Episode 25 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 25

Charlie Ross and James Braxton begin in Brasted, working their way through the Kent and Surrey countryside. Charlie takes a risky punt on a pricey purchase.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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This is beautiful.

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That's the way to do this.

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With £200 each, a classic car and a goal - to scour for antiques.

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Joy.

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-Hello.

-The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction

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but it's no mean feat.

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HE LAUGHS

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Sorry! Sorry! Sorry!

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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The handbrake's on!

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This is Antiques Roadtrip.

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Yeah!

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ROCK AND ROLL MUSIC

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It's the final leg of this week's adventure

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with our top auctioneers, James Braxton and Charlie Ross.

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Do you know, I'm going to miss this. I'm going to miss the car...

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I'm going miss the car.

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-I'm going to miss you.

-I'm going to miss you, Charlie.

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It's been as much fun as my first road trip with you.

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But all good things must come to an end.

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Roadtrip veteran and auctioneer Charlie...

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-Arghh!

-LAUGHTER

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..is ever the entertainer.

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-What do you reckon?

-Uncanny.

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Oh, arm up a bit more.

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While his partner in crime, fellow auctioneer James,

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takes a more relaxed approach to things.

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-Bring the arms up...

-HE INHALES DEEPLY

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..and bringing your toes down on the floor slowly, slowly, slowly.

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-CHARLIE GROANS

-Do you feel that?

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On this journey, our boys have been touring around

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in a 1961 Ford Zephyr,

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manufactured before seat belts were legally required.

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I did early-morning yoga today.

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Ah, that could take you back a bit

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because I've noticed that since you gave up yoga,

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-you've been much better at...

-LAUGHTER DROWNS SPEECH

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No. No, the brain is reoxygenated.

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-Oh, is it?

-I am on form.

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We shall see. Huh!

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After starting this trip with £200 in his pocket,

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Charlie now has £258.74 to play with today.

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While James has more than doubled his original 200 stake

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and starts this final leg with £464.38.

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Awesome!

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That's a modern word.

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I would urge you not to throw in all your money.

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Yeah, but can't you see this is the only way I have of beating you?

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Well, winning is the name of the game, actually.

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Their trip began in the Lincolnshire town of Boston

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and meandered through Norfolk, Cambridgeshire,

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up to Leicestershire, before heading south

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towards the final destination

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in the Surrey town of Cobham.

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Our boys start their last leg in Brasted, Kent,

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before finishing at their very last auction in Cobham.

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James is kicking off proceedings today in Brasted.

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Situated between the towns of Sevenoaks and Westerham,

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this pretty little village was once home

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to Napoleon Bonaparte's nephew, Napoleon III. Huh!

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So, let battle commence.

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An antique shop.

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What a revelation.

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What exactly were you expecting, James?

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One of the longest-running antique dealerships in Kent,

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Courtyard Antiques, is jam-packed with potential buys.

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This is lovely to have all this choice.

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Choice, choice, choice.

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Ah, here's a nice bit. It's a really fun faux caddy.

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Now, this is when biscuit makers were making serious money.

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They used to produce novelty biscuit tins.

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Things that people...

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You know, resourceful, this was a time of thrift,

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you'd buy your biscuits, biscuits would be nicely packed in there

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and then you could use it as your tea caddy.

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Beautifully done, all painted and it's all tin.

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And there we are,

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William Crawford & Sons - biscuit manufacturers.

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Edinburgh, Liverpool and London.

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By royal appointment.

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What have we got on it?

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-£38.

-One to consider.

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-JAMES SIGHS

-What have we got here?

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So, we've got lots of small things.

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What's this? What's this? What does it say on the label?

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18th-century cannonball retrieved from the River Thames by a mudlark.

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Now, mudlarks are those funny people at low tide

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who rush round the embankment finding things

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and that is a cannonball.

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History at £12.

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Right, can a deal be done with Hugh?

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What generously can you do on that? Is there a discount on that?

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Yeah, I think we can go to ten for that.

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-Ten. Put it there, Hugh.

-OK.

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-Come on. That's the first one, first one done.

-OK, good.

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Come on, come with me.

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£10 secures James the first item bought on this leg.

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What about that faux tea caddy, James? Still interested?

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I think the very, very, very best would have to be £30.

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£30? Come on, put it there.

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-30.

-Thank you.

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There we are, I've got a cannonball and I've got a tea caddy

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and I'll give a prize for any sort of connection between the two, OK?

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Answers on a postcard, please. Address them to James, not me.

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Now, what's he found?

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An interesting light pendant, me thinks.

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I like that.

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A nice bit of frosted glass, Art Deco.

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It's got quite a lot going for it -

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stylised flowers, nice weight to it and a nice metal thing.

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Complete with string.

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Complete with string, even with string.

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-We'll throw the string in.

-What does it say?

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"£10, no trade, cost only."

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Done.

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-Crikey!

-There you are.

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Fast business, eh? £10 for the light pendant.

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Some bold buying in James' very first shop, secures him three lots.

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Charlie, meanwhile, has made his way to Westerham.

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He's having a relaxed start to his day

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with a visit to Quebec House,

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the childhood home of one of Britain's unsung military heroes.

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-Hello, I'm Trevor.

-Good morning.

-Welcome to Quebec House.

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By the middle of the 18th century,

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European nations were building their empires

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and the British Empire was expanding fast.

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One daring commander, Major General James Wolfe,

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led a pivotal attack that resulted in British rule in Canada

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and contributed to the British Empire

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becoming the biggest the world had ever seen.

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Here to tell Charlie more is guide, Trevor Gaston.

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-This was his childhood home.

-Right.

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And he joined the Army as an officer cadet at the age of 13.

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At the age of 14, second lieutenant in charge of men...

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-No! My goodness.

-..and going to war.

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Yeah. Fighting at 14.

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Crumbs, that's remarkable.

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I think if you were big enough to hold a sword, you could fight.

