Episode 24 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 24

Charlie Ross and James Braxton begin in Rushden, Northamptonshire, and stop off in Cambridgeshire, Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire, before heading to an auction in St Albans.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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This is beautiful!

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That's the way to do this.

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With £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour for antiques...

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-Joy!

-Hello!

-The aim?

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To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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LAUGHTER

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers...

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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The handbrake's on!

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This is Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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Welcome to the penultimate leg of this week's adventure

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with a couple of old swirls -

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top auctioneers James Braxton and Charlie Ross.

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THEY CHUCKLE

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Our likely lads are roving around in this 1961 Ford Zephyr

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made before seatbelts were legally required.

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And Charlie's starting the day with a refreshing drink of water...

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-It's gone all over my face.

-JAMES LAUGHS

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Oh! It's gone over my trousers.

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In fact, you've got water all over you now.

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Oh, it's gone everywhere!

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Oh, poor old love.

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It's been an eventful journey so far.

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James has been watching his pennies and pulled in profits at every auction...

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On the net at £200 dead. Done.

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..while Charlie's been on a losing streak...

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Oh!

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Things went from bad to worse at the last auction,

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when his rosewood mirror failed to sell...

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Nobody interested? Nope.

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I'm moving on.

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Thankfully, he was saved at the last minute by Winston Churchill.

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Well, a mug of him, anyway...

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Yours at 180...

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Thank you.

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So, after starting this week with £200,

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a profit on the last leg

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has pushed Charlie's purse up to £214.84...

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..while frugal James' original stake has increased over the week

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to a fantastic £470.84.

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Charlie, you've got some serious catching up to do!

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I've only got two more days to do you.

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-Yes.

-It's not easy. It's going to be hard.

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I'm going to grapple, I'm going to hang on to that win.

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-You're like Micawber, aren't you?

-Yes.

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-Scrooge.

-Scrooge.

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-IMITATING SCROOGE:

-How much is that? Four pounds!

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I'll give you £2.50, my dear.

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JAMES CHUCKLES

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You might scoff, but clearly his tight tactics ARE working.

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Our competitive pair began their trip in the Lincolnshire town of Boston.

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They meandered through Norfolk and Cambridgeshire up to Leicestershire,

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before heading south and they will finish this epic journey

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in the town of Cobham in Surrey.

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Today's leg will kick off in Rushden, Northamptonshire

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and then they'll shop their way to auction in St Alban's, Hertfordshire.

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-Pleasure to be driven by you.

-Ah, very fine.

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Charlie's headed for Continental Collectables in Rushden

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by the tradesman's entrance, by the look of it.

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Do I want to do a bingo?

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Do I want to just spent £3 here and £4 there

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like that tight old fellow?

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No. I want to get stuck in.

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Oh, look at that canework seat!

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I was going to say evocative of the '30s,

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but, actually, it can't be, because it says 1948 on it!

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"Madeira."

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That's wonderful! Madeira - a place and also a drink.

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Have some Madeira, m'dear.

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MUSIC: Madeira, M'dear by Michael Flanders & Donald Swann

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# Have some Madeira, m'dear

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# You really have nothing to fear

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# I'm not trying to tempt you

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# That wouldn't be right

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# You shouldn't drink spirits at this time of night

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# Have some Madeira, m'dear. #

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Ah!

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Oh, dear...

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Oh, dear, my dear.

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Well, it's a BIT tatty.

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"Madeira", do you think that came off a ship called Madeira?

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I don't think it's called a Madeira chair.

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Perhaps dealer Ralph can shed some light...

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-They're made in Madeira.

-They were?

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They're renowned in Madeira for making wickerwork

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and they were sold to the tourists who came off the steamer ships.

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I would buy that if it was devilish cheap...

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but I see it's priceless, cos it hasn't even got a label on it!

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-It could be devilishly cheap.

-Could it?

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This is exactly what a dealer shouldn't be doing

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is asking you what you paid for it. What did it cost?

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-99p.

-CHARLIE LAUGHS

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-How much?

-99p.

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99p! I think it's just a fantastic thing, though.

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I'd be very happy to pay you £9.90 as a return,

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a substantial return on your capital.

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I'll tell you, we'll make it easy, £10.

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I can't resist that. Ralph, that's the quickest purchase and...

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Do you know, every time I get really enthusiastic

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about something, it fails, but this can't fail.

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-Well, at

-£10... And, you know,

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my opposition is going to be jealous of that.

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I'm not so sure...

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Anything else grab you?

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How about those nice little bottle coasters?

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I like those.

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Certainly silver plate coasters.

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-Got a bit of age, haven't they?

-Yes.

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I like it when silver plate is rubbed like that...

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-You see the copper.

-..and the copper comes shining through.

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Um...

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-but they're knackered.

-I had £40 on the pair.

-Did you?

-Yes.

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Are they are buyable for me?

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You can have them for 25.

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Well, now I think they'd make 25 at auction. That's my trouble.

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Something to think about, then.

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But James is moving on towards St Neots,

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the largest town in Cambridgeshire.

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St Neots dates back over 1,000 years

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and boasts one of the most ancient market squares in the country.

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And James' first stop of the day.

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Hello...James.

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Hello, James, I'm Jacqueline.

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-Hello, Jacqueline. What a lovely place.

-Oh, I'm pleased you like it.

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I've managed to find it.

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It's through that mystical archway in the market square, isn't it?

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Definitely. We're tucked away, aren't we? We're tucked away.

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Although Jacqueline specialises in jewellery,

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there's also plenty of furniture,

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collectables and memorabilia on offer.

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Jacqueline, I'm a great fan,

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I'm a great fan of the bamboo...

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Right.

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..cos I think it's just one of the most fabulous materials.

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It's so strong, it is the sum of parts.

