disappointed I've found that crack because I love

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this piece, but it does have a big, a big bearing on the price.

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Yeah, better ask James.

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James, I really fell in love with this.

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But I've found a nasty crack in it, I'm afraid.

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-Could you have a word with the dealer because...

-Yeah.

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..unfortunately, it has put me off it, but I do love the shape.

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Do you want to just try 20 as a throwaway?

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And then I can see whether it fits into my plan or not?

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Hi, Sally, it's James at Halstead Antiques Centre.

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Got a customer who has seen your phoenix ware pot.

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And they were wondering if you could actually go down to 20.

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(Please, please.)

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-Even if I told you the customer was Mark Stacey?

-Name-dropping, are we?

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She likes you very much, she's a great fan

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and therefore she will do the 20.

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James, wonderful. I'm thrilled with that.

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And of course, I'm a huge, huge fan of Sally's,

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-whoever she is.

-HE CHUCKLES

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She's the woman that just sold you the vase for £20.

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Along with the globe columns, it's not a bad start.

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This leg is beginning much better than the other two legs.

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Thomas, I hope it is going well for you.

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Let's see, shall we?

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Thomas is 13 miles away in the village of Cavendish, in Suffolk.

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And his first shop is Cavendish Antiques.

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-Hello.

-Hi, there.

-I'm Thomas.

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-Nice to see you. I'm Jackie.

-Jackie, this is like a tearoom.

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It is indeed, yes. All sorts, cakes, soups, light lunches.

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-Wonderful.

-Whatever you like.

-He likes antiques, Jackie.

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-What goes on upstairs?

-More antiques upstairs.

-No tea up there?

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-No tea up there.

-What does better, teas or antiques?

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-Hopefully antiques.

-You bring them in with a cup of tea.

-Sometimes teas.

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-Yeah. Well, I'm going to have a look upstairs and down here.

-Right.

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Give us a shout if you need any help up there and I'll come up.

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That's really kind of you, Jackie, thank you very much.

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Move away from the cakes, Thomas.

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There's a lot of pressure.

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There's a tremendous amount of pressure on me to continue...

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buying well.

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And...

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..making sure that I still beat Mark.

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Ooo! There's that competitive streak.

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What's this?

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That's caught my eye. You've got a little silver pillbox.

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Little enamel decoration there of a leaping stag with his antlers.

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So the way this is done, it's almost...

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We call at guilloche enamel, it's engine turned.

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That means that the underside has been engraved.

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Guilloche is a decorative engraving term where a precise

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and repetitive pattern is mechanically applied.

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This early 1900s piece has a price tag of £95.

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Enamel is almost like a glass substance,

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so when it cracks, it shatters, and it is so difficult to repair.

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That's why I'm so intent on looking at the...

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..quality of the enamel,

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making sure that it is in good condition. But it is dead sweet.

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-Good looking object, that.

-I think he likes it.

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Time to speak to co-owner Graham.

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What's your best offer on that?

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Got 95 on it, will do you 75.

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The thing is, at £75, there's no profit in it.

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-There's a small profit in it for us.

-Small profit in it for you.

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-So that's one winner.

-Steady on, Graham, he's up against Mark Stacey, not you.

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-I've got a figure in mind less than that.

-That doesn't surprise me.

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I think, at auction, that's £50 worth.

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-Yeah, I can't do it for 50.

-What can you do it for?

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I don't mind meeting you halfway and go down 65.

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What about 60, then?

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-Not at 60.

-Are you sure?

-Well, depending on what else you're buying.

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Oh, you drive a hard bargain, Graham.

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But don't worry, Thomas, Jackie has got a few potential items for you.

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-That is pretty.

-The jewellery is nice.

-The jewellery is nice.

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A little pretty brooch here. Art Nouveau in style.

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There's £18 on the ticket.

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-What can that be?

-What about 12?

-£12.

-Yes.

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-I think that's fair enough.

-Yes.

-Yeah.

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And where can we be with the box now?

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-As you've done that, I'll go down to 60 for you.

-Will you?

-I will.

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-That's very generous. So, 72?

-Yeah.

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After that generous discount, give yourself a pat on the back,

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Thomas, you have two lovely lots for auction.

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Meanwhile, Mark has travelled to Castle Hedingham,

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in Essex, for a visit to... Ha!

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..Hedingham Castle.

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This castle has been home to the same family for over 800 years,

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the de Veres.

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A family that once had a great reputation for its military

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prowess, and one that has left a unique mark on England's history.

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But there's one de Vere who stands out from the crowd,

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a military hero whose boldness helped put a king on the throne,

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but ultimately almost destroyed him and his family's wealth.

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Mark is meeting a de Vere descendant, Jason Lindsay, to find out more.

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-Hello, I'm Mark.

-Mark, very good to meet you. Jason Lindsay.

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-This is amazing. This must be Norman.

-It is indeed.

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This is the best preserved Norman castle in England, and has been

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in the de Vere family since 1140.

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Wow...

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It really is well preserved, isn't it?

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It can tell us a lot of stories,

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there must be some notable earls in your family.

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Well, they are rather an incredible bunch.

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I mean, 550 years they lasted, 20 generations.

