Episode 5 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 5

Antiques challenge. Auctioneers Catherine Southon and Paul Laidlaw embark on the last leg of their road trip, shopping in Perthshire and Angus.


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-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

-This is beautiful!

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That's the way to do this!

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-..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal - to scour for antiques.

-Joy!

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-Hello!

-The aim?

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To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Sorry! Sorry!

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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The handbrake's on!

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This is Antiques Roadtrip!

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Yeah!

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Somewhere in this Scottish mist are Catherine Southon and Paul Laidlaw.

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Oops.

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This may be dank and misty, and arguably foreboding,

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-but it's gorgeous!

-Yeah.

-This is a bit Macbethian. Can I say that?

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-Dramatic!

-It is dramatic. A dramatic final.

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-HE CHUCKLES BOTH:

-Oh!

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Our two auctioneers are making their way through the murk towards

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a thrilling showdown in Aberdeen.

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Should one of us go and sell our soul to some witches in

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-return for victory at the auction?

-Oh, don't!

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Who knows what can jump out from behind this hedgerow?

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Maybe after their Morris,

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even though it does date from an era before seatbelts were mandatory.

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They've certainly come a long way together.

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I'm quite upset actually, Paul, that it's our last...

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What a jolly it's been, from Northern Ireland to...

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-Well, we're touching on the north of Scotland.

-Yeah.

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-And it's been glorious.

-Profitable too. Especially for Paul.

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Although, he was rocked by some rare losses last time...

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Oof! What just happened?

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..leaving Catherine feeling rather joyful.

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-So you know what?

-Yeah.

-We are actually...

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Well, we're not equal on money, but we're equal on the auctions.

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-Don't say that!

-You've won two and I've won two.

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Ho-ho! Tiebreaker, is it?

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-You're getting a bit hot under the collar already, aren't you?

-Nah!

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Catherine started out with £200, which has been nudged up to £257.92.

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While Paul's identical stake has thus far more than doubled to £402.46.

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-It could still happen!

-One canny purchase or one disaster

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and that's that bridged.

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Our journey began in Portrush, County Antrim,

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and after exploring Northern Ireland, crossed into Scotland,

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taking in a lot of the Lowlands before arriving,

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several hundred miles later, in Aberdeen.

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Today's last leg starts out in Doune and heads in a north-easterly

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direction towards that deciding auction in Aberdeen.

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Still foggy though!

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They used to make pistols here long ago.

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In fact, one of the town's claims to fame is that a Doune pistol

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fired the first shot in the American War of Independence.

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Oh, dear.

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-Be off with you!

-Oh, Catherine!

-This is my territory.

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It's a very large establishment you have all to yourself.

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It's exciting, isn't it?

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Yes, all this stuff belongs to a whole heap of dealers.

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It's just a question of tracking one down.

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There's a chap there who has got his hands in the cabinet.

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I'm guessing he's got to be a dealer.

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I'll go and have a word with him. It could save me hours.

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-Sir, I presume this is your stand?

-This? Yes.

-Catherine.

-Hiya. David.

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David. Hi, David. Good to see you.

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-So, what's revolving?

-Oh, Louis Wain. What's that Louis Wain book?

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-Have we got to wait for it to revolve?

-Yes.

-It doesn't just stop?

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No.

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Patience, Catherine. Patience.

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-Oh, in the meantime... Hold on.

-Yeah.

-What's that?

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-Oh, that's quite cute, isn't it?

-Yes, compact.

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-Little Deco compact. I like that.

-1930s, yeah.

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-It's quite a nice design, isn't it?

-Yes.

-What are you asking for that?

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-Dare I look?

-It's £48 on it.

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What's your best on that, then?

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-Maybe 40.

-Oh, really?

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20?

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-No.

-Can't go that low.

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What would you do on that?

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Erm, 28.

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Getting close. Quick! The book is back.

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There we go.

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-See, what drew me to this was the whole Louis Wain thing.

-Yes.

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Louis Wain, quite a famous artist

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who was just mesmerised by cats, did lots of cat illustrations.

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But what is this? Can you tell me a bit about this?

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Obviously this is an early book. It's very rare.

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Circa 1908.

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The downside, of course, is the condition. The spine is not...

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Because it's early.

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-Antiques, eh?

-Also at the front, "Daisy" - I think -

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who once owned it. I mean, we used to do that.

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In pencil - it can be rubbed out.

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He's good, isn't he?

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I like that. What have you got on that, David?

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-75.

-Right.

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But what would you offer me on it?

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Ideally, I would love to pick up something like that for about 35.

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-Make it 40 and you can have it.

-What do we say on this?

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Say 28 on that.

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-Can I just have a little think?

-What about if I did the two for 65?

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Mmm...

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Take your time, love.

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I tell you what, if you could nudge it slightly under 60,

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I will definitely shake your hand and run away with both of them.

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Right, what about if we say 60, then?

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58 and you've got a deal.

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-OK.

-Yeah?

-58.

-Is that all right?

-Yeah, that's fine.

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Thank you very much indeed.