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You can work it very quickly and cheaply, very cheap material,

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and yet you can make out of that bamboo,

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out of the thing that's growing in your garden,

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you can make two very stylish

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'60s, '70s side tables.

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-Look at that.

-Lovely in a conservatory.

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Quite fun.

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If you had a '60s, if you had a contemporary house,

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you could easily add these.

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This is very much Margo and Jerry territory, isn't it?

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-Oh, definitely. The Good Life.

-The Good Life.

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I'd like those, they're very stylish, very simple...

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Good price. I know the dealer very well.

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Very good price. He's very keen.

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-Is he?

-Yes.

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Keen on prices? What has he got? 12 for the two?

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It'll be 12 each, I should imagine.

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He's got two after it.

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Yes, we'll do 12 for the two.

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-12, right, come on, put it here.

-Yes.

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BOTH: Well done.

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Thank you very much indeed.

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See, first one in the bag! Thank you, goodbye.

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And good work, James.

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What's he up to now, then?

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I'm just texting Charlie because he's always berating me

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about getting my hand deeper into my pocket.

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I just wanted to give him the good news

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that I have frugally spent £12.

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He's going to love it.

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James knows his shrewd tactic of spending less

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gets Charlie's goat.

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Cor, what a scamp, eh?

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Speaking of Charlie, looks like he's spotted an old friend...

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Ooh... Ah, ha!

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My largest success so far on this trip

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has been thanks to Winston Churchill.

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Well, you have an interesting one there.

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Oh, blimey. Someone's given it a right bashing.

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It says silver, but that appears to be silver-plate to me.

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I think the medallion in the centre is the silver.

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It's hallmarked...

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Oh, clever, so the medallion of Churchill is silver

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and the dish is plated.

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Ticket price is £100.

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Very best would have to be...

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60.

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That's a gamble lot, isn't it?

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A couple of people like Churchill, they could get stuck into that.

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Right...

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If I rolled Churchill in with a couple of coasters,

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would that shave them at all...? Or not?

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-No, I don't want you losing money...

-60 for the pair of coasters.

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-Pair of coasters and the dish...

-..is the very best.

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I think that's incredibly generous.

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I've got to keep Churchill going.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

-Let's put it there.

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-Thank you very much.

-60 quid and Madeira was a tenner.

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-70 quid.

-£70.

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Three items!

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Shopping made easy by Ralph!

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Good work, Charlie. Three lots with potential in your first shop.

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James, meanwhile, has made his way to Bedford.

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In the 17th century, this town became

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the focus of a brutal crackdown on religious freedom.

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At a time when the church, parliament and the monarchy were in turmoil,

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there was one man who stood fast in his beliefs - John Bunyan.

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He was jailed in Bedford for being one of the country's most radical religious thinkers

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and went on to write a revolutionary book

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that would rival the Bible's popularity around the world.

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Here to tell James more is John Bunyan Museum curator

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Nicola Sherhod.

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I come seeking Bunyan! Tell me all about him.

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Well, he was born in Elstow

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and his family had lived there for generations.

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Bunyan as a sort of a slightly hot-headed teenager,

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16, decided to join the army

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and went to fight for Oliver Cromwell and Parliament.

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The young Bunyan had entered the English Civil War.

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This was one of the most turbulent times in British history,

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resulting in the abolition of the monarchy

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and the establishment of a republic, led by Oliver Cromwell.

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This heralded a period of religious freedom for England

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and a time of great religious discovery for Bunyan.

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When did the light shine for him?

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It was really when he returned back to Elstow

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when suddenly this voice came into his head to sort of say,

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"Wilt thou have thy sin and go to hell?

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"Or wilt thou leave thy sin and go to heaven?"

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Heaven.

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From that moment on, Bunyan's life was changed for ever.

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He renounced the Church of England and began to preach

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his nonconformist message around the country with great success.

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But within just seven years,

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the country underwent another radical change

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and religious freedom came to an end.

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With the return of the King and the monarchy in 1660,

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basically they felt that the way to reunify the country

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was to reunify religion

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and bring everyone back under the Anglican Church of England

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and get people to start following the Common Book Of Prayer,

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having people ordained rather than just anyone being allowed to preach.

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So when the clamp-down came with the restoration of the monarchy,

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-what happened to dear old Bunyan then?

-Well, he ignored it, basically.

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He carried on preaching.

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He carried on around the country, People...

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He was becoming very famous, very popular.

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He was starting to be perceived as a bit of a threat by the establishment...

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-Because he was outspoken?

-Yes.

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Exactly, so an arrest warrant was put out which had 13 signatures,

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when, actually, only two would have been necessary.

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As a prominent nonconformist,

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Bunyan was arrested whilst speaking just outside Bedford

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and was imprisoned in the county jail in November 1660.

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Bunyan ended up being put in prison, basically, indefinitely.

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He ended up spending 12 years.

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So we see Bunyan here writing.

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Did he start writing in jail?

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Certainly his spiritual autobiography, Grace Abounding.

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We know he probably wrote that during his 12 years.

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We do believe he got the idea for the Pilgrim's Progress

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-and started sketching that out.

-And this was his big book.

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That was THE book, the one that made him famous

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and that has gone on to be so incredibly well regarded around the world.

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Bunyan was finally released from prison in 1672,

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thanks to a law of religious clemency introduced by the new monarch, Charles II.

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Bunyan went straight back to preaching

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and completed his greatest work, The Pilgrim's Progress,

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a simple tale of good versus evil.

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It tells the story of a pilgrimage through this world to the afterlife.

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From its first publication in 1678,

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it was an instant success.

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He did a sort of synopsis of the Bible.

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He repackaged it.

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Yes, basically, he sort of nailed it in terms of a simple, clear message

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that anyone... it doesn't even have to be a Christian message.