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Hedingham was once home to John de Vere, the 13th Earl of Oxford,

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who lived during the 15th century

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when England was embroiled in a bloody civil war.

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The Wars of the Roses tore the country apart, as two rival

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dynasties, the Lancastrians and the Yorks, fought for the English crown.

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This was also a tragic time for John de Vere,

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whose family suffered at the hands of the Yorkist King Edward VII.

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Basically, he had been locked up for many years. Tragically, his father

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and his older brother had been taken of to the Tower of London and been beheaded.

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-Oh!

-And his son was beheaded earlier, four days before so that

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the father could have his pain, and they were accused of treason.

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So off came their heads.

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With his family in turmoil, John staged a dramatic escape

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and took up the fight for the Lancastrians. At this point,

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the country had been warring for three decades.

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When it all came to a head at the Battle of Bosworth, John de Vere

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was a commander for the future King Henry VII.

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There was a vanguard

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and they managed to cut two armies in half, and he helped swing

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the battle, definitely, and it's stated in all the history books.

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And, as a result, when he was, Henry was crowned,

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the Earl of Oxford was returned all of his hereditary titles,

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all his lands, all his castles, he was hugely powerful.

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Having played a key role in helping secure

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the throne for Henry Tudor, John de Vere used his new-found wealth

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to host a lavish, week-long banquet attended by the King.

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It was an extremely expensive thing to do.

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And there must have been hundreds and hundreds of people with Henry,

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-his courtiers and his...

-The whole entourage.

-..cooks..

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So the castle had to be in an absolute...

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It's probably its best condition it's ever been in.

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But the celebrations were to have a sour ending.

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When Henry, after this great, sumptuous feasting and everything, left,

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they went from the castle down to the village.

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John de Vere lined all his men down the drive, two deep, and they were

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all wearing the livery of the Earl of Oxford.

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And Henry felt threatened because he had banned all his barons from

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displaying livery, because it was basically showing a private army.

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-Yes, exactly.

-And it just shows how insecure he was in his position.

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Confronted by what he saw as a potentially threatening army,

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it's said the King imposed a massive fine on the Earl,

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the equivalent of millions of pounds today.

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Some notable historians basically say that was

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the beginning of the decline of the de Veres, the earls of Oxford.

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Despite this, John de Vere remained loyal to the King for the rest of his life.

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But it's his victory on the battlefield which helped

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stabilise a country in turmoil

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and establish a royal dynasty that ruled for over a century.

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That is his lasting legacy.

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Speaking of epic battles, our pair are back together again

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and heading for a well deserved night's rest.

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Bye-bye, you two. So sweet.

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Morning has broken in the county of Essex,

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and Mark and Thomas are back on the road.

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-We are in my home county of Essex.

-I know, you are an Essex boy, aren't you?

-I am an Essex boy.

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But we have everything in Essex. We've got

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coasts with amusements.

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And we've got beautiful countryside, we've got something for everyone.

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And beautiful people.

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Flattery will get you everywhere, Thomas.

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Before we get started with today's shenanigans,

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let's take a look at the shopping trip so far.

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Playing a thrifty game, Mark has bagged himself

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a couple of bargains - the rather unusual pair of globe columns

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and the Art Deco vase, spending £35, leaving him with £136.

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Thomas Plant notched up two lovely buys,

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spending £72 on the dainty silver pill box

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and the pretty Art Nouveau brooch, giving him £237.96 for the day ahead.

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Mark and Thomas are heading south to the very charming

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village of Blackmore.

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The trouble is, you know, Thomas, I'm still £130 behind you.

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I know. I know. I've got to make a boo-boo for you to catch up.

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And you've got to spend some money. You're just playing Planty tactics.

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-Yes.

-It won't be entertaining.

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-There we are, Thomas.

-There we are.

-Thank you so much.

-Get out!

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-Get out!

-Come on, boys! Play nice!

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HE LAUGHS

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-Mark's first shop today is Megarrys Antiques.

-Hello.

-Morning, Mark.

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-How are you?

-I'm fine. I'm Judy Wood.

-Nice to meet you, Judy.

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You've got a treasure trove here.

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Oh, gosh! Well...

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Lots of china.

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I think this is going to be fun because I'm going to have to

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look in every nook and cranny to see what's here.

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There's so much to see.

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Which is good and bad in equal measures.

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Cos like always, the clock is ticking.

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And time waits for no man.

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Feeling the pressure, Mark?

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What's this? Ooh. I can't get it out.

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It's quite interesting, isn't it?

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It's a frame, obviously you can see that, and it's glazed and probably

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would have had a sort of religious picture in there to begin with.

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It's got four sort of cast gilded brass plaques here,

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which are almost like a sort of Celtic religious theme.

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Let's turn it and see what the back is like.

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Ah, now this is interesting.

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On the front it says 16, but on the back, it says 8.75.

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I think we might have a word with Judy about this.

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I'd forgotten completely that it was there.

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You see, this is music to my ears cos you don't really want it.

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-I've noticed something quite odd.

-Mm-hm.

0:18:320:18:34

On the front, it's got £16, but then on the back,

0:18:340:18:39

it's got the price stickered as 8.75.

0:18:390:18:41

Well, naturally, I want to go nearer the 8.75.

