Episode 3 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 3

Antiques challenge. Catherine Southon uncovers a pair of vintage glove puppets. But will they give her a helping hand at the Edinburgh auction?


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-It's the nation's favourite antique experts.

-This is beautiful.

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That's the way to do this.

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With £200 each, a classic car and a goal to scour for antiques...

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-Joy.

-Hello!

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..the aim - to make the biggest profit at auction

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but it's no mean feat.

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THEY LAUGH

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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The hand brake's on.

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to a bracing Caledonian morn with Catherine Southon and Paul Laidlaw.

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I trust you've had your porridge this morning.

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You'll be set up for the day.

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After starting out back in Northern Ireland,

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they're now deep in the Scottish Borders. Look at that.

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People say, "Oh, the Highlands!" But it's lovely round there, isn't it?

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-Yes.

-It's beautiful.

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Especially in that yellow Morris Minor,

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which dates from an era before seatbelts were mandatory.

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Makes you want to get out your easel and your paint brush.

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-Well, we're glad you like it.

-I do, I do. And it's so green.

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On this trip, auctioneer Paul has mostly steered clear of his

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trademark militaria, profitably exploring his feminine side instead.

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Oh, yes.

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Twee little tea set which did you proud. You bought them beaded bags.

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For goodness sake! Come on, they were dirt cheap, weren't they?

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They were, they were. Which, in truth, was the appeal!

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Not that rival auctioneer Catherine can really claim to have

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-scaled the moral high ground.

-It's just amazing.

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With a similarly shrewd purchase to her name.

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Yeah, we're in the rag trade now!

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Antiques rag trade!

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CATHERINE LAUGHS

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Ha-ha! Catherine has so far shrunk her £200 stake to £169.96.

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While Paul, who began with the same sum, has £372.76 to spend today.

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He's got oodles.

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-I'm rich like Croesus!

-Oh, you've got so much money, you don't know what to do with it.

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I had Warren Buffett on the phone this morning, asking me

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-if he could borrow some money from me.

-Oh, yes.

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Our journey started out in Portrush, County Antrim.

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After exploring Northern Ireland, they crossed the sea towards

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Scotland and will finish several hundred miles later in Aberdeen.

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But today, we begin in Melrose in the Borders and then head

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north towards an auction in Edinburgh.

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At the foot of the ancient Eildon Hills, Melrose,

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with its magnificent ruined abbey, is quite a spot.

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Paul's got the place to himself as well,

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having dropped Catherine off a little earlier.

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Hello, there. Is it Susan?

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-Yes.

-Lovely to see you.

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To see you, nice! Lovely shop, too.

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Ever so cream.

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Fabulous stuff. Very nice indeed.

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But where are the bargains?

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My task, of course, is not just to find a fabulous object,

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anyone with an eye can do that.

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It's to find the object with the profit left in it.

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And here, we're in a very, very smart -

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and I'm going to see sophisticated - environment.

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My hope levels are down at one little bar.

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Keep digging! Dog's life, eh?

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Let me show you something.

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A late 20th century rod and lamp or wine table.

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What on earth is Laidlow up to?

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Forget the table. Look at the top.

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If the stand dates to the 1970s,

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the tiles in the top may date to the 1670s.

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Actually, I think they're a bit earlier than that. Come closer.

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You expect, for a piece that should be 350-year-old, some flaking,

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losses to the glaze. We get all of that.

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We get the wear and tear that we want,

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so the hallmarks of age and we look at the subject matter

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and Laidlaw's eyes light up,

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because here we have a splendid pair of 17th-century musketeers.

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And here we have the chap and his characteristic wide,

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floppy-brimmed hat with bandoliers draped round his body.

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These bandoliers carried typically 12 little wooden containers

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with a measure of powder.

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And these little vessels that we can see draped here,

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were termed The 12 Apostles.

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This is an accurate depiction by an artist who saw these guys

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marching down the high street, parading on a Sunday afternoon.

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Time travel, I love it!

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I like the juxtaposition of the 17th century with the 20th century.

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Yeah, that said, I'd really rather hack them out!

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Best buy it first, Paul. The ticket price is £65.

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Susan, I love your wee wine table.

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Yes, it's lovely, but the tiles especially.

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Aren't they just? Is there much margin in that?

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-Is there slack in that price?

-There is, a little.

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-Are you going to hit me with it?

-50?

-Dare I push you any further?

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You can push me a little but not very much.

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-I need a three at the beginning of that price.

-No, I can't, sorry.

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-Give me the bottom line.

-45 would be the bottom line.

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-Thank you, that's all I need to know.

-We are getting close.

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If you would sell that to me for £40, that fiver will seal the deal.

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-OK.

-Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

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Gosh, all very convivial

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and a lot quicker than it seemed it might be, too.

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Just in time for elevenses, eh?

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It's my lucky day, is it not?

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From an antique shop, straight into a good Scots butchers advertising

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Scotland's finest Scotch pies.

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-HE LAUGHS

-When in Rome and all that!

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Quite! So, while Paul samples certain local delicacies,

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let's see where Catherine has got to.

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Deep in the woods, at the Dawyck Botanic Garden....

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..she has come to find out about an Edwardian adventurer

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who hunted exotic plants.

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-Hi, there, it's nice to meet you.

-And you, too.

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-A beautiful garden.

-It is, isn't it?

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You are very lucky to work somewhere like here.

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Dawyck is now part of Edinburgh's Royal Botanic Garden

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but as archivist Leonie reveals, in the 19th century,

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it belonged to the wealthy Balfour family.

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It is a garden with a long history of being associated

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with plant collectors.

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Well, I'm familiar with antique collecting

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but where does plant collecting come from?

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It is a similar thing - you would go out to different parts

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of the world and collect whatever plants, flowers, trees as well...

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You would take a plant cutting or you could collect the seeds from

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the plant, send them back home and people were able to grow the plants

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that you have seen growing in the world in various parts of the world.

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The profitable pursuit of plant collecting for the gardens

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of the rich has been around for hundreds of years.

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But it was once highly dangerous.