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So, while David gets back to his cabinet, Catherine's work is done.

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But away from downtown Doune town,

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the clouds have parted for Paul in the Highlands.

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He is heading for the World War II POW camp at Cultybraggan

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where, in the shadow of the mountains,

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he has come to discover the secrets

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of the place where they locked up the most dangerous Nazi prisoners.

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-Hi, is it Ann?

-Yes, hi.

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It looks incredibly intact and well preserved.

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-It is like driving back into time.

-It is.

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It has 96 Nissen huts on site,

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over 100 different buildings that are historically important.

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They were only designed to last for 15 years but they have survived.

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-They're a leftover.

-Indeed.

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Built in 1941 as a high-security facility,

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camp number 21 soon became much better known

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as the Black Camp of the North.

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It was Germans from all forms of the Army

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and also we had a lot of SS officers that were sent here.

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-I see.

-A lot of the soldiers who came here had been Hitler Youth

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and then they had gone into the SS.

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They were the hardest, the most fervent Nazis.

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And I daresay its location up here in Scotland is to keep them

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as remote as possible.

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Yeah, we classified our political prisoners -

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white if they were not really adherents of national socialism

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-and black if they were fully committed to it.

-Hardcore.

-Yeah.

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And this camp was full of black Nazis

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and it had a reputation for violence.

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Yeah, the tough regime meant the guards at Cultybraggan were Polish

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because it was felt that British troops would be too nice

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to the prisoners. Aww!

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Red Cross reports reveal that the rations supplied here

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were basic at best.

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This building was the canteen for compound B

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and you can see that for breakfast they would have tea, bread,

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margarine, marmalade. Bean soup for dinner.

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So it wasn't an extensive diet but it was equated with

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the experience of British soldiers who were being kept in Germany.

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-I see.

-So the soldiers here would have been able to still

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wear their uniforms, for example,

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because we wanted our soldiers to be able to wear their uniform.

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Cultybraggan's reputation became even grimmer

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when a white Nazi was murdered here by his fellow prisoners.

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But from early 1945, the horrors of the Black Camp gradually began

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to fade thanks to the arrival of a charismatic German

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in a British Army uniform.

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Herbert Sulzbach was just an extraordinary individual.

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He won an Iron Cross at the Somme and won another Iron Cross in 1918.

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But in 1937 he had to flee Germany because he was a Jew.

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So he came to London and of course,

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when the Second World War broke out, he actually volunteered for

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the British Army and one of the first places

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that we sent him to was Cultybraggan.

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His job was to re-educate the Nazis.

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It was the de-Nazification of the Germans.

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So he talked about how knocking down their ideology

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was like knocking dust from a roof - it was easy for him.

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Sulzbach believed that the men were essentially good

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and set about undermining national socialism with books like this,

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A Short History Of America.

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A German language book from a British prisoner of war camp

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to re-educate Germans about Allied Western ideals.

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Yeah, absolutely.

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Despite working for the enemy, Sulzbach was listened to and trusted.

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When the concentration camps were discovered,

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he showed the prisoners films of Belsen and they rioted,

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they threw things around,

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they didn't believe that it was true, they wouldn't accept

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that the Fatherland had committed these crimes.

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So he used all sorts of different devices to get through to them

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and by November 1945,

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he is able to invite all the prisoners to meet him

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on a parade ground to come and commemorate the dead,

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whether they were enemy or whether they were comrade.

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3,500 come out onto the parade ground and he reads them

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John McCrae's poem In Flanders Fields.

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And he wants them to go home and to be good Europeans,

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-and that's what they do.

-What a good, good man.

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Yeah, a really, truly good person.

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Cultybraggan became a British Army training camp after the war

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and later the site of a nuclear bunker before it was taken over

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by the local community in 2007.

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Meanwhile, in another bonny bit of the Scottish countryside,

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Catherine is off to her next retail experience

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in Perth and Kinross, in Rait.

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Does that make it "bonny Rait"? Ha!

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-Hi. Catherine.

-Hi, I'm Andrew.

-Hi, Andrew.

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This looks beautiful in here.

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Yeah, shame you have less than £200 left to splash.

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What's that little bell? That's nice.

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It has been a hotel bell, I think.

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But it is actually gilded, so it has got a fair bit of age to it.

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Probably late-19th century Victorian.

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Yeah, I would have said it is about 1870, 1880.

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-Yeah, can you do a good deal on that?

-I'm sure I probably could.

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I love a bell. It is slightly wonky, or is that me just being fussy?

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You have got to be fussy at this stage in the game.

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-BELL DINGS

-Nice ring to it.

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Come on, then, what's your best on that?

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That is the sort of thing I am guessing you picked up

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in a big job lot of stuff at an auction.

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I don't buy job lots.

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Oops! The ticket price is £50.

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-You couldn't do 20 on it?

-No, sorry.

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-30, then it would show me a £5 profit.

-OK, right.

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I'm going to put that there.

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There is a nice early wineglass up there,

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that gilded one at the front, which is quite nice.

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-Unfortunately it is only a one, but...