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It is the simple, how to live a good life.

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Because it was such a simple story,

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it was used by the missionaries to go out to other countries

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and to share the Christian word

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and the Bible in a much simpler way than getting them to read the Bible.

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-Yes.

-So there are over 200 languages

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-and dialects that it's been translated into.

-Oh, did it?

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At one point there were more copies of Pilgrim's Progress

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than there were the Bible in working people's houses.

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Goodness!

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Bunyan wrote about 60 books and pamphlets

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and continued preaching right up to his death from illness

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at the age of 59.

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But the one he will forever be remembered for,

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The Pilgrim's Progress, has been continuously in print

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from its first release over 300 years ago to the present day.

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Charlie's journeyed west to the market town of Wellingborough

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in Northamptonshire.

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Wellingborough has a strong Anglo-Saxon history

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and one of the few helmets from that period

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ever to be discovered in Britain

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was found nearby.

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After his buying frenzy this morning,

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what will Charlie uncover at Hunters Antiques?

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-Hello, Nick.

-Charlie, how are you?

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-We've met before, haven't we?

-We have, a little while ago.

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You've done some things since I was last here!

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Bit of a change. Everything's expanded.

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-Good Lord! Who's that?

-That's the complaints department!

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-Complaints department!

-HE CHUCKLES

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I like you, Nick.

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Ooh!

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Nearly broke something there, Nick.

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Do be careful!

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Ah! Look at that!

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It's back to school!

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-An old vaulting horse!

-Yeah.

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Where on earth did you find that?

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-It came from a primary school.

-Fantastic.

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-The kids could never get over it, they were never tall enough!

-THEY LAUGH

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Probably weighs a tonne. It's got some weight.

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Oh!

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If I proved I could jump over it, could I have it?

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THEY LAUGH

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I think my insurance man would pass out... I dare say!

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I think my trousers would split, probably.

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Not a pretty sight...

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Feast my eyes on the cabinet. There's loads of it.

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Now that is quirky and original, Nick.

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-You have a gun.

-We do, we do.

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Or rather a novelty pipe in the shape of a gun.

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Hang on one second, I'll get it out for you.

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There we go, sir.

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Is that Bakelite?

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I think so, I'm not entirely sure, but I think it is.

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Bakelite and briar pipe.

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Inexpensive, but I dare say the auctioneer would want

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to sell that for ten quid or something, wouldn't he?

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It's been knocking around for a bit. I don't think you'd see another...

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I think that's probably the best part of 50 years old.

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I don't suppose that could be insultingly cheap, could it?

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Like a fiver or something?

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I think the auctioneer might sell that for a tenner...

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-Yeah, I could do that.

-As they say, there's not much downside.

-THEY LAUGH

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You can't lose a lot on it, no.

0:18:110:18:13

-Sold, sir.

-Well done, thank you.

0:18:130:18:15

-That's not going to make you the richest man.

-No...

0:18:150:18:17

..in Wellingborough, but there we go.

0:18:170:18:20

Charlie might not have risked much on the pipe,

0:18:200:18:23

but novelty items often do well at auction, so it could be a canny buy.

0:18:230:18:26

With that final purchase of the day,

0:18:280:18:30

it's time for a well-earned sleep, so nighty night...

0:18:300:18:33

# Good morning, world, it's a brand-new day! #

0:18:360:18:39

Oh, yes!

0:18:390:18:41

And this morning, James' shrewd spending tactics

0:18:410:18:44

are still a hot topic in the Zephyr...

0:18:440:18:46

Yes, but you, by nature, are an extremely generous man.

0:18:470:18:51

-Yes, I know.

-It must go against the grain to shop like this.

0:18:510:18:54

Well, hold on, hold on. Let's put this into some proportion.

0:18:540:18:57

One of the greatest profits that you have ever made

0:18:570:19:01

was priced at 12 and you had the temerity to pay £8 for it.

0:19:010:19:06

-I did.

-And it went on to make?

0:19:060:19:09

-2,700.

-You see!

0:19:090:19:11

You weren't exactly peeling off the notes then, were you?

0:19:110:19:14

THEY LAUGH

0:19:140:19:16

Touche!

0:19:160:19:17

So far, James has only secured himself one lot,

0:19:170:19:21

the pair of bamboo tables,

0:19:210:19:23

leaving him a huge £458.84 available to spend...

0:19:230:19:27

..while Charlie has bagged four lots,

0:19:300:19:32

the Madeira wicker chair,

0:19:320:19:35

the Victorian bottle coasters,

0:19:350:19:37

the Churchill commemorative dish

0:19:370:19:39

and the novelty pipe.

0:19:390:19:41

There's also that unsold mirror from the last leg,

0:19:410:19:45

leaving him with £139.84.

0:19:450:19:48

First stop of the day is Woburn in Bedfordshire.

0:19:510:19:54

-This is your county.

-This is my county. Well, yes.

0:19:550:19:58

Not my county of birth, but I have my saleroom here,

0:19:580:20:01

-just down the road in Woburn.

-In Woburn.

-Yes.

0:20:010:20:04

-I think you might go shopping in Woburn if you're very lucky...

-Ooh!

0:20:040:20:08

Woburn has been burnt down and rebuilt three times.

0:20:110:20:14

The final fire in 1724 destroyed much of the village,

0:20:150:20:19

which was rebuilt in the Georgian style that remains today.

0:20:190:20:23

With only one lot bought so far,

0:20:240:20:26

James has some serious shopping to do.

0:20:260:20:28

-Hello.

-Hello, James.

-Hello, Alvin. Very nice to meet you.

0:20:300:20:34

-Nice to see you.

-Good. So this is your emporium?

0:20:340:20:36

Well, shop.

