Episode 23 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 23

Charlie Ross and James Braxton set off from Shenton in Leicestershire and head to an auction in the village of Bourne End, Buckinghamshire.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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This is beautiful.

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That's the way to do this.

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..with £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour for antiques.

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-Joy.

-Hello!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction,

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but it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Sorry, sorry, sorry.

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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The handbrake's on.

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today sees auctioneers James Braxton

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and Charlie Ross midway through their road trip.

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-We've got the sun on our backs, we are going to do well today.

-Yeah.

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I mean, look at this.

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-English countryside...

-Sheep!

-Oh, sheep.

-Sheep!

-Sheep.

-Sheep!

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He's rather excitable.

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Charlie is as charming as ever.

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-I'd quite like to go away with that.

-Yes.

-On holiday.

-Yeah.

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-They're lovely.

-Would you come with me?

-Of course.

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And James is a patriotic soul.

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Well, I am very pleased with my Queen's shield.

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I think I can be a loyal citizen.

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They're navigating their road trip in a 1961 Ford Zephyr,

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a car made before seatbelts were legally required.

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-I think I put it into reverse.

-JAMES LAUGHS

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Whoopsi-daisy!

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Our Road Trip pals started off with £200 each.

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After their second auction, Charlie is lagging somewhere behind James

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with a kitty of £148.76 for the day ahead.

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James is in pole position after the terrific result

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with the two Doulton vases.

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He has a stuffed wallet of £433.50 to spend today.

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Their trip began in the Lincolnshire town of Boston

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and meanders through Norfolk and Cambridgeshire,

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up to Leicestershire, before heading south

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and finishing in the Surrey town of Cobham.

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Today's leg

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sets off from Shenton, in Leicestershire,

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and will head to auction in the village

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of Bourne End, Buckinghamshire.

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I thought I'd wear a black tie in memory of my road trip,

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which seems to have come to a rather premature end.

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Don't you worry, it'll be all right.

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Cheer up, Charlie, you can still catch up.

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Both chaps are sharing a shop

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in the very pretty Whitemoors Antiques and Crafts Centre.

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Here we are.

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I think you need to loosen off that tie at some point.

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The black tie, the tie of mourning?

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-Tie of mourning, I think that can go.

-Early defeat.

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-I think that can go.

-Fair enough, but...

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-You have been here before, haven't you?

-I have been here before.

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-I bought a drum.

-You bought a drum?

-Yes.

-Did well with it?

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# Banging on the big base drum

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# What a picture What a picture

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# Um, dilly-um, dum, dum, dum, dum

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# Stick it in your family album. #

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Right. Good.

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And it made a lot. Carry on. Shall I go this way?

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I'll go this way.

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Blimey, what did Charlie have for breakfast?

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There are 40 different dealers here.

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-Aha! You look like the boss to me.

-I am the boss.

-Are you?

-Yeah.

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-I'm Charlie.

-Lovely to meet you, Charlie. Portia.

-Portia!

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-That's a very racy name.

-Very racy.

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Right. You've got work to do, Charlie.

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Oh, vintage luggage.

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Didn't they make luggage well?

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Look at that.

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An Edwardian piece of luggage.

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It's got its original brass studs on the bottom.

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There's quite a demand for vintage luggage these days.

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Look at the stitching.

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And it's got really rather a lovely patination.

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And what I like is when they've got original labels on them.

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It's £50.

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I could see that making £40 or £50 at auction.

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Portia!

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The popularity of travel in the 1930s heralded

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the use of the rather attractive gentleman's valise.

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-Hello, my darling.

-Hi, you all right?

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Yeah, I've seen something I quite like.

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-I love old luggage.

-Beautiful, isn't it?

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-Oh, no, it's awful.

-SHE LAUGHS

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-No, it's gorgeous!

-No, it is lovely. What chance have we got?

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Have we got a ch...? I mean, I'll tell you, I'll be perfectly honest.

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I think if it goes to auction, it will be estimated at £30 to £50.

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I think it might make 40 or 50 quid. It is a good thing.

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-I'd quite like to go away with that.

-Yes.

-On holiday.

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-Yeah, they're lovely.

-Would you come with me?

-Of course, Charles.

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A bit forward, that. Just a minute.

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-I think I'll have to ring the tenant and see.

-Could you do that?

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I will do that for you.

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-Ring that tenant.

-One second.

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-Tell him I'm a really nice chap.

-I will do.

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Figures crossed, Charlie.

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Portia's got some news.

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-Charles, I've just spoken to the tenant.

-What have you done?

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-Have you done better than 45?

-She'd be happy to take 27.

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-27?!

-Yes.

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What an odd figure.

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I think that's well worth the money. I'm not even going to try

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and beat her down to 25. I'm going to say £27 is really generous.

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The charismatic Charlie has bought his first item,

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the gentleman's valise for £27.

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What about James?

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With over £400 to spend,

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is he going to go all out or exercise some prudence?

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Mind your head.

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-Good morning, James.

-Hello, hello.

-Welcome to Whitemoors.

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-Hello, nice to meet you. And your name is?

-Robert.

-Robert.

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What wonders can you spot in here then, James?

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-So this is your emporium, is it?

-It is, James, yes.

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So where did you gather all your goodies from?

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-From auctions, from houses, from people bringing stuff in.

-Yeah.

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-All over the place.

-This sort of leaps out at me here.

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-That is a very '50s look.

-Isn't that great?

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The retro thing is in at the moment.

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I like the figurine. She is a very shapely lady, isn't she?

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And it has that nice sort of pull,

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that eggshell finish to the glaze, doesn't it? Where...?

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-So, who's made this?

-It is West German.

-Made in West Germany.

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And the pattern is called Jamaica.

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-That's right.