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So George Forrest,

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a 30-year-old herbarium clerk may not have been the obvious choice,

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but in 1904, the rookie collector set off for China

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in search of exotic plants. What fun!

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There is an area in south-west China in the province of Yunnan,

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cos there had been plant collectors

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on the east coast of China before

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but this part of China in the south-west was relatively unexplored.

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It is where the end of the Himalayas hooked down into it,

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so you have got these huge, high mountain ranges

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and then these low, tropical river valleys,

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so you were able to get whatever environment or climate

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you were looking for fairly close at hand.

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Obviously, all you had to do was get there.

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A look around the gardens reveals that Forrest was to become

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one of the most successful plant collectors of all time.

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But history could have turned out very differently.

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So, how successful was the first expedition?

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It started off fairly quietly, actually.

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Forrest arrived too late in the season to collect any plants.

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-Oh, no.

-But it was OK. He spent the time usefully here.

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He scoped his way around Yunnan,

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working out where the best place to collect plants would be.

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So 1905 finds him up the Mekong River in Yunnan, staying at a mission,

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but this is where it all starts to go wrong for Forrest.

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It's been illustrated quite nicely with this map that Forrest drew himself.

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To the north are missions that were under siege by some irate locals

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at the time, I think, quite fed up with western influence

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so Forrest is basically in a position, knowing that any moment,

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these men could come down and do the same

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and that is exactly what happens.

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-He finds himself...

-It must have been terrifying.

-Absolutely terrifying.

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Yes, they found themselves having to flee in the dead of night

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-and this map shows the little...

-Oh, is that his escape route?

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It is his escape route, indeed.

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Unfortunately, they are not able to evade these men for long.

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The attack eventually does happen and it is every man for himself.

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What followed was a massacre, from which only a very fortunate few,

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including Forrest, survived.

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-Oh, is this him?

-This is him, yes.

-He looks completely different.

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Completely different, yes, he has been starved, hunted.

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He looks a lot thinner.

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But after that, Forrest actually does then go

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and have a very successful plant collecting summer in 1906

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and returns back to Edinburgh in 1907 with a massive haul of plants.

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And then, as his fame grows,

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he goes on to do another six expeditions out to China.

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Altogether, Forrest brought back as many as 31,000 specimens,

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including many new discoveries, but having ensured a place

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in scientific history, his seventh trip in 1932 was to be his last.

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He is just about to return home and he has a heart attack

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in the hills outside Tengchong and he dies there and is actually...

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Oh, he dies there!

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..buried out there in the hills that he loved, yes,

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so he never made it back to Edinburgh.

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But thanks to his extraordinary photographs

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and immaculate record keeping, Forrest's plant collecting legacy lives on.

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So this is all listed in a number of field books, all

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-the different specimens that he was picking up?

-Yes.

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-There's about 25 volumes of them that we have.

-Goodness.

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And they're still used today. That's the nice thing about these archives.

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Although he was writing these

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almost 100 years ago we can still take a record such as this

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one here, the Rhododendron species that he collected in June 1918,

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and we can now just walk just up the road here

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and have a look at this plant actually growing here now.

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That's incredibly special, isn't it?

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-And here it is.

-So what is this particular plant?

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This is Rhododendron roxieanum.

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I quite like the fact that it's named after

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the wife of a friend of George Forrest's as well.

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Of course, Forrest could never have foreseen that several

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of the plants he brought home would become threatened back in Yunnan.

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But in the herbaria he helped to create, biodiversity is in good hands.

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If plants are in danger, or they're suffering in their native habitat,

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we now have a lot of plant material we can now send back to China

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and plant it in the botanic garden there.

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And we can also make people more aware about their biodiversity.

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I shall certainly look at a Rhododendron in a totally

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different way now.

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Thank you ever so much.

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Meanwhile, Paul has got some collecting of his own to

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attend to, taking our route a little

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closer to the border to Hawick,

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the riverside town that is famous for its knitwear factories,

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manufacturing luxurious cashmere and merino products.

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Not that Paul will have time for jumpers...

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Don't judge me.

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..once he's polished off that pie, that is.

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HE CHUCKLES

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-Hello there. Is it Morris?

-It is. Hello, Paul.

-Good to see you.

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-Good to see you.

-You too.

-What a structure.

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-Is it a mill we're in?

-It were a cashmere mill, yeah,

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up to about ten years ago.

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Recently transformed into this huge antiques emporium.

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Containing an awful lot of fine furniture.

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Give it a rub, eh?

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18th century gate leg table. Nice little size. It's £245.

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It's £245.

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I think even our hard-hearted expert is tempted.

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I like that.

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I like that.

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Face it, Paul, those aren't for you.

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This is the densest room in the building for smalls.

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I keep looking at this stick stand here. There's good workmanship there.

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Don't write this off as the work of some 1960s blacksmith.

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I think there's real quality in terms of design and execution here.

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What makes it for me are these scrolls.

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Slightly naturalistic, asymmetric.

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And see the way that scroll wraps itself around the upright member.

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That's good work.

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But it's very black and that's not everyone's cup of tea.

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It's also got some problems. It's a wee bit drunk.

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Indeed this little pan didn't sit right in the first place

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because this replacement bowl is too long.

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Ticket price £75. I'll tell you what.

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You're not going to find anyone that could make anything of that

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quality for £75.

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I think his mojo is working again. Must be the pie.

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Time to get a price from Morris.

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-60. 60-ish. 60 quid.

-I'm a long way off.

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-I'm a 40 quid job on that.

-Can I let you know?

-Yeah, do. Yeah, yeah.

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-Absolutely. But I'm seriously interested.

-Right.

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Sounds like Morris may be biddable. Anything else?

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Look at that nice little burr walnut veneered collector's cabinet

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with that little string inlay there.

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Wrong! It's all tin plate.

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Tin plate at that time, as it still is today, was used commonly to

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package sweets.

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And this one is issued for our world famous Victory V gums

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and lozenges. "The world's winter sweetmeats." Get in!

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Invented in 1864, the first recipe contained chlorodyne,

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a mixture of laudanum, cannabis and chloroform.

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Advertising packaging, vintage material, sells.

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It's a hot market.