0:20:360:20:38

Shop! It's quite a big shop, isn't it?

0:20:380:20:42

You'd better get on with it, then.

0:20:420:20:44

He's on to more bamboo, look.

0:20:480:20:50

Nice bit of bamboo.

0:20:510:20:52

Incredibly light.

0:20:520:20:55

Now, this is very much your Victorian bamboo -

0:20:550:20:57

aspidistra flowing out of the brass pot...

0:20:570:21:00

But do people want that in a modern interior? That's the difficulty.

0:21:010:21:06

Quite fun if you did have a nice conservatory.

0:21:060:21:09

Ah, just the man!

0:21:100:21:12

Something like 28? Could that buy it?

0:21:130:21:16

Don't look at the label, no clues.

0:21:160:21:18

The ticket says 50.

0:21:180:21:19

No. No. OK, that's all right.

0:21:210:21:23

£40 you can have it for.

0:21:230:21:25

Now, I'm going to look at other items

0:21:250:21:28

-and I might do a collective.

-OK.

0:21:280:21:31

Smart thinking.

0:21:310:21:32

Now what's he onto?

0:21:360:21:37

I quite like this little lot.

0:21:380:21:41

I've always loved picnic cups

0:21:410:21:43

and you've got six there, which is really unusual.

0:21:430:21:46

They fit together in the cases there.

0:21:460:21:48

Worth a closer look, I guess.

0:21:480:21:51

I suppose you'd call it a nest, wouldn't you?

0:21:510:21:53

Well, yes.

0:21:530:21:56

This is...this is...very fine maker, Hukin and Heath.

0:21:560:21:58

-And look...

-They sit together...

-They just fall beautifully,

0:22:000:22:03

so when people were motoring and various things like this...

0:22:030:22:07

And there's a leather case, which is a little bit tired.

0:22:070:22:09

And they're gilded inside, of course, which is...

0:22:090:22:12

-Quite like those.

-They're quite cheap, I think.

0:22:120:22:15

They might join the planter in the great scheme of things...

0:22:150:22:21

Another possibility.

0:22:210:22:22

Anything else before you go in for the deal, James?

0:22:240:22:28

-I quite like the look of that.

-OK.

0:22:280:22:30

So games are always quite fun.

0:22:300:22:32

-That's quite big, isn't it?

-It's unusual, this size.

0:22:320:22:35

They are normally quite a bit smaller than that.

0:22:350:22:37

So that's... This is a solitaire board.

0:22:370:22:40

-It's quite nice having the big marbles, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:22:400:22:42

They are obviously all original.

0:22:420:22:45

I guess this is best part of 100 years old.

0:22:450:22:48

-It looks 1920s, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:22:490:22:53

Always good to introduce into a home a dusting nightmare, isn't it?

0:22:530:22:57

THEY CHUCKLE

0:22:570:22:58

Absolutely.

0:22:580:22:59

-I think that's rather fun.

-I quite like that.

0:23:010:23:03

So I like the bamboo, the brass pot...

0:23:030:23:07

I like the Hukin and Heath

0:23:070:23:09

and I like this.

0:23:090:23:10

Could the lot be bought for, say, 95?

0:23:100:23:13

Erm... They are all priced around the 40, 45 mark, aren't they?

0:23:130:23:19

I'm looking for a discount!

0:23:190:23:21

You're not a million miles away.

0:23:210:23:23

Ooh! Is there a little chink of hope there?

0:23:230:23:27

Let's say 110.

0:23:270:23:28

Let's say 100.

0:23:290:23:31

-105 and you've got it.

-105 and you've got it?

0:23:310:23:35

Cor...

0:23:350:23:36

I got the feeling it's 105, isn't it?

0:23:360:23:39

-It is. Thank you, James.

-THEY LAUGH

0:23:390:23:41

You're slightly frightening, I was going to chance me arm.

0:23:420:23:46

Well, some serious shopping done there with three lots bought.

0:23:470:23:51

Charlie, meanwhile, has made his way to Woburn Abbey.

0:23:540:23:57

A stunning historic house that is a symbol

0:24:000:24:03

of the opulent lifestyle of the aristocracy.

0:24:030:24:05

Charlie, however, is here to find out about a lady

0:24:100:24:12

who wasn't content with her life of luxury, Mary Russell,

0:24:120:24:16

a formidable woman who challenged conventional behaviour,

0:24:160:24:19

becoming known as the Flying Duchess,

0:24:190:24:22

whose tragic last flight remains a mystery.

0:24:220:24:24

To tell Charlie more is curator Chris Gravett.

0:24:260:24:29

How did she get associated with the family?

0:24:290:24:32

She married when she met her future husband in India.

0:24:320:24:37

He was an ADC in the Army.

0:24:370:24:39

She'd gone out because her father was an Archdeacon over in India.

0:24:390:24:43

Yes.

0:24:430:24:44

They met and got married

0:24:440:24:46

and then the Duke at the time, who was her husband's brother,

0:24:460:24:50

dies and suddenly they become Duke and Duchess.

0:24:500:24:53

She was never expecting to be Duchess, then?

0:24:530:24:55

No.

0:24:550:24:57

Mary spent most of her time pursuing great passions in life,

0:24:570:25:01

one of which was caring for the sick,

0:25:010:25:04

which she did at the cottage hospital she established near the Abbey.

0:25:040:25:08

Because she was so interested,

0:25:080:25:10

-she trained as a nurse herself.

-Yes.

0:25:100:25:13

And then, of course, when World War I broke out,

0:25:130:25:16

the Duke agreed to use Woburn as a military hospital for soldiers.

0:25:160:25:20

-What a wonderful place to be recuperating!

-Wasn't it.

0:25:200:25:24

-When the war ended, she still worked in the hospital.