0:18:410:18:45

That's what I paid for it.

0:18:450:18:48

Mystery solved.

0:18:480:18:50

Judy left the original price tag on. Oh, Judy!

0:18:500:18:54

Well, how close can we get to 8.75?

0:18:540:18:56

-How about 8.75?

-I think that would suit me down to the ground.

0:18:580:19:02

-Thank you. Very much indeed. I've got to pay you.

-Yes, please.

0:19:020:19:06

And I've decided, there's £10, just give me

0:19:060:19:08

a pound change cos I think you need to earn a bit of profit. You see?

0:19:080:19:12

This has always been my problem, I'm too generous.

0:19:120:19:15

-Thank you so much.

-There you are.

-Lovely to meet you.

-And you.

0:19:150:19:18

Don't blow that 25p all at once, Judy.

0:19:180:19:21

At a bargain £9, Mark has his third item for auction.

0:19:230:19:27

Meanwhile, our Thomas is motoring on to Chelmsford.

0:19:330:19:37

In the late 19th century,

0:19:390:19:41

Chelmsford was a hotbed of innovative industry, attracting engineers and

0:19:410:19:46

inventors from all over, who carried out pioneering work that would

0:19:460:19:51

change Chelmsford and the world forever.

0:19:510:19:54

Thomas is visiting Sandford Mill, part of Chelmsford Museum,

0:19:560:20:00

to learn about the town's history

0:20:000:20:03

and one of the inventors that helped put it on the map.

0:20:030:20:06

-Hello, I'm Thomas.

-Welcome, Thomas.

0:20:060:20:08

Showing him round is curator Nick Wickenden.

0:20:080:20:12

Chelmsford at the time was like the Silicon Valley of its day.

0:20:120:20:15

There was electrical engineering going on here already,

0:20:150:20:18

with Colonel Crompton and the Christys.

0:20:180:20:20

There was Hoffman's, which were ball bearings.

0:20:200:20:24

Joining these pioneers was Guglielmo Marconi.

0:20:240:20:28

he began developing wireless radio whilst growing up in Italy

0:20:280:20:32

and with the British government investing in new technology,

0:20:320:20:35

he brought his idea to Chelmsford in 1898.

0:20:350:20:40

He found out that there was an old silk factory, which was empty,

0:20:400:20:45

and so it was perfect for him to set up the first radio

0:20:450:20:49

factory in the world in this former silk factory.

0:20:490:20:53

Marconi continued his groundbreaking work,

0:20:530:20:56

developing and manufacturing wireless technology in his Chelmsford factory.

0:20:560:21:01

In 1912, he opened the world's first purpose-built radio factory,

0:21:040:21:09

the Marconi Works, at New Street, becoming one of Chelmsford's

0:21:090:21:13

biggest employers and making his mark on the town.

0:21:130:21:16

It's dominated by two aerials, 450ft high,

0:21:160:21:19

and that really dominates Chelmsford's

0:21:190:21:22

landscape in the centre of the town for at least a generation.

0:21:220:21:26

Although Marconi had proved that signals could be sent

0:21:260:21:29

wirelessly over long distances, at the start of the 20th century,

0:21:290:21:33

the technology was still in its infancy.

0:21:330:21:36

It wasn't until after the First World War that those experiments

0:21:380:21:42

into entertainment broadcasts started in Chelmsford.

0:21:420:21:46

In 1920, Dame Nellie Melba, a famous Australian opera singer, performed

0:21:490:21:54

a concert at the factory that was transmitted over the wireless.

0:21:540:21:57

This was a major turning point and demand for radios in the home grew.

0:21:570:22:03

And who is listening to this at this time?

0:22:030:22:05

People who have wireless sets are basically by now all

0:22:050:22:09

round the world and not just Britain, not just Chelmsford,

0:22:090:22:14

it's literally all round the world.

0:22:140:22:16

But Chelmsford was to play another vital role, as it was here,

0:22:160:22:20

from an old World War I hut on the outskirts of town that the

0:22:200:22:25

world's first regular entertainment broadcast started in 1922.

0:22:250:22:30

They were led by Marconi engineer Peter Eckersley.

0:22:310:22:34

Eckersley's a bit of a comedian.

0:22:340:22:36

He starts telling jokes, they bring him a piano from the local pub...

0:22:360:22:40

-This is the actual piano.

-Really?

0:22:400:22:42

And they bring in singers, little concerts, little sketches.

0:22:420:22:45

And the people who are listening to this on their radio sets at home

0:22:450:22:49

absolutely love it

0:22:490:22:50

and they actually then get a licence from the British Post Office

0:22:500:22:54

and it's effectively the first broadcasting

0:22:540:22:56

station in the world that is purely for entertainment

0:22:560:23:01

and Eckersley really becomes the first disc jockey, if you like.

0:23:010:23:05

Soon, others recognised the chance to transmit their own shows

0:23:050:23:10

and there were 20 applications to broadcast.

0:23:100:23:14

A decision was made to form a single company,

0:23:140:23:17

responsible for broadcasting in Britain.

0:23:170:23:20

Yes, you guessed it, the good old BBC was born.