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Now I don't think this is the most exciting tin plate

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box in the world but it's not the most dreary either.

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It taps into an iconic brand.

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No price label though.

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Something to ask about, I'd imagine.

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Only issue I could find was the top drawer is snagged.

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I don't think that is a difficult fix.

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But you know what it might be?

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It might be a lever for me to get this at the right price.

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Morris is still considering Paul's proposal of £40 for the stick stand.

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Gird your loins.

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-There's a tin plate chest of drawers, it's a Victory V's thing.

-Yeah.

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-It's a bit buckled. I can't get top drawer open. 10 or 20 quid.

-Right.

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-The stick stand which I offered 40 quid on and the box...

-Uh-huh.

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-£50 the two. We've got a deal.

-Pleasure, Morris. Sweet as a nut.

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-You're welcome.

-I'll give you some money.

-That sounds good.

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THEY LAUGH

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No sign of Paul's little fortune going to his head just yet, is there?

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Ah, now, here's Catherine, hands in her pockets.

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That cheeky Laidlaw is already here.

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Yep, and he's looking suitably smug.

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-Well, well, well. What are you doing sitting here?

-Don't interrupt me.

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-Have you shopped up?

-Uh... I've bought a few things.

-I don't believe you.

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-I don't believe you.

-What have you been doing? Where have you been?

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-I've been on an adventure.

-You'll love it by the way.

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Huge. Nothing left of course.

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Take no notice.

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But Catherine seems to be adopting a different approach,

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ignoring the furniture and letting Morris be her guide.

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-Maybe this case.

-This one?

-Let's have a look.

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Nice quality. Japanese.

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-Cigarette.

-That is nice quality, isn't it?

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-With Mount Fuji in the background.

-That's right.

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So fresh it hasn't got a ticket on it yet.

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So this is probably going to be produced in the early part of the

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-20th century, I would say.

-I would think so, yeah.

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So you would have put your cigarettes all in here.

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-Sometimes people use these today as cardholders or something like that.

-Yeah.

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-So this is all lacquered here.

-Mm-hm.

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-What's the best on that then, Morris?

-55.

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If you'd said to me yesterday, yes, I probably would have paid 55

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but I'm struggling on the cash front at the moment so...

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Is a possibility... Is there any chance that we can deal a bit

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-lower or should I look for something else.

-How much lower?

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-Would it be really cheeky to say 35?

-I'll take your £35 for that.

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-Right, OK.

-So we've got a deal on one thing.

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Not a lot of shaking on just yet though. Anything else?

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That's got a good look to it. I like that.

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-How old is this one do you think?

-1950s, I would think.

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I've got another one upstairs, another pond yacht.

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-I think it's upstairs anyway.

-Is it a good one?

-I don't know.

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It's all right.

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Meanwhile there's a pair of decanters to take a peek at.

0:17:070:17:10

-I've only got £30 on the pair.

-They look pretty good, don't they?

0:17:100:17:15

-But they don't excite me like the case did.

-OK.

-Unless they're dirt cheap.

0:17:150:17:20

15 quid. That's £7.50 each.

0:17:200:17:23

That is cheap. Still no deal though.

0:17:230:17:26

-Now for his other yacht.

-Quite a nice thing actually.

0:17:260:17:30

-That is a proper pond yacht.

-Yeah.

0:17:300:17:32

-200...

-£80.

-£80.

0:17:330:17:36

Quite a reduction.

0:17:360:17:38

What can that really go for at auction? What can I see that making?

0:17:380:17:42

-200, 300.

-No, it won't make as much as that.

0:17:420:17:45

I think it's a bit tatty.

0:17:450:17:47

I like it but it's a bit tatty so I think I'd have to...

0:17:470:17:50

-Knock me down a lot.

-Yeah, I would.

0:17:510:17:53

Honestly I'd probably see that at £40.

0:17:530:17:56

HE GULPS

0:17:560:17:58

50 quid.

0:17:590:18:01

Let me... Do you know what? I'm not shaking on anything

0:18:010:18:04

at the moment because I'm... I've got a lot to think about.

0:18:040:18:07

I'm beginning to lose track of the contents of Catherine's growing pile.

0:18:070:18:11

There's more too.

0:18:110:18:12

How about this little tobacco jar? Victorian, cast iron.

0:18:120:18:16

Love the shape. Octagonal shape. Nice. It's cast iron. Nothing to it, is there?

0:18:160:18:21

Original tobacco press.

0:18:210:18:22

Everything is there. Little brass finial.

0:18:220:18:26

-Fiver.

-That's a possibility.

0:18:280:18:31

OK, are we about to witness a handshake?

0:18:310:18:34

-Hello.

-There you be. Are you ready for this?

-Go on.

0:18:340:18:37

I'm deciding not to go for the decanters although I like them.

0:18:370:18:40

Then there was three items.

0:18:400:18:42

-There was the lacquered card case.

-Card case, yeah.

0:18:420:18:44

-There was the little Victorian tobacco press.

-Mm-hm.

0:18:440:18:49

There was the pond yacht.

0:18:490:18:51

So those three together with the prices that we discussed was 80.

0:18:510:18:54

Can I come down to 65, 70?

0:18:540:18:57

-Yeah, go on, then.

-Which one?

-70. Not 65. 70.

0:18:570:19:03

-Thank you very much indeed.

-OK. You're welcome.

-I'm really grateful.

0:19:030:19:07

Phew! They've both had quite a start.

0:19:070:19:11

Three items. Happy days.

0:19:110:19:13

But what will tomorrow bring?

0:19:130:19:16

-Do you know what would be my dream?

-Go on.

0:19:160:19:19

-Is that you would go out and spend £200 on something...

-And it makes 20!

0:19:190:19:23

And it makes... Oh! Oh!

0:19:230:19:25

Are you enjoying that? Are you enjoying that?

0:19:250:19:28

Ha-ha! Nighty night.

0:19:280:19:30

Next day there is an "offal" lot to talk about.

0:19:330:19:36

Right next door to the first antique shop I was in,

0:19:360:19:38

face lit up when I saw the finest Scotch pie emporium in Scotland.