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-And where did he first fight? In Europe?

-In Europe, Dettingen.

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And he obviously did well.

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He did very well.

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He was mentioned in dispatches.

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His horse was shot from beneath him...

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-Yeah.

-..and he carried on fighting.

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By 1759, Britain and France were at war

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over control in North America and Canada.

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Having gained a reputation as a strong and decisive leader,

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Wolfe was chosen, at the age of 32,

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to lead the campaign to capture Quebec, a crucial French stronghold.

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It took 100 ships to get them there.

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God. How long did it take to get there?

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They started in March and arrived in May.

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-Really?

-And this to Wolfe would have been an absolute nightmare

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-cos he was violently seasick.

-Oh, dear.

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-He wasn't a good traveller.

-No.

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In fact, his mother made a pronouncement when he was 14

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that "water and my son do not mix."

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CHARLIE LAUGHS

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Wolfe experienced months of frustration and ill health.

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Many thought the operation would fail.

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Then, at dawn on 13 September,

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helped by Native American guides, Wolfe led his men into battle.

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The British had already identified the Heights of Abraham

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-as being a strategic point.

-Yeah.

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And Wolfe landed the 4,000 men in four hours.

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Started at 2.00 in the morning

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and by 6.00 he was ready.

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-Took the French by surprise.

-Yeah.

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The French had to march through Quebec to attack Wolfe.

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-And then the battle?

-Then the battle.

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-And how long did the battle last?

-20 minutes.

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-20 minutes?

-20 minutes.

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-Crikey! That's very one-sided.

-It was.

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The French really weren't prepared.

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Sadly, Wolfe was fatally wounded early in the battle

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but lived long enough to hear of his victory.

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Do we know exactly how he died?

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He took two musket balls to the chest.

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-Two?

-Two.

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He was wounded before that, he took a musket graze to the wrist

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and one to the thigh and two of those...

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-That would do for you.

-You wouldn't last very long.

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-They're heavy.

-Indeed.

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# "Well done, me lads," General Wolfe did say... #

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So, this man, having won this battle -

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his body was brought home - became an instant legend.

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A national hero.

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And the whole country must have been amazed and thrilled

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-with what he'd done.

-Yeah. He turned the tide of the war.

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The French surrendered Quebec on 18th September and a year later,

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in 1760, the rest of Canada followed.

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It wasn't until 1982

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that Canada gained formal independence from Britain.

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And I suppose although Wolfe perhaps isn't as famous as Nelson or...

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-the Duke of Marlborough perhaps...

-Or Churchill.

-..or Churchill,

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he'd be really up there, wouldn't he?

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If you had the top half-dozen commanders,

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-he'd be there, wouldn't he?

-I think so, yes.

-Yeah.

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-I mean, capturing Canada, it's no mean feat.

-No, no.

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I mean, that really is a huge, huge legacy, isn't it?

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James Wolfe will forever be recognised

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as an important military figure

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who helped his country create the biggest empire in the world.

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James has joined Charlie in Westerham,

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where they're making their way to the next shop of the day.

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-I've got a bit of a back, I'm afraid.

-Why?

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-Sitting in that...

-Oh, steady! Steady.

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-Sitting in that...

-Steady.

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This is the problem with shopping,

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doing a tour with a sort of more elderly gentleman...

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-With a pensioner.

-You've got to...with a pensioner.

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I need a bit of yoga, I think, for my back.

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I've got something for a back. Shoulder apart...

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-I've got it.

-..and then we bring the arms up...

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HE INHALES DEEPLY

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..and then roll them back, OK?

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As you breathe out, roll them back, feel those shoulder blades...

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-Oh, yeah.

-..bringing your toes down, heels down on the floor slowly,

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-slowly, slowly.

-HE GROANS

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-Do you feel that?

-I do.

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It's just reacquainting yourself with the mechanics of breathing.

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-I've gone slightly dizzy.

-I know, it often happens.

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-You know, that's a very novice thing, to get dizzy.

-Is it?

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And then, you know, you're in the hands of the master now.

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Place those soles correctly, please.

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I never thought I'd see that on this show.

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Time to shop, fellas.

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Now, Charlie, I've been in this shop before and I'll introduce you.

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This is the owner. Mick, Charlie - Charlie, Mick.

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-Nice to meet you, Charlie.

-Lovely to meet you.

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Nice to see you again, Mick.

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-Hey, Charlie.

-Yes?

-The blessed bamboo.

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-Bamboo.

-Should we be on it?

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We didn't have a great success with bamboo last time.

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No, I don't think so.

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With four rooms filled full of antiques

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of all shapes and sizes, there's plenty for our boys to fight over.

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There's nothing like a really good rummage.

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I tell you what, if you don't look, you're not going to find it.

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Ah, could this be the game changer?

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TIM CLEARS THROAT I doubt it.

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Now, what has Charlie spotted?

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HE GROANS

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The sort of radio that James used to listen to the news on

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in the war, you know, with Alvar Lidell.

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Is it a period radio or is it a copy?

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I think it's a period radio but it's got a new flex on it.

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Ah, a label.

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£140.

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(I'd like that for about 50.)

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I can't get up.

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So, Charlie's considering the radio, but does it work?

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-Look, it's glowing!

-It's glowing.

-It's glowing.

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It's glowing, that's a good sign.

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Where's its aerial, Mick?

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-It doesn't need an aerial.

-Doesn't it?

-No.

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-RADIO CRACKLES

-Oh!

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-Do we get the BBC Home Service...

-Sshhh!

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Am I hearing something?

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Yes.

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There's life.

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-Well, I think, Charlie...

-Yeah.

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-..while you're getting a signal...

-Yeah, you carry on.

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..I'm going to carry on. Do you mind?

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Oh!

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-We're not getting any stations whatsoever but it does work.

-Yeah.

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-Well, it makes a noise.

-Yeah.

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Depends on what you want to listen to, really.