0:23:200:23:24

Marconi remained very much at the heart of Chelmsford,

0:23:280:23:31

with the company moving in to areas like radar

0:23:310:23:34

and television equipment before finally closing its doors in 2006.

0:23:340:23:39

But as the birthplace of the wireless

0:23:410:23:43

and the foundation of entertainment broadcasting,

0:23:430:23:46

Chelmsford has secured its rightful place in the history books

0:23:460:23:50

and Marconi's legacy lives on throughout the town.

0:23:500:23:53

Meanwhile, Mark is moving on to Gosfield for his last shop

0:23:580:24:02

at Gosfield Shopping Village, and Glen is on hand to assist.

0:24:020:24:06

Hello, Glen.

0:24:060:24:08

-Hello.

-Good afternoon. Welcome to Gosfield.

-Nice to see you.

0:24:080:24:11

This is good fun, isn't it?

0:24:110:24:12

Well, there's plenty to take a good look at.

0:24:120:24:15

-Let's take a look at the plenty to look at, shall we, first?

-This way.

0:24:150:24:18

With over 100 dealers, Mark should have no problem in shelling

0:24:180:24:21

out some of that £127 he's got left.

0:24:210:24:25

I'm going to try and stick to my tactics, you know,

0:24:270:24:29

of buying interesting, good items, as cheaply as possible,

0:24:290:24:34

which have as wide a range of profit as possible

0:24:340:24:37

because I am trailing Thomas and there's one thing we've learnt this

0:24:370:24:41

week and that's Mr Plant is rather good at finding profitable items.

0:24:410:24:46

And I'm not terribly happy with him for that.

0:24:460:24:49

Well, profit is the name of the game, Mark.

0:24:490:24:52

I like that little box there.

0:24:560:24:59

It's a small, I would have thought, a small snuff box.

0:24:590:25:02

And it dates to the sort of 1830s, 1840s, so it's a proper antique.

0:25:020:25:07

You are allowed to sell tortoiseshell

0:25:070:25:09

if the work of art you are handling was produced before 1947.

0:25:090:25:15

Well, this is 100 years before that, so we're well into the antique realm.

0:25:150:25:19

That's something I'm going to keep in my mind.

0:25:190:25:20

That's quite interesting, there.

0:25:250:25:27

That vase. I mean, it looks VERY stylised.

0:25:280:25:31

I mean, you can see this is Art Nouveau,

0:25:310:25:34

so 1910-ish, that sort of period.

0:25:340:25:36

But you see, I'm going off-piste again, this is priced at £165.

0:25:360:25:40

Please, stop me! Don't let me buy it!

0:25:400:25:42

OK, we'll remember that.

0:25:420:25:45

And to add to your woes, Mark, the competition's arrived.

0:25:450:25:48

Look out!

0:25:480:25:50

This is the first cabinet I want to look into.

0:25:500:25:52

There's some interesting objects in here, good, solid antiques.

0:25:520:25:56

And I wouldn't mind looking... There's a pen set,

0:25:560:26:00

like a desk set, which looks really lovely.

0:26:000:26:02

With, er, a really lovely price tag. At £58.

0:26:020:26:06

Peter is on hand to assist.

0:26:060:26:08

It's a good-looking lot, that.

0:26:080:26:10

I don't want to pay that, though.

0:26:100:26:12

-I'm sure... If you find some other things...?

-You never know.

0:26:120:26:16

Can I have a look at the rest of it?

0:26:160:26:18

This is really nice coramandel... Lovely vesta.

0:26:180:26:22

This is in the form of a drum, isn't it?

0:26:230:26:26

Vestas appeared around the 1830s,

0:26:260:26:29

designed to carry matches.

0:26:290:26:31

This particular model is made of coromandel wood

0:26:310:26:34

and has £60 on the ticket.

0:26:340:26:35

There's two items there which I'm relatively interested in.

0:26:370:26:41

-LAUGHING:

-I'll keep in my mind.

0:26:410:26:43

-So... So, could you take those to the desk...

-Uh-huh.

0:26:430:26:46

-..and see what we could do on those?

-Yes, of course.

0:26:460:26:48

-While I carry on looking?

-Yes.

-Is that all right?

-Yes, no problem.

0:26:480:26:51

While Tom carries on looking, let's check on Mr Stacey.

0:26:510:26:55

There's one thing I've noticed here, actually,

0:26:550:26:57

I was looking at the little seated pig yesterday, and didn't buy it.

0:26:570:27:00

But here, they've got a very big, fat, juicy, succulent pig.

0:27:000:27:05

It's actually a pincushion.

0:27:050:27:08

And he's loads of fun, actually, he looks like he's got a fun face.

0:27:080:27:11

I don't think it's terribly old, but it's only £22.

0:27:110:27:14

The price of pork has just gone down.

0:27:150:27:17

Oink. Oink.

0:27:170:27:19

And there's an interesting spoon, here.

0:27:220:27:24

It simply says "Arts and Crafts spoon. £22."

0:27:240:27:28

It's all hand-beaten and hand-shaped.

0:27:280:27:31

I can't believe it's silver, for £22.

0:27:310:27:34

But it's worth a look, I think.

0:27:350:27:37

Better have a word with Glenn.

0:27:370:27:39

-You're a very naughty man.