0:19:380:19:44

I bought haggis, white pudding... Have you had mealy pudding?

0:19:440:19:49

-White pudding?

-No. Don't like the sound of that.

0:19:490:19:51

HE LAUGHS

0:19:510:19:53

-Sounds horrible. Do you eat it?

-It's gorgeous.

0:19:530:19:55

And when he wasn't scoffing he found time to buy some tin drawers,

0:19:550:19:59

a stick stand and a tile top table...

0:19:590:20:04

I'd really rather hack them out.

0:20:040:20:06

..which set him back £90, leaving just over 280 in his wallet.

0:20:060:20:12

While Catherine's haul included a tobacco jar, a cigarette case

0:20:120:20:16

and a pond yacht. As you do.

0:20:160:20:18

-Is it a good one?

-I don't know.

0:20:180:20:21

It's all right.

0:20:210:20:22

Hey. All for £70. Meaning she has less than 100 at her disposal.

0:20:220:20:28

-Any windfalls?

-There's nothing I'm going to make a lot of money on.

0:20:280:20:33

That's all right then. I don't care any more. Aren't the views nice?

0:20:330:20:37

Later they'll be heading for an auction in Edinburgh

0:20:370:20:40

but our next stop is in Innerleithen, Tweeddale.

0:20:400:20:44

Yes, he was here.

0:20:470:20:50

Plus this spa town was immortalised in Saint Ronan's Well,

0:20:500:20:53

the only contemporary novel by Sir Walter Scott.

0:20:530:20:57

Have a good one, you.

0:20:570:20:59

-Thank you. Wish me luck.

-See you later.

-Ciao.

0:20:590:21:03

-Hello, there.

-Hi. Hi. Lovely to see you.

-Hi. You are?

0:21:050:21:10

-Margaret.

-Hi, Margaret. Nice to meet you.

0:21:100:21:12

It's a small space but it's absolutely rammed full, isn't it?

0:21:120:21:16

You took the words right out of my mouth, Catherine. Look at that lot.

0:21:160:21:19

-Is that silver, the golfing one or...?

-Yes, it is.

0:21:190:21:23

-I've got 35 on that one.

-Are you a golfer, Margaret?

0:21:230:21:26

No, I'm not a golfer.

0:21:260:21:28

THEY LAUGH

0:21:280:21:29

Quite a few are in Edinburgh though.

0:21:290:21:31

Stamp 925 sterling so probably not English silver I wouldn't say.

0:21:310:21:36

I think it's really interesting. You've got a man there in his

0:21:360:21:39

plus fours taking a swing. And what could you do on that, Margaret?

0:21:390:21:43

I could do 28.

0:21:430:21:45

Well, I'll have a look to see if there's anything else

0:21:450:21:47

because at 28 it might be a bit much.

0:21:470:21:50

One little item under consideration already.

0:21:500:21:54

Oh! They are being watched.

0:21:540:21:56

-That's my speciality, is the dolls and the teddy bears.

-Is it?

-Yeah.

-How is the market?

0:21:560:22:01

-It's not as good as it used to be, is it?

-No.

0:22:010:22:03

But there's still doll collectors who come to me

0:22:030:22:06

-and want to find a doll.

-They look good up there, don't they?

0:22:060:22:10

-They're watching over you, Margaret.

-They come out at night and have fun.

0:22:100:22:14

This is turning into Toy Story. I bet those two join in.

0:22:140:22:18

Puppets. You sell a lot of puppets, do you?

0:22:180:22:20

Not really but that's Sooty and Sweep there, which is a 1950s Sooty

0:22:200:22:24

-and Sweep.

-I loved Sooty and Sweep.

0:22:240:22:27

These are the earlier ones, the '50s ones, when they came out earlier.

0:22:270:22:30

You'll notice actually that Sooty doesn't have black ears

0:22:300:22:33

-in that one. He has brown ears.

-Do I buy the brooch?

0:22:330:22:37

I do buy the brooch. Oh!

0:22:370:22:39

Consulting Sooty, eh? I didn't see that coming.

0:22:390:22:42

Does Sweep concur?

0:22:420:22:44

They're in agreement. They're fantastic. I'm tempted to buy these.

0:22:440:22:49

-So who were these made by? Chad Valley...?

-Chad Valley.

0:22:490:22:51

It's got the label there somewhere on the side.

0:22:510:22:53

-This one's not in bad condition.

-No.

0:22:530:22:55

-Sometimes you get the noses repaired and they've been re-sown.

-Yes.

0:22:550:22:59

-But I don't think...

-No, that's not had anything done, I don't think.

0:22:590:23:01

No surgery then. But his mate's looking a bit worse for wear.

0:23:010:23:06

Sooty, I think you're kind of past it a bit.

0:23:060:23:08

-I thinks Sooty's maybe been the one that was the most cuddleable.

-Yeah...

0:23:080:23:14

The ticket price for the furry pair is £48.

0:23:140:23:18

That to me doesn't even look like Sooty. Are we definitely Sooty?

0:23:180:23:22

Erm... Well, they came together.

0:23:220:23:24

He's not Basil Brush, Catherine(!)

0:23:240:23:26

-Where did you get them from actually?

-From a toy museum.

0:23:260:23:29

-Did you?

-So that's why I felt reasonably confident that they were right.

0:23:290:23:33

-The fact that we've got a bit of provenance behind that, a bit of history...

-Yeah.

0:23:330:23:38

Sounds like Sooty's passed the test but where are we on the deal, children?

0:23:380:23:42

What could you really do on these? Could you do 50 for the two?

0:23:420:23:46

Because that, I think this is mid-20th century.

0:23:460:23:50

-But I think 25 is top whack.

-OK.

0:23:500:23:52

And then I think 25 on that is just a punt

0:23:520:23:56

-and a bit of fun.

-OK, then. We'll go for 50.

-Is that all right?

-OK.

0:23:560:24:01

-Done.

-I'm going to shake your hand.

-Hope they do well for you.

0:24:010:24:04

I really hope they do. Yeah.

0:24:040:24:06

I mean that face, it says, "Come on, buy me," doesn't it?