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Can you just plop it up on here?

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Just have a think about the aerial.

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James, I eat humble pie - it needs an aerial.

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HE CHUCKLES

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I like it, I like the look of it.

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I'm just worried about the functionality of it, really.

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Having a radio, it's all very well looking at it, Mick, isn't it?

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But you really need to listen to it.

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While Charlie puts the radio back on the shelf,

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it looks like James just isn't giving up on his old bamboo.

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The thing with these bamboo tables

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is that very light construction.

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And the thing is with light construction,

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is that you want it all to be sound.

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We've got some use, so we've got...the legs have been bent out.

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This is all pinned or nailed.

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This is totally right

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and all it needs is a piece of cut glass in there

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and it's just perfectly functional.

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I like it.

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The ticket says £45,

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so Hugh's phoned the owner with James' optimistic offer of £25.

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-Well, the lady wants 35 for it, so a bottom price.

-35?

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Put it there, Mick.

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-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you.

-Another bit of bamboo.

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This is my turning point with bamboo.

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Fingers crossed, eh?

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And it looks like Charlie's found something he fancies, too.

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A quadruple decanter for four different liqueurs.

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-Mick...

-Yes, Charlie.

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..look at this, a four-sectioned bottle decanter.

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-Is it yours?

-No, I'm afraid not.

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It's got 18 on the ticket, I would love to give you a tenner for it.

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-I'm sure you would.

-Yeah.

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What do you think they would take?

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I can always try her...

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-May you try?

-..and see what she says, yeah.

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-Give her a quick call...

-No problem.

-..and we'll see what we can do.

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(I think I will buy this anyway,

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(even if it's a bit more than a tenner.

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(But don't tell Mick.)

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Right, Mick's got Sue on the blower.

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Can he seal the deal for Charlie?

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Come on, Sue!

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The person who's trying to buy it wants it for a tenner.

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Come on, Sue!

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Erm...OK.

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-Hello, Sue!

-Right, so 15 is the best.

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-Is it?

-Yes, I'm afraid.

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Thanks, Sue, very much indeed. And tell her...I'll have it!

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All right, he's going to have it. Did you hear that?

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It's made Sue's day, £15.

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OK, Sue. Thanks, bye.

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Well done, sir.

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Charlie's bought his first lot of the final leg of the road trip.

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And with that, our boys call it a day.

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So, nighty-night.

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Hey, good morning, gentlemen.

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I'm in the last chance saloon today.

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And how much spending money? Lots?

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I've got about 200... 250-odd quid.

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-That's all right.

-Considerably better than it has been.

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Yeah. Well, at least it's more than you started with.

0:16:530:16:55

That's true. Having only bought the vintage glass decanter yesterday,

0:16:550:16:59

Charlie has some serious shopping to do today with his £243.74.

0:16:590:17:05

Meanwhile, James has already secured himself four lots.

0:17:090:17:12

The cannonball,

0:17:140:17:16

the novelty biscuit box,

0:17:160:17:18

the Art Deco light pendant

0:17:180:17:20

and the bamboo tiered-table.

0:17:200:17:23

He's still got £379.38 available to spend.

0:17:240:17:29

It's the last day for Charlie to catch up.

0:17:310:17:34

He's starting in Reigate, Surrey.

0:17:340:17:36

Set at the foot of the North Downs,

0:17:360:17:38

historic Reigate has existed as a market town since 1150

0:17:380:17:42

and is home to the quaintly-named Magpie House & The Yard.

0:17:420:17:47

-Hello!

-Hello, hi.

-Good morning.

0:17:470:17:49

-Morning.

-How are you?

-I'm fine thank you.

0:17:490:17:51

-It's Lynne, is it?

-It's Lynne and you're Charlie, aren't you?

0:17:510:17:54

-I am Charlie, yeah. Well spotted.

-Good to meet you.

-This is fab.

0:17:540:17:57

You know, walking through, my eye line...

0:17:590:18:01

-took immediately to this man.

-Oh, yes. He's beautiful, isn't he?

0:18:010:18:05

-Isn't he fab?

-He's our Mercury.

0:18:050:18:07

-Mercury?

-He's absolutely gorgeous.

-The messenger god.

0:18:070:18:10

-The messenger of wealth, isn't it?

-Wealth? Bringer of prosperity.

0:18:100:18:14

That's the one, yeah.

0:18:140:18:16

And I think he's also god of thieves.

0:18:160:18:19

-Right. I think I did hear that.

-So, cheerio!

0:18:190:18:21

He's pretty heavy, I don't know if you can manage him.

0:18:210:18:24

-SHE LAUGHS

-Blimey, he's heavy!

0:18:240:18:26

You wouldn't be able to just walk out the shop with him.

0:18:260:18:28

-And it's a genuine bronze.

-Yes, definitely.

0:18:280:18:30

It's not old but it's quite well-modelled.

0:18:300:18:34

-Yeah.

-Is that very cheap?

0:18:340:18:36

It doesn't seem to have a price, it's free at the moment.

0:18:360:18:38

Well, not really.

0:18:380:18:40

-But I can find out for you.

-Could you?

-Erm...

0:18:400:18:42

-Go and find out now.

-OK.

-That's the first thing that...

0:18:420:18:45

That's really caught your eye, hasn't it.

0:18:450:18:47

I'm betting old Mercury here is going to be pretty pricey.

0:18:470:18:51

And from an impressive piece of metal to another,

0:18:530:18:56

well, less so.

0:18:560:18:57

Look at this. An old...an old iron stove.

0:18:580:19:03

Very Serrell.

0:19:030:19:04

You're right, Roadtrip favourite Philip Serrell

0:19:040:19:06

relishes his random rusty rustic buys.

0:19:060:19:10

It's not quite Mercury, is it?

0:19:100:19:12

It's not quite the messenger god but...

0:19:120:19:16

..the more you look in this shop, the more there is. It's fab.

