Episode 4 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 4

Antiques challenge. It's the penultimate leg for auctioneers Paul Laidlaw and Catherine Southon as they start in Callander and shop across central Scotland.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

-This is beautiful!

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That's the way to do this.

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal, to scour for antiques...

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Joy! Hello!

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..the aim to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Sorry!

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So will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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The handbrake's on!

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Say hello to Stirling,

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the brooch which clasps Bonnie Scotland together.

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-This is a beautiful town, isn't it?

-It's a joy, is it not?

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And this morning, the light is good, the air is good.

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-You bottle this up and sell it.

-Oh!

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Sniffing the heather hard are auctioneers Paul Laidlaw

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-and Catherine Southon.

-And the people are so friendly.

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They are lovely. There are a few exceptions...

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WE ARE FRIENDLY!

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Yes, and you may have already detected only one of our plucky

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pair is indigenous.

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I think we'll be all right, because the Scots, they like their own.

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Oh, wait a minute, it's just me that's Scots.

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Awks...

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If you take a Scotsman, an Englishwoman and a Morris Minor,

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what do you get?

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A car which dates from before the time seat belts were mandatory

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and has been taken to auction already three times this week.

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Somebody's walking out with a big smile on their face,

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and it's not just me.

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And although Paul has thus far delivered a textbook profit

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performance, Catherine remains a model of composure.

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My plan is to have no plan and just let it happen. Let it happen!

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That I like.

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Except you don't see me in the shops going, "What am I going to get?!

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"How am I going to do?! Laidlaw, Laidlaw!"

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No, I'm so cool.

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Catherine has transformed her £200 stake

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into £195.92,

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whilst Paul, who began with the same sum, has almost doubled it,

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with £392.34 to spend in Scotland today.

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Do you know what? I could move here.

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Would you then run away, if I moved up to Scotland?

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"No...!"

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The journey began in Portrush, County Antrim

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and explored Northern Ireland before crossing the sea towards Scotland.

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They take in a lot of the Lowlands before arriving several

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hundred miles later in Aberdeen.

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But today, we start shopping in Callander and, after a thorough

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exploration of central Scotland, conclude at an auction in Kinbuck.

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Perched on the edge of the Trossachs - sounds painful - the delightful

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town of Callander is known as the Gateway to the Highlands.

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But will it be Catherine's portal to profit?

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-Good morning!

-Good morning. How are we?

-I'm good, thank you.

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-You must be Mr George. Your name is outside.

-It is.

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That's so I can't run away.

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This shop is so full that you have to look in every direction.

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CRASH

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-Oh!

-TIM LAUGHS

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-Whoops!

-Sorry!

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Carry on. Just act naturally.

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Black I win, red Laidlaw wins. Here we go.

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No further bets!

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It's...

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-22 black.

-Black.

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-What did I say I was?

-Lordy!

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Now, what does George reckon is a good bet?

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-Nice little country-interest snuff box.

-Oh, that's nice!

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-Always happy to help.

-A little bit of treen there.

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And you've got a nice little riding interest. See, that's nice.

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-But how nice?

-20. 15.

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Ten. Eight. Five. Two?

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SHE LAUGHS

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Give me £20, you can have that, and there's a profit in it.

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One to think about...

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This is just the sort of thing that I was looking for.

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It's nicely turned with the applied horseshoes and the crop there

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on the top, and I think it's just the sort of thing that would appeal.

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At £20, there's not a lot of profit,

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because I wouldn't have thought that would go past 30.

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I think that's probably about its limit.

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But it's a nice piece, and it's a very good start.

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Keep 'em coming.

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A bit of Scottish jewellery. Hallmarked.

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It's an amethyst!

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A little scratch there. A little bit of a scratch across it.

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What's your price on that?

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-HE INHALES

-What do you think it should be?

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Seeing as you had an intake of breath, I start to wobble and worry.

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What do I think it should be?

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15.

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-15? No, it's a bit too far away.

-What are we, then?

-40.

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-I thought you were going to say 14. 40? Oh, no.

-We're not a boot sale.

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I feel a parcel coming on.

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I'll keep looking, as well,

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because I don't like anyone going out of here empty-handed.

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-I do like it when you do the job for me, actually.

-Oh, quite.

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But you can join in, Catherine.

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That's quite sweet, a little Art Nouveau pendant.

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That's quite pretty. What's on that?

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That's a bargain. That's 15 on it, but we can...

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I love the "But we can..." and then you stop.

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Yeah, "But we can..."

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Just leading you in.

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I'll sort a few things out and I'll give you a little groupie deal.

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-A groupie deal.

-Very rock and roll!

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-You a golfer?

-No.

-Curler, then?

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I really like this. How much is this?

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That's probably about your range.

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£48, actually, which I'm fairly sure she'll consider a bit steep.

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-Can that be sort of dirt-cheap?

-What's dirt-cheap?

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Dirt-cheap is, like, £15, £20.

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Cos I probably will get a little groupie going down there.

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Sort a group out and we'll sort you a price out.

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-We're getting a fairly large group together! OK.

-Gird your loins.

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Do they say that in curling?

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I'm going to put this here with my ever-expanding...

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-It's a buffet of bargains.

-It is, it is. It's a smorgasbord we have here.

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Yeah, which, for the record, is the brush, the snuff box,

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the brooch and pendant.

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-Can we do more sort of 12 on that?

-No.

-15, then.

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Come on, that's... 15. And then I've got a bit of a chance.

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-Do you 17 on that.

-OK, 17 on that. That's fine.

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-Yeah.

-40 is way, way too high for me.

-Mm-hm.

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I think I'd probably quite like to put those two bits

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together in a little group.

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-So what could they be, the two?

-Do you 40 for the two.

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35 on those. That will give me a little chance.

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Do you 35 on that, 25 and 17.

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-That's got to be more like 15, surely.

-20 on that.

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-You've never seen another one.

-I think she has.

-Come on, 15.

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-Go on, George. Go on, George.

-18.

-Go on, George.

-16.

-Go on, George.

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It's so there. Go on, 15. Come on.

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-I tell you what, roulette, red or black.

-Ahhh!

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-That never works for me!

-Makes a change from tossing a coin.