0:24:060:24:09

Oh-ho-ho! I think we might have struck gold, don't you? Oh, yes.

0:24:090:24:14

Bye-bye.

0:24:140:24:16

Elsewhere in the Borders, Paul's making his way to another place

0:24:190:24:23

with strong literary associations,

0:24:230:24:26

towards the county town of Tweeddale in Peebles, where he's come

0:24:260:24:30

to find out more about the incredible real life adventures of the

0:24:300:24:34

Scottish writer of The Thirty-Nine Steps, one of our most influential spy novels.

0:24:340:24:40

-Hello, Deborah.

-Yes, Paul. How very nice to meet you.

0:24:400:24:44

Thank you very much for coming.

0:24:440:24:46

The museum dedicated to Deborah's grandfather John Buchan is

0:24:460:24:49

located here in the Borders

0:24:490:24:51

because this was where he spent time as a young man and set

0:24:510:24:56

some of the most exciting passages of his man on the run thriller.

0:24:560:25:00

You think of Richard Hannay running across these moors,

0:25:000:25:03

-and you know how bare those hills can be...

-Indeed.

0:25:030:25:06

-..and that you would see a fugitive running.

-Yes.

0:25:060:25:09

Particularly if you had a monoplane.

0:25:090:25:11

I read it as a teenager and it is one of the best reads of my life.

0:25:110:25:16

Buchan, the son of a Scottish minister,

0:25:160:25:18

had already been a published author for several years when he wrote

0:25:180:25:21

The Thirty-Nine Steps while recovering from an illness on the eve of World War I.

0:25:210:25:27

He was sent to bed in August 1914 with a terrible stomach complaint.

0:25:270:25:33

He ran out of thrillers to read and he said to my grandmother,

0:25:330:25:36

"I want to write a book where the writer cares what happens to

0:25:360:25:40

-"both the victim and the perpetrator."

-Mm-hm.

0:25:400:25:43

And him and his daughter Alice were convalescing in Kent, in Broadstairs,

0:25:430:25:49

and she was running up and down the steps that led down to the beach.

0:25:490:25:53

-And she ran up and she said, "Daddy, there are 39 steps."

-Oh!

0:25:530:25:56

And that's supposed to be from where he got the title.

0:25:560:26:00

-Well, the source of the story is quite good.

-Yes.

0:26:000:26:03

Buchan's tale of one man's fight against German spies was an immediate

0:26:040:26:09

hit, with huge numbers delivered to the troops.

0:26:090:26:12

He went on to write a further four novels featuring hero

0:26:120:26:15

Richard Hannay, but the author himself,

0:26:150:26:17

although too ill for active service, was to play quite a part in the war.

0:26:170:26:21

-He becomes a Times correspondent during the war.

-A war correspondent?

0:26:220:26:27

A war correspondent.

0:26:270:26:28

But all the time he is writing a contemporaneous

0:26:280:26:32

history of the war published fortnightly in The Times.

0:26:320:26:36

-Then he joins Earl Haig's staff.

-I see. In intelligence or...?

-Yes.

0:26:360:26:40

-In uniform?

-In uniform.

-So he ends up on active service regardless?

-Yes.

0:26:400:26:46

By the end of hostilities, during which both his brother and his

0:26:460:26:51

best friend died, Buchan occupied a senior propaganda post in Whitehall.

0:26:510:26:56

He then turned to politics and became a Member of Parliament.

0:26:560:27:00

He's a good MP but he's not a successful politician

0:27:010:27:05

-because he can always see the other person's point of view.

-Right.

0:27:050:27:09

I mean, for example, he was great friends with Jimmy Maxton of the

0:27:090:27:12

Red Clydesiders.

0:27:120:27:13

And he found it very difficult to adhere to a party line.

0:27:130:27:18

Throughout, Buchan continued to write, eventually

0:27:180:27:21

publishing around 100 works of both fact and fiction.

0:27:210:27:25

And it was during his late 50s that a writing job led to his last

0:27:250:27:29

great public role.

0:27:290:27:31

He's commissioned to write the Jubilee book for King George V.

0:27:310:27:34

And probably as a result of spending a lot of time with

0:27:340:27:39

the king, the king decided to send him as governor general to Canada in 1935.

0:27:390:27:43

My word. That is some career.

0:27:430:27:47

-You say not a successful politician but that's some achievement.

-Yes.

0:27:470:27:53

But if his never out of print shocker remains Buchan's greatest

0:27:530:27:58

legacy, it's thanks in part to the 1935 movie version by a

0:27:580:28:02

young Alfred Hitchcock.

0:28:020:28:04

Although as anyone who's experienced them both

0:28:040:28:07

can tell you, it's a somewhat free adaptation.

0:28:070:28:10

The film premiered in London just before JB left to be

0:28:100:28:14

governor general of Canada, and in the interval Alfred Hitchcock

0:28:140:28:18

came to him and said, "Tell me, my Lord, how are you enjoying the film?"

0:28:180:28:21

And he said, "Well it's very good, Mr Hitchcock, but can you tell me

0:28:210:28:24

"how it ends?"

0:28:240:28:26

HE LAUGHS

0:28:260:28:27

That's the anecdote of this encounter for me.

0:28:270:28:31

Now, with our two chums back together and back on the road...

0:28:350:28:39

This is just beautiful. There's more sheep than anything here.

0:28:390:28:43

It makes you feel good to be alive, doesn't it?

0:28:430:28:46

..it's time to head off to South Lanarkshire

0:28:460:28:49

and the village of Wiston.

0:28:490:28:51

-Sheepie, sheepies.

-There's so many mutton pies there.

0:28:510:28:54

Paul, they're not all to eat!

0:28:540:28:56

One last shop to share. Nicely.

0:28:560:28:59

Right then. Elbows at dawn?

0:28:590:29:02

Let the shop name be your guide.

0:29:020:29:04

-Oh-ho-ho! Hello.

-Hello. I'm Mark.

0:29:040:29:07

-I'm Catherine.

-Nice to meet you.

-Nice to meet you.

-How are you doing, Mark?