0:19:180:19:21

Charlie's still got Mercury on his mind.

0:19:260:19:28

The dealer is looking for £375,

0:19:280:19:31

so Charlie's got some serious negotiating to do.

0:19:310:19:34

It's a straightforward thing,

0:19:370:19:38

I have got £240 and I think I've got £3.43 or something.

0:19:380:19:43

God, you'll get a latte with that, can't you?

0:19:430:19:46

-LAUGHING:

-I don't want a latte.

-You want Mercury.

0:19:460:19:48

-I've got to buy other things, but I want Mercury.

-You want Mercury.

0:19:480:19:51

Spending almost every penny you have left on one item

0:19:510:19:54

is a big gamble. I hope you know what you're doing, Charlie.

0:19:540:19:58

It's a pathetic offer and I don't make any bones about it.

0:19:580:20:01

-If I had £350, I'd give you £350 for him but I haven't got it.

-Yeah.

0:20:010:20:05

Shall I just double-check?

0:20:050:20:07

-Well, you'd better triple-check, yeah.

-Let me just double-check.

0:20:070:20:10

I think, you know, just to be...

0:20:100:20:11

I would.

0:20:110:20:13

Charlie's after a hefty discount, so what's the verdict, Lynne?

0:20:140:20:18

It's your lucky day, talking about those rippling muscles.

0:20:180:20:20

-Are you sure?

-Yeah, he's going to do it for you.

-May I hug you?

0:20:200:20:23

-That is so generous.

-Well, we've had a great day, so, yeah.

0:20:230:20:27

And do you know, I can give you an impersonation.

0:20:270:20:30

Now, look. Can you spot the difference here?

0:20:310:20:34

-Uncanny!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:20:370:20:40

-What do you reckon?

-Uncanny.

0:20:400:20:41

Yeah, that's one way of putting it.

0:20:430:20:45

Charlie's spent almost all of his money on the statue of Mercury.

0:20:450:20:49

It's a very risky punt and let's hope it pays off.

0:20:490:20:53

James is still in Kent and has made his way to the village of Hever.

0:20:580:21:02

He's come to Hever Castle,

0:21:020:21:03

a 13th-century castle saved from ruin

0:21:030:21:06

then extensively restored to its former glory

0:21:060:21:10

by a fabulously wealthy New York Senator,

0:21:100:21:13

William Waldorf Astor.

0:21:130:21:15

Here to show James more is guide Ian Smith.

0:21:170:21:21

-James, welcome to Hever Castle.

-Isn't it glorious?

0:21:210:21:25

It's a lovely setting,

0:21:250:21:27

moat and this wonderful defensive stronghold.

0:21:270:21:30

Astor was captivated by the castle's royal connections,

0:21:300:21:34

particularly Anne Boleyn, who grew up here.

0:21:340:21:37

She was the ill-fated second wife of Henry VIII

0:21:370:21:41

and mother of the future Queen Elizabeth I.

0:21:410:21:44

And here we are inside.

0:21:440:21:46

What you see is not medieval

0:21:460:21:48

but a beautiful Tudor house from the late 1400s.

0:21:480:21:53

We believe built by Anne Boleyn's great-grandfather.

0:21:530:21:57

And subsequently, after many other owners,

0:21:570:22:00

by William Waldorf Astor in 1903.

0:22:000:22:04

-This was going to be his country retreat...

-Yeah.

0:22:040:22:07

..and he was going to lavish his millions

0:22:070:22:09

in bringing this building back to life.

0:22:090:22:12

William Waldorf Astor's great-grandfather

0:22:140:22:18

was a fur and real estate tycoon

0:22:180:22:20

and was America's first multimillionaire.

0:22:200:22:24

William inherited a personal fortune,

0:22:240:22:26

which made him the richest man in America.

0:22:260:22:29

After a failing political career, William moved to England in 1891

0:22:290:22:34

with a reputed 100 million to his name.

0:22:340:22:37

He set about trying to be accepted

0:22:370:22:39

into the upper echelons of English society.

0:22:390:22:43

He invested in newspapers and property

0:22:430:22:45

and purchased the historic Hever Castle.

0:22:450:22:48

Ian, what sort of state was the castle in

0:22:500:22:53

when William Waldorf Astor bought it?

0:22:530:22:56

In the 19th century,

0:22:560:22:58

it had become an absentee home

0:22:580:23:01

and tenant farmers lived here.

0:23:010:23:04

And it's suggested that the ground floor rooms

0:23:040:23:07

were inhabited by animals.

0:23:070:23:09

Upstairs, there was an artists' commune,

0:23:090:23:12

-so you can imagine...

-JAMES LAUGHS

0:23:120:23:14

..the mess that was here.

0:23:140:23:17

So, what did William Astor do to this marvellous place?

0:23:170:23:21

This is an extraordinary room and it looks almost old Tudor.

0:23:210:23:25

Astor was an historical romanticist.

0:23:250:23:29

He wrote historical novels

0:23:290:23:31

and like many others he had fallen in love with the Anne Boleyn story.

0:23:310:23:36

But if Anne Boleyn walked into this room now,

0:23:360:23:38

she would be astonished.

0:23:380:23:40

"I just have to ask you, what has happened to my kitchen?"

0:23:400:23:43

-Because it's been given this tremendous makeover.

-Yeah.

0:23:430:23:47

William Waldorf has turned it into an inner hall.

0:23:470:23:50

Not using oak, as any normal person might use

0:23:500:23:53

but walnut, to give these wonderful effects.

0:23:530:23:57

-Right.

-So, he created these wonderful interiors

0:23:570:24:00

inside the moated walls for himself.

0:24:000:24:03

-Outside those moated walls, he built a Tudor village.

-Really?

0:24:030:24:08

But not a Tudor village where, you know,

0:24:080:24:10

-peasants wander from house to house.

-Right.

0:24:100:24:13

All the rooms interlink.