-Did she?

0:25:250:25:28

In 1919, she was trained enough to do minor surgery.

0:25:280:25:33

-So she became a surgeon?

-She became a minor surgeon, yes.

0:25:340:25:38

Mary said the only thing

0:25:380:25:39

stopping her from pursuing her medical career further

0:25:390:25:42

was her wretched tinnitus,

0:25:420:25:44

a hearing impairment she'd developed after a bout of typhoid.

0:25:440:25:48

It wasn't until Mary was in her '60s

0:25:510:25:53

that she discovered a new passion - flying.

0:25:530:25:56

It was a pastime reserved only for the very rich.

0:25:560:25:59

She went out for a pleasure flight in 1926 from Croydon,

0:25:590:26:03

thought it was really good

0:26:030:26:04

because it also eased the tinnitus that she suffered from,

0:26:040:26:07

possibly because of the racket in the engine, we don't know...

0:26:070:26:10

And employed a pilot to take her up.

0:26:100:26:15

She decided to take it up seriously, so she did more and more flying,

0:26:150:26:20

so much so that in 1928, they had a go at the record to India.

0:26:200:26:26

Although their first attempt failed

0:26:260:26:29

due to hitting telegraph wires shortly after take off -

0:26:290:26:32

not a great start - the next year they tried and succeeded,

0:26:320:26:35

flying to India and back in eight days with many fuel stops.

0:26:350:26:39

With her pilot and mechanic, Mary then followed it up

0:26:410:26:44

by breaking the record of flying to the Cape of South Africa and back

0:26:440:26:48

in just 20 days. Wow!

0:26:480:26:50

They had a few hairy moments.

0:26:500:26:52

I mean, at one point she was found to be asleep in the plane

0:26:520:26:56

because there was a cracked pipe that was heating from the exhaust

0:26:560:26:59

and they were being gassed.

0:26:590:27:01

The pilots were fighting to keep awake.

0:27:010:27:03

They realised something was wrong,

0:27:030:27:05

couldn't land cos of jungle, and had to wrestle for three hours before...

0:27:050:27:08

And that was the fumes coming...

0:27:080:27:10

Luckily, they reckoned a few more minutes

0:27:100:27:12

-and they'd have all been dead.

-Really?

0:27:120:27:14

Mary became an accomplished pilot.

0:27:160:27:18

By 1937, she was 71 years old with failing eyesight

0:27:180:27:23

and needed to clock more hours to renew her pilot's licence.

0:27:230:27:26

She took to the air

0:27:280:27:30

and headed towards the fenlands, inland from the North Sea.

0:27:300:27:34

It was a reasonably good day when she set out in the afternoon,

0:27:340:27:38

but the weather closed in and by 4.30,

0:27:380:27:41

the Duke was getting worried because she hadn't come back.

0:27:410:27:44

And she was never seen again.

0:27:440:27:46

And, to this day, we're not sure what happened.

0:27:460:27:50

There are two theories as to what actually happened.

0:27:520:27:55

The first is that with failing eyesight,

0:27:550:27:58

she may have misread her compass and ended out over the North Sea

0:27:580:28:02

before running out of fuel and crashing.

0:28:020:28:05

But there is an even more tragic possibility.

0:28:050:28:08

The other alternative is that she deliberately did it

0:28:090:28:12

because she knew that the hospital was liable to close,

0:28:120:28:16

she knew that... Because of the funding.

0:28:160:28:19

She knew she may not get her licence back

0:28:190:28:21

because of her age and she'd already said,

0:28:210:28:23

"If I didn't have the hospital, and the flying,

0:28:230:28:25

"I'd have virtually nothing."

0:28:250:28:26

She was so deaf she couldn't communicate with her husband.

0:28:260:28:30

It could be she got in the air and decided,

0:28:300:28:32

-"Well, let's go out on a high."

-Yeah.

0:28:320:28:33

And a little while later, four struts were washed up,

0:28:360:28:40

the first at Yarmouth and then around the vicinity.

0:28:400:28:42

-From her plane?

-From the plane and we have those here.

0:28:420:28:46

-Gosh! How poignant.

-(Yes.)

0:28:460:28:48

So it's still a mystery.

0:28:500:28:52

Thank you very much indeed, Chris.

0:28:540:28:56

It's been a real treat to see you

0:28:560:28:58

and to learn about that remarkable woman.

0:28:580:29:02

-Pleasure.

-Thank you.

0:29:020:29:03

Back on terra firma,

0:29:060:29:08

James has made his way to Bletchley in Buckinghamshire,

0:29:080:29:12

famous for the wartime work done at Bletchley Park and home,

0:29:120:29:16

it would seem, to a rather large family of Canada geese.

0:29:160:29:19

James has one last shop of the day.

0:29:220:29:25

-Charming weather out there, isn't it?

-It's lovely, isn't it? Hello.

0:29:290:29:32

-James.

-Mags.

0:29:320:29:34

Hello, nice to meet you, Mags.

0:29:340:29:36

Fenny Antiques is full of the combined treasures of 40 dealers.

0:29:360:29:39

-Anything upstairs?

-Only general furniture.

0:29:410:29:44

Only general furniture.

0:29:450:29:47

Ooh! I might have a look up there.

0:29:470:29:49

That's quite nice. I've got a carpet here...

0:29:520:29:54

..and it's tapestry

0:29:590:30:01

and this is known as a design called aubusson

0:30:010:30:04

and it comes from, the design comes from France

0:30:040:30:07

and they're very often these, sort of, light colours.

0:30:070:30:11

What do you look for when you look at a carpet?

0:30:120:30:14

You look for holes, don't you.

0:30:140:30:16

And Mr Moth! Any moths?

0:30:160:30:18

But rather nice. You know, somebody has made this.