-What have you found?

0:27:400:27:43

Well, I found so much I could fill cabinets here

0:27:430:27:47

with the amount of stuff that I've found. But I have found the vase,

0:27:470:27:50

an interesting spoon, a lovely little Regency tortoiseshell box

0:27:500:27:54

and a big fat porker.

0:27:540:27:57

But I've got to try

0:27:570:27:58

and make choices about what I'm going to put in the auction.

0:27:580:28:01

Right, let's have a look.

0:28:010:28:03

We've got the vase, best price we could do there would be 80.

0:28:030:28:06

For these spoon, ten. For the snuffbox, 40.

0:28:060:28:11

And the pig, ten on that one.

0:28:110:28:13

The pig, at £10, is a no-brainer really, isn't it?

0:28:130:28:16

I mean, that at auction could do really well.

0:28:160:28:19

The vase I love because it sums up to me a very subtle

0:28:190:28:23

Art Nouveau form that the Americans surpassed themselves in.

0:28:230:28:29

I want to take a bit of a risk. I've been very...

0:28:290:28:33

restrained so far.

0:28:330:28:36

If I try to buy those two, Glenn, to put forward as my last two items,

0:28:360:28:41

-could I possibly get those two in for £60?

-60?

0:28:410:28:46

-I think I could meet you halfway, there.

-£55?

-At 75.

0:28:460:28:51

Oh, my God, that's not halfway, is it?

0:28:510:28:53

If we could say 70, I'll have a go.

0:28:530:28:56

-OK, I'll give you the next two for 70.

-Are we there?

-Yes.

-Lovely.

0:28:560:28:59

Let shake on 70, shall we? Thank you.

0:28:590:29:02

What have I done?

0:29:020:29:04

You've taken a bit of a gamble on that vase, Mark!

0:29:050:29:08

That's what you've done.

0:29:080:29:10

But, you have five items for auction and well done.

0:29:100:29:13

Meanwhile, Thomas is still on the hunt.

0:29:150:29:18

I feel there's this last-minute last-item buy.

0:29:180:29:21

It could be... You know, the wrong thing to do, buying at speed,

0:29:210:29:26

buying at haste and not really giving it careful consideration.

0:29:260:29:29

Not finding a real...

0:29:290:29:31

..bargain.

0:29:330:29:35

Here comes trouble...

0:29:350:29:36

-Thomas.

-THOMAS SIGHS

0:29:360:29:38

-How are you doing?

-Fine.

0:29:380:29:40

-Time's running out, Thomas.

-I know. Have you purchased?

-I'm all done.

0:29:400:29:43

-You're all done?

-I'm all done.

0:29:430:29:45

-Well, I suggest you go away!

-But my strategy's gone out of the window.

0:29:450:29:49

-Have you spent?

-I've spent a lot of money.

-No, you haven't.

0:29:490:29:52

-I have, honestly.

-Have you?

0:29:520:29:54

-Look, there's wonderful cabinets here of quality items.

-Mm-hm.

0:29:540:29:57

-You've got huge amount of money left, Tom.

-Yes...

-Then get spending it.

0:29:570:30:00

Well, I'm going to spend SOME.

0:30:000:30:02

Now, I'll be so disappointed if you've been tactical.

0:30:020:30:04

Turn around and off you go.

0:30:040:30:06

-No, no...

-I'll be really disappointed if...

-There's more spending,

0:30:060:30:09

-there's more spending going on, I promise.

-Promise?

-I promise.

0:30:090:30:11

Don't make promises you can't keep, Thomas. Naughty.

0:30:110:30:14

This last bit is such a panic.

0:30:220:30:24

I mean, there's...

0:30:250:30:27

Thing is, you've got to think about auctions and what's

0:30:270:30:30

going to sell well at auction.

0:30:300:30:32

This is what caught my eye and it's a sort of

0:30:370:30:41

double whistle-cum-compass.

0:30:410:30:43

£28 on the ticket, but does it work?

0:30:430:30:46

-SHRILL WHISTLE

-Yes, that works.

0:30:470:30:50

-So maybe I'll be able to call Mark.

-WHISTLING SOUND

0:30:500:30:53

HE LAUGHS

0:30:530:30:54

Well, it's got someone's attention.

0:30:550:30:57

Look at these, cigar cutters in silver.

0:30:570:31:00

Gosh! You put your cigar in the end, you snip it.

0:31:000:31:04

They're in solid silver and they're probably 1920s.

0:31:040:31:07

Oh, they're just simply wonderful, aren't they?

0:31:070:31:10

For the man who has everything.

0:31:100:31:12

Priced at £45.

0:31:120:31:14

Thomas also has his eye on the writing set and the vesta.

0:31:150:31:18

All four items have a combined ticket price of £191.

0:31:200:31:25

-What can be done on all of these?

-SHE SIGHS

0:31:260:31:30

-177.

-177?

0:31:300:31:34

-That's a lot of money.

-It's the first step, 177.

0:31:340:31:37

-Yeah, no, I wouldn't be happy with that.

-I know.

0:31:370:31:39

How much are you prepared...?

0:31:390:31:41

-I know this is really going to push it...

-Uh-huh.

0:31:410:31:44

-Really push it...