-Is it champagne, or...?

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-I would think it is a champagne flute, yeah.

-That is lovely.

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And it's gilded as well with the most beautiful decoration.

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-And again, late Victorian?

-Yeah.

-Would you think a bit earlier?

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It might be earlier because when you hold it up to the light

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you can see there's imperfections in it.

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That was the thing with the Victorians,

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if they were going to decorate something

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they were really going to go for it and you can see that here.

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There is a bit of wear.

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-Well, you might be a bit worn if you were as old as that!

-Oh!

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Fair point.

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-What have you got on that?

-Erm...

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-Can that be, like, 20, then?

-Not quite.

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But 30, I will do it for.

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-OK. Can I put this in with my little bell?

-Certainly.

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We are having a bit of a Victorian selection here.

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There is a lot of it about.

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Carpet bowls.

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They're made of turned lignum vitae.

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Each one is engraved with a different number

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and then that one is your jack,

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and they are pretty smart.

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I have sold these before and I have done quite well with these.

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115.

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I wonder if he can do a good deal on those.

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-Your lignum carpet bowls.

-Yes.

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Do you play?

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-I do play green bowls, yes.

-Oh, do you?

-I do, yes.

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That's the small talk over with, then.

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Can something be done on that, something substantial?

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Erm...

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It is a nice little set. There is a bit of wear to it but...

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Strangely enough.

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75 would be the absolute best on those.

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-Right.

-Right!

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The carpet bowls are on the list and I think she has designs on the lot.

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So, we have Victorian bell, Victorian glass,

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Victorian carpet bowls -

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three completely different items!

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Can a deal be done if I took all these beautiful items from you?

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-Initially we said about 30 for that, right?

-Yeah.

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And then you said 30 for that.

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I was thinking of a bit less and I was thinking maybe 50 for the two.

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Right? Stay with me, hear me out.

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I'm listening.

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And then I thought maybe we could come down a bit on these

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and maybe say 50, so £100 for the lot.

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I can't come down to 50 on those

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-because they cost more than that, unfortunately.

-Right, OK.

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What about £110 for the lot? That's fair, isn't it?

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I'm really struggling at 110. Make it 115.

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115 and that would make you...?

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I might be able to have a fish supper tonight, if I'm lucky.

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-Aww, I don't want that! Go on, then.

-Thank you.

-I can't do that to you!

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-You have got to have a decent supper.

-Sweet.

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So that is £30 for the glass, £20 for the bell and £65 for the bowls,

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plus haddock and chips for Andrew later. Yum, yum.

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Meanwhile, back on the higher ground, Paul is making his way

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to his very first shop of the day

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at the delightful village of Comrie.

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Situated on the Highland Boundary Fault Line,

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Comrie once experienced more earth tremors

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than anywhere else in Britain, hence its nickname of Shaky Toon.

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-Hi, Paul.

-Hello, is it Debbie?

-Yeah, pleased to meet you.

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-Lovely to see you.

-Welcome to Comrie Antiques.

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Thank you very much.

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Off you go, then, Paul.

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That polygonal-sectioned shouldered baluster...

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That's gorgeous.

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-But it's not for me.

-Oh.

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Oh, my word, that's delicious.

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-What's the price on that?

-900.

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It's well worth that.

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Sadly, you'd need to give me another fortnight of auctions

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to work up the budget to buy it!

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We rummage on.

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-What about the stick stand? Is that dear?

-Price on it is 78.

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That's elegant, narrow, but it's way too much for me.

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What are you like on flexibility?

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Well, offer me a price.

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I think it's worth £40-£60.

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I like that, but that's a £35 purchase to me, that.

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Of course, Paul has already bought a stick stand this week.

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Candlesticks, too.

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Oh, it's deja vu all over again.

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-The bolts that secure the dividers on that are loose.

-OK.

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And you can't get at the heads of them because they are concealed.

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So the darned things twist and turn.

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See, that is how it should be - nice and rigid, fantastic.

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That is a real annoyance because you stick your brolly in there and it

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goes skewwhiff and if you're like me, you then can't sleep at night.

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Thankfully, the rest of us aren't so afflicted.

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So I'm offering 35 quid.

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-OK.

-Seriously?

-OK, yeah.

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-Got a deal?

-Yeah, deal.

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Wonderful, thank you very much.

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I'll give you some money and I'll be gone.

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-Yeah, that'd be good.

-Brilliant.

-Thank you very much.

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Now the hard work is done.

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Time to get ready for tomorrow, so nighty-night.

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Next day, it's not so much Scottish play, more Saint-Tropez.

0:16:180:16:23

Paul, we've taken a wrong turn.

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-Go on!

-We have!

-We've not.

-We are in the South of France.

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This weather is amazing.

0:16:310:16:33

Well, Catherine can afford a leisurely day in the sun

0:16:330:16:36

because she did plenty of shopping yesterday,

0:16:360:16:39

acquiring a compact,

0:16:390:16:40

a glass,

0:16:400:16:42

a cat book,

0:16:420:16:44

some carpet bowls

0:16:440:16:45

and a desk bell.