0:30:200:30:22

It's probably made by machine now.

0:30:220:30:24

But, you know, there is evidence of craft here.

0:30:240:30:28

Look at the back of it.

0:30:280:30:30

(For £20. I think that's quite a good deal.)

0:30:300:30:34

Can Mags do an even better deal?

0:30:350:30:38

It's got a couple of wine stains and things...

0:30:380:30:41

Fortunately it hasn't got a hole - I've checked it all over for a hole.

0:30:410:30:45

Hasn't got the moth, which I'm pleased about.

0:30:450:30:47

I wouldn't mind buying it for a tenner, if that's possible?

0:30:470:30:51

OK, I'll go a tenner.

0:30:510:30:53

Oh, well done, Mags.

0:30:530:30:55

Well done.

0:30:550:30:56

With one aubusson rug bagged for half price,

0:30:570:31:01

both our boys are bought up.

0:31:010:31:03

James spent a total of £127 on five lots...

0:31:080:31:12

The pair of bamboo wine tables,

0:31:120:31:15

the late Victorian bamboo plant stand and planter,

0:31:150:31:18

the nest of picnic cups,

0:31:180:31:21

the hardwood solitaire board...

0:31:210:31:23

..and the aubusson wool carpet.

0:31:240:31:25

Charlie spent less, shelling out £75 on four lots.

0:31:270:31:31

The Madeira wicker chair,

0:31:310:31:33

the Churchill centenary dish,

0:31:330:31:36

the late Victorian plated bottle coasters

0:31:360:31:39

and the vintage novelty pipe.

0:31:390:31:41

He will also take his unsold rosewood mirror

0:31:420:31:45

from the last auction to this auction.

0:31:450:31:48

So what do they think of each other's lots?

0:31:480:31:51

God, where do I start?

0:31:510:31:53

Talk about the Battle of the Bamboo!

0:31:530:31:55

I bring you the 1970s in the guise of my tables,

0:31:550:32:00

Charlie Ross brings the most extraordinary Madeira chair

0:32:000:32:04

and he buys it for a remarkable £10.

0:32:040:32:06

I think he's got a winner there.

0:32:060:32:08

And a game of solitaire, £25.

0:32:080:32:10

I've seen them for ten in the shops!

0:32:110:32:13

That pipe! Now there's no excuse for that pipe.

0:32:130:32:16

It's quite fun that it's in the style of a colt 45,

0:32:160:32:20

but at the end of the day, it's a pipe and it's a fiver.

0:32:200:32:23

As for your rug at a tenner?

0:32:230:32:26

(Well, off to the skip with that!)

0:32:260:32:28

After starting this leg in Rushden,

0:32:310:32:34

our experts are now motoring south

0:32:340:32:36

towards auction in St Albans, Hertfordshire.

0:32:360:32:39

A place many a famous face has called home,

0:32:390:32:42

from the late, great comic Benny Hill

0:32:420:32:45

to world-famous physicist Stephen Hawking.

0:32:450:32:49

Charlie, great shame you didn't go all-in on this one, wasn't it?

0:32:510:32:56

Oh, I really wish I'd spent all my money!

0:32:560:32:59

Because I think the auctioneer would be well-suited

0:32:590:33:01

to have the sale outside today.

0:33:010:33:02

THEY CHUCKLE

0:33:020:33:04

Go on!

0:33:050:33:06

Our boys will battle it out at Hertfordshire Auctioneers.

0:33:070:33:11

What does auctioneer Chris Small make of our experts' lots?

0:33:140:33:18

There's quite an eclectic mix of items.

0:33:190:33:23

I quite like the pipe revolver.

0:33:230:33:25

What it's worth and what it will make, I don't know.

0:33:250:33:28

I don't really rate the bamboo tables at all -

0:33:280:33:30

I think if we get a tenner for those, we'll be doing well.

0:33:300:33:33

The Churchill centenary dish, a little bit of damage to it,

0:33:330:33:36

it does have its original box.

0:33:360:33:38

Yes, I think that's probably going to make...

0:33:380:33:40

maybe the most money today.

0:33:400:33:42

We've got bidders in the room and online.

0:33:440:33:46

Get comfy, chaps, the games are about to begin.

0:33:460:33:49

At £10, at £10...

0:33:510:33:53

-Here we are.

-Back in your favourite position.

0:33:540:33:58

-Front row of the stalls.

-Front row, I'm looking forward to this.

0:33:580:34:01

Well, you're up first, James,

0:34:020:34:04

with the late Victorian bamboo stand and planter.

0:34:040:34:08

-15, you've got 15, have you?

-Ooh!

0:34:080:34:10

15, I've got. £15 I've got.

0:34:100:34:12

To my right at £15 I've got now.

0:34:120:34:14

At 15, I'm bid.

0:34:140:34:16

It's on the net at 15.

0:34:160:34:17

And 20, Steve at 20.

0:34:170:34:19

-Taking off now, James.

-Taking off.

0:34:190:34:21

At 20, I've got now, £20 I've got.

0:34:210:34:23

20 for this one, at £20 for the bamboo,

0:34:230:34:26

plant stand and brass pot there.

0:34:260:34:29

£20 only I'm bid.

0:34:290:34:30

All done with that one at £20?

0:34:300:34:33

-Go on, James.

-£20.

0:34:330:34:34

You've halved your money!

0:34:340:34:36

-Half my money.

-Less a little commission...

0:34:360:34:38

You're coming back to join me, James. You're coming back!

0:34:380:34:42

Much to Charlie's delight, that's a disappointing start for James.

0:34:430:34:47

Will his pair of 1970s bamboo tables do a bit better?

0:34:490:34:53

Give me a tenner, who's in?

0:34:540:34:55

-Quiet!

-Ooh!