-Just what we need, something exotic and warm, isn't it?

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-On a cold day.

-THEY LAUGH

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I definitely need it. That would... She would be a lovely tonic.

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She'd lose your cold in a hurry, wouldn't she?

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Crumbs!

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West German pottery is a brand-new field of collecting

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and is proving to be very popular at auction.

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And very practical, you know. A couple of single stems.

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Get your gladiolas in there, your camellias, whatever.

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-With or without, it still stands good.

-It stands good, doesn't it?

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I would definitely have that in my home.

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Now, what could you do on that, Rob?

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The absolute best to you, James...

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-Don't...

-..because I want you to win.

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Don't...don't put yourself down.

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-I won't. £12.

-£12.

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It is in good order. It is bright, it has been looked after.

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It has been slightly treasured. I think that is very handsome.

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What about eight on that, Rob?

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-Oh...

-You know how these auctioneers work.

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Oh, here we go.

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Yeah, you know, they all start in ten, five and everything.

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And, you know, if you're going to have a chance of it,

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a little profit, you need...

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-Ten.

-Ten?

-To give me a little bit.

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Ten. I am liking your start. Rob, put it there.

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-Thank you very much indeed.

-You're welcome.

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A quick and efficient purchase from James.

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£10 for the 1950s West German vase.

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Charlie has journeyed east to the historic village of Kidworth.

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Charlie is some way behind James in the profit stakes

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so needs to uncover a hidden gem somewhere.

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This large, family-owned antiques centre has over 60 dealers.

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That's...early Victorian. It's...

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Or even William IV rosewood over-mantle mirror.

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Now, you can see that the mirror is not in great condition.

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But frankly, when you look like me,

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it's quite good having a mirror like that, to be perfectly honest.

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He's hard on himself.

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It's 150-plus years old.

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160, 170 years old years old.

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And I could get away with putting a new mirror in there.

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And it's £25.

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If that could be really cheap...

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..I would buy it because it's a genuine antique.

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Let's go and see what we can do.

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Time to track down the lady in charge, the lovely Sally.

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-Turn right. It used to be a mirror.

-Used to be a mirror.

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Well, it looks like it. Can you see?

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I have to say that the owner...

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Can you hold that end?

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-I can.

-Well done.

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The owner does admit...

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-Cos it says antique tarnished mirror.

-Very tarnished.

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-It certainly is. Look at us in there.

-Absolutely.

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You can't really see us.

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-The fairest of them all.

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

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But it is a rosewood frame

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and it's about 1840, 1850,

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so it's old.

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And I like old things. It's knackered here and there.

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Um, it's £25.

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-And I want to give a tenner for it.

-SHE GASPS

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-HE IMITATES HER GASP

-I can feel your heart

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-miss a beat there.

-It's missing lots of beats.

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-What do you think? Who is HH? It has got HH on it.

-HH...

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-It's not Horrible Henry, is it?

-No, it's not Horrible Henry.

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-Is it Happy Harry?

-It's Happy Henrietta.

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Happy Henrietta!

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If you told her that Charlie wants to give her a tenner for her

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-mirror, would she still be Happy Henrietta?

-Maybe not.

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-But we could try.

-What we can do, we can make a phone call.

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-Would you mind?

-We can do that.

-That's sweet of you.

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Tell her Charlie's desperate, would you?

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And a bit of a chancer.

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-Are you smiling?

-I am smiling a little bit.

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I've spoken to the dealer,

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she says that she is quite happy to come down to £15 for you.

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-I can't ask for more than that, can I, really?

-No, not really.

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-I was being very cheeky at ten. Put it there.

-OK.

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-May I give you one of...those?

-Thank you.

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That's really kind of you.

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Charlie's second purchase is the 19th-century mirror for £15.

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James, meanwhile, has travelled 24 miles to the city of Leicester.

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James is sitting pretty with a large stack of cash.

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So far, he has spent a tenner.

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Come on, James, get spending.

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-Hello. James.

-Hello, James. My name is Mark.

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Hello, Mark. I'm after the elusive bargain.

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The elusive bargain. Well, let's see if we can find you something.

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-I am getting the lay of the land.

-Yeah.

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What's that you've found?

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Quite a crude tribal stool, this.

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Not the finest carve,

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but it's carved from the solid, from the trunk.

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And they're useful.

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They make great occasional tables.

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They're just the right height for sitting beside a sofa or something.

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And they have a look, don't they?

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Would it've been a solid trunk of wood here?

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And somebody has freed it.

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As Michelangelo used to say,

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you release the figure from the object, be it marble, be it wood.

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And you chip away and you release it from its natural bindings.

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If you say so.

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What about the price?

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I noticed this when I walked in, Mark.

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-Yes.

-Not the finest one, but...

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It's not the most detailed carving, but crudities can be sometimes...

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-interesting.

-Yeah, naive charm, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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So it's carved out of the solid.

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I think it would've been one piece, definitely.

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-You can't see any joins or anything.

-And does this come from...?

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Where do you think it comes from?

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Probably...African origin, somewhere around there.

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What sort of money do you have on that, Mark?

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Um, I've got 55 on that one.

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55...

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-I'm going to carry on looking, Mark.

-Yeah, certainly.

-Keep looking.

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Scratching away.

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After a good scratch around, James is ready to make a deal.

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-Mark, the stool there with the antelope...

-Yeah.

-Is it...

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Would it be too cheeky to say 25 on that?

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-Could you make it 30?

-30?

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-Mm-hm.

-You've gone and got yourself a deal, Mark.

-OK, lovely.

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Thank you, I'll take that.

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James is attracted to the exotic today.

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The tribal stool for £30 is his second item.

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Tribal art has always...

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The Continent, especially the French,

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have always loved tribal art.