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-Right, red or black?

-It's got to be black. Come on...

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It worked before...

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Yeah!

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It's yours.

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And the winner pays £67.

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TIM CHUCKLES

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So, with Catherine sweeping all of Callander before her, whither Paul?

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On the road to Dunfermline, that's where,

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the town in Fife that's full of reminders of its most famous son,

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the entrepreneur and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.

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Paul's come to find out more about the Scot who was once

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one of the richest men on earth.

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-Hello!

-Is it Morna?

-Hi, Paul. Yes, that's right.

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-This is the Carnegie Birthplace Museum.

-Indeed!

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Yes, Carnegie,

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the contradictory figure who made millions before giving away

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almost all of his vast fortune, came from this tiny Dunfermline dwelling.

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When was he born?

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-On the 25th of November 1835.

-Humble beginnings, clearly.

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-It was, very, yes.

-What was his family background?

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His father was a handloom weaver,

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and he made the best-quality damask linen in a workshop downstairs.

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It was humble. They didn't have running water, toilets were outside,

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all that kind of thing, but at the same time,

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the weavers were actually quite well off in the status of working people.

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Young Andrew even received a rudimentary education and showed

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early promise in memorising the poetry of Rabbie Burns.

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But the coming of steam power made his father's trade obsolete.

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He was struggling to make a living, his father,

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and his mother had twin sisters in Pittsburgh already, and she was

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the driving force. She was quite a formidable lady, as they say!

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So she's the one that made them go to America.

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His father didn't really want to go.

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In 1848, Carnegie began his working life in a Pittsburgh cotton

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mill before progressing to telegraph operator.

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The clever and hard-working young man

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was already impressing some important people.

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He became the personal assistant to Thomas Scott,

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who was a superintendent on the Pennsylvania Railroad Company.

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Thomas Scott suggested that he invest in a company called

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Adams Express, which became American Express,

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so it was a good investment.

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So he started putting money into shares.

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His mother acquired the money for him.

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-She remortgaged their house to get the money.

-Right!

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So she had great faith in Andrew,

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and I don't think I would do that for my son!

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Although much of his early investment was with the help from both

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Scott and the railroad president, John Edgar Thomson,

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Carnegie was clearly the right man at the right time.

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So, he's not a maker of things, he's an investor, he's a Warren Buffett.

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What else is he investing in?

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Essentially, it was all to do with the iron industry to start

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-with, so iron rails, iron bridges.

-Oh, I see.

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And then later in life he discovered that you could make steel more

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cheaply than you could initially,

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so then he moved into building steelworks.

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It's America growing, railroads crossing this huge country.

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-Absolutely.

-And what do they need? They need steel.

-Yes.

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But the tough capitalist who formed a vast steel empire to make rails,

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bridges and then skyscrapers was to surprise the world when, during

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his thirties, he started sharing, and philanthropy began at home.

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The first gift was when he was 38, and he gave Dunfermline

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the swimming baths, and that was followed by the very first library.

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We're talking about a man making his wealth out of steel and iron,

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but I can't help but notice a big piece of silver in front of us.

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Absolutely, yes. This is from the Stevens Institute in America.

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He gave money to fund the engineering laboratory,

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and so it was a thank you for his philanthropy.

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-That's a railway line.

-It is.

-Or a bit of one, I daresay.

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And this was inside the casket as part of the gift,

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-so something that Carnegie would appreciate, I'm sure.

-I see.

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And of course I guess these guys are rolling...

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-Yes, they're rolling steel rails, that's right.

-Yeah.

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Education and the arts were amongst the biggest benefactors, with

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New York's Carnegie Hall becoming perhaps his most famous monument.

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He was in many respects the embodiment of the American dream

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and, despite evidence of some rather ruthless business practices,

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clearly a man of noble intent

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determined to distribute his wealth so that others might thrive.

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He believed in Chartism and that all men should get the vote

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and that everyone should be equal, treated as equal.

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Interestingly, he would have people like the King to dinner

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and he would have all his Dunfermline aunts and uncles,

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and they would all sit together at dinner.

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So he was very...

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"Egalitarian" I think is maybe the word!

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-That's Carnegie's roll-top desk.

-It is indeed, yes.

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That makes you stop and think. Out of all things, the desk.

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It paints this picture of the industrious, the busy man.

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Absolutely, and he wrote a lot of books.

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He wrote Triumphant Democracy and The Gospel Of Wealth.

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There's an interesting title. Tell me more about that.

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Well, in that, there's a quote, "He who dies thus rich dies disgraced."

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Having explained how wealthy you might be,

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you should get rid of the money. If you keep it, you die disgraced.

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He was as good as his word, because when he died,

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on the 11th of August 1919, he'd given away about 90% of his

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fortune and encouraged several others to follow suit.

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He gave away 350 million in his lifetime, which is

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worth billions now.

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I mean, we say Bill Gates is worth about 53 billion.

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-Well, this was between 100 and 150 billion.

-That he gave away?

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That he gave away before he died. So a tremendous amount of money.

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And that work continues to this day.

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There are institutions spending Carnegie's money

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at the rate of 150 every minute of every day.

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-So in a sense, the old boy's still giving.

-He is.

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Meanwhile, on the other side of the Forth Valley, Catherine's

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travelled south to Falkirk, a town with landmarks to spare.

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-Ooh! Hello!

-Hello.

-I'm Catherine.

-David. Pleased to meet you.

-David.

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-Pleased to meet you. And you're...?

-Yasmin.

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Yasmin, pleased to meet you, too.

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-This is good! This all looks very tidy in here.

-It is.

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I hope you haven't tidied up just for me.

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THEY LAUGH

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It might mean David knows exactly where his bargains are.

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Two can play at the Victory V game, Mr Paul Laidlaw.

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Yeah, Paul unearthed a similar tin earlier this trip.

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I know he would love that. I know he would love that.

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It sounds like I'm buying a present for Paul Laidlaw.

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I'm really not.

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His was Victory V-related, as well.

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Other lozenges are available.

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That's quite nice, sort of Austrian, isn't it?

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-You've got, like, a mountain scene or something here.

-Mountaineer.

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I love the shape of the vase. The handles here are lovely.