0:24:130:24:15

William Waldorf was a newcomer to England

0:24:150:24:18

but he'd actually housed himself in a medieval stronghold.

0:24:180:24:22

In other words, given himself 700 years of history

0:24:220:24:25

that his family here didn't really have.

0:24:250:24:28

Between 1903 and 1908, William restored the ruined castle,

0:24:280:24:33

creating magnificent gardens and a lake.

0:24:330:24:36

The remarkable mock-Tudor village he built

0:24:360:24:39

was the perfect place for his society friends to stay,

0:24:390:24:43

while attending his lavish parties.

0:24:430:24:46

And here we are in Anne Boleyn's bedroom.

0:24:460:24:49

Tradition says that this is where she spent her time as a girl

0:24:490:24:53

and she would keep coming back to Hever

0:24:530:24:56

all the way up to the time of her marriage to Henry VIII.

0:24:560:24:59

The panelling behind the bed conceals William Waldorf's wardrobe.

0:24:590:25:03

-This was his dressing room.

-Right.

0:25:030:25:06

And he chose Anne Boleyn's bedroom for that purpose.

0:25:060:25:09

-But he would have this wonderful window to look out.

-Rather fun.

0:25:090:25:13

He was in the castle, he looks out onto his village there.

0:25:130:25:16

As well as being completely enchanted by Hever Castle,

0:25:160:25:19

Astor became increasingly fascinated by the tragic story of Anne Boleyn.

0:25:190:25:24

William Waldorf searched the world for artefacts

0:25:250:25:28

that he could link to Anne.

0:25:280:25:30

He acquired many that have proved to have doubtful provenance,

0:25:300:25:34

but this is as close as you're going to get today to Anne's DNA.

0:25:340:25:39

It's a beautifully-illustrated book of hours, prayers,

0:25:390:25:43

that were said during the day.

0:25:430:25:45

Her fingerprints will be all over that book because she signed it.

0:25:450:25:50

-Really?

-The inscription there says,

0:25:500:25:53

"Le temps viendra." The time will come.

0:25:530:25:56

"Je Anne Boleyn."

0:25:560:25:58

And there's a little celestial sphere there as well.

0:25:580:26:03

And she signed it on the page of the Last Judgement.

0:26:030:26:07

One would love to know just what she meant by, "The time will come."

0:26:070:26:10

Did it mean her marriage to Henry?

0:26:100:26:12

The birth of an heir?

0:26:120:26:14

Or it certainly couldn't mean the fact that

0:26:140:26:16

she was going to be beheaded after 1,000 days as Henry's Queen.

0:26:160:26:23

Over the years,

0:26:230:26:24

William donated a substantial amount of his fortune to charity.

0:26:240:26:28

He eventually achieved his ambition of acceptance into the aristocracy

0:26:280:26:32

when he was given the title Viscount Astor of Hever Castle.

0:26:320:26:36

It remained in the Astor family ownership until 1983

0:26:360:26:41

and is now a popular tourist destination.

0:26:410:26:44

Charlie meanwhile has journeyed to Dorking,

0:26:470:26:49

where Charles Dickens wrote much of his Pickwick Papers.

0:26:490:26:53

This historic market town holds Charlie's final shop,

0:26:530:26:57

Pilgrims Antiques Centre.

0:26:570:27:00

After taking a massive punt on Mercury,

0:27:000:27:04

here's hoping Steve will have a hidden bargain

0:27:040:27:07

for Charlie's remaining few pounds.

0:27:070:27:10

-Do you have a sort of bargain basement area?

-Yes, we do indeed.

0:27:100:27:14

Where's the area where I might be...

0:27:140:27:16

Can I introduce you to the final death zone here.

0:27:160:27:20

CHARLIE LAUGHS

0:27:200:27:22

This is as cheap as it comes in this shop, really.

0:27:220:27:25

When they get to red labels, that's...

0:27:250:27:27

That's it, no negotiation.

0:27:270:27:29

-Exactly right.

-Other than a few pence possibly.

0:27:290:27:32

Very possibly, yeah.

0:27:320:27:34

Yeah. Well, I do hope so,

0:27:340:27:36

as it's unlikely Charlie will find something

0:27:360:27:38

with an exact ticket price of £3.74.

0:27:380:27:43

Oh, £8.

0:27:430:27:46

(It's not easy shopping with £3.74.)

0:27:470:27:50

Oh! I've seen something rather splendid.

0:27:510:27:54

WHISPERING: £5.

0:27:560:27:58

£5.

0:27:580:27:59

That's a 15% discount or thereabouts,

0:28:000:28:03

if I were to get it for £3.74.

0:28:030:28:07

-Right.

-There's rather a charming glass there,

0:28:070:28:09

cordial glass. Sadly I don't think it's 18th-century.

0:28:090:28:12

No, I think you're probably right.

0:28:120:28:14

But it's got some nice diamond cutting into the side.

0:28:160:28:22

It's got a little bit of fruiting vine engraved round the top.

0:28:220:28:26

I'm really making it sound particularly good, aren't I?

0:28:260:28:28

-Well, I think it is rather good.

-Edinburgh Crystal.

0:28:280:28:32

What would the Scots put in there?

0:28:320:28:33

I mean, it looks to me like a sherry, a port glass, I suppose.

0:28:330:28:36

Oh, I should think some...

0:28:360:28:38

Port, are you a drinker of port?

0:28:380:28:39

..Scottish wine in a Scotsman's measure.

0:28:390:28:42

A small measure, sir?

0:28:420:28:43

Poor old Greg.

0:28:450:28:46

That would probably be in my price range, wouldn't it?

0:28:470:28:50

It's not that much of a discount.

0:28:500:28:51

It's priced at five.

0:28:510:28:53

I should think we could scrape that down to 3.75

0:28:530:28:55

-or whatever the last...

-3.74.

-3.74.

0:28:550:28:59

Looks like that's a done deal.