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This is a rather fun thing. Anyway, I'm pleased with it.

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And I'm off with it. Thank you, bye-bye.

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He doesn't hang about much.

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Charlie has travelled south to the town of Northampton.

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It's the home of British shoemaking

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and even the local football team have the nickname The Cobblers.

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And it's here, at Northampton Town Football Club,

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that Charlie is heading to find out more about a pioneer

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not just in sport but also in British history.

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Charlie is meeting with author Phil Vasili.

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-Charlie, hiya.

-Hello, Phil.

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-How are you?

-Very well indeed, thank you.

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Welcome to Northampton Football Club.

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Walter Tull was one of the first black professional footballers

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who played right here, at Northampton Town Football Club.

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He was also the first black officer to lead troops into battle

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in the First World War.

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Phil is the biographer of Walter's sensational story.

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This is very appropriate,

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we are in the engine room of the Northampton Town FC.

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We can see the pitch, we can see the stands.

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And where better to start?

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We've got this wonderful archive here.

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Yeah, it's a great place to start

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because Walter was very happy here, by all accounts.

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Walter was born in Folkestone, at the end of the 19th century.

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His father was a carpenter from Barbados and worked

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as a ship's joiner until he settled in England in 1876

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and married a local girl.

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Tragically, by the age of nine,

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Walter had lost both his parents to ill health and was sent,

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along with his brother, to an orphanage and Bethnal Green.

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-When he went to the orphanage, they had a football team.

-Right.

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And they played in a... They played competitive games.

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And somebody spotted him

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-round about this time as being particularly talented.

-Yeah.

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Well, you could see in the photo, Charlie, that he's in the middle

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-and he's got the ball at his feet.

-He has.

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Which usually signifies that he has got respect

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and he's one of the better players.

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In 1908, Walter was signed by amateur club Clapton FC.

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Within the year, he turned professional

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when he was signed by Tottenham Hotspur.

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It was here that Walter experienced a horrible display

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of spectator racism.

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Spurs, for him, wasn't a great source of happiness, was it?

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-It was wonderful that Spurs signed him.

-Yes.

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And, you know, to be signed as a black player

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is unusual at the time.

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And Spurs have to be commended for that.

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However, Walter got a lot of abuse when he was playing.

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And in one particular match,

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in September of 1909 at Bristol,

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it was so bad that one of the newspapers headlined

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the abuse that Walter got.

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And in the report,

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the journalist said that Walter was a model for all white men who

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playful football because of the way he withstood the abuse.

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I think that was the strength of Walter, that he

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-did his talking as a footballer, with his feet.

-Yeah.

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A year later, Northampton Town

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was thrilled to snap up the talented Walter.

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But soon, the dark clouds of war loomed, in 1914.

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Walter was one of the first to enlist in the British Army.

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It wasn't until November 1915

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that Walter went to France,

0:16:500:16:52

his battalion went to France.

0:16:520:16:54

-Hm.

-And they saw action almost immediately

0:16:540:16:57

in around the Festubert-Givenchy region.

0:16:570:17:01

Walter's cool-headed leadership ensured that he rose through

0:17:010:17:05

the ranks quickly.

0:17:050:17:06

So he saw action -

0:17:100:17:12

and I think I'm right in saying - was he recommended for an MC?

0:17:120:17:16

As far as we know, Walter was the first black officer to lead

0:17:160:17:20

white troops into battle in the Army.

0:17:200:17:23

And he was commended for his bravery

0:17:230:17:25

and commended for bringing back his party without injury.

0:17:250:17:29

That's when he was recommended for the Military Cross,

0:17:290:17:31

which he never actually received.

0:17:310:17:33

He embodied a legal contradiction.

0:17:330:17:36

As a black soldier, he shouldn't have been an officer

0:17:360:17:39

according to the manual of military law.

0:17:390:17:41

So if they gave him his Military Cross, it was almost like

0:17:410:17:45

they were admitting that they'd created

0:17:450:17:49

-this illegal precedent.

-Yeah.

0:17:490:17:52

-They were giving a rubber stamp to breaking the law, really.

-Yeah.

0:17:520:17:55

Sadly, tragedy struck.

0:17:560:17:58

On 25 March 1918, Second Lieutenant Tull

0:17:580:18:02

was killed in action at the German spring offensive on the Somme.

0:18:020:18:06

He was 29 years old.

0:18:060:18:08

He was certainly a very remarkable black Britton

0:18:090:18:13

who achieved a great deal in his short life.

0:18:130:18:15

I mean, we are here at a club that's...

0:18:150:18:18

-The road that leads into the stadium is called Walter Tull Way.

-Yeah.

0:18:180:18:21

We've got the memorial stone detailing his achievements.

0:18:210:18:25

I think it has been absolutely fascinating -

0:18:250:18:29

an extraordinary tale of a remarkable man.

0:18:290:18:32

Thank you, Charlie.

0:18:320:18:33

The odds were stacked against Walter, but he succeeded

0:18:330:18:37

as a star on the football field and a hero on the battlefield.

0:18:370:18:41

It's the end of a long day, so time for a bit of a rest. Nighty-night.

0:18:420:18:47

Cor, it's absolutely tipping it down this morning.

0:18:530:18:56

This weather, very good for the leather upper, I would say.

0:18:580:19:03

You need a leather upper.

0:19:030:19:05

A good brogue is always the best option.

0:19:050:19:08

Anyway, here is a rundown of their shopping so far.

0:19:080:19:11

Charlie has snapped up two items - the leather valise

0:19:130:19:17

and the 19th-century mirror, giving him a meagre £106.76 for today.

0:19:170:19:22

I love you!

0:19:220:19:24

-Good morning, James.

-Hello.

0:19:240:19:25

James also bought two items - the 1960s West German vase

0:19:250:19:29

and the tribal stool.