-Uh-uh.

0:31:440:31:45

But I'm at round about £110.

0:31:450:31:49

That's where I am. 110?

0:31:490:31:51

You're going to do it for me, 110... Really?

0:31:530:31:56

Deal. Thank you very much.

0:31:560:31:58

£110.

0:31:580:32:00

So, that means 40 for the matchbox, 30 for the desk set,

0:32:000:32:05

£15 for the scout's compass-whistle

0:32:050:32:07

and £25 for the cigar cutters.

0:32:070:32:11

He's cleaned up. Well done, Thomas.

0:32:120:32:14

That's four items! Mark's going to go mad, I've bought four items.

0:32:140:32:17

That's six in total! He's going to go bonkers.

0:32:170:32:20

Thomas has spent £182. As well as his latest purchases,

0:32:210:32:27

he's also picked up the pillbox and the brooch.

0:32:270:32:30

Despite starting out with thrifty intentions,

0:32:310:32:34

Mark threw caution to the wind and bought five items.

0:32:340:32:37

The piggy pin-cushion, the globe columns,

0:32:380:32:42

the bronze vase, the frame and the Art Deco vase.

0:32:420:32:46

Spending a grand total of £114.

0:32:460:32:49

Quite a haul for them both.

0:32:500:32:53

But what do they think one of another's buys?

0:32:530:32:56

One of the best items Thomas has bought,

0:32:560:32:58

and one of his most expensive, is the little Art Deco pillbox.

0:32:580:33:02

Beautifully enamelled and very collectable, but £60?

0:33:020:33:05

That's quite a lot of money.

0:33:050:33:07

He's bought this fabulous sterling silver and bronze vase.

0:33:070:33:10

This could be a bit too subtle for auction, but somebody out there

0:33:100:33:15

will spot the quality, and hopefully, he'll make a good profit on it.

0:33:150:33:18

I'm really looking forward to this auction,

0:33:180:33:20

because I've bought very well and I think Thomas has bought reasonably well,

0:33:200:33:24

but he's bought a Scout's whistle. Honestly, what next?

0:33:240:33:27

He's used his eye, he's used his knowledge.

0:33:270:33:30

And I am in fear of him racing ahead while I slightly lag behind.

0:33:300:33:36

After their trip around Essex and Suffolk,

0:33:380:33:40

our road trippers are heading north to the village of Willingham

0:33:400:33:44

in Cambridgeshire, for auction.

0:33:440:33:46

-Are you excited? For auction day?

-I am! Auction day... Yeah, I am excited.

0:33:460:33:51

-I think you've bought immensely well.

-Do you think so?

-Yes, I do!

0:33:510:33:54

I'm a little bit jealous. I've had to be very cunning.

0:33:540:33:58

-I am...

-In awe.

0:33:580:34:00

-In awe of Mr Mark Stacey.

-Well, so you should be, Tom.

0:34:000:34:02

You've bought so well. It's only taken you three legs to get this far.

0:34:020:34:06

THEY LAUGH

0:34:060:34:07

Ha-ha-ha, you are cheeky, Thomas.

0:34:070:34:10

Today's auction is being held and Willingham Auctions.

0:34:100:34:13

-Look at you, you're already dying to get out.

-I am.

0:34:150:34:17

It's like Auction Village.

0:34:170:34:19

-It's like Starsky & Hutch, isn't it?

-More like Laurel & Hardy. Ha!

0:34:190:34:23

Our auctioneer today is Stephen Drake.

0:34:250:34:28

What does he think of Mark and Thomas's purchases?

0:34:280:34:32

The bronze vase is very nice, actually.

0:34:320:34:35

It's got a tiny bit of oxidisation on it, but it's really nice.

0:34:350:34:39

Nice, small, well made, good quality.

0:34:390:34:43

I'm probably going to put my foot in it, but a scout's whistle,

0:34:430:34:46

is a bit...

0:34:460:34:48

I mean, there are whistle collectors out there

0:34:480:34:51

and I'm hoping that they're going to turn up today, basically.

0:34:510:34:54

Come on, boys, the auction is just about to start.

0:34:540:34:57

First up is Mark's piggy pin cushion.

0:35:000:35:03

Decorative little lot, stick pins in pigs.

0:35:030:35:06

We'll start at £10 on this lot.

0:35:060:35:08

-£10 bid.

-Oh, this isn't looking good.

0:35:080:35:11

18, 20, £25 bid on the lot at 25.

0:35:110:35:14

25, 30.

0:35:140:35:15

5.

0:35:150:35:16

-40, 5.

-It's going on, you see?

0:35:160:35:19

£45 bid.

0:35:190:35:20

45 bid. Are we all done? Selling, then, at 45.

0:35:200:35:23

-That's not bad on a tenner, is it?

-No, on a little piggy.

0:35:250:35:28

Oink, oink.

0:35:280:35:29

He'll be happy with pork chops tonight.

0:35:290:35:32

The £10 piggy has paid off for Mark.

0:35:320:35:35

Next up, Thomas's silver cigar cutters.

0:35:360:35:39

Interest in this.

0:35:390:35:40

We'll start at £40 on this lot.

0:35:400:35:42

-£40 straight in.

