Episode 21 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 21

Charlie Ross and James Braxton begin in Boston and make their way to their first auction in the Norfolk town of Fakenham.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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-This is beautiful.

-That's the way to do this.

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With £200 each, a classic car and a goal - to scour for antiques.

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-Joy.

-Hello.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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HE LAUGHS

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-There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

-Sorry!

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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The handbrake's on!

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's the first leg of a brand-new road trip

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and this week, it's the return of old partners in crime,

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James Braxton and Charlie Ross.

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# Another opening, another show

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# In Philly, Boston or Baltimo'

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# Another chance for the folks to show

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# Another opening of another show. #

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How's that?

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Sounds all right to me, Charlie.

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They are travelling in a 1961 Ford Zephyr, manufactured

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before seatbelts were mandatory, and spirits are high on day one.

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-The sun is out.

-The sun is out.

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I'm in the hands of an expert driver.

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-Yes.

-In a luxury car.

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On the last outing those two took together,

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Charlie smashed a road trip record.

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He paid just £8 for a Staffordshire elephant,

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and sold it for an astonishing £2,700.

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You're hearing this?

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For the last time, £2,700...

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APPLAUSE

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-Take a bow.

-Take a bow.

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James took his defeat on the chin.

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I'm leaving. I think my road trip is over.

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LAUGHTER

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But this time round, he's going to new lengths to try

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to gain the upper hand.

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Since I last saw you, since our Scottish trip,

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I bring a new thing in my life, which is yoga.

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Don't tell me you're into yoga?!

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Both mentally prepared and physically prepared.

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You are taking on the athlete of antiques.

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Could have fooled me!

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Our experts have £200 to spend.

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Their trip starts in the Lincolnshire town of Boston

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and meanders through Norfolk and Cambridgeshire, up to Leicestershire

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before heading south and finishing in the Surrey town of Cobham.

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Today's leg starts off from Boston

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and heads to auction in the rural Norfolk town of Fakenham.

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Charlie's first shop is an old railway station office.

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Look at this. Oh!

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All my shopping will be over in a twinkling of an eyelash.

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-Go forward and multiply.

-Multiply.

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-Multiply.

-200 quid! Bingo!

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Crikey, he's in a hurry!

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-Jack, I'm running to meet you.

-I don't blame you.

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It's always such a pleasure to be here. Can I have a look round?

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-Yeah, have a look round.

-Wonderful.

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They bill themselves here as dealers in nostalgia, and that may be true,

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but it's outside that looks rather interesting.

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Good Lord, you've got a camel! Was that here last time I came?

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-No, no, that's recent.

-Can I go and sit on him?

-Yeah, you go sit on him.

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-I've never bought a camel.

-No.

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-I'm going to fall over this damn thing.

-Mind how you go, Charlie.

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-Oh, gosh!

-The stepladder is not very strong.

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I feel like Lawrence of Arabia already.

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You look a bit like Peter O'Toole.

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SINGS THEME TO LAWRENCE OF ARABIA

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Haven't got any white robes, have you, Jack?

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This is not a camel for a hernia problem, is it?

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-How much is your camel, Jack?

-He can be 275 to you.

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-What a steal, Jack.

-It's for nothing, isn't it?

-It is.

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A steal, but, sadly, too rich for your blood, Charlie.

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Time to get inside and see

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if there's anything in your price range here.

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-It's a bit more modern, that, isn't it?

-Yeah, it's '50s, isn't it?

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Got a plastic head. He's quite fun, though.

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We're getting almost buyable.

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-Can that be 30 quid?

-No.

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Jack, I thought I'd ask.

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There's never any harm in asking, Jack.

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-£70.

-55?

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£60, I'll have a deal with you.

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-He's coming down. Jack's coming my way.

-£60.

-Jack's coming to meet me.

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Oh, hang on.

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-That's ghastly, isn't it?

-What's that?

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You must agree with me -

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-that's the most awful cruet I've ever seen in my life.

-Yeah.

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But... Chromium plated,

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-19...

-It's got to be '50s.

-..60-something, I'd say.

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Salt and pepper in the form of a rather...

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-£35, Charlie.

-35.

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Now we're going, now we're going. We're really motoring now.

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Could spend all my £200 here today and then go to the seaside.

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Bingo would be so jealous.

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So would I.

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With the model car and the salt-and-pepper cruet

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under consideration, he is making progress.

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-Charlie...

-Yeah.

-..what about this globe here? That's quite nice.

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Very 1960s, isn't it?

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-That's nice, isn't it?

-Is that a 30-quid globe?

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-No, it's not. 75.

-75.

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-But it's just nice.

-Lovely globe. It's in super condition.

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We'll talk prices.

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I've seen three things there I might well be able to get...

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Come round, Jack. Let's get to the nitty-gritty of this.

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HE EXHALES

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I quite like your globe. I love your toy.

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The cruet I think is ghastly, but is saleable at a price.

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-Not going to take 100 quid for those three, are you?

-No.

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Or are you? Cash.

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Give me another 20 and you've got a deal.

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-120 for the three?

-Yeah.

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-110?

-No, 120.

-That's it, isn't it?

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-Yeah, that's the lot.

-And not a penny less.

-No.

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I'm not going to knock you any more

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because I think you've been very fair to me.

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Charlie's off on a flyer.

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He's got the globe for £50, the 1960s battery-operated car,

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also for £50,

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and the chromium-plated cruet in the form of an aeroplane for £20.

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Got it? Good.

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-Lovely to see you, Jack.

-Well done.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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-See you again.

-Bye-bye.

-Yeah, bye-bye.

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Meanwhile, James is heading to the centre of Boston.

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This charming little antiques and collectables emporium

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is his first shop,

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and if the paint looks fresh, well, that's because it only just opened.