0:16:450:16:47

-BELL DINGS

-Nice ring to it.

0:16:470:16:49

That lot set her back £173,

0:16:490:16:52

leaving less than 100 for any further purchases,

0:16:520:16:56

while Paul's haul was just one solitary stick stand...

0:16:560:16:59

-Got a deal?

-Yeah, deal.

-Wonderful.

0:16:590:17:02

..costing him £35,

0:17:020:17:04

meaning he still has over £350 left.

0:17:040:17:08

-Shall we spend all our money? Shall we?

-No, you may.

0:17:110:17:14

-You may!

-Oh, come on!

0:17:140:17:16

-Let's go for it. Let's be united.

-PAUL CHORTLES

0:17:160:17:18

It's not stupid! Why are you laughing?

0:17:180:17:21

Because it's a trap.

0:17:210:17:23

Oh, you never play the game, do you?

0:17:230:17:26

Oh, yes, he does, Catherine.

0:17:260:17:28

Later, they'll be making for that deciding auction in Aberdeen,

0:17:280:17:32

but our next port of call is Arbroath.

0:17:320:17:35

Famous for its unique brand of smoked haddock

0:17:380:17:41

and the fact that in 1885 Arbroath Football Club beat

0:17:410:17:46

a side from Aberdeen by the record score of 36 goals to nil. Ha!

0:17:460:17:50

Hello, how are you doing? I'm Paul.

0:17:510:17:53

Hiya, Paul, nice to meet you, I'm Colette.

0:17:530:17:55

-Good to see you, Colette.

-And you.

0:17:550:17:57

-This is your emporium.

-It is that, yes.

-Very good.

0:17:570:18:01

There's a lot of choice. Look at that!

0:18:010:18:04

I've got a few really nice things in the back.

0:18:040:18:07

Oh, you tantalise me, Colette.

0:18:070:18:10

SHE GROWLS

0:18:100:18:13

Oh, yes. Mention the back and our lot are all of aquiver.

0:18:130:18:17

-The nerve centre, is it?

-This is the nerve centre.

-Right.

0:18:190:18:22

This is all stuff that's not been priced up yet.

0:18:220:18:25

You trust me just to have a wee rummage, then?

0:18:250:18:27

Not half!

0:18:270:18:29

I've just picked up something randomly,

0:18:290:18:31

but I think it's delicious. Take a look at that.

0:18:310:18:34

This is a brooch.

0:18:340:18:36

We have enamelling

0:18:360:18:38

over what legally we always call white metal

0:18:380:18:43

but actually is silver.

0:18:430:18:45

In black enamel, in silhouette, this dancer.

0:18:450:18:51

And whose music is she dancing to?

0:18:510:18:53

That of a fawn, half chap, half goat.

0:18:530:18:56

Each to their own.

0:18:570:18:59

That works, that's charming. It dates to the 1920s, 1930s.

0:18:590:19:03

Does it appeal today?

0:19:030:19:05

Oh, come on!

0:19:050:19:07

Here is the problem - ta-da.

0:19:070:19:09

The pin is a paperclip.

0:19:090:19:11

What you do is you go to your local charity shop or whatever,

0:19:110:19:16

you buy a cheap throwaway brooch and you swap the pin.

0:19:160:19:19

-That's a start, is it not?

-Yeah.

0:19:190:19:21

Well, he has certainly confounded us

0:19:210:19:23

with a few of his purchases this week.

0:19:230:19:25

Add to that these assorted silver thimbles.

0:19:250:19:30

The piece for me is the royal commemorative.

0:19:300:19:32

Now, which royal commemorative is that?

0:19:320:19:36

The coronation in 1910 of George V.

0:19:360:19:41

-No...

-It's Elizabeth.

-It's Elizabeth.

0:19:410:19:44

How about we halve them

0:19:440:19:47

-and you have half and I have half?

-OK, right.

0:19:470:19:51

-What's the price on those?

-About 55.

0:19:510:19:54

-Throw something else into the melting pot.

-That is lovely.

0:19:540:19:58

What's the price on a wrecked brooch and thimbles?

0:19:580:20:02

How about we do 65 for the lot?

0:20:020:20:04

I am not going to give in that easily.

0:20:040:20:06

How about I come down a tenner?

0:20:060:20:09

So basically you're getting that for free.

0:20:090:20:12

Basically, Colette, you've got a deal.

0:20:120:20:15

Love working with you.

0:20:160:20:18

Once Colette has put him down,

0:20:180:20:20

he's got a much more Paul object in mind.

0:20:200:20:23

This tool is a clinometer.

0:20:230:20:27

A clinometer allows us to measure angle of elevation

0:20:270:20:31

of the barrel of a three-inch mortar.

0:20:310:20:34

A mortar is a type of artillery for infantry use.

0:20:340:20:39

That's neither use nor ornament.

0:20:390:20:41

But it is what it is -

0:20:410:20:42

it is utterly authentic Second World War ordnance equipment.

0:20:420:20:46

And because of that, Laidlaw is a little drawn to it.