0:19:290:19:31

He's swimming in money with £393.50 for the day ahead.

0:19:310:19:36

James is in Northampton to have a go at spending some of his money.

0:19:400:19:45

Although he's rich in profits, he's only spent £40 so far.

0:19:450:19:48

Oh, nice hat!

0:19:480:19:51

-Hello. James.

-Hello, I'm Sonia.

-Hello, Sonia. Very nice to meet you.

0:19:510:19:56

You're a very nice little haven amongst a... Foul out there today.

0:19:560:20:01

-Well, I hope we've got something for you.

-I'm sure you will.

0:20:010:20:04

Maybe Sonia will persuade James

0:20:070:20:09

to part with some cash.

0:20:090:20:11

There's some nice things amongst here. I love this!

0:20:120:20:15

This is very theatrical, isn't it?

0:20:170:20:19

Great for a sort of baronial hall, isn't it?

0:20:200:20:23

It is.

0:20:230:20:25

Baron Braxton has a certain ring to it.

0:20:250:20:28

Really good.

0:20:280:20:29

Love that.

0:20:290:20:31

Right, like that.

0:20:310:20:33

So, the shield...

0:20:330:20:35

It's on the list.

0:20:350:20:36

The shield is priced up at £40

0:20:370:20:39

and could have been made for the Queen's Silver Jubilee.

0:20:390:20:42

I like this. A modest woodcut.

0:20:450:20:49

But what I like about this is it's very much in its contemporary frame.

0:20:490:20:54

It has a good look. Does it have a date on it?

0:20:540:20:57

It's evocative of a period, isn't it? 1920s.

0:20:570:21:01

The Untidy Corner.

0:21:010:21:02

It's got a personal inscription on it. And it is a woodblock print.

0:21:020:21:06

Very much used early illustrations for newspapers

0:21:060:21:11

and book illustrations. Artists really loved it.

0:21:110:21:15

I like that. It's got style.

0:21:150:21:18

Another one on the list.

0:21:190:21:21

The woodblock print has a ticket price of £10.

0:21:210:21:25

Now, to find Sonia to talk money.

0:21:250:21:27

These are my two items, Sonia.

0:21:270:21:30

I love this shield. Isn't that fun?

0:21:300:21:34

So that's the shield.

0:21:340:21:35

-Do you know much about that?

-Not really.

0:21:350:21:37

It was something to do with Andy's family.

0:21:370:21:40

He bought it because he liked it and it was his family's initials.

0:21:400:21:44

Andy is the owner of the shield.

0:21:440:21:47

-I see, I see.

-I think it was his father.

-I see.

0:21:470:21:50

It also happens to be the Queen's.

0:21:500:21:52

True.

0:21:520:21:53

-THEY LAUGH

-True.

0:21:530:21:55

-So I like that one.

-OK.

-And I like the woodblock print.

-Ah.

0:21:550:21:59

You don't have to do me a special price on the woodblock print.

0:21:590:22:02

-I'm very happy to pay your ticket price.

-OK.

0:22:020:22:06

-But could I get a price on the shield?

-What have we got on that?

0:22:060:22:09

I think... What have we got? We've got £40.

0:22:090:22:13

-What price did you have in mind?

-Oh!

-See if we can meet in the middle.

0:22:150:22:19

Oh, if you're going to meet in the middle, 20 quid.

0:22:190:22:21

SHE LAUGHS

0:22:210:22:23

-SHE SIGHS

-25?

0:22:230:22:25

25, you've got yourself a deal, Sonia.

0:22:250:22:28

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Lovely.

0:22:280:22:30

I am very pleased with my Queen's shield.

0:22:300:22:32

I think I can be a loyal citizen.

0:22:320:22:34

-You'll have to find a sword now to go with it.

-I will!

0:22:340:22:38

Not spending big, is he?

0:22:380:22:40

The decorative shield for £25 and the woodblock print for ten.

0:22:400:22:44

Charlie is also in Northampton.

0:22:500:22:52

This looks interesting, Charlie.

0:22:550:22:57

Our man is having a look around The Old Bakehouse Antiques.

0:22:590:23:03

-Hello there.

-Hello.

0:23:090:23:10

-Steve, is it?

-Yeah.

-Charlie.

0:23:100:23:11

-Pleased to meet you.

-Nice to see you.

-And you.

0:23:110:23:14

-What a wonderful establishment you've got.

-Thank you very much.

0:23:140:23:16

-Did you ever see Doctor Who out the front?

-Oh, he is in there.

0:23:160:23:19

-He is in the record room.

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

0:23:190:23:21

That's a wonderful thing! Where did you get that from?

0:23:210:23:23

-He's popping in all the time.

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

0:23:230:23:26

There are over 60 dealers here.

0:23:290:23:31

Blimey, he's like a dog let off the lead.

0:23:310:23:34

Look at that old projector.

0:23:370:23:39

With its original box.

0:23:390:23:42

"Specto film projector.

0:23:420:23:45

"Wood box and accessories. Bulb not working."

0:23:450:23:48

Well, you can get a bulb these days for something like that.

0:23:480:23:53

In the mid-1930s,

0:23:530:23:54

the British company Specto were renowned for their cine projectors.

0:23:540:23:58

During the Second World War,

0:23:580:24:00

the British government used the projectors to review intelligence

0:24:000:24:03

captured by British aircraft flying over occupied Europe.

0:24:030:24:07

£110.

0:24:080:24:10

HE SIGHS

0:24:100:24:13

I'm not going to spend £110 on that.

0:24:130:24:15

But I would buy it at a price.

0:24:150:24:17

Good to hear, Charlie.

0:24:190:24:20

Oh, what is that you've found?