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I mean, they're very typical Art Nouveau,

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which I would say dates this to early 20th century.

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-Right, let's think about that. Can I put that to one side?

-OK.

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Catherine's off to a bit of a flier

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while Paul, today's late starter in the shopping stakes,

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is making has way to South Queensferry, where,

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in the shadow of this mighty construction,

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the world's second-longest single-cantilever span,

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he's desperately seeking his first retail opportunity.

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-How you doing? Hello!

-Hello.

-The Sea Kist?

-Yes.

-Right on the Forth.

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-Absolutely.

-What a prospect you have got!

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Is that looking out or in? Both are appealing.

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-Reel me in.

-THEY LAUGH

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You've got me!

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The clue's in the name.

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It's a little marine Aladdin's cave, is it not?

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-Nirvana for the nautically inclined.

-I like your teak books...

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-No, they're bookends, aren't they?

-Yes, yes.

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And they're actually made from the wood of HMS Ganges.

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Oh, is that a wee brass plaque? It's one of those!

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That's pleasingly wrought. Yeah, that's not bad work.

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The last sailing ship to serve as a seagoing flagship,

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and at this point, between the wars, they're breaking up a lot of

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vessels, relics of the First World War and so on, and there's this...

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industry on the back of that,

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turning out all sorts of tat - in this instance, not tat -

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-from the ships' timbers.

-That's right.

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-Yeah. And you've either side. You've a pair of those.

-Yes, that's right.

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-I see a price on those of £55.

-Mm-hm.

-Slack in that?

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Yeah, they could be 40.

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Anything for landlubbers?

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Ooh, I like your dressing-table set in Lucite. That's a sexy thing!

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-Very Art Deco.

-Ohhh! Any problems with it? No fractures or losses?

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There's not fractures.

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I mean, there's some signs of wear, but you can have a look at it.

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Oh, if it's got signs of wear, it's going to be wrecked, then, isn't it?

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-Is that an expensive thing?

-£45 for that.

-Ohhh!

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Is that your starting price, or is that...?

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Oh, that's always negotiable.

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On that highly promising note, let us return to Falkirk,

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where Catherine, with an early-20th-century advertising

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piece under consideration, is still on the hunt.

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I love little cabinets like this.

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I love going to someone's house, as well,

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and if they've got, like, a little bijouterie table, you can just stand

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there and look for ages and see all these wonderful little curios.

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There's a little knife there,

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a little sort of fruit knife, penknife.

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Now, this is interesting.

0:16:560:16:57

With the little hook, it might have been

0:16:570:16:59

part of a chatelaine or something like that.

0:16:590:17:02

So perhaps a lady would have had her belt here

0:17:020:17:05

and then might have had something like that hanging down.

0:17:050:17:09

I just think that's quite pretty.

0:17:090:17:11

This is actually made from bone, you can see the little flecks there.

0:17:110:17:15

But the detail on there where you've

0:17:150:17:17

got the lady's boot, right at the bottom there,

0:17:170:17:21

all the buttons and the hooks.

0:17:210:17:22

I think it's absolutely smashing.

0:17:220:17:24

I would say that it is probably early to mid Victorian.

0:17:240:17:28

The ticket price is £42.

0:17:280:17:31

Could there be a deal afoot?

0:17:310:17:32

What is your absolute rock bottom price?

0:17:320:17:36

As it's you, I could do it for £32.

0:17:360:17:39

Is that going to make a profit on £32?

0:17:390:17:41

28.

0:17:410:17:44

-That will be my best.

-And what about the tin that we saw?

0:17:440:17:47

-Would that be, like, silly money?

-That could be very cheap.

0:17:470:17:50

-Oh, could it?

-Yes.

0:17:500:17:52

How about if I did you the knife and the tin for £30?

0:17:520:17:56

That sounds very tempting.

0:17:560:17:57

OK, so...

0:17:570:18:00

-That I'm going to say 25.

-OK.

0:18:000:18:02

And then your tin, I'm going to say 5. So £30 in total.

0:18:020:18:05

£30 for the two.

0:18:050:18:07

-Is that all right?

-Yeah.

-Put it there, my friend.

-Thank you.

0:18:070:18:10

Thank you very much indeed.

0:18:100:18:12

Dave, it has been a pleasure.

0:18:120:18:14

Catherine's had a very fruitful day.

0:18:140:18:16

Things are also looking shipshape beside the Forth.

0:18:170:18:21

-That's a soldier's strongbox, isn't it?

-It is.

0:18:210:18:23

Is it dated on the inside?

0:18:230:18:24

They sometimes have dated plaques on the underside of the lid.

0:18:240:18:27

-I don't think that one has.

-Are you sure?

0:18:270:18:30

No, I'm not sure because I can't remember the last time

0:18:300:18:32

-I looked at it.

-May I?

0:18:320:18:34

-Yeah, yeah.

-So the hasp is a replacement.

0:18:340:18:37

That latch is missing. This one's here.

0:18:370:18:40

And underneath there, there is a plaque with a date, 1916.

0:18:400:18:45

We knew he'd be right, didn't we?

0:18:450:18:47

Were you going to try and sell that or was that hidden on the way

0:18:470:18:50

out the door just to get rid of?

0:18:500:18:52

-It was propping up a few other things.

-Wasn't it just.

0:18:520:18:54

Now, I tell you what, let's park that because

0:18:540:18:57

what I'm going to do is try and buy something

0:18:570:18:59

off you properly and I'm going to ask for that

0:18:590:19:02

-at a pittance thrown in the deal.

-Right.

0:19:020:19:04

What about the dressing table set you took a fancy to earlier, then?

0:19:040:19:08

It's Lucite, which you and I both know is another term for Plexiglas

0:19:080:19:13

-in America and Perspex to you and I.

-Yes.

0:19:130:19:16

All the same, aircraft windshields, that's what you're looking at.

0:19:160:19:21

There's a bit missing off it.

0:19:210:19:22

-Is there?

-That's supposed to continue to there.

-Right.

0:19:220:19:26

-That changes everything, doesn't it?

-Could do, yes.

0:19:260:19:30

Right, a revised price.

0:19:300:19:32

Cheapy cheapy cheap cheap cheap cheap cheap?