0:20:460:20:50

-You've heard all of that, haven't you?

-I have, yes.

0:20:500:20:52

I couldn't help but notice in the back you've got other

0:20:520:20:55

little bits and bobs that are similar to this

0:20:550:20:57

-in so far as they are brass and military.

-Yeah.

0:20:570:20:59

-Put them on the table and see what we can do?

-Yeah.

0:20:590:21:02

-Give me a second...

-You can get them.

0:21:020:21:03

This is turning into Supermarket Sweep.

0:21:030:21:07

Those are artillery buttons.

0:21:070:21:09

The motto of the artillery is "ubique",

0:21:090:21:11

which is Latin for "everywhere".

0:21:110:21:13

-Right.

-These buttons are everywhere.

0:21:130:21:15

That's the cap badge of the Royal Scots Fusiliers

0:21:150:21:19

and that is...you get yourself a big brass nut

0:21:190:21:22

and then all you need are a couple of coins to solder either side

0:21:220:21:26

and you've created a vessel

0:21:260:21:28

which can be made into a little petrol lighter.

0:21:280:21:30

Now, while I might not be passionate about these things individually,

0:21:300:21:34

that is an auctionable lot.

0:21:340:21:36

But I need them to be cheap

0:21:360:21:37

and I'm just going to hit you with a little offer.

0:21:370:21:40

Oh, hit me, hit me.

0:21:400:21:41

Erm, a tenner.

0:21:410:21:43

-Oh!

-Yeah.

0:21:430:21:45

-What about 22?

-Oof, seriously?

0:21:450:21:48

I am going to pitch 15 quid.

0:21:480:21:51

How about 18? And then we're both happy.

0:21:510:21:54

All right, then.

0:21:540:21:56

So, that was 55 and 18.

0:21:560:21:59

-£73.

-£73.

0:21:590:22:01

-It is, isn't it?

-Mm-hm.

0:22:010:22:03

And I've got no money, so I was just wasting your time.

0:22:030:22:06

Take no notice, Colette.

0:22:060:22:07

-Colette, you've been an absolute diamond.

-It's been great.

0:22:100:22:12

-You look after yourself.

-And you.

-Next time.

-See you again.

0:22:120:22:15

Now, while Paul sniffs out a smokie,

0:22:150:22:18

Catherine is headed down the beach to find out about one of Britain's

0:22:180:22:21

greatest feats of engineering, the Bell Rock Lighthouse.

0:22:210:22:25

-Hi, there. Catherine.

-Good morning.

-Very nice to meet you.

0:22:280:22:31

I am Colin Easton, the curator for the Signal Tower museum

0:22:310:22:34

and if we go indoors, I can show you a little bit more.

0:22:340:22:36

Lead the way, Colin.

0:22:360:22:37

Constructed 11 miles off the Angus coast

0:22:370:22:40

by the Glasgow-born lighthouse engineer Robert Stevenson,

0:22:400:22:44

the beacon and Arbroath Signal Tower were the solution to a pressing need.

0:22:440:22:50

-I'm guessing this is Bell Rock.

-This is the Bell Rock.

0:22:500:22:53

It was called the Bell Rock

0:22:530:22:55

because one of the abbots of the abbey here in Arbroath

0:22:550:22:58

a few hundred years ago thought it would be a bright idea

0:22:580:23:02

to mount a bell on it, mounted on a wooden structure

0:23:020:23:05

tethered to the rock so that it would be a warning to passing ships

0:23:050:23:09

that there was a dangerous rock there.

0:23:090:23:11

That bell was allegedly stolen by a Dutch pirate.

0:23:110:23:14

And by the time of the Industrial Revolution, with shipping greatly

0:23:140:23:18

increased, a manned lighthouse was required to keep mariners safe.

0:23:180:23:22

This is a copy of the original 1806 parliamentary act just giving

0:23:220:23:27

permission for a lighthouse to be constructed.

0:23:270:23:30

You can see this is dated 21st of July, 1806,

0:23:300:23:33

and August 1807 was when they set off from Arbroath to actually

0:23:330:23:37

begin the construction process.

0:23:370:23:39

Although the contract was awarded to the experienced John Rennie,

0:23:390:23:42

the design, which featured interlocking stones

0:23:420:23:45

for strength against the elements, was a Robert Stevenson feature

0:23:450:23:50

and it was he who supervised the hazardous building work.

0:23:500:23:53

If you're 11 miles offshore on a rock peeping up

0:23:530:23:57

out of the sea where the tide rises

0:23:570:23:58

and there's only a few hours each day that you can actually

0:23:580:24:01

work at low tide and you're exposed to the wind and the weather,

0:24:010:24:05

the rain and everything, the conditions were harsh.

0:24:050:24:09

I can see there's the model there.

0:24:090:24:11

Am I right in thinking that this here,

0:24:110:24:13

that's like the foundation, that's the beginning of it?

0:24:130:24:16

But what's that at the back of it there?

0:24:160:24:18

That was built as a beacon originally,

0:24:180:24:20

but then it was converted into what they called the barracks.