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-Hello, James.

-Welcome to the Magpie's Nest.

-Hello.

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-What are you called?

-Des.

-Des, very nice to meet you.

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-We've only been open for one week now.

-One week?

-One week.

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So there's no point in me saying fresh goods here. They're all fresh.

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-All fresh goods.

-Lead on. Lead on, Des.

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This way into one of the first rooms.

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The shop may be new and the stock may be fresh,

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but nothing's got James hooked just yet.

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We're not finding you a sale yet?

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No, don't worry. I just like to drink it all in.

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Drink it all in.

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And he won't miss a thing.

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Look at this tall fellow. He is handsome.

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I always like something that's a little tall. What is this for?

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-I think that's for gladioli.

-Gladioli.

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Dame Edna Everage's great, great thing.

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I love the way she used to throw it at the end of the thing.

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She used to throw these things out.

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Gladioli is like being hit by a bit of bamboo, isn't it?

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THEY LAUGH

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I think it's made for a '60s, '70s market, isn't it?

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-So very light, isn't it?

-What have you got on it?

-£22 on it.

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-You chancer, Des, eh?

-What about 15?

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What about 15? What about 10, mate?

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-£12 and it's yours.

-12, you say?

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-12.

-12, put it there.

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-Thank you very much.

-Very kind. Thank you, Des.

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Well, possums, the Dame-Edna-inspired gladioli vase,

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which had a ticket price for £22,

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has been snapped up by James for £12.

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Charlie has travelled to the Lincolnshire town of Spalding.

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With three items already under his belt, he's on a roll.

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-Ah, this must be the boss?

-This is the boss.

-Hello, boss.

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-Hello, Charlie. Nice to see you.

-Your name is?

-John.

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John, lovely to be here, John. Now, may I have a quick look round?

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You have a look round with pleasure.

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It's not every antique shop which can boast its very own

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oil painting of Chas and Dave, so what other gems are there in here?

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On my way in here, out of the corner of my eye,

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I caught a glimpse of an extremely exciting item.

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Now, what would that be?

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Well, I tell you what, what do fish have on the outside?

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-They have scales.

-Scales?

-They do.

-What's outside?

-A set of scales.

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THEY LAUGH

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-Can we go and have a look at them?

-Yes, let's have a look.

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-Thank you.

-After you.

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-Here they are. Look at that.

-Yes.

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-Avery of Birmingham.

-That's right.

-Victorian.

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Hang your weights on there, I suppose, don't you,

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-and there's the fine tuning for your pounds.

-That's right.

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On the scale of things, these look very nice.

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I'll be perfectly honest with you.

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-I think they'll probably sell for 35 quid at auction.

-What about...

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rock bottom...

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£30 notes?

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Charlie's going to think about that one.

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He's also spotted a flash little number

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that might just suit his personality.

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Ooh, you've got a racing car, a Ferrari, no less.

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-I think it is a Ferrari.

-It is a Ferrari.

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I can tell you it's a Ferrari. Look at that.

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-Wonderful. I've sold a real one of these.

-I know you have.

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Do you know how much it made? 16 million.

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I think this is probably a little less.

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This is a very good model, actually. It's even got the old...

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Well, that's terribly expensive.

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-It's a tenner.

-Is it a tenner?

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-It's a tenner.

-What, a Ferrari for a tenner?

-A Ferrari for a tenner.

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You're in Spalding.

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THEY LAUGH

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I love that line.

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"A Ferrari for a tenner. You're in Spalding!"

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-I'm getting very excited...

-Really?

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..by your Ferrari and your Victorian scales.

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We might be able to do a little package, do you think?

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The scales have a ticket price of £40, and the car £10,

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but can Charlie strike a deal for the two?

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Now, you don't want to take £20 for your scales, do you?

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-I'm trying hard.

-I'll take £30 for the scales.

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The scales I want to buy because I think I might make a profit.

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This I want to buy cos I don't think it will make a profit,

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but it's me, isn't it?

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-I'll give you 30 quid for your scales, John.

-OK.

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I'm sorry I haggled so hard. That was a bit naughty of me, really.

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No, it wasn't. It was most enjoyable.

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But you stuck your ground and I'm happy to give you £30.

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Well, that's very kind of you. You ought to have the Ferrari.

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I should have a Ferrari, shouldn't I? It's silly not to buy a Ferrari.

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-That's right.

-£30 for your scales.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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I shall be able to go out this evening now.

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Yeah, I'm going to have your bloomin' Ferrari.

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-I can't resist it.

-I can go out tomorrow night as well.

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You can go out for the rest of the week, sir.

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-John, it's been a pleasure.

-I enjoyed it.

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Thank you very much indeed.

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So, Charlie walks away with the scales for £30

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and a rather sentimental purchase of the model Ferrari Testarossa

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for £10, bringing his total spend to £160.

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Bingo, who would have thought it?

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I've come to Spalding and what have I found?

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A Ferrari Testarossa!

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While Charlie's been spending, James is heading to King's Lynn.

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During the early part of World War I,

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this historic Norfolk town was literally struck with tragedy.

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It was one of the first places in Britain to be

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bombed from the air by the Germans.

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To make matters worse, King's Lynn wasn't even the intended target.

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James has come to the Lynn Museum,

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where curator Dana Woolbright can tell him more.

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-Hello.

-Hello. James Braxton.

-Welcome to Lynn Museum.

-Hello.

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-Would you like to follow me?

-Yes, lead on.

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In January 1915, two massive German Zeppelin airships came

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floating over the Norfolk skies.

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Many people in Britain had heard of these, but nobody would ever

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have expected to see them flying overhead,

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leave alone what was about to come.

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King's Lynn was actually one of the first places

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to be bombed by a Zeppelin.