0:19:320:19:35

What did I say? 45.

0:19:350:19:39

-30.

-What?! What?!

0:19:390:19:42

What were you thinking?

0:19:420:19:44

20 quid for that and the box means I might make a wee bit of profit.

0:19:440:19:48

I was thinking more 25 for the two.

0:19:480:19:51

I bet you were.

0:19:510:19:53

Any other desirable items we could include in this deal?

0:19:530:19:55

What's the story with the tiny little rocking crib?

0:19:550:19:57

-Is there age to that?

-Would you like to see it?

0:19:570:20:00

That's the first rule of selling, isn't it?

0:20:000:20:02

Get it into the mug's hand.

0:20:020:20:04

I reckon it's a wee charmer. It's too long.

0:20:070:20:09

It's a pretty spindly bairn that rattles about in there.

0:20:090:20:13

-How interesting. What's the price on that?

-£20.

0:20:130:20:16

-It's not a lot of money, is it?

-Nope.

0:20:160:20:19

It's almost too good to be true, that.

0:20:190:20:22

Because, apart from that, has got some patina on it.

0:20:220:20:26

A plan is hatched.

0:20:260:20:28

Can we do a deal?

0:20:280:20:29

Three things, the Lucite, moderne dressing table set,

0:20:290:20:34

there's the little throw away steel box

0:20:340:20:37

and then we've got our little

0:20:370:20:39

19th century dolls, or toy, rocking cradle.

0:20:390:20:44

I'm going to be brutal and say I'd like to give you 15 for that.

0:20:440:20:49

That would make three things for £35.

0:20:490:20:52

Can we do this?

0:20:520:20:55

Yeah, I think we can, yep.

0:20:560:20:59

Is that just to get rid of me?

0:21:000:21:01

No, not at all! No, no!

0:21:010:21:03

But there's the door, Paul.

0:21:050:21:08

Nighty-night.

0:21:080:21:10

Next morning, Catherine's feeling encouraged.

0:21:110:21:14

Well, I've got a little challenge. I've purchased something which is

0:21:140:21:17

very similar to what you purchased once upon a time.

0:21:170:21:20

Mine is bigger, mine is better and more classy.

0:21:200:21:24

Did my, whatever it was, make money?

0:21:240:21:27

Come on, do I look stupid?

0:21:270:21:28

Would I have bought something that didn't make money?

0:21:280:21:31

Fair enough, yeah!

0:21:310:21:32

Catherine is, of course, archly referring

0:21:320:21:35

to the sweet tin vase she purchased,

0:21:350:21:37

along with the brooch, a pendant, a pen knife, a snuff box

0:21:370:21:41

and a curling broom.

0:21:410:21:44

Or it could be a brush for a very small house.

0:21:440:21:46

Those cost £97, leaving her with just under £100 available for today.

0:21:460:21:51

While Paul's haul included a military strongbox, a doll's cradle

0:21:510:21:57

and a pink dressing table set.

0:21:570:21:59

It's the work of the devil, that frivolity.

0:21:590:22:01

All for a mere 35.

0:22:010:22:04

He still has a small fortune of over £357.

0:22:040:22:07

Not such a moo, eh?

0:22:070:22:09

I embraced my feminine side, yet again.

0:22:090:22:12

-Oh, no, handbags! Was it handbags again?

-I couldn't possibly comment.

0:22:120:22:17

I think you'll go, "Not Laidlaw, but I like!"

0:22:170:22:20

Later they'll be heading for an auction in Kinbuck.

0:22:200:22:23

But the next stop is Helensburgh, beside the Firth of Clyde...

0:22:230:22:26

..where, behind some very distinctive gates, Catherine has come to see one

0:22:290:22:33

of the greatest architectural gems of Glasgow's Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

0:22:330:22:39

Lucky girl.

0:22:390:22:40

-Good morning.

-Good morning, Catherine.

-Hello.

-Welcome.

0:22:400:22:43

-And you are?

-I'm Lorna Hepburn.

0:22:430:22:45

Lorna, lovely to meet you.

0:22:450:22:47

The moment you walk in,

0:22:470:22:50

you see a real Charles Rennie Mackintosh statement.

0:22:500:22:53

Mixing arts and crafts, Scottish Baronial and Art Nouveau,

0:22:530:22:59

Hill House was designed in the early years of the 20th century

0:22:590:23:02

as a family home for a Glasgow publisher.

0:23:020:23:05

-It's quite asymmetrical.

-Yes.

-And it's not, sort of, traditional.

0:23:050:23:10

I mean, is that where we're going in?

0:23:100:23:12

-That's where we're going in.

-So that's the front door?

0:23:120:23:15

The front door and lots of

0:23:150:23:16

people can't find it because they're looking for something grander.

0:23:160:23:19

The young architect and designer,

0:23:190:23:21

who's name is now synonymous with Glasgow Style, had just created

0:23:210:23:25

the School of Art when he received this rare domestic commission.

0:23:250:23:30

Isn't it amazing?

0:23:300:23:31

Mackintosh believed in architecture as art and his ideas were

0:23:330:23:36

given full expression at Hill House.

0:23:360:23:39

It's the colours.

0:23:390:23:41

It's the dark wood and then that beautiful soft purple.

0:23:410:23:46

Soft purples, yes. Lots of purples, blues.

0:23:460:23:49

We often think of this space as an enchanted woodland

0:23:490:23:52

-with the trees rising up.

-With the trees coming up.

0:23:520:23:55

You can see that, can't you? All these panels of wood

0:23:550:23:58

and it does feel like you're almost in a forest.

0:23:580:24:00

It's almost a bit fairy-tale like.

0:24:000:24:03

Yes, yes, and the Blackie family did publish a lots of fairy tales

0:24:030:24:06

and that's a recurring theme.

0:24:060:24:08

These distinctive motifs had been developed by Mackintosh during the

0:24:080:24:13

1890s, while creating the interiors of various Glasgow tea rooms.

0:24:130:24:17

But just outside the city,

0:24:170:24:18

his admiration for Japanese simplicity

0:24:180:24:21

resulted in a more calming, modern space.

0:24:210:24:25

Oh, my goodness me.