0:28:590:29:02

Och aye the noo.

0:29:020:29:04

Och aye... Oh, you're Scottish, too!

0:29:040:29:05

Would you like all my money?

0:29:050:29:07

-Yes, I will actually, I think I would.

-Aye.

0:29:070:29:10

On the final leg, our Charlie has spent every last penny he has

0:29:100:29:13

on a pretty piece of Scottish glass.

0:29:130:29:16

James has now made his way to Dorking too

0:29:180:29:21

and he's going to try his luck in the Christique Antique Centre.

0:29:210:29:25

He's meeting old friend there, Christie.

0:29:250:29:29

Christie, get it?

0:29:290:29:31

-Oh, a familiar face. How are you?

-How lovely to see you.

0:29:310:29:33

Yeah, really nice to see you.

0:29:330:29:35

With just under £380 in his pocket, there's plenty on offer.

0:29:360:29:40

What will catch your eye in all of this lot then, James?

0:29:420:29:46

Rather interestingly, I've just seen a bit,

0:29:460:29:50

which I hope is Tunbridge ware.

0:29:500:29:52

Quite an interesting, very fine tesserae mosaic of a butterfly.

0:29:520:29:57

And it's either £5 or 500, let's have a look.

0:30:000:30:02

No, it's five. Bound to be, down there.

0:30:020:30:04

-Is it?

-Yeah. I just took it in the other day.

0:30:040:30:06

Let's have a look at this.

0:30:060:30:09

It reminds me...

0:30:090:30:11

I think this was a modern maker.

0:30:110:30:13

It's signed, "Robert Vorley, 1980."

0:30:130:30:17

In the Tunbridge ware tradition.

0:30:170:30:18

Tunbridge ware was made as, sort of, high quality souvenirs

0:30:180:30:22

for the spa town of Tunbridge Wells.

0:30:220:30:25

I think it would be churlish of me to argue about that, wouldn't it?

0:30:250:30:29

£5. Shall we say three, to give you a fighting chance.

0:30:290:30:32

Three.

0:30:320:30:34

It doesn't normally work that way, Christine.

0:30:340:30:36

Cor, you're a lucky man, James.

0:30:360:30:38

Go on, put it there.

0:30:380:30:40

Thank you very much indeed, thank you.

0:30:400:30:42

So, it's rather fun.

0:30:420:30:43

That was my only specialism in my working life

0:30:430:30:47

was Tunbridge ware.

0:30:470:30:48

And I've found a modern piece of Tunbridge ware.

0:30:480:30:51

James has played it safe this leg

0:30:530:30:55

but his last purchase is something he loves.

0:30:550:30:58

James spent a total of £88 on five lots.

0:31:010:31:03

His cannonball,

0:31:050:31:07

the novelty biscuit box,

0:31:070:31:09

the Art Deco light pendant,

0:31:090:31:11

the bamboo tiered-table

0:31:110:31:14

and the modern Tunbridge ware box.

0:31:140:31:16

Charlie spent every penny he had on three lots.

0:31:190:31:22

The vintage decanter,

0:31:220:31:23

the Edinburgh Crystal glass

0:31:230:31:25

and his pricey purchase, the bronze of Mercury.

0:31:250:31:29

So, what do they make of each other's lots?

0:31:300:31:33

Has Charlie put all his eggs in one basket?

0:31:330:31:36

Well, the fewer items you buy, you know, you're narrowing,

0:31:360:31:39

you're shortening your risk, aren't you?

0:31:390:31:42

I've lengthened my risk with five.

0:31:420:31:44

He bought that little bit of Tunbridge ware for £3.

0:31:440:31:46

Actually, I think that's a very good buy.

0:31:460:31:49

I think his cannonball is pretty ghastly,

0:31:490:31:52

his bamboo table, frankly, is even worse.

0:31:520:31:55

What is it with him and bamboo?

0:31:550:31:57

Bim-bam, bim-bamboo. He'll lose money on that.

0:31:570:32:00

Charlie has bought a whopper, though, £240.

0:32:000:32:04

It's a lovely item.

0:32:040:32:05

I think he'll do well on it.

0:32:050:32:07

I'm slightly worried about that.

0:32:070:32:09

It might make £100.

0:32:090:32:11

It might, God willing, make £500.

0:32:110:32:15

In which case, victory will be mine.

0:32:150:32:18

After starting this leg in Brasted,

0:32:190:32:22

our experts are now motoring towards their final auction

0:32:220:32:25

in Cobham, Surrey.

0:32:250:32:26

I can't believe it, this is the last few hundred yards of our trip...

0:32:300:32:34

-Yeah.

-..to the final auction.

0:32:340:32:35

-What are we going to find in the auction room?

-Our destiny.

0:32:350:32:38

Our destiny? Oh.

0:32:380:32:40

Well, we'll soon find out as our chirpy chaps have arrived

0:32:400:32:43

in the village of Cobham to battle it out

0:32:430:32:46

at Fryer & Brown Auctioneers.

0:32:460:32:48

I don't think whatever the auctioneer does

0:32:510:32:53

will provide me with enough luck to beat you.

0:32:530:32:55

I hope the wind of Mercury stays trapped.

0:32:550:32:59

CHARLIE LAUGHS

0:32:590:33:01

The lady with the gavel today is Jane Brown.

0:33:030:33:06

What does she make of our experts' lots?

0:33:060:33:09

One of the interesting things is the tea caddy, the biscuit tin.

0:33:090:33:13

We've seen a lot of interest in advertising ware lately

0:33:130:33:18

and that one's quite unusual.

0:33:180:33:20

The large bronze, it's a very good thing as a garden statuary piece.

0:33:200:33:26

I don't think it has a great deal of age

0:33:260:33:29

but it is a very attractive subject.

0:33:290:33:32

Well, let's hope the buyers think so too, for Charlie's sake.