0:24:200:24:23

As the tide rose, instead of having to go onto one of the support ships,

0:24:230:24:26

they could go into the barracks, maybe have something to eat.

0:24:260:24:29

But they also slept in it during storms as well.

0:24:290:24:31

The lighthouse took just over three years to construct

0:24:310:24:34

and began operating in early 1811.

0:24:340:24:38

It's a testament to the engineer that in over 200 years

0:24:380:24:42

there have been only two recorded shipwrecks.

0:24:420:24:45

So, do you think the Bell Rock Lighthouse was one of the real

0:24:450:24:48

models for others lighthouses?

0:24:480:24:50

Robert Stevenson and several generations of his family

0:24:500:24:53

went on to be a dynasty of lighthouse builders,

0:24:530:24:55

learning from experience

0:24:550:24:57

and trial and error that they went on to use in later projects.

0:24:570:25:01

One other key element was the question of communication,

0:25:010:25:06

hence the signal tower.

0:25:060:25:07

Although it's now a museum and the lighthouse has been fully automated

0:25:090:25:13

since 1988, the link between them was once vital.

0:25:130:25:17

-Wow, this is amazing!

-It is.

0:25:170:25:19

So, how would communication actually work?

0:25:190:25:22

The basic communication method was this metal pole

0:25:220:25:25

with originally a copper ball, and it's painted red now but

0:25:250:25:28

originally it would have been a copper ball

0:25:280:25:30

that would have reflected the sun.

0:25:300:25:32

If they raised the ball to the top of the pole in the morning out on

0:25:320:25:35

the lighthouse, that was the signal that all was well in the lighthouse.

0:25:350:25:39

If the ball in the lighthouse was still at the bottom of the pole,

0:25:390:25:42

that meant there was a problem so the keepers

0:25:420:25:44

had to dispatch someone out to investigate.

0:25:440:25:47

Does this still work today?

0:25:470:25:48

The mechanism still works today and I can demonstrate it for you,

0:25:480:25:51

-if you like.

-Oh, yes, please.

0:25:510:25:53

-Turning this handle just raises the ball.

-Look at that!

0:25:530:25:56

Oh, that's fantastic.

0:25:560:25:58

And good exercise as well.

0:25:580:26:00

Now, on the subject of feats of engineering,

0:26:030:26:06

Paul has tootled a little further into Angus towards

0:26:060:26:10

the town of Montrose where, just up the road from the lagoon known

0:26:100:26:14

as the Montrose Basin, Paul's off to his very last shop of the week.

0:26:140:26:19

-Hi, George.

-Hello there.

-Good to see you.

0:26:190:26:22

I love the feel of this place, I don't mind telling you.

0:26:220:26:25

This is my kind of shop.

0:26:250:26:27

Yes, I think the expression "old school"

0:26:270:26:29

might be appropriate in this instance.

0:26:290:26:32

What's the story of the mirror in the doorway?

0:26:320:26:34

-Is it anything or nothing?

-It is probably Edwardian.

0:26:340:26:38

That could be yours for 40.

0:26:380:26:41

Who knows what he'll emerge with?

0:26:410:26:44

This is a big lump of pot.

0:26:440:26:48

I would call it a cachepot,

0:26:480:26:50

which is a French word that translates to "hide the pot".

0:26:500:26:54

You might call it a jardiniere.

0:26:540:26:56

Basically, you stick your plant pot in there.

0:26:560:26:59

How do we tell a cachepot?

0:26:590:27:01

A cachepot won't, and this doesn't, have a hole in the bottom.

0:27:010:27:04

There is no ticket price, either.

0:27:040:27:06

It's made by Bretby.

0:27:060:27:08

Now, listen up, Bretby Collectors' Club,

0:27:080:27:11

loads of Bretby stuff is pig ugly.

0:27:110:27:14

Get over it.

0:27:140:27:15

Which is why I have never bought a piece of Bretby in my life.

0:27:150:27:19

This, however, I am going to concede to you.

0:27:200:27:24

It's about 100 years old.

0:27:240:27:26

It was pre-First World War, so let's call it belle epoque.

0:27:260:27:29

I think this juxtaposition of the big, heavy,

0:27:290:27:34

bold bronze decoration

0:27:340:27:37

with this delicate,

0:27:370:27:39

almost aesthetic depiction of birds and blossom works.

0:27:390:27:45

It's a standout thing. Let's have a wee look.

0:27:450:27:47

POT CLANGS

0:27:470:27:49

Well, it sounds fair enough.

0:27:490:27:51

Dusty, honest, nobody has tried to improve it and no restoration.

0:27:510:27:56

But while Paul wrestles with that pot,

0:27:560:27:59

Catherine's headed further north to the most northerly point

0:27:590:28:03

of our trip at Newmachar,

0:28:030:28:05

the Aberdeenshire village formerly known as Summerhill.

0:28:050:28:08

-Hello there.

-Hi.

-Hi.

0:28:100:28:12

-And your name is?

-Brian.