0:24:250:24:27

Every single corner is simplicity but real beauty.

0:24:270:24:31

It's stunning.

0:24:310:24:33

People come into this room and they look round, they take in the

0:24:330:24:36

peace and the tranquillity and then they start to look at the detail.

0:24:360:24:40

Again, Mackintosh creating an indoor garden in this room.

0:24:400:24:44

Bringing elements from the outside, like the roses,

0:24:440:24:48

into the living space as decorative features.

0:24:480:24:52

He wanted to keep his buildings very Scottish,

0:24:520:24:55

so he's referencing Scottish tower houses, for example, but he's

0:24:550:24:58

also thinking about creating modern buildings for modern people.

0:24:580:25:03

But the architect was not working alone

0:25:030:25:05

because Mackintosh's greatest collaborator was his wife, Margaret.

0:25:050:25:09

Their marriage grew out of what had become a very creative and close

0:25:090:25:12

and intimate partnership.

0:25:120:25:14

We don't know who did what

0:25:140:25:16

but certainly they must have been exchanging ideas.

0:25:160:25:19

But there are items in this room, objects in this room,

0:25:190:25:22

which are by Margaret.

0:25:220:25:25

Tucked away at the far end of the sitting room is

0:25:250:25:27

one of Margaret's masterpieces.

0:25:270:25:30

That's just breathtaking. It's so beautiful.

0:25:300:25:35

The couple contributed to exhibitions throughout Europe

0:25:350:25:37

and Margaret's work was especially

0:25:370:25:39

influential on the artists of Vienna Secession, such as Gustav Klimt.

0:25:390:25:44

-What is...

-It's gesso.

-It's gesso.

0:25:440:25:46

It's plaster of Paris and rabbit glue and all sorts of things

0:25:460:25:50

-and the colour is dropped on.

-But I love the style, the technique.

0:25:500:25:54

This, almost, like, it's being piped with an icing bag.

0:25:540:25:59

It makes it look so soft and so romantic as well.

0:25:590:26:02

It is very romantic.

0:26:020:26:04

Very appropriate to have the sleeping princess in a house

0:26:040:26:08

where you have four young woman growing up.

0:26:080:26:10

Yet, despite international acclaim,

0:26:100:26:13

commissions back home proved hard to come by.

0:26:130:26:16

Within a few years the Mackintosh's had moved away from Glasgow and

0:26:160:26:19

all but given up on architecture.

0:26:190:26:22

So they didn't quite go down the avenue that they thought

0:26:220:26:25

-they were going to go down.

-He was an accomplished artist.

0:26:250:26:28

He designed amazing furniture.

0:26:280:26:31

There were lots of avenues he could have gone down,

0:26:310:26:34

but the architecture one pretty much closed down.

0:26:340:26:37

Partly because of the war

0:26:370:26:39

and partly because of his temperament and his feeling

0:26:390:26:43

he wasn't appreciated, he wasn't understood by they establishment.

0:26:430:26:49

Thankfully the handful of great works Mackintosh did manage to see

0:26:490:26:53

built are now amongst the country's most treasured buildings.

0:26:530:26:56

And talking of Scottish treasures, Paul's motored on,

0:27:000:27:04

taking our route around Gairloch towards Kilcreggan

0:27:040:27:07

where, at the very end of the Rosneath Peninsula,

0:27:070:27:10

not only is there and antique shop,

0:27:100:27:12

but they have a sale on.

0:27:120:27:15

-Good morning.

-Ah, good morning.

-How are you doing?

-I'm very good.

0:27:150:27:18

-I'm Roo, nice to meet you.

-It is a pleasure to meet you, Roo.

0:27:180:27:21

Welcome to Kilcreggan Antiques.

0:27:210:27:23

Just like Paul's shop yesterday, this establishment has a view to die for.

0:27:230:27:27

-But what bargains have washed up on this shore?

-Right then.

0:27:270:27:31

You know the drill, clockwise from the door.

0:27:310:27:34

Thorough as always.

0:27:340:27:36

You're shocked and appalled

0:27:360:27:38

-because Laidlaw is looking at brass candle sticks.

-Erm, well...

0:27:380:27:41

-Actually, that's not unattractive.

-But who cares,

0:27:410:27:44

it's Victorian brass candlestick.

0:27:440:27:45

Your point being?

0:27:450:27:47

This is not a Victorian brass candlestick.

0:27:470:27:50

That's George III.

0:27:500:27:52

That could be the thick end of a 100 year older than the aforementioned.

0:27:520:27:57

How do you know that, Laidlaw? It's the form.

0:27:570:28:00

That is, we could say, Adam influenced.

0:28:000:28:05

He's just warming up.

0:28:050:28:08

Now, when this was made, which I suspect would have

0:28:080:28:11

been 1780, brass was more expensive than it is in 1880.

0:28:110:28:16

And they make these in parts, as opposed to casting that in one,

0:28:160:28:22

but actually in two thin halves that are braised together

0:28:220:28:26

and we look for a seam.

0:28:260:28:28

That's what you see there.

0:28:280:28:31

Then we look to the base and we have a little tongue there,

0:28:310:28:34

a little tail.

0:28:340:28:36

That is a steel wire that is a push-eject.

0:28:360:28:39

The problem is when your candle burns down,

0:28:390:28:41

what do you do with the stump?

0:28:410:28:43

You push here and out it pops.

0:28:430:28:46

That shone some light on it.

0:28:460:28:48

He's a full period. And nobody cares!

0:28:480:28:51

Because the problem is, they are still a pair of brass candle sticks.

0:28:510:28:55

You stick them in the auction and the auctioneer

0:28:550:28:57

sticks them on a table,

0:28:570:28:58

as we see them here, and everybody is blind to them.

0:28:580:29:01

People walk past and think, "Brass candlesticks, who cares?"

0:29:010:29:04

What do they scrap at at the moment?

0:29:040:29:06

Because they're philistines.

0:29:060:29:08

-Ignorance.

-Crikey!

0:29:080:29:11

Price tag on these? Now £12.

0:29:110:29:14

And I may buy them.

0:29:140:29:16

Anything else you'd like to get off your chest?

0:29:160:29:19

Well, you've got the longbow with the arrow

0:29:190:29:21

and you've a couple of African axes.