0:33:320:33:36

Today, there are bidders online and in the room,

0:33:360:33:39

so for one last time on this trip,

0:33:390:33:41

take your seats and deep breathes, boys.

0:33:410:33:45

CHARLIE INHALES DEEPLY

0:33:450:33:48

First up is Charlie's vintage decanter.

0:33:510:33:53

£10, please.

0:33:550:33:57

-She's rather nervous.

-Oh... £10.

0:33:570:33:59

10, I have. Thank you, sir.

0:33:590:34:01

12.

0:34:010:34:03

£12 with the lady.

0:34:030:34:04

-Disappointment.

-£12.

0:34:040:34:06

Any interest on the internet? It is £12 with...

0:34:070:34:11

-Oh!

-15.

-Excitement.

0:34:110:34:14

Sniping at the last minute. £15 against you.

0:34:140:34:17

20. £20 with the lady.

0:34:170:34:20

Are you all done in the room? £20 then.

0:34:200:34:23

A profit to kick things off, great stuff.

0:34:250:34:28

-Do you know, after commission...

-That was a result.

0:34:280:34:30

-It was a serious result. £20?

-In the money.

0:34:300:34:33

Will James' Art Deco light pendant spark some interest?

0:34:340:34:38

Here comes your big hope, lampshade. Lampshade.

0:34:380:34:41

I have a bid at £15.

0:34:410:34:44

-Hallelujah!

-£15, it is yours.

0:34:440:34:47

And we're going...15.

0:34:470:34:50

A pleasing little profit there for James.

0:34:510:34:55

That was superb, well done.

0:34:550:34:57

James' cannonball is up next.

0:34:580:35:00

-£20.

-£20.

0:35:000:35:02

-£20.

-All around her.

-Fell off a cruise.

0:35:020:35:05

-MAN SHOUTS

-Oh!

-£20, I have.

0:35:050:35:07

On the internet, £20.

0:35:070:35:10

Any advance on 20?

0:35:100:35:12

Maiden bid it is.

0:35:120:35:14

£20, on the internet.

0:35:140:35:16

-20.

-Well done. Doubled your money, old bean.

0:35:160:35:19

Another huge success.

0:35:190:35:21

That solo bidder means James pulls in another profit.

0:35:210:35:25

How many bidders will there be after Charlie's Edinburgh Crystal glass?

0:35:250:35:30

Just the one.

0:35:300:35:31

£5, please.

0:35:310:35:34

And a host of hands.

0:35:340:35:36

£5 with the lady in the pink.

0:35:370:35:39

Six, sir. Six.

0:35:390:35:41

Seven.

0:35:410:35:43

-Eight.

-Huh!

0:35:430:35:44

-Nine.

-This is a world record.

0:35:440:35:46

Ten.

0:35:460:35:48

-11.

-They want it.

0:35:480:35:50

11 with the lady in the pink.

0:35:500:35:53

Oh, I'll buy you a pint... Oh!

0:35:530:35:55

12.

0:35:550:35:56

13.

0:35:560:35:58

£13.

0:35:580:36:00

We have £13 with... 14.

0:36:000:36:03

The gentleman's come back in.

0:36:030:36:05

-£15.

-This, by percentage,

0:36:050:36:08

is the most extraordinary profit I've had on this trip.

0:36:080:36:12

£15.

0:36:120:36:14

15. Thank you, madam.

0:36:140:36:16

Well worth the round of applause there.

0:36:180:36:21

What a nice little earner.

0:36:210:36:23

Do you know, that's the finest bit of auctioneering

0:36:230:36:26

I've ever heard in my life.

0:36:260:36:28

On that basis, my bronze could make £1,500.

0:36:280:36:31

-It could, it could.

-Yeah.

0:36:310:36:33

We'll have to wait and see as next, it's James' canny little buy

0:36:350:36:39

that Charlie fancied, the Tunbridge ware box.

0:36:390:36:43

20. Yes, sir.

0:36:430:36:44

20.

0:36:440:36:45

-£20.

-With an outlay of £3, this is good.

-Any advance on 20?

0:36:450:36:49

£20.

0:36:490:36:51

£20? No.

0:36:530:36:54

£20 then, squashed.

0:36:540:36:56

Another maiden-bid sale there

0:36:560:36:59

and what a wonderful result.

0:36:590:37:02

If you carry on for the rest of your life

0:37:020:37:04

buying things for three quid and selling them for 20...

0:37:040:37:06

-Yeah.

-..you'd be a happy man.

0:37:060:37:09

He would indeed.

0:37:090:37:10

The auctioneer had high hopes for this next lot -

0:37:100:37:13

it's James' novelty biscuit tin.

0:37:130:37:15

-£15.

-MAN:

-Yes.

0:37:150:37:18

-15, I have.

-Oh, the internet's bubbling along now.

0:37:180:37:20

-15 is against you all in the room.

-In the room.

0:37:200:37:23

18 with the young lady at the back.

0:37:230:37:24

18. 18 against you, internet.

0:37:260:37:28

Oh, it's all over the place.

0:37:280:37:30

I have 20 with the lady in front.

0:37:300:37:33

-Keep going.

-22.

0:37:330:37:35

25.

0:37:360:37:37

28.

0:37:410:37:43

£28 with the young lady at the back.

0:37:430:37:46

£28, internet.

0:37:460:37:50

Last chance.

0:37:500:37:51

-Hovering on the net.

-Hovering.

0:37:510:37:53

-Hovering, madam.

-Hovering, they are.

0:37:530:37:56

28, though, is going to take it.

0:37:560:37:58

All done.

0:37:580:37:59

28.

0:37:590:38:01

-Nearly got out of it.

-A small loss, a small loss.

0:38:010:38:03

Yes, but a small loss is better than a large loss.

0:38:030:38:08

Wise words, wise words.

0:38:080:38:09

The biscuit tin failed to deliver

0:38:090:38:12

but the loss doesn't put much of a dent in James' impressive lead.