0:24:230:24:26

Joy!

0:24:260:24:27

Look at that.

0:24:270:24:29

A vintage bamboo child's push chair.

0:24:290:24:33

That is fantastic!

0:24:340:24:36

Original wheels.

0:24:360:24:38

It's got two little wheels at the front here, just to stabilise it.

0:24:380:24:43

The bamboo's in good condition. It is a really unusual object.

0:24:430:24:48

And I'm always looking for something quirky and unusual.

0:24:480:24:51

It's got age, it's got quality in a certain sort of way,

0:24:510:24:55

it's got originality.

0:24:550:24:57

It is £68.

0:24:570:24:59

I don't think that's untoward.

0:25:030:25:04

That is as charming and historically interesting as that projector.

0:25:040:25:10

Projector, seat, what have I got? £106.76.

0:25:100:25:15

-HE CHUCKLES

-I hope Steve is a nice bloke.

0:25:150:25:18

Let's leave Charlie to ruminate over the lightness of his purse.

0:25:200:25:24

We'll catch up with him later.

0:25:240:25:26

James is

0:25:280:25:29

15 miles away in the village of Harrington.

0:25:290:25:32

He's visiting Harrington Aviation Museum.

0:25:350:25:39

During the Second World War, the Office of Strategic Services,

0:25:390:25:43

the precursor to the CIA, sent battalions of the US Army

0:25:430:25:47

to build this airfield and set up clandestine warfare operations.

0:25:470:25:52

James is meeting with the museum's chairman, Clive Bassett.

0:25:540:25:57

-Hello. Must be Clive.

-Hi and welcome, James.

0:25:580:26:02

Welcome to RAF Harrington.

0:26:020:26:04

Top-secret missions would fly deep into the heart of occupied

0:26:040:26:08

Europe, dropping supplies to the pockets of partisan fighters

0:26:080:26:11

who would become known as the Resistance.

0:26:110:26:14

The codename for the covert missions was Operation Carpetbagger.

0:26:140:26:19

This codename, what did Carpetbaggers do?

0:26:190:26:21

The Carpetbaggers, really,

0:26:210:26:23

were the American Air Arm of the Office of Strategic Services,

0:26:230:26:26

the American side of things, and their missions were to take

0:26:260:26:29

supplies and agents over to occupied Europe.

0:26:290:26:32

And the Americans initially were using British aircraft.

0:26:320:26:34

And there came a point in time where they felt they were getting

0:26:340:26:38

slightly compromised in some of their own missions.

0:26:380:26:40

They wanted to run them themselves.

0:26:400:26:41

So they then decided to set up their own airfield, which is

0:26:410:26:44

-why we are here at Harrington.

-Ah!

0:26:440:26:46

In the months of July 1944, four squadrons at Harrington

0:26:490:26:53

supplied resistance forces with the 69 agents

0:26:530:26:57

and over 5,000 containers filled

0:26:570:26:59

with items such as weaponry and food.

0:26:590:27:03

The dangerous ones, the really dangerous missions,

0:27:030:27:05

even more so, were the blind drops where an agent would

0:27:050:27:08

just parachute into occupied Europe, it could be anywhere,

0:27:080:27:10

without any local knowledge. They may have a contact to make.

0:27:100:27:14

But that was very dangerous.

0:27:140:27:16

The daredevil agents would fly on moonlit nights

0:27:200:27:24

and would land with some rather unusual supplies.

0:27:240:27:27

The idea was an agent would parachute down

0:27:270:27:29

in a special container made for it.

0:27:290:27:32

And when he got on the ground, he'd just open the container,

0:27:320:27:35

fire it up. A little bike - 98cc engine, centrifugal clutch -

0:27:350:27:40

push it along, hop on and off you go.

0:27:400:27:42

The problem is, I think people suddenly realised

0:27:420:27:44

that you couldn't really have a motorbike running around

0:27:440:27:46

the early hours of the morning

0:27:460:27:48

-in the moonlight period with some strange person on it.

-Yeah, right.

0:27:480:27:51

Especially a strange bike, yeah.

0:27:510:27:53

Very much so. So they sort of abandoned the idea.

0:27:530:27:56

But the bikes continued to be made.

0:27:560:27:58

And they made over 3,500 during World War II,

0:27:580:28:01

different formats of them.

0:28:010:28:03

This is the actual size of the bike used.

0:28:030:28:07

-It is a fabulous piece of design, isn't it?

-It is, really clever.

0:28:070:28:10

Obviously, the saddle raises up, the handlebars raise up.

0:28:100:28:13

You can get on this within a minute or so of landing on the ground.

0:28:130:28:17

The most ambitious covert project that took place here was

0:28:200:28:23

Operation Jedburgh.

0:28:230:28:25

A creation of the British and Americans,

0:28:250:28:27

the clandestine units were designed to operate behind enemy lines.

0:28:270:28:32

It ran from 1944 until the end of the war.

0:28:320:28:35

Recruited and trained in total secrecy,

0:28:370:28:39

the units would be made up

0:28:390:28:41

of three men from Britain, France and America.

0:28:410:28:44

Their job was to coordinate resistance groups

0:28:440:28:46

and help supply, arm and train them.

0:28:460:28:49

Brit Harry Verlander was one of the agents.

0:28:490:28:53

Harry Verlander was a Jedburgh wireless operator.

0:28:530:28:56

And these are all his various artefacts

0:28:560:28:59

and bits of memorabilia from his wartime service.

0:28:590:29:02

It's quite a unique exhibit, I think, of one person

0:29:020:29:06

and his different things from his service initially with

0:29:060:29:09

the Home Guard, the King's Own Royal Rifles...

0:29:090:29:13

-Trophies of war.

-Very much so, yes.