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On the night of 19th January 1915,

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two Zeppelins flew over from Germany, both carrying bombs.

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When the L4 Zeppelin came over King's Lynn,

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it dropped a total of eight bombs.

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Some of them didn't explode, others did.

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Several people were injured and buildings were destroyed,

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and there was two casualties, unfortunately, on that night.

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This is actually a piece of the Zeppelin bomb

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which came down in a very small village outside of King's Lynn.

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-So is this just the tip of it?

-It's just the tip of it.

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-And that's a real weight, isn't it?

-It really is, yeah.

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The bombing of King's Lynn and the deaths of two locals inspired

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the community to become more involved with the war effort.

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Engineers, in particular, had valuable expertise to bring to the

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table and local firm Savage's turned their business towards the fight.

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Frederick Savage was a fantastic engineer and entrepreneur.

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He started off his business in farming and agricultural equipment

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before he then branched off into fairground rides.

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In the Victorian era, no fairground would be complete without

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one of the Savage's carousels.

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So, from a carousel, from a sort of tractor-maker to carousel-maker,

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which avenue did he go down for the war effort?

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By the time the First World War started,

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Frederick Savage had unfortunately died,

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but his sons were running the business instead

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and they managed to secure the manufacturing rights

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to the Voisin LA biplane,

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which they made in their factory here in King's Lynn.

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The skills of working with canvas and wire, engineering equipment

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was easily transferable into working with these planes.

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From flying horses to flying planes,

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Savage's produced a number of these aircraft for the British war effort,

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and the King's Lynn engineering expertise didn't stop there.

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A local inventor by the name of Thomas Cooper

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revolutionised how we bombed the enemy.

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This is a Thomas Cooper bomb, which were made in King's Lynn,

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and they were one of the first small aerial bombs to be

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used during the First World War.

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They were fitted with a safety device, which meant that they

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wouldn't explode until they'd been dropped out of the aeroplane.

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That's a very wise idea.

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And this great wheel thing going on in the front?

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Yeah, that's part of the safety device,

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-so this little propeller would have fitted on the front there.

-Yeah.

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That would have been spinning as it went out

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and once it had spun enough times, you get your explosion.

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Interesting that in King's Lynn, we've got Savage's,

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we've got Cooper's and this probably was replicated all over the country,

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everybody migrating their existing skills

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to help with the mighty war effort.

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This collective invention and spirit played an important role,

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and its impact on helping win the First World War

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cannot be underestimated.

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Right now, it's time for the chaps to have some well-earned rest

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so, nighty-night.

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It's a brand-new day and the boys are back on the hunt

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for antiques, with Charlie taking on chauffeuring duties.

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-Is everything all right in the back, sir?

-Lovely, thank you.

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Yesterday, Charlie was a big spender,

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splashing £160 on five lots.

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A 1960s vintage battery-operated car,

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a cruet in the form of an aeroplane,

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a globe,

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a set of Victorian baker's scales, and a model car.

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That leaves him with just £40 to spend today.

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James had far less fruitful day,

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spending only £12 on a gladioli vase.

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His pockets are pretty full, with £188 left to spend.

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The fellows are still in King's Lynn this morning

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and heading to James's first shop.

0:17:470:17:49

-Lovely.

-Will that do for you, sir?

0:17:500:17:53

-Lovely, thank you.

-Splendid.

0:17:530:17:55

I'll be around, sir, don't worry.

0:17:550:17:57

HE LAUGHS

0:17:570:18:00

-Ah, thank you. Thank you.

-Pleasure, sir.

0:18:020:18:05

-Are you going shopping this morning, sir?

-Yes, shopping.

-Marvellous.

0:18:050:18:10

-Just freshen you up a little, sir.

-There we are.

-Marvellous.

0:18:100:18:14

-Have a good day, sir.

-Same to you, Ross.

-See you later.

-Bye.

0:18:140:18:17

How sweet.

0:18:170:18:19

James still has plenty of money burning a hole in his pocket

0:18:190:18:22

and with only one item to show for yesterday,

0:18:220:18:25

he'd best not dilly-dally today.

0:18:250:18:28

-Hello.

-Good morning.

-Hello. James.

0:18:280:18:30

-Hello, James. I'm Maggie.

-Hello, Maggie. Nice to see you.

0:18:300:18:34

-Nice to meet you.

-Now, how long have you had this lovely place for?

0:18:340:18:37

-Two-and-a-half years.

-Two-and-a-half years? Good. Going strong.

0:18:370:18:41

OK, well, I'll just have a good old rootle around.

0:18:410:18:44

Chop chop. You're lagging behind here.

0:18:440:18:48

Crikey, he's an acquired taste!

0:18:500:18:53

Maggie, can I look in this cabinet down here?

0:18:550:18:59

Lovely piece of wood.

0:18:590:19:01

"The Beaver Talbot tie press."

0:19:010:19:04

-I'd like the nameplate.

-Would that have been...

0:19:040:19:08

..something, yeah,

0:19:100:19:11

that a gentleman would have simply

0:19:110:19:14

put in his wardrobe with the tie in?

0:19:140:19:18

Yeah, I think so. He would have left it overnight,

0:19:180:19:20

-rather like putting trousers in a trouser-press.

-Yeah.

0:19:200:19:23

Or maybe at rest, when he was reading his newspaper.

0:19:230:19:28

You just recline in your armchair,

0:19:280:19:30

there we are, doing two jobs at once.

0:19:300:19:33

SHE LAUGHS

0:19:330:19:35

A man should look his best at all times.

0:19:350:19:39

With James's tie now nice and straight, and the tie-presser

0:19:390:19:43

a definite contender, are there any other items on his radar?

0:19:430:19:47

It's a stand, it's a tazza.