0:34:570:34:58

'£5.'

0:34:580:34:59

-Cheeky monkey!

-I've got 5, it's a bid, it's a bid!

0:34:590:35:01

£5 I've got.

0:35:010:35:04

10 bid, £15 got.

0:35:040:35:05

£15 I've got.

0:35:050:35:07

-See, he's out.

-15, got now at 18.

-18. Keep going.

0:35:070:35:10

18 and 20, bid 20.

0:35:100:35:12

You're riding it now, James.

0:35:120:35:14

-22.

-Oh!

0:35:140:35:15

£22 I'm bid.

0:35:150:35:18

Uncharted territory.

0:35:180:35:20

Amazing. £22 I am bid for these.

0:35:200:35:23

Any more now at £22?

0:35:230:35:26

Can't be!

0:35:260:35:28

-22 salvaged.

-That's marvellous.

0:35:280:35:30

Indeed, bravo, James.

0:35:300:35:32

Charlie, m'dear, it's your Madeira chair.

0:35:360:35:38

-Ten I've got, thank you, at ten.

-Well done.

-We're away.

0:35:390:35:42

£12, 12 I've got.

0:35:420:35:44

12 I've got now. At 12, you're out at £12.

0:35:440:35:47

To my left is the bid at £12, I've got.

0:35:470:35:49

It's from Madeira, my dear!

0:35:490:35:51

1948 Madeira sunlounger there.

0:35:510:35:54

£12 is bid to my left, at £12 for it. Is there any more now?

0:35:540:35:57

£12 for the sunlounger.

0:35:570:35:59

It's got to go, then.

0:35:590:36:01

£12, oh, dear, oh, dear, oh, dear!

0:36:010:36:02

Once, twice and...

0:36:020:36:05

Ooh!

0:36:050:36:06

It's like a bullet through the heart.

0:36:080:36:10

I don't think he's taking it very well.

0:36:100:36:13

-So you're not pleased with the 12?

-Desperately disappointed.

0:36:160:36:19

-Desperately. I feel a moistening of the eye.

-JAMES CHUCKLES

0:36:190:36:23

Come on, chaps, dry those eyes.

0:36:230:36:25

Your rosewood mirror that failed to sell at the last auction is up next.

0:36:250:36:30

Start me at 20, who's there?

0:36:300:36:32

20, 30 I'm bid. Goodness me.

0:36:320:36:34

Oh, come on, folks - lovely thing.

0:36:340:36:36

-£30.

-Thank goodness for that, Charlie.

0:36:360:36:39

30 on the net, £30 I'm bid this one. Is there any more now?

0:36:390:36:42

At £30 on this one.

0:36:420:36:44

£30, doubling money.

0:36:440:36:47

-Good work, sir.

-Well done.

0:36:470:36:49

Well done.

0:36:490:36:51

A lovely profit and Charlie can finally say farewell to the mirror

0:36:510:36:54

and we don't have to cart it round any more.

0:36:540:36:56

-You doubled your money!

-You are all fire...

0:36:560:37:00

You are smelling of roses here, I don't know what's going on.

0:37:000:37:03

-Rosewood.

-Rosewood!

-Rosewood!

0:37:030:37:05

Can Charlie's luck continue with his silver-plate bottle coasters?

0:37:070:37:11

-20, got 20 I'm bid straight in.

-20, straight in.

0:37:110:37:15

At 20 I'm bid these, at £20 I've got.

0:37:150:37:18

Nearly all the bidding is online, isn't it?

0:37:180:37:21

I don't know what all these people are here for.

0:37:210:37:23

£20 I've got now.

0:37:230:37:24

It's the net bidder at £20.

0:37:240:37:26

-Are you done with them? Gone!

-£20.

0:37:260:37:29

-I think the buyer will be over the moon.

-Yes.

0:37:290:37:32

Someone's bagged themselves a real bargain there.

0:37:320:37:35

Charlie's up again now with his Bakelite pipe shaped like a gun.

0:37:370:37:40

20, thank you, straight in. £20 I got.

0:37:420:37:44

20 I'm bid, it's on the net.

0:37:440:37:46

£20 I've got. 20 and 5, 25.

0:37:460:37:48

-In with...

-25, madam.

0:37:480:37:50

I've got 25 in the room, 25 I've got, lady's bid.

0:37:500:37:53

Are we selling?

0:37:530:37:54

-30, back in.

-Oh!

0:37:540:37:56

-35.

-35.

-35.

0:37:560:37:58

35, got. 35, it's in the room now.

0:37:580:38:01

Net bidder, you're out at 35.

0:38:010:38:03

Selling it once, twice...

0:38:030:38:06

-Well done.

-Thank you, madam.

-Well done.

0:38:090:38:10

What a result. Fabulous profit there for Charlie

0:38:130:38:16

and something to bang on about, heh.

0:38:160:38:18

Today, you are a man in form.

0:38:180:38:21

I am, I'm on fire.

0:38:210:38:23

It's the pipe.

0:38:230:38:24

Auctioneer Chris' son James is taking the helm now.

0:38:260:38:29

And it's the turn of

0:38:310:38:32

James Braxton's hardwood solitaire board with marbles...

0:38:320:38:35

£10 I'm bid.

0:38:350:38:37

At ten on this, at £10 I'm bid.

0:38:370:38:38

-Keep going!

-12 on the net.

0:38:380:38:40

-12 on the net.

-Here we go.

-Keep going.

0:38:400:38:42

Back in. £15 now, 15.

0:38:420:38:45

Are we all done then?

0:38:450:38:46

-Oh.

-New bidder at £18.

0:38:460:38:48

£18 now. At 20. You got 20.

0:38:480:38:50

-Over at 20, you're out.

-Keep going, madam!