0:29:130:29:16

Harry dodged many dangers,

0:29:180:29:20

but one story demonstrated his particular style of ingenuity.

0:29:200:29:24

The story related to you, it was the time

0:29:250:29:28

when he was going to be taken by some Germans.

0:29:280:29:30

He knew this trick, apparently - if you pee or urinate at the bottom

0:29:300:29:33

of a tree, it will stop dogs from finding you or chasing you.

0:29:330:29:37

So he peed at the bottom of the tree, climbed up it

0:29:370:29:39

and the Germans missed him.

0:29:390:29:41

-Really?

-So he was... Yeah. Clearly, it worked cos he wasn't captured.

0:29:410:29:45

-Perfect.

-A very brave man. As they all were.

0:29:450:29:48

It's been absolutely fascinating, Clive. And I am amazed...

0:29:480:29:53

Just shows you what training do. I'm amazed how successful they were.

0:29:530:29:57

Nearly 7,000 men were involved in the covert operations

0:29:570:30:02

that took place here.

0:30:020:30:04

Without question, the work done by everyone

0:30:040:30:06

involved in resistance groups helped ensure victory for the Allies.

0:30:060:30:11

I go away a wiser and humbler man.

0:30:120:30:15

-It was a pleasure to meet you, James.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:30:150:30:17

Talking of brave and courageous men,

0:30:250:30:27

let's see how Charlie is getting on in The Old Bakehouse Antiques.

0:30:270:30:31

Aha!

0:30:320:30:34

Churchill, bulldog spirit.

0:30:340:30:36

That's up as Beswick model there, Toby jug of Churchill.

0:30:370:30:43

And it's got one of his great speeches on the scroll here.

0:30:430:30:47

"We shall fight on the beaches, the landing grounds,

0:30:470:30:50

"in the fields, in the streets and on the hills.

0:30:500:30:53

"We shall never surrender."

0:30:530:30:56

1940.

0:30:560:30:57

They've paraphrased what he said there a little bit

0:30:570:31:00

in order to get it onto their scroll.

0:31:000:31:02

Beswick Pottery began in the 19th century and produced

0:31:040:31:07

a lot of commemorative and advertising wares like this one.

0:31:070:31:10

The price tag on the jug is £60.

0:31:100:31:13

Still quite collectible.

0:31:140:31:16

It'll probably come off the boil a bit. I don't think it's...

0:31:160:31:19

unrealistically priced. Not a bad likeness.

0:31:190:31:23

You could not mistake that for Churchill.

0:31:230:31:27

There he is, the great man.

0:31:270:31:30

£60.

0:31:300:31:32

I think that is...

0:31:320:31:33

..more or less worth the money. I've seen a projector.

0:31:350:31:40

I've seen that, I think, fabulous child's bamboo push chair.

0:31:400:31:46

The sum total of these objects is comfortably over £200.

0:31:460:31:51

I've got £106.76 in total.

0:31:510:31:57

There is no need to fib to Steve.

0:31:570:32:00

You just never know in life.

0:32:000:32:01

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

0:32:010:32:03

Time to strike a deal. Where is Steve?

0:32:060:32:08

Well, I think you've got a fantastic mix here.

0:32:090:32:12

I've got three things I've completely fallen in love with.

0:32:120:32:15

-There is a projector upstairs with its original box.

-Yeah.

0:32:150:32:18

There is a real talking point, which is that bamboo push chair.

0:32:180:32:22

The other thing, completely differently,

0:32:220:32:24

is Mr Bulldog Spirit here, Winston Churchill,

0:32:240:32:27

simply because I need a bit of that bulldog spirit

0:32:270:32:30

to beat old Bingo.

0:32:300:32:32

And some extra cash.

0:32:320:32:34

I'm not going to beat around the bush, I mean,

0:32:340:32:36

I like those three things.

0:32:360:32:37

I don't suppose I'd be able to buy those three things,

0:32:370:32:40

but I'll tell you what I've got. I've got £106.76.

0:32:400:32:44

I can't add to it because that's all I've got.

0:32:440:32:48

-I mean, you're adding up to 230-odd quid. I mean, that's...

-Yeah.

0:32:480:32:51

-It depends on what these things have cost.

-Yeah.

0:32:510:32:54

If I can't buy the three things...

0:32:540:32:57

-No, I think we can...

-Do you think you could?

0:32:570:32:59

The projector's sat around for a while, so I'd like to get it gone.

0:32:590:33:01

-Has it?

-You know, cos you're only taking dust.

0:33:010:33:03

You take the dust with you, don't you?

0:33:030:33:05

I'll take the dust, I'll clean it, I'll do your washing up...

0:33:050:33:08

That's good. Oh, yeah, if you're doing the washing up as well...

0:33:080:33:11

Would you take all I've got for those three? Are you sure?

0:33:110:33:14

I don't want you...

0:33:140:33:15

When I walk out of that door, I don't want you to think,

0:33:150:33:18

"Mr Ross, honestly!"

0:33:180:33:19

No, I'll just phone the police. "I've just been robbed."

0:33:190:33:22

-You are the best dealer I've ever met in my life!

-Thanks.

0:33:220:33:25

-Shake me by the hand. You sure?

-Oh, yeah...

0:33:250:33:28

Yeah, let me have it, please.

0:33:280:33:30

Please. And the change.

0:33:300:33:32

Well done, Charlie.

0:33:320:33:33

He has blown the last of his cash on three items -

0:33:330:33:37

the cine projector for £40,

0:33:370:33:39

the push chair for 30

0:33:390:33:40

and Churchill jug for £36.76.

0:33:400:33:45

That plucky display of buying

0:33:470:33:50

and big discounts wraps up our shopping trip.