-Hi, Brian, good to see you.

0:28:120:28:16

What else can Catherine squeeze into her trolley?

0:28:160:28:19

You could do some serious damage with these.

0:28:200:28:22

-Look at those callipers, they're fabulous! Brian...

-Yeah.

0:28:220:28:26

These callipers, where have they come from?

0:28:260:28:28

They came along with a load of cooper's tools that I bought.

0:28:280:28:32

Cooper's is a local...?

0:28:320:28:34

Cooper...for barrel-making. Cooperage.

0:28:340:28:38

Right. Oh, OK.

0:28:380:28:40

So associated with either the whisky industry

0:28:400:28:44

or barrels for holding herring.

0:28:440:28:46

-They are meaty, aren't they?

-Yeah.

0:28:460:28:49

You have got 32 on those. I mean, is there a lot of movement in them?

0:28:490:28:53

There's a bit of movement in the price, yeah.

0:28:530:28:55

I wouldn't offer any more than £10.

0:28:550:28:57

Are you familiar with the term "on your bike"?

0:28:570:28:59

-Oh...

-She is, Brian.

0:28:590:29:01

I thought we were getting on so well!

0:29:010:29:03

Hmm, moving on.

0:29:030:29:04

So we've got a refracting telescope as opposed to

0:29:060:29:09

a reflecting telescope.

0:29:090:29:11

This is probably going to be third-quarter 19th-century,

0:29:110:29:15

about 1860, 1870.

0:29:150:29:17

Hasn't got its lens cap, which is such a shame. Price...

0:29:170:29:21

-78. Your telescope, Brian.

-Mm-hm.

0:29:210:29:24

It's a nice little telescope.

0:29:240:29:26

The big, big downfall is the fact that you haven't got your lens cap.

0:29:260:29:29

Yeah, I was wondering that. I mean, it's pretty good.

0:29:290:29:32

It's got the name on it, the maker.

0:29:320:29:35

Nice that you have got a nice Scottish name on it.

0:29:350:29:37

Would these have been used just for pleasure purposes?

0:29:370:29:40

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, this is just a gentleman's pocket telescope.

0:29:400:29:45

And lovely that you've got the, you know,

0:29:450:29:47

-the eight sections, that it really does...

-Yeah.

0:29:470:29:49

-I hadn't seen them with as many sections before.

-Yeah.

0:29:490:29:52

It's just that, for me, is a number one issue

0:29:520:29:55

cos that's what people look for.

0:29:550:29:57

-Mmm, that is a shame.

-What can you say, eh, Brian?

0:29:570:30:00

OK, keep looking and we can see what we can do.

0:30:000:30:03

Her search continues.

0:30:040:30:05

Back in Montrose, however, they are getting down to brass tacks

0:30:070:30:10

with the pot and the mirror under consideration.

0:30:100:30:13

They were both 40 each...

0:30:130:30:15

..but there's more of a margin on the Bretby.

0:30:160:30:20

Time for a closer look, then.

0:30:210:30:24

That could be a wall mirror or, by virtue of this easel back,

0:30:240:30:29

it could adorn your dressing table.

0:30:290:30:31

It would be late Victorian.

0:30:310:30:34

It's all about this extremely rich

0:30:340:30:39

embossed facing.

0:30:390:30:42

The manufacturer of this wanted it to look like silver,

0:30:420:30:46

back in the day, but it's not.

0:30:460:30:48

This is electroplate, I'm quite sure.

0:30:480:30:51

A rich thing in its day. Flamboyant, but just affordable.

0:30:510:30:55

Back to George.

0:30:550:30:56

-The Bretby.

-Yeah.

-The mirror.

0:30:560:30:58

If I bought the pair of them, squeeze another fiver off them

0:30:580:31:01

-so I can make them 30 quid a pop?

-We could indeed.

0:31:010:31:04

-Looks like a deal, then.

-Perfect, thank you.

0:31:040:31:07

Spot on. Thank you.

0:31:070:31:08

That £60 completes Paul's purchases.

0:31:080:31:11

But what about our Newmachar correspondent?

0:31:110:31:14

Back in those cabinets again, eh, girl?

0:31:140:31:17

Look at that sweet little pillbox.

0:31:170:31:21

Opening up these two little hinged lids there for little pills.

0:31:210:31:28

Now, the thing about this is it is beautifully embossed

0:31:280:31:31

around the sides with sheaves of corn and also

0:31:310:31:36

on the top there.

0:31:360:31:37

Really, really nice quality.

0:31:370:31:39

However, it is not hallmarked.

0:31:390:31:41

You would expect something of this quality, if it was silver,

0:31:410:31:44

to be hallmarked, so it's definitely not English.

0:31:440:31:47

£38 is on this.

0:31:470:31:48

I'm going to see if I can do something,

0:31:480:31:50

a really good deal on this.

0:31:500:31:53

Seconds out, round three.

0:31:530:31:55

-Brian...

-Yep.

0:31:550:31:57

..I just found your little pillbox.

0:31:570:31:59

I am really concerned that it might be plated and not solid silver.