0:38:120:38:17

Up next is bamboo table.

0:38:180:38:20

Putting the sheets on it for the auction.

0:38:200:38:22

Sshhh!

0:38:220:38:24

£10, I have.

0:38:240:38:26

Any advance on £10?

0:38:260:38:28

There'll be masses.

0:38:280:38:29

-Oh, madam.

-12.

0:38:290:38:31

14.

0:38:310:38:32

Striking a chord here.

0:38:320:38:34

£14.

0:38:340:38:35

Do you want me to hold it up? £16.

0:38:360:38:40

18.

0:38:400:38:42

20.

0:38:420:38:44

22.

0:38:440:38:45

At this price, it's worth building a conservatory.

0:38:450:38:48

LAUGHTER

0:38:480:38:51

22, then.

0:38:510:38:52

-25.

-25. Well done, madam.

0:38:530:38:57

28.

0:38:570:38:58

-30, madam. Go on!

-I can't believe this.

0:38:580:39:00

Internet?

0:39:000:39:01

Are you all done at 28?

0:39:010:39:03

-30, at the last moment.

-James.

0:39:030:39:06

35, madam. Come on.

0:39:060:39:07

-Go on.

-32.

0:39:070:39:09

Go on, it's only money.

0:39:100:39:12

-35.

-35!

0:39:120:39:14

37. Thank you.

0:39:140:39:16

It's got three tiers.

0:39:160:39:18

If it doesn't make any more money

0:39:180:39:20

you'll have a lot more than three tiers!

0:39:200:39:22

Last chance.

0:39:220:39:24

-37.

-Where did that come from?

0:39:240:39:26

-That was superb.

-That was hard work, wasn't it?

0:39:260:39:29

Worth it in the end, though.

0:39:290:39:31

Five days of toil, driving around...

0:39:320:39:35

-Yeah.

-..banter, buying, selling has all come down to one bronze.

0:39:350:39:42

-Held on a puff of wind.

-Oh.

0:39:430:39:46

Here we go then, it's the biggie.

0:39:460:39:49

Charlie's hopes for a big profit,

0:39:490:39:51

enough to catapult him into the lead,

0:39:510:39:53

all ride on the wings of his bronze of Mercury.

0:39:530:39:57

Deep breathing, James, deep breathing.

0:39:580:40:00

£200 for this nice bronze, at 200.

0:40:000:40:05

Shall we try 150?

0:40:050:40:07

It's all gone very quiet.

0:40:070:40:09

-150.

-Oh, no.

0:40:090:40:10

-I'd try 30, if I was you.

-James!

0:40:100:40:12

Sorry, sorry, sorry.

0:40:130:40:15

-How dare...

-100.

0:40:150:40:18

100 for the bronze.

0:40:180:40:19

-I'm going to fold up my glasses.

-He is 104cm high.

0:40:190:40:22

-It is.

-50.

0:40:220:40:24

-Oh, no, James.

-50.

0:40:240:40:26

£50.

0:40:260:40:27

-50, I have.

-Oh, good Lord!

-Oh, good Lord.

0:40:280:40:31

-Only another 400 to go.

-LAUGHTER

0:40:310:40:33

£50.

0:40:350:40:37

Someone help this gentleman out.

0:40:370:40:39

-Any advance on 50?

-I'm beyond help, madam.

0:40:390:40:42

£50.

0:40:430:40:44

-I think £50 is where...

-Our Father...

0:40:460:40:49

-..is where we are stopping.

-Who art in Heaven...

0:40:490:40:52

-£50.

-Ah!

-169.

0:40:520:40:54

Arrow in my heart, madam.

0:40:540:40:57

-No, that's Cupid.

-Well done, James.

0:40:570:40:58

It was a bold move and we commend you for taking the risk, Charlie.

0:41:010:41:05

Someone is walking away with a bargain bit of bronze.

0:41:050:41:09

Hello?

0:41:090:41:11

Oh, dear. And he hasn't even heard the final figures.

0:41:120:41:16

Charlie started this final leg with £258.74.

0:41:210:41:26

Sadly, he made a loss today of £189.04 after auction costs.

0:41:260:41:32

That's dreadful.

0:41:320:41:34

So, he finishes with £69.70.

0:41:340:41:37

I'm pretty sure that's the worst result we've ever had.

0:41:370:41:41

Oh, dear! Oh, dear!.

0:41:410:41:43

James began with £464.38 after auction costs.

0:41:480:41:53

He made a profit of £10.40,

0:41:530:41:55

which means not only has he won today's battle,

0:41:550:41:59

he's crowned King of the Roadtrip -

0:41:590:42:01

finishing with a massive £474.78.

0:42:010:42:05

And all profits go to Children in Need.

0:42:050:42:08

Will it be champagne, sir?

0:42:120:42:14

-I think for me.

-I won't be buying it.

0:42:140:42:16

I think it's a mild for you.

0:42:160:42:19

The pint of mild.

0:42:210:42:22

And so it's the end of our gentlemen's journey.

0:42:260:42:29

It's been a tough old trip for Charlie.

0:42:310:42:34

Oh, it's gone over my trousers.

0:42:340:42:36

He tried his best to climb the ladder of success...

0:42:360:42:39

Oh!

0:42:390:42:40

..and although he put his back into it...

0:42:400:42:43

Ah!

0:42:430:42:44

..he failed to deliver.

0:42:440:42:46

Oh!

0:42:460:42:47

While frugal James took a much more Zen approach.

0:42:470:42:50

I bring yoga.

0:42:500:42:52

And he proved himself to be the supreme athlete of antiques.

0:42:520:42:57

But our boys remain the best of pals.

0:43:010:43:04

-I will take you out for lunch...

-Oh, excellent.

0:43:040:43:06

..at a restaurant of your choosing.

0:43:060:43:08

Oh!

0:43:080:43:10

Farewell, fellas, it's been a pleasure.

0:43:100:43:13