0:19:470:19:50

The rather nice thing is, it has a little

0:19:500:19:53

pictorial thing here,

0:19:530:19:56

and I think it's probably Windsor Castle.

0:19:560:19:59

This is rather fun so, a paper knife,

0:19:590:20:01

wholly appropriate it should have a terminal here, the Penny Black.

0:20:010:20:05

This was the mighty stamp.

0:20:050:20:07

This is the stamp that made the world slightly smaller,

0:20:070:20:10

introduced in the early part of the 1840s.

0:20:100:20:14

Incredibly successful.

0:20:140:20:16

This was an invention that introduced a new item.

0:20:160:20:20

-It's like the internet revolution, isn't it?

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:20:200:20:24

An amazing take-up.

0:20:240:20:26

Maggie is off to chat with colleague Ian to see what price they'll

0:20:260:20:30

be able to do on the tazza and the paper knife.

0:20:300:20:34

We could do...maybe 40 would probably be the best, I think.

0:20:350:20:40

So that's sort of looking at about £20 each, isn't it?

0:20:400:20:44

What about if I bought the strange beaver fellow, what could that be?

0:20:440:20:50

-Four.

-That could be four, could it?

0:20:500:20:53

How about the whole lot for 40?

0:20:530:20:56

-Erm, yeah, OK.

-That's very kind of you.

0:20:580:21:01

Thank you very much indeed, Maggie.

0:21:010:21:03

So that's a deal done for £40 for all three items.

0:21:030:21:08

£18 for the tazza,

0:21:080:21:09

£18 for the paper knife

0:21:090:21:12

and the tie press thrown in for £4.

0:21:120:21:15

-£40. Very kind of you.

-Lovely.

0:21:150:21:18

Is that you done in here now, James?

0:21:190:21:22

-Maggie, I did notice one more thing. Can I show you?

-Yes, certainly.

0:21:220:21:26

It's sort of winking at me.

0:21:260:21:28

My eye suddenly alighted on this rather magnificent pheasant.

0:21:280:21:32

-Ah, yes.

-The mighty cock bird.

0:21:320:21:34

And I just wondered, I've had a look at the price tag,

0:21:340:21:37

and I was sort of tempted...

0:21:370:21:40

Could it be bought for 45?

0:21:420:21:45

The ticket price is a very specific £92.52p,

0:21:450:21:49

so Maggie's off for another tete-a-tete with Ian,

0:21:490:21:52

armed with James's £45 offer.

0:21:520:21:56

What's the result, Maggie?

0:21:560:21:58

-What is the result?

-He says yes.

0:21:580:22:01

He says yes, the man from Del Monte says yes!

0:22:010:22:04

-45, let's not fiddle around.

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:22:040:22:09

I've had a lovely morning with you

0:22:090:22:12

and I am now offski.

0:22:120:22:14

Bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.

0:22:140:22:17

So that last-minute purchase of the pheasant brings James's total spend

0:22:180:22:22

to £97, with one more shop to go.

0:22:220:22:26

King's Lynn is steeped in maritime tradition.

0:22:290:22:32

For centuries, it was one of the country's most vital river ports,

0:22:320:22:36

providing easy access for trade with mainland Europe,

0:22:360:22:39

so it's perhaps not surprising that two of the town's

0:22:390:22:42

most celebrated sons are a pair of sailors

0:22:420:22:45

who made their mark on the world stage.

0:22:450:22:48

George Vancouver and Samuel Gurney Cresswell were both born in the town

0:22:480:22:54

and were both instrumental in some crucial geographic discoveries.

0:22:540:22:59

Charlie's come to meet Doreen Leventhall

0:22:590:23:02

from the King's Lynn Preservation Trust to find out more.

0:23:020:23:05

Doreen, what a splendid sea breeze there is today.

0:23:050:23:09

I've been to King's Lynn before,

0:23:090:23:11

but I've never really realised its historical importance.

0:23:110:23:15

It was a very important port,

0:23:150:23:18

and from earliest times, grew up on the side of the River Great Ouse

0:23:180:23:23

and by the early 13th century,

0:23:230:23:26

it was one of the four most important ports in England.

0:23:260:23:30

The port was the hub for trade with Europe for centuries, and buildings

0:23:330:23:37

like the old custom house were right at the heart of the business.

0:23:370:23:41

Not far from here is a tribute

0:23:430:23:45

to our first King's Lynn maritime hero, George Vancouver.

0:23:450:23:50

Born in the town in 1757, he joined the Navy at just 13.

0:23:500:23:56

At the end of the 18th century, there was

0:23:560:23:58

a race to discover a faster trade route between Europe and Asia.

0:23:580:24:02

Vancouver was sent to explore.

0:24:020:24:05

-Here he is.

-Here he is.

0:24:050:24:07

Captain George Vancouver.

0:24:070:24:09

He made his career in the Navy

0:24:090:24:11

and in 1791, he was given the commission of charting

0:24:110:24:16

the west coast of America.

0:24:160:24:18

They made this massive journey from California right up to Alaska.

0:24:180:24:23

All the little inlets, they went in on small boats, charting them

0:24:230:24:28

and keeping the records, and his maps were

0:24:280:24:31

so good that they were still used until relatively recent times.

0:24:310:24:36

After the longest surveying expedition in history,

0:24:360:24:39

which lasted four-and-a-half years,

0:24:390:24:41

Vancouver didn't find the elusive Northwest Passage but he made all

0:24:410:24:46

sorts of other discoveries, and even had a Canadian city named after him.

0:24:460:24:51

When he got back here, he didn't make old bones, did he?

0:24:510:24:54

-You're right about the old bones. He was only 39.

-Gosh.

0:24:540:24:57

He died of illness, but this seems to be quite common with sailors.