0:29:070:29:10

-Are you all right.

-Hi. I'm fine, Paul.

0:29:100:29:12

Delightful place but it might be a bit of a squeeze.

0:29:120:29:15

-Would you mind if I head that way?

-With your new friend?

0:29:150:29:18

-With my new friend.

-Good idea.

-You just kind of go that way,

0:29:180:29:22

wherever you want, and I'll go with Mark.

0:29:220:29:24

-At what point did I become the gooseberry?

-Yeah, exactly.

0:29:240:29:28

So while Paul makes himself scarce...

0:29:280:29:30

You've got some fantastic pieces round here.

0:29:300:29:33

There's plenty of things hidden away. In under things.

0:29:330:29:36

There are, aren't there? That's what I like.

0:29:360:29:38

-Nice... This octant has seen better days, hasn't it?

-Yes.

0:29:380:29:41

Missing the scale and the vernier.

0:29:410:29:43

Still looks good though doesn't it? Looks nice.

0:29:430:29:45

-Yeah, a nice decorative thing for the wall now.

-Absolutely.

0:29:450:29:48

-It makes it cheaper as well.

-Good point.

0:29:480:29:51

But after her happy shopping thus far I don't think she's too

0:29:510:29:54

bothered about buying more.

0:29:540:29:56

Paul however is definitely in the market.

0:29:560:29:59

So I've just picked up a wee plastic box full of bits and bobs.

0:29:590:30:06

That is a little Scottish brooch set with polished hard stones.

0:30:060:30:12

One couldn't call that a lot.

0:30:120:30:15

That's a little fob, Royal Highland Agricultural

0:30:150:30:18

Society of Scotland Long Service.

0:30:180:30:21

HE YAWNS

0:30:210:30:24

Women's Voluntary Service, a little badge worn by people to say,

0:30:240:30:28

"Look, I'm doing my bit for the war effort."

0:30:280:30:31

For me the most interesting little object is here.

0:30:310:30:33

Nice little silver lapel badge.

0:30:330:30:37

If you don't know your armorials you've got no idea.

0:30:370:30:39

However I do recognise the device of the three cannon and the three shot.

0:30:390:30:46

That's the badge of the Ordnance,

0:30:460:30:48

the government department that deals with munitions and supplies.

0:30:480:30:52

None of that particularly stands out.

0:30:520:30:54

However, show me a fistful of it and I will show you an auction lot.

0:30:540:30:58

A bit distracted, Catherine?

0:31:000:31:02

Ah, Paul, just the person.

0:31:020:31:05

You're good at crosswords.

0:31:050:31:07

HE LAUGHS

0:31:070:31:08

No, come back, come back.

0:31:080:31:09

You know what your problem is, Catherine? It's work ethic.

0:31:090:31:12

If you wouldn't mind getting me a coffee because I'm almost done with this crossword.

0:31:120:31:16

I think she's done with shopping too.

0:31:160:31:19

Ah. That's familiar.

0:31:190:31:20

You've seen a mariner's sextant before.

0:31:200:31:24

This is a variation on the theme called an octant.

0:31:240:31:26

That was used to measure the angle of elevation above the horizon

0:31:260:31:32

of a given celestial object. And thus one can determine longitude.

0:31:320:31:39

It was developed around 1730 with both an Englishman and

0:31:390:31:43

an American having independent and equal claims to have got there first.

0:31:430:31:48

That's early 19th century.

0:31:480:31:50

I adore scientific instruments. However, this one is incomplete.

0:31:500:31:56

It is lacking, for one, a register here

0:31:560:32:00

that would have been inset into that channel,

0:32:000:32:03

it's an engraved scale from which one can take readings.

0:32:030:32:07

So as far as I'm concerned it's too far gone.

0:32:070:32:10

However... Maybe in that condition it's buyable. We'll ask the question.

0:32:100:32:17

-Mark? Octant?

-Very much so, yes.

-Wrecked. Very much so, yes.

-Seen better days, yes.

0:32:170:32:23

PAUL LAUGHS

0:32:230:32:24

-It's dead and gone to heaven.

-Not in my opinion.

0:32:240:32:28

HE LAUGHS

0:32:280:32:29

In your opinion what's it worth then?

0:32:290:32:32

-Well, I have £100 on it at the moment.

-Too much.

0:32:320:32:34

Are you open to offers, cheeky offers, insulting offers?

0:32:340:32:38

-Borderline insulting offers?

-Make it 50.

0:32:380:32:41

-50 quid, eh? A thought for you.

-Mm-hm.

-Spotted that earlier.

0:32:410:32:45

Box full of random fobs, commemorative medallions,

0:32:450:32:49

-military insignia and brooches.

-I would do the whole lot for 25.

0:32:490:32:55

So the total currently stands at £75.

0:32:550:33:00

I'm breaking one of my cardinal rules here which is to never

0:33:000:33:02

buy anything you have to apologise for.

0:33:020:33:06

A very good rule of thumb. But do we spy a deal on the horizon?

0:33:060:33:11

Now you can't sell that damaged piece to me for 40 quid

0:33:120:33:17

and I can't pay 50 but if I float you an offer of 65 quid

0:33:170:33:25

-on the two I will convince myself I got it for 40.

-I'll go 70.

0:33:250:33:32

-I'm really...

-For a fiver?

-Yeah, I'm really struck now. 70 quid.

0:33:320:33:36

-That's it. I know when the bottom line's been reached.

-OK.

-Good.

0:33:360:33:39

-We did it.

-We got there.

-Phew!

0:33:390:33:41

With those final buys wrapped up, let's take a peek at what

0:33:430:33:45

they'll be bringing to auction.

0:33:450:33:47

Paul parted with £160 for a table, some tin drawers,

0:33:490:33:53

various badges, a stick stand and that octant.

0:33:530:33:58

While Catherine spent £120 on a cigarette case, a golf

0:34:000:34:05

brooch, a pond yacht, a tobacco jar and two vintage glove puppets.

0:34:050:34:10

Who did good?

0:34:100:34:12

She's going to make money and there are some killers in there perhaps.

0:34:120:34:16

That stand. I'm surprised he paid so much for that.