-£40 bid on the lot at 40. £45 bid.

0:35:420:35:46

In the room at 45. 50.

0:35:460:35:47

5.

0:35:470:35:49

60. 5.

0:35:490:35:51

-£65 bid.

-£65.

-70.

0:35:510:35:53

£75 bid. 80. 5.

0:35:530:35:56

£85 bid.

0:35:560:35:57

-That's awesome.

-At 85.

0:35:570:35:59

90. If you want to bid, be quick on the internet.

0:35:590:36:02

90, that was quick.

0:36:020:36:03

It wasn't quick, he gave him about half an hour to make his mind up.

0:36:030:36:06

-I don't care.

-Selling, then, at £90.

0:36:060:36:08

-That's not bad, is it?

-I'm rubbing my hands with glee.

0:36:090:36:12

-I think it's over for me already.

-Don't be so ridiculous!

0:36:120:36:16

Great result for Thomas, putting him in a strong lead.

0:36:160:36:20

But let's not light the cigars just yet.

0:36:200:36:22

It's Thomas's pill box next.

0:36:230:36:25

£50 bid. Nice little pot at 50, 5, 60, 5...

0:36:250:36:30

-There we are.

-..80, 5,

0:36:300:36:32

90, 5,

0:36:320:36:34

100,

0:36:340:36:36

-110.

-Good, brilliant.

-£110 bid.

-Gosh, that's a jolly good profit

0:36:360:36:40

-and you weren't expecting that.

-No.

0:36:400:36:42

Well done, 130.

0:36:420:36:43

140.

0:36:430:36:45

You're not going to give up now, are you?

0:36:450:36:47

Good man.

0:36:470:36:48

Lady's bid at 140.

0:36:480:36:50

Are we all done now? Selling, then, at 140.

0:36:500:36:53

-That's brilliant.

-That's £80 profit.

0:36:540:36:56

That's brilliant.

0:36:560:36:58

Well, I think you've done very well.

0:36:580:37:00

-I think I have.

-I wasn't expecting that.

-No, nor was I!

0:37:000:37:02

I thought you might get 20 quid out of it.

0:37:020:37:05

You're on a roll, Thomas.

0:37:050:37:06

Up next are Mark's globe columns. Can their association with the Masons

0:37:080:37:13

spark some interest?

0:37:130:37:15

-Start at £75 on this lot.

-That's all right.

-£75 bid.

0:37:150:37:19

85, 90.

0:37:190:37:20

£90 bid.

0:37:200:37:22

95, £95 bid.

0:37:220:37:23

-That's all right.

-Get in there, look at the profit on that!

0:37:230:37:27

£100 bid on the Masonic columns, at 100, are we done?

0:37:270:37:30

Selling, then, at £100.

0:37:300:37:32

-That's all right.

-Brilliant!

-£85 profit.

-Superb.

-Pleased with that.

0:37:330:37:38

Gosh!

0:37:380:37:39

An amazing profit - this could really help Mark.

0:37:390:37:43

Back to Thomas now with his desk writing set.

0:37:440:37:47

Start at 25 on this lot. £25 bid.

0:37:470:37:50

25, 30.

0:37:500:37:52

£30 bid. £30 bid on the lot at 30.

0:37:520:37:55

35, £35 bid.

0:37:550:37:57

If you want to bid, be quick.

0:37:570:37:58

£35 bid and selling, then, at 35.

0:37:580:38:02

What did you pay for that?

0:38:020:38:03

£30, I think.

0:38:030:38:05

So £5 profit.

0:38:050:38:07

Not quite as good a result.

0:38:070:38:09

Can Mark's bargain frame put him in the winning picture?

0:38:090:38:14

-£10 on this lot. £10 bid.

-£1 profit.

0:38:140:38:18

12, 15,

0:38:180:38:19

18.

0:38:190:38:20

£18 bid, and 20.

0:38:200:38:22

-£20 bid, and 5. £25 bid.

-Come on, a bit more.

0:38:220:38:25

-Oh, no, it's going well...

-..forwarded to sixth.

-Have they?

0:38:250:38:30

Are we done now? I shall sell, then, at £25.

0:38:300:38:33

-£16 profit.

-I think that's brilliant.

-16 quid profit.

0:38:340:38:38

That's more than double back.

0:38:380:38:40

Well done.

0:38:400:38:42

It's Thomas's Art Nouveau brooch next.

0:38:420:38:44

Bit of interest in this. We'll start at a tenner on this one.

0:38:440:38:47

-That should make a lot more than that.

-..18, 20, 25, 30,

0:38:470:38:50

-35...

-That's good.

0:38:500:38:52

£40 bid on the lot at 40.

0:38:520:38:54

-£40 bid.

-It's not expensive for what it is.

0:38:540:38:57

I think it's charming.

0:38:570:38:59

I think it's lovely.

0:38:590:39:00

Are there any further bids? Selling, then, in the room, £40.

0:39:000:39:04

Brilliant.

0:39:040:39:06

More of those.

0:39:060:39:08

That turned out to be a good little find.

0:39:080:39:10

Next up is Mark's bronze vase.

0:39:120:39:14

The auctioneer has high hopes for this.

0:39:140:39:17

Start at £80 on this lot, 80 bid.