0:24:570:25:03

I think it was just a very tough life at sea.

0:25:030:25:05

That didn't stop another of King's Lynn's finest taking up the mantle.

0:25:070:25:12

Samuel Gurney Cresswell was born in 1827

0:25:120:25:15

and was to become another King's Lynn naval legend.

0:25:150:25:19

Cresswell was born into a banking family

0:25:190:25:23

in these opulent surroundings.

0:25:230:25:26

So this is a bank house. It's really rather splendid.

0:25:260:25:29

And this was where Samuel Gurney Cresswell was born.

0:25:290:25:32

We know from his mother's letters that he was always a restless child,

0:25:320:25:36

so it was suggested by a family friend, who was in the Navy,

0:25:360:25:39

that perhaps a naval life would be better for young Samuel.

0:25:390:25:42

Young Cresswell loved Navy life,

0:25:440:25:46

ao much so, that he signed up for an Arctic voyage in 1849,

0:25:460:25:51

hoping to discover the Northwest Passage that had eluded

0:25:510:25:55

fellow King's Lynn sailor, Vancouver.

0:25:550:25:58

Cresswell was on a ship that was captained by a man called McClure

0:25:580:26:01

and he was absolutely determined to be the first man

0:26:010:26:05

-to find the Northwest Passage.

-Yeah.

0:26:050:26:07

So he pressed on in when the other ship that was with them

0:26:070:26:12

actually turned back because they thought it was too dangerous.

0:26:120:26:17

And that's how we know that they made it into the Arctic

0:26:170:26:21

but, of course, they got stuck in the ice.

0:26:210:26:24

Cresswell's ship, HMS Investigator,

0:26:240:26:27

was trapped in the ice for over two years.

0:26:270:26:31

The crew, faced with starvation, were eventually rescued.

0:26:310:26:35

Cresswell, who was still in good health, volunteered to lead

0:26:350:26:39

a group overland for 300 miles to meet a rescue ship.

0:26:390:26:42

This journey was the first documented evidence

0:26:440:26:47

of the Northwest Passage.

0:26:470:26:49

Cresswell arrived back in England as living proof of the discovery

0:26:490:26:52

of this long-sought-after route.

0:26:520:26:54

All the people of King's Lynn turned out and gave him a hero's welcome.

0:26:540:26:58

-The church bells were rung...

-Oh, my goodness.

-..and flags were waved.

0:26:580:27:02

-He'd never have got that if he'd been a banker, would he?

-No.

0:27:020:27:05

And so he was home and he was safe.

0:27:070:27:10

King's Lynn may not be a thriving port today, but, thanks to

0:27:100:27:14

its two naval heroes, it holds a special place in maritime history.

0:27:140:27:18

James's final shop is in the seaside town of Hunstanton.

0:27:200:27:25

Le Strange Old Barns is located only 200 yards from the beach

0:27:250:27:31

and while we do like to be beside the seaside,

0:27:310:27:34

James still has some shopping to do.

0:27:340:27:37

-James Braxton.

-Hello, James.

0:27:370:27:39

-Patrick.

-Hello. Nice to meet you, Patrick.

-You too.

0:27:390:27:41

James still has just over £100 to play with.

0:27:440:27:47

On such a sunny day, his thoughts are turning to the outdoors

0:27:510:27:55

and this funny-looking little old chap.

0:27:550:27:58

-Well, he's a humorous old fellow, isn't he?

-He's a little planter.

0:27:580:28:01

He's a planter, is he? Very smart.

0:28:010:28:05

A smart gnome's hat, hasn't he?

0:28:050:28:07

He's rather funny. What sort of price is he, Patrick?

0:28:070:28:12

£35 on him.

0:28:120:28:14

-35?

-You could make an offer.

0:28:140:28:17

The only thing that is steering me towards the gnome is to hear

0:28:170:28:22

Charlie... my competitor's reaction to it.

0:28:220:28:26

Patrick, would a tenner buy that?

0:28:260:28:28

-Yes, it will.

-You had me worried there for a moment.

-£10.

0:28:300:28:34

I thought you'd held your breath and you were going to faint on me.

0:28:340:28:38

-I'm sure he'll go to a good home, definitely.

-I think he's rather fun.

0:28:380:28:42

-Antiques should have a little humour.

-Of course.

0:28:420:28:45

Will there be a profit in humour, though? That remains to be seen.

0:28:450:28:49

Let's go to your till.

0:28:490:28:52

So, for £10 down from a ticket price of £35,

0:28:520:28:55

the gnome is off to auction, and James's shopping is complete.

0:28:550:28:59

Thank you.

0:28:590:29:01

Thank you.

0:29:010:29:04

Charlie's final shop is in the Norfolk village of Snettisham.

0:29:040:29:09

The Old Granary is packed to the gunwales,

0:29:090:29:11

but with only £40 left, Charlie will have to be resourceful.

0:29:110:29:16

No better fellow for resource.

0:29:160:29:18

-A-ha, are you Sarah, by any chance?

-I am.

0:29:180:29:22

-Marvellous. I'm Charlie.

-Hello, Charlie.

-Lovely to meet you.

0:29:220:29:26

-Am I allowed to do that?

-You are.

-We've only just met!

0:29:260:29:29

-Can I have a look round...

-Of course you can.

0:29:290:29:32

-..and I'll scream for you if I see the bid of my dreams?

-OK, thank you.

0:29:320:29:35

Ooh, look at this. Columbia grafonola number 202 portable.

0:29:430:29:47

What amazing condition! I don't think anybody's ever used it.

0:29:470:29:50

Price, £85. Problem. I don't have £85.

0:29:500:29:56

Not even half that, in fact.

0:29:560:29:58

-Sarah...

-Hello.

-..I need you.