0:33:500:33:53

Charlie has bought a total of five items -

0:33:530:33:55

the 1930s leather valise,

0:33:550:33:58

the antique mirror,

0:33:580:34:00

the cine projector,

0:34:000:34:02

the Edwardian push chair and the Beswick Churchill jug.

0:34:020:34:06

His purse is empty. £148.76 gone!

0:34:060:34:11

James has four items - the 1960s West German vase,

0:34:130:34:18

the African tribal stool,

0:34:180:34:20

the decorative shield

0:34:200:34:23

and the 1920s woodblock print.

0:34:230:34:26

He is reluctant to let go of his profits

0:34:260:34:29

and has been very thrifty, spending a total of just £75.

0:34:290:34:33

But what do they think of one another's buys?

0:34:340:34:37

You give him over £400 and he spends 75 on, frankly...

0:34:400:34:45

-WHISPERS:

-a load of nonsense!

0:34:450:34:47

-IMPERSONATES CHURCHILL:

-'I shall fight him on the beaches.'

0:34:470:34:50

A ghastly vase for £10.

0:34:500:34:53

The over mantle mirror.

0:34:530:34:54

OK, the plate has gone.

0:34:540:34:56

There is very little silvering.

0:34:560:34:59

So you've got a sort of calcified piece of glass there.

0:34:590:35:02

I think all of those things might make a profit simply

0:35:020:35:05

because he's been so stingy!

0:35:050:35:07

Would I swap my lots for his? No.

0:35:070:35:11

OK.

0:35:110:35:12

Charlie and James are travelling south to Bourne End,

0:35:160:35:18

in Buckinghamshire.

0:35:180:35:20

-MIMICS CHURCHILL:

-'We shall fight in the Zephyr,

0:35:220:35:24

-'we'll fight in the salerooms.'

-Yeah.

0:35:240:35:26

'We shall fight in the shops!

0:35:260:35:30

-'We shall never surrender.'

-Yes.

0:35:300:35:32

-'This shall be our finest hour.'

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

0:35:320:35:36

Was that Churchill? Ha!

0:35:360:35:39

Bourne End Auctions is where we're headed.

0:35:390:35:42

We're here. Bourne End Auction Rooms.

0:35:420:35:44

This, remember this, Bingo.

0:35:440:35:46

-Because this is when it turned round.

-Really?

0:35:460:35:49

This is where your frugal behaviour comes back to bite you.

0:35:490:35:53

Ah-ha-ha!

0:35:530:35:54

Taking to the rostrum today is auctioneer Simon Brown.

0:35:560:36:00

What does he think of the gaggle of goodies from James and Charlie?

0:36:000:36:04

The 1920s block print, I think you might struggle with that.

0:36:050:36:09

The 1950s projector, I think, will be the winner today.

0:36:090:36:13

I can see that making 80 to 120.

0:36:130:36:16

Sounds promising.

0:36:160:36:18

All quiet then, the auction is about to begin.

0:36:180:36:21

First to go is Charlie with his leather valise.

0:36:230:36:26

Start me at £30, please, for this lot.

0:36:260:36:29

-20 then to start. 20, anybody interested?

-Ten.

0:36:290:36:32

-20?

-Ten.

-20? Nobody interested?

0:36:320:36:35

Ten to start. Ten I'm bid. Got you at ten.

0:36:350:36:37

-You got a bidder.

-I recognise that lady.

0:36:370:36:39

Never mind the lady, Charlie.

0:36:390:36:41

-Are we all done at ten on my left?

-JAMES LAUGHS

0:36:410:36:45

That buyer has got a great deal there.

0:36:450:36:49

-Estimate - 40 to 60.

-Excellent!

0:36:490:36:52

James's West German vase is next.

0:36:520:36:55

£10. Ten I'm bid. Yours at ten.

0:36:550:36:58

-Bingo, you are already in at ten.

-12.

-14.

0:36:580:37:00

16. 18. 20. 20. 22.

0:37:000:37:04

25.

0:37:040:37:05

25. 22 on my right.

0:37:050:37:07

Selling at 22. Are we all done at 22?

0:37:070:37:09

Got you at 22 on my right now.

0:37:090:37:12

22.

0:37:120:37:13

There we are.

0:37:130:37:15

All smiles for James as he starts off with a profit.

0:37:150:37:18

It is Charlie's rosewood mirror next.

0:37:210:37:24

Start me at £30, please, for this lot. 30. Anybody interested at 30?

0:37:240:37:29

Nobody interested at 30? 20 then start.

0:37:290:37:32

20, anybody interested? Nobody interested? No?

0:37:320:37:35

I am moving on.

0:37:350:37:37

-Lot 36 is...

-JAMES LAUGHS

0:37:370:37:39

What do you mean "moving on"?

0:37:390:37:41

He's moving on.

0:37:410:37:43

Uh-oh. This no sale means it will be added into your next leg's auction.

0:37:430:37:48

-Moving on.

-Do you think he might not sell any of my items?

0:37:480:37:53

Surely not.

0:37:530:37:54

It's James's tribal stool next.

0:37:560:37:59

Who will start me at 20, please, for this lot? 20 I'm bid.

0:37:590:38:02

22. 25. 27. 30. 32.

0:38:020:38:06

35. 37. 40. 42. 45. 47.

0:38:060:38:10

50. 55. 60. 65. 60 in the corner.

0:38:100:38:14

Selling at 60. Yours at 60. Are we all done at 60?

0:38:140:38:17

On my right. Selling at 60 now.

0:38:170:38:20

Marvellous!

0:38:200:38:22

Absolutely. Thank the good people of Bourne.

0:38:220:38:25

Well done, James, another great outfit.

0:38:250:38:27

James is in the lead.

0:38:290:38:30

Can Charlie ramp up his profits with the cine projector?