0:29:210:29:24

I don't like the prices.

0:29:240:29:25

Are you stuck on those? Are you flexible?

0:29:250:29:29

I'm flexible to the right buyer, of course.

0:29:290:29:33

-Promising, but the ticket price is £118.

-Shall we go and have a look?

0:29:330:29:36

-Let's have a peek.

-Come on then.

0:29:360:29:40

All right.

0:29:400:29:42

We have some form of longbow of indeterminate origin,

0:29:420:29:46

whether it is South Asian or African. I cannot tell you.

0:29:460:29:50

It's the nature of the longbow.

0:29:500:29:52

The axe, on the other hand, we can absolutely assert are African.

0:29:520:29:57

So we are looking for an honest aged patina. Do you know what?

0:29:570:30:00

I think I see it there.

0:30:000:30:02

I love ethnographica. It transports me.

0:30:020:30:05

I am in darkest Africa,

0:30:050:30:07

or deepest South Asia exploring.

0:30:070:30:12

-And antiques should transport you.

-Well, they should.

-They do.

0:30:120:30:15

-They'd make beautiful wall pieces.

-Don't they?

0:30:150:30:17

These would have to be very reasonably priced for me

0:30:170:30:21

to justify the business transaction.

0:30:210:30:24

So are you thinking as a set of three to get more

0:30:240:30:26

-value for you at auction?

-I am.

0:30:260:30:28

My estimate on the three, as an auctioneer, is £40-70.

0:30:280:30:33

Right, OK.

0:30:330:30:34

So I'd need to buy them south of that for it to work.

0:30:340:30:39

-What are you thinking?

-I'll offer you £40.

-Would you go to 45?

0:30:390:30:43

45, 45, 45.

0:30:430:30:46

-Done deal.

-You did it, you did it.

-No worries.

0:30:460:30:48

That's a good negotiating tool by the way,

0:30:480:30:50

when you've got that in your hand.

0:30:500:30:52

-As is one of those.

-I spied a pair of brass candlesticks next door.

0:30:520:30:56

-Right, OK.

-They are marked up at 12 quid at the moment.

0:30:560:31:00

Are they the ones that are reduced from £18?

0:31:000:31:02

They may have been reduced, I guess.

0:31:020:31:05

-Georgian, 220 years old.

-No! No, no!

0:31:050:31:08

It's a hidden gem in amongst the

0:31:080:31:10

-rest of the mundane brass candle sticks.

-No! That's not fair!

0:31:100:31:15

And a keen eye at auction would spot those and grab them very quickly.

0:31:150:31:19

Sounds like Paul needs to keep his voice down a bit in future.

0:31:190:31:22

-You can have them for 10.

-I'll give you a fiver for them.

0:31:220:31:25

-Seeing as you went to 45, you can have them for

-£5. Well said, Roo.

0:31:250:31:29

-You've been brilliant.

-So have you. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:31:300:31:35

Now, away from all that delightful scenery, Catherine has a pile

0:31:350:31:39

of salvage to get stuck into on the outskirts of the City of Glasgow.

0:31:390:31:44

Get ready to rummage!

0:31:440:31:46

Wow! OK!

0:31:460:31:48

This is a bit different.

0:31:480:31:50

It's a wee bit jam-packed.

0:31:500:31:52

Tina's is a bit of an upcyling evangelist.

0:31:520:31:55

Anything that she can save from landfill, she will.

0:31:550:31:58

-It's piled high!

-Oh, yes.

0:31:580:32:02

What about that chair? That little kiddies chair.

0:32:040:32:06

That's a refurbishment job.

0:32:060:32:09

-It's not for sale, I'm afraid.

-That's for sale, though.

0:32:090:32:12

Love the look of these, love the colour.

0:32:120:32:15

Very retro.

0:32:150:32:17

Glad they're not working, actually,

0:32:170:32:19

-because I don't want to give away my weight.

-Don't be so vain, Catherine.

0:32:190:32:23

Wouldn't go into the average bathroom. Anything else inside?

0:32:230:32:26

-Can I have a little look in your chaotic mess here?

-Absolutely.

0:32:260:32:30

I like a bit of chaos.

0:32:300:32:32

You've got his little watch case and it's been made into a brooch.

0:32:320:32:36

Which is very clever.

0:32:360:32:37

With lots of different watch parts and a feather behind it.

0:32:370:32:41

If the watch doesn't work anymore, I'll take it apart and use the cogs.

0:32:410:32:45

-You did this?

-M-hm.

-Oh, that's very clever.

0:32:450:32:48

That must take a fair bit of time there, though.

0:32:480:32:51

If you pardon the pun.

0:32:510:32:53

SHE LAUGHS

0:32:530:32:55

Sorry!

0:32:550:32:56

How much is little silver... It's not silver.

0:32:560:32:58

-How much is that little brooch?

-Smooth, Catherine.

0:32:580:33:01

You can have it for eight quid.

0:33:010:33:03

Might fit in with the jewellery she bought yesterday.

0:33:030:33:06

She's already got plenty for the auction. But it's that kind of place.

0:33:060:33:10

Oh, these are fun. Ration tins.

0:33:100:33:13

So these are the days in WWII when the lady of the house

0:33:130:33:16

would have gone with her little ration book

0:33:160:33:20

and collected her tins of tea, pre-cooked rice.

0:33:200:33:26

Yum!

0:33:260:33:27

Sugar and instant coffee.

0:33:280:33:30

Tina, where did you get these from?

0:33:300:33:33

They were from a house clearance.

0:33:330:33:35

Opened up a beautiful vintage suitcase,

0:33:350:33:39

which had caught my eye, and these were in it.

0:33:390:33:42

These were inside.

0:33:420:33:43

They were going to get thrown out.

0:33:430:33:45

-The sweets, they were part of it as well.

-Ah, sweeties.

0:33:450:33:48

-They've all gone a bit yuck.

-I don't know if I would eat them.

-No.

0:33:480:33:51

These must be quite rare. How much is the collection?

0:33:510:33:55

All the tins, 55 quid.

0:33:550:33:58

Can I throw in the sweeties for free,

0:33:580:33:59

so they get to go with their friends?