-You need me?

-I need you.

-Wonderful.

0:29:580:30:03

-This is fab. Does it play?

-It does.

0:30:030:30:06

RECORD PLAYS

0:30:060:30:09

I think I'm falling in love. Hang on.

0:30:110:30:15

-Would you dance?

-I would.

0:30:150:30:17

Ah, this is romance! Dim the lights!

0:30:200:30:24

You old charmer, Charlie.

0:30:240:30:27

-I could give you a few lessons, if you like?

-That's fab.

0:30:270:30:30

It's portable, so you could take it on a picnic.

0:30:300:30:32

I'll be quite frank with you,

0:30:320:30:34

-I don't think I'm going to be able to buy this...

-Right.

0:30:340:30:36

-..because I went shopping yesterday.

-Could we run to 50?

0:30:360:30:39

I haven't got 50. I have not got £50.

0:30:390:30:42

-I can tell you, I've got 40 quid.

-Do you have rubber gloves?

0:30:420:30:46

-Do I have rubber gloves?

-Yes.

-No, why? Odd question.

0:30:460:30:49

You could do some washing up downstairs, I'm sure, earn £40.

0:30:490:30:53

-I'll tell you what, I've got a better idea.

-All right.

0:30:530:30:55

-Would you like a ride in my car?

-I'd love a ride in your car.

0:30:550:30:58

If I gave you a ride in my car,

0:30:580:30:59

would I still have to do the washing up?

0:30:590:31:02

OK, we'll forget the washing up.

0:31:020:31:04

Forget the washing up and have a ride in my car.

0:31:040:31:06

Oh, I'm not quite sure this is within the rules

0:31:060:31:08

but Sarah seems quite happy.

0:31:080:31:10

-So where are we going?

-Right, we're going...

0:31:100:31:15

..to Paradise Island.

0:31:150:31:17

Good work, Charlie.

0:31:170:31:19

The grafonola is yours for £40 and a spin round the block

0:31:190:31:23

and you even got out of doing those dishes, you old rogue!

0:31:230:31:27

So, with the shopping complete,

0:31:270:31:29

Charlie Ross has spent all of his £200 picking up six lots -

0:31:290:31:33

the set of scales, two very different model cars,

0:31:330:31:36

a globe,

0:31:360:31:39

a chromium-plated cruet and the grafonola.

0:31:390:31:43

James Braxton was a lot more frugal, only spending £107 on his six lots -

0:31:430:31:50

the gladioli vase, the tie-press, the brass tazza,

0:31:500:31:54

the silver paper knife, the stuffed pheasant

0:31:540:31:58

and, topping it all off,

0:31:580:31:59

the gnome guarding naturally over Mother Earth.

0:31:590:32:03

But what do they make of each other's items?

0:32:030:32:05

I'm most worried about the Avery scales,

0:32:050:32:09

the globe and the Testarossa.

0:32:090:32:12

Well, amongst James's sea of mediocrity, he bought a tie-press.

0:32:120:32:17

Well, Bingo and I are the only two people in the world that wear ties

0:32:170:32:21

so although it was £4, it's probably worth 5.

0:32:210:32:24

Charlie and James are travelling to the auction in the Norfolk

0:32:260:32:29

town of Fakenham, and thoughts are turning to the competition.

0:32:290:32:34

Bingo, are you pleased with your purchases?

0:32:340:32:36

Cos I was quite amused by some of them, to be perfectly honest.

0:32:360:32:39

I was delighted with them.

0:32:390:32:41

I thought, when in Norfolk, what do you think about Norfolk?

0:32:410:32:44

You think about pheasants, you think about wildlife. OK, mine's stuffed.

0:32:440:32:48

I will declare my hand.

0:32:480:32:50

I am not confident, and looking at your purchases

0:32:500:32:53

and the fact that you've only spent half your money

0:32:530:32:56

and mine, I'm expecting defeat.

0:32:560:32:59

Oh, yeah, that's the spirit, Charlie.

0:32:590:33:02

Today's auction is taking place at the local racecourse.

0:33:020:33:05

Look at this.

0:33:050:33:07

-What time is the first race?

-The first race will be 2.30, won't it?

0:33:070:33:10

-Or 1.30.

-I'll put on a tenner.

0:33:100:33:13

I stand a better chance with that than my lots, I think.

0:33:130:33:15

But does auctioneer David James think there's an odds-on favourite?

0:33:150:33:21

Well, I think the teams have chosen an interesting range of items.

0:33:210:33:25

Not so sure about the garden gnome,

0:33:250:33:27

but it does look a bit aged, so it might sit well in somebody's garden.

0:33:270:33:31

I'm not sure that stuffed pheasants in Norfolk will be a prize-winner,

0:33:310:33:35

cos we've all got them in the garden all the time,

0:33:350:33:37

and the rest, well, we'll just have to see how it goes.

0:33:370:33:40

We will indeed. Time for the auction.

0:33:400:33:44

First up, James's gladioli vase.

0:33:440:33:48

And I have been given bids to start at £15.

0:33:480:33:52

-You're into a profit.

-15, I have.

0:33:520:33:55

20 in the room. 20, I have.

0:33:550:33:57

In the room at 20. Five, do I hear?

0:33:570:34:00

-That's not bad.

-Are we all sure? At £20, it is.

0:34:000:34:04

First, second, last time at £20.

0:34:040:34:07

A promising start there.

0:34:070:34:09

Next up, Charlie's baker's scales.

0:34:090:34:14

-My bid starts at £20 only.

-Well, £20.

0:34:140:34:18

That's a big price.

0:34:180:34:21

£30 bid. 40 do I hear?

0:34:210:34:23

At £30, at 30, £40, I have.

0:34:230:34:27

-Oh.