0:34:160:34:19

He may have a little wobble with that.

0:34:190:34:21

Glove puppets, not my thing.

0:34:210:34:23

£25 paid, however, and if the specialists out there go,

0:34:230:34:27

"That's the rare early one that you never see," it could be a good margin in it.

0:34:270:34:32

After setting off from Melrose, our experts are now heading

0:34:320:34:35

towards an auction on the outskirts of the capital.

0:34:350:34:38

It doesn't feel like we're anywhere near Edinburgh.

0:34:380:34:40

Turn this corner, you'll be able to see Edinburgh

0:34:400:34:43

because there are the Pentland Hills and just to the north-east of those you've got Edinburgh.

0:34:430:34:47

I've got my own little navigational...

0:34:470:34:51

-Oh!

-My little map here, haven't I?

-Am I like your little Sherpa? That's right.

0:34:510:34:55

I can translate, I can show you the right fish and chip bars.

0:34:550:34:58

If you're looking for a bottle of Buckie in a brown paper bag...

0:34:580:35:01

HE LAUGHS

0:35:010:35:02

You know how to treat a girl, don't you(?)

0:35:020:35:05

Welcome to Rosewell, the home of the long established

0:35:050:35:08

Thomson Roddick Scottish Auctions.

0:35:080:35:10

Here we go.

0:35:100:35:11

Are you ready for a slaughtering?

0:35:110:35:13

HE LAUGHS

0:35:130:35:14

Listen to you. Get in there.

0:35:140:35:16

I wonder what auctioneer Sybelle Thomson thinks will get

0:35:160:35:20

everyone hot under the collar.

0:35:200:35:21

Sybelle?

0:35:210:35:23

Toys are very popular here and there's already been a few

0:35:230:35:25

commissions left on Sooty and Sweep and I think they'll make £30, £40.

0:35:250:35:29

The ebony and brass inlaid octant, unfortunately it is missing

0:35:290:35:33

a small section, but I still think it will fetch in the region of £60 to £80.

0:35:330:35:38

OK, eyes down, everyone.

0:35:380:35:40

Hotting up in here.

0:35:400:35:41

HE LAUGHS

0:35:410:35:43

# Feeling good. #

0:35:430:35:44

You ain't seen nothing yet.

0:35:440:35:45

# Feeling good. #

0:35:450:35:47

First at the hammer is Paul's slightly tatty table featuring

0:35:470:35:51

two exquisite tiles.

0:35:510:35:52

People will see beyond the table.

0:35:520:35:54

They will see just the tiles, I think.

0:35:540:35:57

As long as nobody's a mug on them.

0:35:570:35:59

-Two bids on this, can start at £25.

-What a start.

-25. 25.

0:36:000:36:05

Who's going on at 25? 28, 30, two, five, eight, 40.

0:36:050:36:11

-Two, 42.

-Close.

0:36:110:36:13

You're all out in the room at 42. Anyone else going on at £42?

0:36:130:36:18

HAMMER THUDS

0:36:180:36:19

-Oh!

-Close but no cigar.

0:36:190:36:22

Not a bad start.

0:36:220:36:24

We'll move on.

0:36:240:36:26

HE MUTTERS

0:36:260:36:28

Catherine's turn. Her Japanese cigarette case.

0:36:280:36:31

INDISTINCT

0:36:310:36:33

-Good.

-Yes.

-Good. Keep talking.

0:36:330:36:35

And I can start straight in at ten bid.

0:36:350:36:37

-Ten bid for a nice cigarette case.

-Come on.

-Ten.

0:36:370:36:40

INDISTINCT

0:36:400:36:41

12, 15, 18, 20, two, 25, eight, 30,

0:36:410:36:47

-two, five, eight, 40.

-It's going to do it.

-Yes.

-£40...

0:36:470:36:51

Come on, a bit more. A bit more.

0:36:510:36:54

Anyone else going on at £40?

0:36:540:36:57

HAMMER THUDS

0:36:570:36:59

That's better than my table.

0:36:590:37:00

Yep, it's warming up.

0:37:000:37:02

So now we have your box of rust. Your rusty box.

0:37:030:37:09

Or an early 20th-century chest of drawers modelled in tin

0:37:090:37:13

advertising Victory Vs.

0:37:130:37:14

I remember the sweets when I was younger.

0:37:140:37:17

-They were really, really...

-Astringent.

-Very strong.

0:37:170:37:20

-Clean your tubes.

-I'm going to start this at ten bid.

0:37:200:37:23

Ten bid, ten bid, ten bid.

0:37:230:37:25

-12, 15, 18...

-Well done.

-Bid's with the lady at 18.

0:37:250:37:29

-Anyone else going on?

-Made a profit there.

0:37:290:37:32

-The lady seated at 18. 20...

-It's got life in it yet.

-22.

0:37:320:37:37

On my right at 22. At 22.

0:37:370:37:40

HAMMER THUDS

0:37:400:37:41

-Happy days.

-I take it all back about a rusty box.

0:37:410:37:44

Definitely V for victory. Now for Catherine's tobacco jar.

0:37:440:37:50

-A fiver. A fiver.

-A bit of jealousy there?

-A bit?!

0:37:500:37:55

£20 for this. 20, £10.

0:37:550:37:58

£10. £5.

0:37:580:38:01

Five bid, everywhere,

0:38:010:38:02

-eight, ten...

-Everywhere. I don't like the sound of that.

0:38:020:38:05

-..15, 18, 20, 22, 25...

-Yes.

0:38:050:38:11

-28. The lady standing at the back at 28.

-Keep going.

0:38:110:38:14

Anyone else going on at £28?

0:38:140:38:17

HAMMER THUDS

0:38:170:38:19

-28.

-Loved that.

0:38:190:38:21

Are you sure, Paul?

0:38:210:38:23

I may have to lie down somewhere.

0:38:230:38:25

Mr Laidlaw, are you jealous of that purchase? Go on, admit it. Go on.

0:38:250:38:30

He picked this stick stand up pretty cheaply too.

0:38:300:38:32

£30 for this. 30, 20...