0:38:500:38:53

At £20 in the furniture.

0:38:530:38:54

22. At 22, says no. At 22.

0:38:540:38:58

-25?

-At £22 I'm bid.

0:38:580:39:01

Down the front at £22.

0:39:010:39:03

Last warning at £22...

0:39:030:39:04

-Nearly bailed you out.

-Nearly.

0:39:060:39:08

Thank you, madam, thank you. Thank you.

0:39:080:39:11

James seems pretty relieved with that result.

0:39:110:39:14

It's the auctioneer's pick next...

0:39:140:39:15

..and Charlie's final lot -

0:39:170:39:19

the commemorative Churchill dish.

0:39:190:39:22

-Start me at 20.

-Oh.

0:39:220:39:24

20 I've got, at 20 now.

0:39:240:39:26

-20 on the internet.

-22.

0:39:260:39:28

At 22, got 28. 28, 28, 28. £28

0:39:280:39:31

I'm bid and 30. At 30, got 30.

0:39:310:39:33

-30.

-Come on, we need to get on a bit here.

0:39:330:39:36

This is Winston Churchill, this isn't Enid Blyton.

0:39:360:39:40

The saviour of a nation.

0:39:400:39:42

With the box, as well. £30.

0:39:420:39:43

-With the box!

-At 30.

0:39:430:39:45

32, at £32. 32.

0:39:450:39:47

35. 38. 38, bid 38.

0:39:470:39:49

38. Now were getting there.

0:39:500:39:52

-We're getting there.

-At 40. I've got 40.

-We need a bit more, sir.

0:39:520:39:55

42, got 42. At 42.

0:39:550:39:57

At £42.

0:39:570:39:58

That should be enough.

0:39:580:40:00

No, no, no. I think we need a little more.

0:40:000:40:02

-48, got 48.

-It is Churchill.

0:40:020:40:05

At £48 I'm bid. Any more?

0:40:050:40:06

'Are we all done in the room?'

0:40:060:40:08

On the net at £48, the hammer's up.

0:40:080:40:12

-Well done.

-A rollercoaster.

0:40:130:40:15

Churchill does Charlie proud again.

0:40:150:40:17

Another profit.

0:40:170:40:18

Will James' six plated picnic cups prove popular?

0:40:200:40:23

Bid 20, got 20 at £20 in the room.

0:40:240:40:28

And two, and five, and 25.

0:40:280:40:30

Got 25, at 25. At 28, got 28, at 30...

0:40:300:40:33

Now we're going!

0:40:330:40:35

-At £30 I'm bid for this.

-30.

0:40:350:40:37

-30, 2, 5, 35.

-James!

-At £35 I'm bid.

0:40:370:40:39

35, 38, 40, at £40 I'm bid.

0:40:400:40:44

At £40 now, 42, 45.

0:40:440:40:46

£45, 45. Still cheap for these.

0:40:460:40:50

-Hukin and Heath.

-48, at 48.

0:40:500:40:52

They're a good size, aren't they?

0:40:520:40:55

-At £48.

-Go on, go 50.

0:40:550:40:57

-50!

-At £48 I'm bid.

0:40:570:41:00

Are we all done? At £48, I'm bid.

0:41:000:41:02

Are we all done at 48?

0:41:020:41:03

Nice little profit there.

0:41:050:41:06

It's their last lot of the day

0:41:080:41:10

and to have any chance of winning this leg,

0:41:100:41:12

James needs a good result on his aubusson rug.

0:41:120:41:17

Here we are, here we go.

0:41:170:41:18

My bids, then. I've got 10, £15 I'm bid.

0:41:180:41:21

-At 15 on this, 15.

-15.

0:41:210:41:23

At £15. Left bid at 15,

0:41:230:41:26

20, 5... 25.

0:41:260:41:28

-Keep going.

-Bid 30, got 30.

0:41:280:41:30

Keep him rocking on!

0:41:300:41:33

I'm out at £30. £30 I'm bid.

0:41:330:41:35

35? Got 35.

0:41:350:41:36

-Well done.

-At 35. At £35 I'm bid.

0:41:380:41:41

At 35 I'm bid.

0:41:410:41:43

At 35 on this. Any more?

0:41:430:41:45

-At £35 are you out?

-No!

-We need another one!

0:41:450:41:49

Once, twice, third and final time at £35...

0:41:490:41:51

Serious triumph, though, 10 to 35.

0:41:540:41:57

10 to 35!

0:41:570:41:59

Lovely profit there for James.

0:41:590:42:01

But has he done enough to win this leg?

0:42:010:42:04

James began with £470.84.

0:42:040:42:07

After auction costs, he made a small loss of £6.46,

0:42:080:42:13

but he still goes into the last leg in the overall lead

0:42:130:42:17

with a fantastic £464.38

0:42:170:42:21

and he's looking very prosperous, if you don't mind my saying so.

0:42:210:42:24

Charlie started this leg with £214.84.

0:42:260:42:29

He made a profit of £43.90 after auction costs,

0:42:310:42:36

which means he goes into the final leg with £258.74

0:42:360:42:40

and is crowned today's winner.

0:42:400:42:43

Well done, old bean.

0:42:430:42:45

Very good, sir, very good.

0:42:450:42:46

Well, as the winner, winner takes all.

0:42:460:42:49

-Thank you very much, sir.

-Thank you.

-Take me away.

-Take you away.

0:42:490:42:52

-Where to, sir?

-Somewhere exotic.

-Exotic, sir.

0:42:520:42:55

Ah, home, James.

0:42:550:42:57

See you soon, road trippers!

0:42:570:42:59

Charlie Ross and James Braxton begin in Rushden, Northamptonshire, stop off in Cambridgeshire, Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire, before heading to an auction in St Albans, Hertfordshire.