0:38:300:38:34

Who will start me at £30, please, for this?

0:38:340:38:36

-30 I'm bid. Yours at 30.

-What?

-Are we all done at 30?

0:38:360:38:39

Maiden bid. Selling at 30 on my left. Yours at 30.

0:38:390:38:43

With William, are we all done at £30 now?

0:38:430:38:46

Marvellous, that's only a small loss there.

0:38:460:38:49

At least you got a bid on that.

0:38:490:38:51

Yeah, but not a profit.

0:38:510:38:53

Maybe blowing the whole budget was a bit hasty.

0:38:530:38:56

Don't dwell on the figures, Charlie.

0:38:560:38:59

I've got to because I've got to go shopping again, Bingo.

0:38:590:39:02

And at this rate, I won't even be able to buy a West German vase.

0:39:020:39:05

-Oh, you spent...?

-I spent all my money!

0:39:050:39:08

-JAMES LAUGHS

-So...

0:39:080:39:10

Oops, Charlie!

0:39:100:39:11

James's turn now with the big decorative shield.

0:39:130:39:16

Who will start me at £50, please, for this lot? 40 then to start.

0:39:160:39:20

40 anybody interested? 40 I'm bid.

0:39:200:39:22

With Martin at 40. Yours at 40. 42. 45. 45 with Martin.

0:39:220:39:27

Selling at 45. Are we all done at 45? Got you at 45 on my left now.

0:39:270:39:32

That'll do me.

0:39:320:39:34

JAMES LAUGHS

0:39:340:39:36

So far, James is enjoying profits on every item.

0:39:380:39:40

In round terms,

0:39:400:39:42

-it's the biggest ever thrashing...

-Really, why?

-..in Road Trip history.

0:39:420:39:47

Profit, loss. Profit, not even a bid.

0:39:470:39:51

Profit, loss.

0:39:510:39:52

Are we setting a trend here now?

0:39:520:39:55

For your sake, Charlie, let's hope not.

0:39:550:39:57

It's your Edwardian push chair next.

0:39:590:40:02

Who will start me at £50, please, for this lot? Interesting lot at 50.

0:40:020:40:06

Anybody interested? 40 then to start. 40, nobody interested?

0:40:060:40:10

40 I'm bid. Selling at 40. Yours at 40. 42.

0:40:100:40:14

45. 42 in front.

0:40:140:40:15

Selling at 42. Are we all done at 42?

0:40:150:40:18

On my left now, got you at 42.

0:40:180:40:21

Well done.

0:40:210:40:22

A profit, hurrah! But sadly, not enough to catch up with James.

0:40:230:40:27

-Well done.

-Keep the hanky in reserve.

0:40:280:40:31

Well, that goes into the kitty.

0:40:310:40:33

It's James's last item of the day - a woodblock print.

0:40:330:40:38

Who will start me at £20, please, for this lot?

0:40:380:40:41

20, anybody interested? At 20.

0:40:410:40:44

Ten then to start. £10. Ten I'm bid. Selling at ten.

0:40:440:40:47

-Ten?

-Are we all done?

0:40:470:40:48

Maiden bid, got you at ten. Selling at £10 just in front now.

0:40:480:40:53

First loss of the day, though, for you, James.

0:40:530:40:56

And you are still way ahead of Charlie.

0:40:560:40:58

-MIMICS CHURCHILL:

-'We shall fight them on the beaches.

0:40:580:41:02

'We shall fight them on their soft furnishings.'

0:41:020:41:05

Enough of the Churchill impressions!

0:41:060:41:09

It's all or nothing with Charlie's last lot of the day -

0:41:090:41:12

the Churchill jug.

0:41:120:41:14

Wouldn't it be fun if he got to my character jug and said,

0:41:140:41:17

"I have four commission bids."

0:41:170:41:20

-Yeah.

-"And I'm going to start at 320."

0:41:200:41:24

It would be fun.

0:41:240:41:25

Unbelievable, but fun.

0:41:250:41:28

It would be.

0:41:280:41:29

-MIMICS CHURCHILL:

-'My last chance...

0:41:290:41:31

'for profit.'

0:41:310:41:32

100, I'm bid. 110. 120.

0:41:320:41:35

130. 140. 150.

0:41:350:41:37

160. 170. 180. 190.

0:41:370:41:40

180 standing. Selling at 180. Are we all done at 180?

0:41:400:41:44

Yours at 180.

0:41:440:41:45

Winston's has come good.

0:41:480:41:50

-'We did fight them on the beaches.'

-We did.

0:41:500:41:53

Unbelievable! Saved by Winston at the 11th hour, Charlie.

0:41:540:41:58

Excellent stuff.

0:41:580:42:00

-That is a surprise.

-COCKILY:

-Well, I don't think so...

0:42:000:42:04

JAMES LAUGHS

0:42:040:42:07

Has Charlie done enough to get back into the game?

0:42:080:42:11

James started the third leg with £433.50.

0:42:120:42:16

His frugality made him a profit

0:42:160:42:18

of £37.34 after auction house costs.

0:42:180:42:24

James has a total of £470.84 for the next leg.

0:42:240:42:29

Charlie began this leg with £148.76.

0:42:320:42:37

Astounding success with the Churchill jug means that

0:42:370:42:40

Charlie wins this leg with a profit of £66.08 after costs.

0:42:400:42:46

He now has £214.84 to take forwards.

0:42:460:42:50

Until next time, chaps!

0:42:540:42:55

Next time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:010:43:03

Charlie reminisces...

0:43:030:43:04

It's back-to-school!

0:43:040:43:07

..while James offers household tips.

0:43:070:43:09

Always good to introduce into a home

0:43:090:43:11

-a dusting nightmare, isn't it?

-DEALER LAUGHS

0:43:110:43:14