0:33:590:34:01

They look quite tasty, don't they? But the brooch is cheap.

0:34:010:34:04

And what's it made of again?

0:34:040:34:07

I'm just looking at it purely because, as you turn it over, there

0:34:070:34:10

are three little marks on there and that tells me that it's silver.

0:34:100:34:16

What's your very, very best on that?

0:34:160:34:19

£6. Is there any chance you can push it down to a fiver for me?

0:34:190:34:24

SHE SIGHS

0:34:240:34:26

-Will you come back?

-I will certainly try.

-OK then.

0:34:260:34:30

Fantastic. There we are.

0:34:310:34:33

That piece of silver salvage completes our buys.

0:34:330:34:37

But with the auction beckoning, what lots have they got?

0:34:370:34:41

Paul parted with £85 for a strongbox, some brass candlesticks,

0:34:410:34:45

a dressing table set, some ethnographica and a toy cradle.

0:34:450:34:50

While Catherine spent £102 on a penknife, a curling broom,

0:34:520:34:56

two brooches and a pendant, a sweet tin and a snuff box.

0:34:560:35:02

What did they make of each others purchases?

0:35:020:35:05

Strongbox, £1?!

0:35:050:35:07

How can he possibly pay £1 for anything?

0:35:070:35:11

Victory V lozenge tin, the cheek of it!

0:35:110:35:14

It was cheaper than mine

0:35:140:35:16

and so it should have been because it's not as good, is it?

0:35:160:35:20

I don't think there is anything that is going to fly.

0:35:200:35:23

I think she might make profits across the board, but I think after

0:35:230:35:26

charges she's not, she's going to make a small step again.

0:35:260:35:29

I won the last auction. Do you know what? I could do it again.

0:35:290:35:34

Bring it on.

0:35:340:35:36

After setting off from Callander, our experts are now

0:35:360:35:39

making for an auction not far from where they began, in Kinbuck.

0:35:390:35:44

Can you curl?

0:35:440:35:45

Not your hair, obviously. But have you ever done that?

0:35:460:35:50

-No, I never have.

-I find that mesmerising. It's from the broom.

0:35:500:35:52

-It's wonderful.

-Show me that action again.

0:35:520:35:55

SHE MIMICS CURLING

0:35:550:35:57

-That's Olympic.

-But what do you think of my curling broom?

0:35:570:36:00

You're upset that you haven't got one, aren't you?

0:36:000:36:03

That's what it is.

0:36:030:36:05

They're in tennis territory

0:36:050:36:07

because Andy Murray hails from nearby Dunblane.

0:36:070:36:10

But what does auctioneer Struan Robertson think will be a smash?

0:36:110:36:16

The penknife is one of my favourite items in the auction today.

0:36:160:36:18

Something about the shape of this

0:36:180:36:20

and the lady's boot just makes it really different.

0:36:200:36:23

I think we'll get between £80-120 for that.

0:36:230:36:26

The candlesticks have a bit of age to them.

0:36:260:36:28

They look like 18th century.

0:36:280:36:30

It's a shame that one of them is a bit squint,

0:36:300:36:32

but I think it will go between £20-30 today.

0:36:320:36:35

Well, Kinbuck is certainly eager for something.

0:36:350:36:38

-This is heaving!

-Even the local wildlife has an interest.

0:36:380:36:41

Catherine starts off with her lozenge receptacle.

0:36:430:36:47

You cannot lose your fiver for it.

0:36:470:36:49

I can't lose, can I Paul?

0:36:490:36:52

Who will give me £20? £20 for the tin. £20.

0:36:520:36:56

15, 10, £10 start.

0:36:560:36:57

Come on, guys. Nice and unusual piece for a tenner. 10 bid there.

0:36:570:37:01

Advance on 10. Keep it going. Advance on 10, 12.

0:37:010:37:05

Advance on 12, 14. 14, 16. Advance on 16. Advance on £16.

0:37:050:37:10

-All out on £16 then, ladies and gentlemen.

-I'll take that.

0:37:100:37:14

-I'll take that.

-All day long you'll take that.

-I will take that.

0:37:140:37:18

Good start. What about Paul's slightly random choice?

0:37:180:37:22

-It just doesn't say Paul Laidlaw.

-If anything it says funky Manchester.

0:37:220:37:29

-London.

-Funky?!

0:37:290:37:31

-Yeah, come on! It's cool.

-It's not cool.

0:37:310:37:34

Who will give me £40? £30, 20.

0:37:340:37:36

£20 then. £20. Come on, guys. Nice set there for £20. 20 bid.

0:37:360:37:40

An advance on 20.

0:37:400:37:42

Advance on £20, going cheap. 22, 24.

0:37:420:37:46

He's got commission bids.

0:37:460:37:48

30, 32, 34, 36. Advance on 36.

0:37:480:37:51

Does nobody have any style?

0:37:510:37:53

Still going cheap, guys. Nice set there for £36.

0:37:530:37:56

All out on £36 then.

0:37:560:37:58

Na-na-na-na-na!

0:37:580:38:00

It is not cool!

0:38:000:38:03

The object or Paul's mature response to profit?

0:38:030:38:05

How will Kinbuck rate Catherine's little collection.

0:38:070:38:10

I'll bid 18.

0:38:100:38:12

An advance on 18. 22, 24. I'm going to go to 25.

0:38:120:38:16

An advance on 26. 28.

0:38:160:38:18

Advance on 28. Advance on £28.

0:38:180:38:21

-Don't stop at £28.

-Going cheap, guys. 30. An advance on 30. 32.

0:38:210:38:24

-It's got legs.

-34, 36. Advance on 36. Still going cheap.

0:38:240:38:30

All out on £36 then.

0:38:300:38:33

-That was really cheap, wasn't it?

-A temporary setback, I'm sure.

0:38:330:38:36

Time for Paul's bargain militaria.

0:38:380:38:40

I'll bid 10. An advance on 10. An advance on 12. Going cheap.

0:38:400:38:43

An advance on £12.

0:38:430:38:45

All out on £12, guys. Going cheap.

0:38:450:38:47

14, 16, 18, 20. An advance on 20.

0:38:470:38:50

-22, 24.