0:39:170:39:19

So £20 in profit.

0:39:190:39:22

85. 85, got to go 90.

0:39:220:39:24

95, I'm out now.

0:39:240:39:25

95, I'm comforted I've made a profit.

0:39:250:39:29

Are there any further bids?

0:39:290:39:30

I shall sell in the room, then, at 95.

0:39:300:39:32

100.

0:39:320:39:34

-5?

-105.

-Broken that three-figure...

-110 against you now.

0:39:340:39:40

115. £115 bid.

0:39:400:39:42

-Creeping.

-Still in the room.

0:39:420:39:44

120 against you.

0:39:440:39:45

120. It's on the internet at 120.

0:39:450:39:48

Selling, then, at 120.

0:39:480:39:49

I was concerned at that, cos I didn't know the factory.

0:39:510:39:54

-It looks very Tiffany to me.

-It did!

0:39:540:39:57

It has that look,

0:39:570:39:58

so it's obviously from that period.

0:39:580:40:00

-Doubled its...

-I'm pleased with that, I'm happy.

-Well done, you!

0:40:000:40:03

What a gamble! He's doubled his cash!

0:40:030:40:06

But is it enough to put him in the lead?

0:40:060:40:08

Back to Thomas and his vesta is the next lot.

0:40:100:40:14

£20 bid. Bid's with me at £20. 25, 30.

0:40:140:40:17

35, got to go 40.

0:40:170:40:19

-One more, I'll take it. 45.

-Oh, there's a profit.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:40:190:40:23

-A very small profit, though.

-Are we done now?

0:40:230:40:25

Selling in the room, then, at 45.

0:40:250:40:27

I am surprised at that.

0:40:290:40:30

I thought that would have done better.

0:40:300:40:32

Same here, but it's yesterday's antiques, isn't it?

0:40:320:40:36

Turn that frown upside down.

0:40:360:40:38

It's still a profit.

0:40:380:40:39

Thomas, again, now, with his scout whistle.

0:40:410:40:44

The auctioneer and Mark aren't fans,

0:40:440:40:46

but will the bidders be?

0:40:460:40:48

£10 bid on the scouts' whistle, ever popular at £10.

0:40:480:40:51

£10 bid? £10 bid on the whistle at 10.

0:40:510:40:54

12, £15 bid.

0:40:540:40:56

18, just what you want, madam, at 18.

0:40:560:40:58

£18 bid.

0:40:580:41:00

£18.

0:41:000:41:01

Selling, then, in front, lady's bid at £18.

0:41:010:41:05

Well done - you've made a profit on that.

0:41:050:41:07

-That was great. Reminded me of my schoolboy days.

-Yes.

0:41:080:41:11

You know, yomping through the moors.

0:41:110:41:13

-You managed to navigate yourself to a profit.

-I did, I did.

0:41:130:41:17

Very, very cautiously, but it happened.

0:41:170:41:20

It's a profit, albeit a small one.

0:41:200:41:23

It's our lads' last lot of the day,

0:41:230:41:26

Mark's cracked Art Deco vase.

0:41:260:41:29

£20 bid. Bid's with me at 20.

0:41:290:41:31

-£20 bid.

-£20.

-He's killed it by saying that.

0:41:310:41:34

-25.

-At 25.

0:41:340:41:36

£30 bid. Decorative little lot at 30 and selling, now, in front at £30.

0:41:360:41:42

-Well done, madam.

-Well done, Mark.

0:41:420:41:44

Another good profit.

0:41:440:41:45

Come on, you can buy me a cup of tea.

0:41:450:41:47

-Why me?

-Cos you've got more money.

0:41:470:41:49

Great auction, chaps.

0:41:510:41:52

Now, let's do the maths.

0:41:520:41:54

Thomas started off this leg of the trip with £309.96 in his pocket.

0:41:550:42:00

After auction costs, he made a profit of £119.76,

0:42:020:42:08

giving him a hefty £429.72 to carry forward.

0:42:080:42:14

But today is Mark's day.

0:42:160:42:18

Starting off with £171, after auction costs,

0:42:200:42:24

he's notched up a profit of £148.40, winning this leg of the trip.

0:42:240:42:30

He has an impressive £319.40 to take forward. Well done.

0:42:300:42:36

-You've beaten me!

-But you're still £110 ahead, Thomas.

0:42:390:42:42

Oh, yes, but this is where - as I say, you were on the ropes -

0:42:420:42:46

-the fight-back starts here for Mark.

-Absolutely, it's started, my friend.

0:42:460:42:50

Be afraid!

0:42:500:42:52

-Be very afraid!

-I'm quaking!

0:42:520:42:55

Best we leave them before it all kicks off. He-he, bye for now!

0:42:550:42:59

Next time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:000:43:03

Mark's having a crisis of confidence...

0:43:030:43:05

What am I doing here?

0:43:050:43:07

..while Thomas keeps his eye on the ball.

0:43:070:43:10

Maybe I can look into the crystal ball

0:43:100:43:12

and see how Mark's fortunes turn out.

0:43:120:43:14

Thomas Plant and Mark Stacey are halfway through their road trip. They shop in Essex and Suffolk before making their way towards an auction in Cambridge.