-50 will do.

0:34:270:34:29

£40 I am bid. At 40.

0:34:290:34:31

Go on, go 50. At 40.

0:34:310:34:34

At £40, are we done with them?

0:34:340:34:36

-At £40.

-A working profit.

-Yeah.

0:34:360:34:40

Another profit. So, it's still a close contest.

0:34:400:34:46

Well done, well done.

0:34:460:34:47

-Very nip and tuck, isn't it?

-It is.

0:34:470:34:49

It's very tight.

0:34:490:34:51

James's tie-press is next to go.

0:34:510:34:54

Tenner then, come on. Start me at a tenner.

0:34:550:34:58

-Surely a tenner.

-£8 I am bid.

0:34:580:35:01

Ten, do I hear? Eight, I have.

0:35:010:35:02

Ten do I hear for the tie-press?

0:35:020:35:05

-At £8 only.

-Eight?

-Eight only.

0:35:050:35:07

A working profit, James.

0:35:070:35:09

At eight I'll sell. £10 on the net, saved by the net.

0:35:090:35:12

At £10 on the net. Internet bid at 10.

0:35:120:35:15

12 anywhere? At £10, first, second, last time at 10...

0:35:150:35:19

A small profit for the tie-press.

0:35:200:35:23

Up now is the grafonola record player.

0:35:230:35:27

This is my coup de grace.

0:35:270:35:28

-This is the grafonola?

-Yeah.

0:35:280:35:30

I have all my eggs in this basket.

0:35:300:35:33

I'm delighted to say that the bidding starts at £70.

0:35:330:35:37

Five, do I hear? 70 I have.

0:35:370:35:40

Five do I hear?

0:35:400:35:41

£70 bid. 75 bid.

0:35:410:35:43

£80. £80 bid.

0:35:430:35:45

At £80 and selling, are we all sure? At £80...

0:35:450:35:50

First, second, last time at 80...

0:35:500:35:53

That was marvellous.

0:35:530:35:55

That puts Charlie in the lead.

0:35:550:35:58

Wow! Can James's Victorian tazza help him catch up?

0:35:580:36:02

-I think your tazza's got a bit of money there. Honestly.

-Do you?

0:36:020:36:06

-Quite collectable, these are.

-They are.

-They are.

0:36:060:36:09

Not very valuable, but quite collectable.

0:36:090:36:13

Not saleable.

0:36:130:36:14

-Start me 10.

-Sounds a little low.

0:36:140:36:17

10, I have. £10 I'm bid. 12 I'll take.

0:36:170:36:19

£10 I'm bid. £10 I'm bid.

0:36:190:36:21

£12 on the net. 15 do I hear?

0:36:210:36:23

-£15 against the bar.

-On the net.

0:36:230:36:26

-15 bid. 18 do I hear?

-Keep going.

0:36:260:36:29

Are we all done with it? At £15 it is, then.

0:36:290:36:33

First, second, last time at 15.

0:36:330:36:35

-Oh, dear.

-Sold to the butler.

-Oh, dear.

-Roger the butler.

0:36:350:36:39

First loss of the day for James, which puts him further behind.

0:36:390:36:43

Charlie's tinplate car is next to go.

0:36:450:36:48

You see, he's an expert in his field

0:36:480:36:50

and he's put 20 to 30 on my toy.

0:36:500:36:53

And how much did you pay for it?

0:36:530:36:55

-It cost 50.

-Excellent.

0:36:550:36:57

£10 I'm bid.

0:36:570:36:59

£12, madam. £12 to the lady.

0:36:590:37:01

15 against the bar. £16 to the lady.

0:37:010:37:04

18 at the bar. 18 at the bar.

0:37:040:37:07

-Come on.

-£20 on the net. 22 on the net.

0:37:070:37:10

-25 on the internet.

-Ah, the internet.

0:37:100:37:12

30, do I hear? 25 I'm bid.

0:37:120:37:15

28 do I hear? £28 to the lady.

0:37:150:37:18

-Well done.

-Come on.

0:37:180:37:20

Still making a substantial loss, of course.

0:37:200:37:23

£28. Are we all done at £28?

0:37:230:37:25

-227.

-Thank you, madam.

0:37:250:37:28

That helps James catch up a bit.

0:37:280:37:31

Things are a lot tighter now.

0:37:310:37:33

How will James's gnome fair?

0:37:330:37:36

I think he's going to be your surprise thumping profit of the day.

0:37:360:37:42

I'm rather hoping anything north of 30 and I'll be delighted.

0:37:420:37:47

Who's in at 10? 10 at the back. 10.

0:37:470:37:49

12 against the bar. 15 to the lady.

0:37:490:37:52

-Good Lord!

-£18 standing at the back.

0:37:520:37:54

£20 there seated.

0:37:540:37:56

22 seated to the lady. 25 bid here.

0:37:560:37:59

£28 to the lady. £30 bid.

0:37:590:38:03

At 32, bid reluctantly.

0:38:030:38:06

35 bid. My God.

0:38:060:38:08

LAUGHTER

0:38:080:38:10

-There's no accounting for taste, sir, is there?

-Or a lack of it.

0:38:100:38:14

-35 bid.

-Quirky and ugly.

0:38:140:38:16

38. £40. At £40 standing here.

0:38:160:38:20

All done with it at 40.

0:38:200:38:22

-Well played, sir.

-Well done.

0:38:220:38:24

Sensational.

0:38:240:38:25

-Marvellous. What an auctioneer.

-Yes, marvellous.

0:38:250:38:28

Well, that's a turn-up for the books and puts James narrowly in the lead.

0:38:280:38:32

Your in-depth knowledge of antiques is second to none.

0:38:330:38:37

It's marvellous, isn't it?