-Oh, you've got it here.

-All out on £24.

0:38:500:38:54

A margin, that'll do.

0:38:540:38:57

That's quite a return.

0:38:570:38:59

How can you get something for £1 and turn it into £24? That's magic.

0:38:590:39:03

I'd have rather of got it for a tenner and sold it for 240.

0:39:030:39:06

That would have been magic.

0:39:060:39:08

Now, there have already been a few people sniffing around this.

0:39:080:39:11

Got a number of bids. I'll start the bidding of at 20. An advance on 20.

0:39:110:39:15

-Good.

-Nice wee item here, guys. 22. Advance on £22. 24, 26.

0:39:150:39:20

-Advance on 26. 28. Still going cheap.

-It is cheap!

0:39:200:39:24

Come on you horse lovers here. 30.

0:39:240:39:26

An advance on 30. All out on £30 then.

0:39:260:39:28

-Last chance.

-I'm happy.

0:39:280:39:31

You're going to be happy.

0:39:310:39:33

And why not? A fine profit.

0:39:330:39:35

Paul spent over half of his meagre outlay on these beauties.

0:39:350:39:40

I'll bid 30. An advance on 30.

0:39:400:39:42

Advance on 30. 32, 34.

0:39:420:39:44

Advance on 34. £34.

0:39:440:39:47

They're faltering. I'm going to lose money.

0:39:470:39:49

All out at £34 then.

0:39:490:39:52

Does that hurt?

0:39:520:39:54

HE WHINES

0:39:540:39:55

His first loss of the trip.

0:39:550:39:58

Makes it competitive at least.

0:39:580:39:59

Swift return to form with his cradle?

0:39:590:40:02

Nice wee piece here.

0:40:020:40:03

Been kept in good condition.

0:40:030:40:04

It's a shame about the wee break at the end.

0:40:040:40:06

(Don't mention that!)

0:40:060:40:08

I'll bid 12. An advance on £12.

0:40:080:40:09

-Come on, guys. It's going cheap.

-That's got to be 40/50 quid.

0:40:090:40:12

-That is gorgeous.

-He's going to sell it for 12 quid.

0:40:120:40:15

All out on £12 for the rocking cradle then.

0:40:150:40:18

What just happened?

0:40:180:40:20

-What just happened?

-Straight face, Catherine.

0:40:200:40:23

Do you remember all of those conversations I've said, "auctions

0:40:230:40:26

"terrify me because of the uncertainty"? I rest my case.

0:40:260:40:29

Now, she's already sold a Sooty and a Sweep on this trip.

0:40:290:40:32

How often do these come up?

0:40:320:40:34

They never come up because no auctioneer would

0:40:340:40:36

stick a lot number on one.

0:40:360:40:38

This is something quite different.

0:40:390:40:41

Oh, no! He loves it, he loves it!

0:40:410:40:43

I'll bid 15.

0:40:430:40:45

An advance on £15 in the room. 18, 20, 22. An advance on 22.

0:40:450:40:49

Come on, if you don't like curling you can use it for the floors.

0:40:490:40:56

-Come on!

-Advance on 22. All out on 22. 24. Advance on 24.

0:40:560:41:00

All out on 24 then.

0:41:000:41:03

-He's still bidding.

-26. An advance on 26. Advance on £26.

0:41:030:41:07

Somebody make it stop.

0:41:070:41:08

All out at £28.

0:41:080:41:11

-I was actually hoping for a bit more, to be honest.

-What?!

0:41:110:41:14

She smells blood.

0:41:140:41:16

I've got the Laidlaw nervous twitch.

0:41:160:41:19

Is it catching? It's catching!

0:41:190:41:21

Jig along because you're little bit of bijouterie is up next.

0:41:230:41:25

I'll bid 80.

0:41:250:41:27

An advance on 80. 8, 90. Advance on 90. Advance on 90.

0:41:270:41:31

Still going cheap.

0:41:310:41:33

An advance on 90. All out at £90 then.

0:41:330:41:37

That was fantastic.

0:41:370:41:39

Where did that come from?

0:41:390:41:40

This is turning out to be another great auction for Catherine.

0:41:400:41:43

I didn't even get the chance to get into that. It was just...

0:41:430:41:47

SHE MUMBLES

0:41:470:41:49

Come on Kinbuck. Prove Paul wrong by bidding on his Georgian candlesticks.

0:41:500:41:55

I've got a cold sweat on.

0:41:550:41:57

Who will give me £40? £40. 35, 30 then. £30. 20 to start me.

0:41:570:42:03

£20 for the 18th century candlesticks there. 15 then.

0:42:030:42:06

Tenner starts. £10 for the candlesticks. 10 bid there.

0:42:060:42:09

An advance on 10. Going very cheap, guys. An advance on 10.

0:42:090:42:13

All out on £10 on the candlesticks.

0:42:130:42:15

Well, I didn't lose money.

0:42:160:42:19

Over 200 years old. Lordy!

0:42:190:42:21

Very good auction.

0:42:210:42:23

Interesting. Lovely. Want to come back here. When's the next one?

0:42:230:42:26

-Let's go.

-Get out of here.

0:42:260:42:29

Paul started out with £392.34 and after paying auction costs,

0:42:290:42:34

he made a profit of £10.12.

0:42:340:42:37

So he has £402.46.

0:42:370:42:40

Catherine began with £195.92.

0:42:420:42:46

And after auction costs she made a profit of £62.

0:42:460:42:51

So she wins today and has £257.92.

0:42:510:42:56

It's not much but it's in the right direction and I beat you.

0:42:570:43:00

What do you mean it's not much? What?!

0:43:000:43:04

Take me to lunch, driver.

0:43:040:43:06

Next on Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:060:43:08

How to make friends...

0:43:080:43:11

You tantalise me, Colette.

0:43:110:43:12

SHE PURRS

0:43:120:43:14

-..and influence people.

-I wouldn't offer any more than £10.

0:43:140:43:17

-Are you familiar with the term "on your bike"?

-Oh!

0:43:170:43:20

It's the penultimate leg for auctioneers Paul Laidlaw and Catherine Southon as they start in Callander and shop across central Scotland before heading for auction in Kinbuck.