0:38:320:38:34

-She's got nothing.

-£10. Ten bid. 12, 15, 18, 20...

0:38:340:38:40

They didn't miss it. They walked round.

0:38:400:38:42

..Eight, 30, two, five, eight, 38. Bid's on the right at 38.

0:38:420:38:50

40, 42, 45...

0:38:500:38:52

-People appreciated it like you did.

-..at 45.

0:38:520:38:54

It's just going to wash its face.

0:38:540:38:55

HAMMER THUDS

0:38:550:38:58

It's flat, this. For me, it's flat.

0:38:580:39:00

An unusual experience for our Paul.

0:39:000:39:04

I am really enjoying this.

0:39:040:39:06

-Bring it on. What's next for you?

-You're cold!

0:39:060:39:10

They're supposed to be quite keen on golf round here.

0:39:100:39:14

I have two bids on this and we start at 15 bid.

0:39:140:39:17

-15 on commission, 18, 20, two, five, eight, 28...

-28.

0:39:170:39:22

..anyone else for 30?

0:39:220:39:24

30, 30, standing right at the back at 30.

0:39:240:39:28

Who am I missing for golfing interest? At £30.

0:39:280:39:31

HAMMER THUDS

0:39:310:39:32

We're not seeing the auction we would have liked today, are we,

0:39:320:39:36

with our purchases?

0:39:360:39:37

I think any golfer would be pleased with that.

0:39:370:39:40

This could be divisive, the octant Catherine rejected.

0:39:400:39:43

If this one just makes it over the line

0:39:430:39:46

and no more, as my other lots have, I'm doomed.

0:39:460:39:50

Anyone else going on? 38.

0:39:500:39:54

There are two bids on this and we must start straight in

0:39:540:39:56

at 55 bid, 55.

0:39:560:39:59

-55, 60, five...

-Come on.

-..70, five...

-No.

0:39:590:40:03

..80, £80. You're all out in the room.

0:40:030:40:06

-Make no mistake, selling on commission.

-On commission.

-£80.

0:40:060:40:10

Any advance on £80?

0:40:100:40:11

HAMMER THUDS

0:40:110:40:13

I'll take it.

0:40:130:40:14

The best profit of the day.

0:40:140:40:16

Now, "Izzy wizzy, let's get busy."

0:40:170:40:20

Did you not have a Sooty and Sweep?

0:40:200:40:22

-Are you a bit old for that?

-How very dare you, madam?

0:40:220:40:27

-And I can start this straight in at 20 bid, 20 bid...

-What?

0:40:270:40:33

-..22, 25, 28, 30...

-She's off.

0:40:330:40:37

..two, five, eight, 40, £40, on my right at 40...

0:40:370:40:41

Keep going.

0:40:410:40:42

Anyone else going on at £40?

0:40:420:40:45

HAMMER THUDS

0:40:450:40:47

-Yes.

-HE GROANS

0:40:470:40:49

Take that, Teletubbies!

0:40:490:40:51

Phew!

0:40:510:40:52

THEY LAUGH

0:40:520:40:54

Paul reverts to type with his next lot.

0:40:540:40:57

Very interesting collection of military and other badges.

0:40:570:40:59

"Very interesting collection."

0:40:590:41:01

I can start straight in at 10 bid, ten bid for military badges,

0:41:010:41:04

-at 10, 12, 15, 18, 20, two...

-Oh, no.

-..five, eight, 30, £30...

0:41:040:41:12

-Not enough. You've done it.

-..30. anyone else going on at 30?

0:41:120:41:16

-Hammer down.

-Interesting lot. At £30.

0:41:160:41:19

HAMMER THUDS

0:41:190:41:20

-I'm so sorry.

-You've beat me and you've got a lot to go.

0:41:200:41:24

Never nice to see a grown man cry.

0:41:240:41:26

I like auctions here.

0:41:260:41:27

I think maybe we should come back here.

0:41:270:41:30

Yes, she's cruising towards victory today.

0:41:300:41:33

£50 for it. 50, 30?

0:41:330:41:35

She's stabbing me in the heart.

0:41:350:41:37

£20 for a pond yacht. 20 bid, 22, 25, 28, 30, 30, 30, 32...

0:41:370:41:45

-No.

-..35, 38, 40, £40. On my left at £40.

-Come on.

0:41:450:41:50

-Anyone else going on? On my left...

-No-one else, I would hope.

0:41:500:41:54

..at £40.

0:41:540:41:55

HAMMER THUDS

0:41:550:41:57

Southon... Loving your work.

0:41:570:42:01

No losses and some tidy profits leaves Catherine set fair.

0:42:010:42:05

Oh-ho-ho-ho! Let's go and party.

0:42:050:42:10

I don't feel in a party mood, funnily enough. I don't know what it is.

0:42:100:42:13

Come on, don't be a party pooper.

0:42:130:42:16

SHE HUMS

0:42:160:42:18

We could do the conga.

0:42:180:42:20

SHE HUMS

0:42:200:42:22

Paul produced a profit of £19.58 after paying auction costs

0:42:220:42:26

so has £392.34 in his kitty...

0:42:260:42:30

..while Catherine started out with £169.96 and after costs she made a

0:42:310:42:37

profit of £25.96 so wins the day and

0:42:370:42:41

has £195.92 to spend next time.

0:42:410:42:45

# At auction. #

0:42:450:42:47

-Oh!

-There's only one way I'm going now and that is up.

-What?!

0:42:470:42:52

Fighting talk.

0:42:520:42:54

You've beaten me by a fiver and you've taken off like a rocket!

0:42:540:42:57

-Listen. Hare and tortoise, remember that.

-Oh!

0:42:570:43:00

Next on Antiques Road Trip, Catherine bets on black...

0:43:020:43:05

Yeah!

0:43:080:43:10

..and Paul sees red.

0:43:100:43:13

Philistines! Ignorance!

0:43:130:43:16

Auctioneers Paul Laidlaw and Catherine Southon are almost halfway through their road trip. Deep in the Scottish Borders, Catherine uncovers a pair of vintage glove puppets. But will they give her a helping hand at the Edinburgh auction?