0:38:370:38:38

Now for Charlie's cruet.

0:38:380:38:41

10 I have, thank you. £10 bid.

0:38:410:38:43

-12 do I hear?

-It's a bit tight.

0:38:430:38:45

16 on the net. 18 do we hear?

0:38:450:38:48

18 on the net. £18 on the net.

0:38:480:38:50

20 do we hear? £20 in the room.

0:38:500:38:52

-£20 in the room.

-You're in profit.

0:38:520:38:55

-No, it's what it cost.

-At 20.

0:38:550:38:57

First, second, last time at £20...

0:38:570:39:00

-Oh, dear.

-Oh, dear. What's going on?

0:39:000:39:02

Crumbs!

0:39:020:39:04

Oh, dear.

0:39:040:39:05

After commission, it's a small loss, I'm afraid.

0:39:050:39:09

-I'm going down the pan.

-No, you're not.

-You're pulling away.

0:39:090:39:12

-Am I pulling away?

-Two lots each.

0:39:120:39:14

You've got a paper knife, which is going to

0:39:140:39:16

make you a thumping great profit.

0:39:160:39:19

Will the paper knife do as well as they think?

0:39:190:39:22

We'll make a start at £30 to start. 40 do I hear? £40 bid.

0:39:220:39:27

50 do I hear? £40 bid. 50 do I hear?

0:39:270:39:30

At £40, seated in the room.

0:39:300:39:33

-45 bid, fresh bid.

-45!

-Well done.

0:39:330:39:36

At £45. 50 do I hear? At £45.

0:39:360:39:41

Standing there at 45.

0:39:410:39:43

All done with it? £45.

0:39:430:39:45

-I'm up against a master here.

-£45, you see.

-Yeah.

0:39:450:39:49

Just steady work, steady work.

0:39:490:39:52

That's another good bit of business for James. Charlie's globe now.

0:39:520:39:58

He had high hopes for this one.

0:39:580:40:00

So start me off at £30, then.

0:40:000:40:02

-Oh, dear, is that all?

-Start me off at 20. Come on. 15 I'm bid.

0:40:020:40:06

-£20 standing at the back.

-20.

-This is... Come on.

0:40:060:40:11

25 standing here. £30 at the back.

0:40:110:40:13

It's bouncing around.

0:40:130:40:15

This needs to be £60.

0:40:150:40:18

£40 at the bar.

0:40:180:40:20

At 40. 45 standing.

0:40:200:40:21

We need a bit more, don't we?

0:40:210:40:23

-It's coming on, coming on.

-At £50.

0:40:230:40:26

-55 standing. At 55.

-Almost a profit.

-At £55.

0:40:260:40:30

In the room and standing at £55, are we all done?

0:40:300:40:33

For the second and last time at £55...

0:40:330:40:36

Another small profit in the old bag.

0:40:360:40:40

We're down to one item each and it's still all to play for.

0:40:400:40:44

It's basically all boiling down to a pheasant versus a Ferrari.

0:40:440:40:47

-A stuffed pheasant.

-Yeah.

0:40:470:40:50

James's pheasant is last up for him.

0:40:500:40:54

Start me 10, then, come on.

0:40:540:40:56

£10 I have. £10 bid. 15 bid.

0:40:560:41:00

£18 I have.

0:41:000:41:01

-James...

-Well done.

-£20 I'm bid. £20 I'm bid. At the bar, £25 on the net.

0:41:010:41:06

-Well done.

-Oh, yes!

-At £25 for the pheasant...

0:41:060:41:10

Coming home to Norfolk, 467.

0:41:100:41:13

How stuffed is that?

0:41:130:41:16

If the Ferrari can come up trumps for Charlie, he will win the day.

0:41:160:41:21

-I'm very nervous.

-Start me at 10, then.

0:41:210:41:24

It's got to be worth more than that.

0:41:240:41:26

£10 to start. £10 to start.

0:41:260:41:28

-£10 to start. Where are we?

-Don't they like Ferraris here?

-10 I have.

0:41:280:41:32

12 do we here? £12 internet bid.

0:41:320:41:34

-15 do we hear?

-Oh, on the internet.

0:41:340:41:37

£12 only on the net. At £12 only, are we... 15 standing at the back.

0:41:370:41:41

-15 at the back.

-One more, sir.

0:41:410:41:44

We take our time in Norfolk.

0:41:440:41:46

-15 at the back. 18.

-You need a Ferrari.

-15 at the back. 18.

0:41:460:41:51

16 on the net. £18. Got there.

0:41:510:41:54

-18 bid.

-Oh!

-20 do we hear?

0:41:540:41:58

18 bid in the room. At £18 and selling. Are we done with it at 18?

0:41:580:42:02

It's a close one, but let's see who's coming out on top.

0:42:020:42:07

Charlie started this first leg with £200.

0:42:080:42:12

After auction costs, he's made a small loss of £2.38,

0:42:120:42:16

leaving him with £197.62 to spend next time.

0:42:160:42:21

James has emerged victorious today.

0:42:240:42:26

He also started off with £200.

0:42:260:42:28

After auction costs, he's made a profit of £20.10,

0:42:280:42:32

meaning he takes £220.10 on to the next leg.

0:42:320:42:38

Pleasure to be thrashed by you, sir.

0:42:380:42:41

As always! Where to, sir?

0:42:410:42:44

-I think the station.

-The station, sir.

-The station, thank you.

0:42:440:42:48

Cheerio, chaps.

0:42:540:42:57

Next time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:42:570:42:59

Charlie's doing all he can to balance his budget...

0:42:590:43:03

I feel like the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

0:43:030:43:06

..and James is on electrifying form.

0:43:060:43:08

I'll be buzzy, I'll be singing arias. Ahhh!

0:43:080:43:12