0:31:590:32:04

You've got £38 on it.

0:32:040:32:05

I think if you're in any doubt

0:32:050:32:07

you're probably as well just to pass on it.

0:32:070:32:09

I like Brian!

0:32:090:32:10

I was thinking maybe of taking a little gamble with it.

0:32:100:32:13

What were you thinking?

0:32:130:32:14

£20.

0:32:160:32:18

I was thinking 15, to be perfectly honest with you.

0:32:200:32:23

OK, well, let's make it 18 and we can do a deal at that.

0:32:230:32:26

-If we weren't going for that, then maybe the telescope.

-Mm-hm.

0:32:260:32:30

The telescope I like, but at £78...

0:32:300:32:34

Yeah, that missing lens cap.

0:32:340:32:36

So, what would work for you on the telescope?

0:32:360:32:39

30-ish.

0:32:390:32:40

We could make it 35, I could do it for that.

0:32:400:32:43

Can you come down to 30 on that and then I'm done?

0:32:430:32:47

-Yes.

-Oh!

-Hoorah!

0:32:480:32:51

This is it, this is the end of the road for me!

0:32:510:32:54

So, with everything in the bag, let's take a sneaky peek.

0:32:550:32:59

Paul's pot, with £168 for a stick stand,

0:33:000:33:04

some silver thimbles,

0:33:040:33:06

a Bretby pot,

0:33:060:33:08

a brooch,

0:33:080:33:09

a mirror and a collection of militaria,

0:33:090:33:12

while Catherine has lavished £203 on a telescope,

0:33:120:33:17

some carpet bowls,

0:33:170:33:18

a cat book,

0:33:180:33:20

a desk bell,

0:33:200:33:21

a compact and a glass.

0:33:210:33:24

How is the mood in the two camps?

0:33:240:33:26

Am I worried? Oh, yes, I am.

0:33:260:33:29

The champagne glass, it needs five friends to be worth money.

0:33:290:33:35

I particularly adore his brooch.

0:33:350:33:39

That is exquisite and he paid £10.

0:33:390:33:43

The book, I just don't know.

0:33:430:33:46

If it makes £120...

0:33:460:33:49

that's bad news for me.

0:33:490:33:52

After setting off from Doune, our experts are now

0:33:520:33:54

making for their final auction of the week at Aberdeen.

0:33:540:33:58

And still as fiercely competitive as ever.

0:33:580:34:01

It's a horrible thing to say,

0:34:010:34:02

but I would be so happy if I could be the one person

0:34:020:34:06

in the whole of the history of the Antiques Road Trip

0:34:060:34:10

to beat Paul Laidlaw.

0:34:100:34:12

Welcome to Aberdeen, the granite city and hometown of Denis Law,

0:34:120:34:16

although the local football team's record score line

0:34:160:34:20

remains a piffling 13-0.

0:34:200:34:23

Well, it's last chance saloon, this.

0:34:230:34:26

Er, get it?

0:34:260:34:28

So, what might our final score be?

0:34:280:34:31

The thoughts of auctioneer Steven Donaldson, please.

0:34:310:34:34

The telescope, an eight-draw, it's quite a nice thing.

0:34:340:34:37

A Scottish scope and a good size.

0:34:370:34:39

There's been a little bit of interest in it.

0:34:390:34:41

The lot with the buttons, the clinometer and the trench lighter,

0:34:410:34:45

I think this might do quite well today.

0:34:450:34:46

We've got a lot of other military items in the sale.

0:34:460:34:49

I think £40-£60 for this lot and possibly a touch more.

0:34:490:34:52

Cor, that will please Paul.

0:34:520:34:54

It's got a great feel, this auction, hasn't it?

0:34:540:34:57

Good crowd here today.

0:34:570:34:59

Mm, bums on seats.

0:34:590:35:00

First under the hammer is Paul's bargain brooch.

0:35:010:35:04

30 for this lot.

0:35:040:35:06

20.

0:35:060:35:07

-10.

-Oh!

0:35:070:35:09

10, 12, 15,

0:35:090:35:11

18, 20, 22...

0:35:110:35:13

-Got a little friend bidding on it.

-..25, 28, new place.

0:35:130:35:16

30, 32, 35...

0:35:160:35:19

-Darn.

-..38, 40,

0:35:190:35:22

42, 45,

0:35:220:35:24

48, 50,

0:35:240:35:27

55, 60,

0:35:270:35:29

65, 70, 75...

0:35:290:35:32

-No! Stop!

-..80, 85,

0:35:320:35:35

90, 95...

0:35:350:35:37

100, sir, rounds it up.

0:35:370:35:39

105, 110 - he's back. 115.

0:35:390:35:43

£115.

0:35:430:35:45

All done, sure and selling at 115...

0:35:450:35:49

GAVEL BANGS

0:35:490:35:50

What a great start, eh? Hard to see Catherine overtaking him now.

0:35:500:35:54

Do you know what? I don't even know what it made. After 100, I cried.

0:35:540:35:59

Another Paul purchase - the pot.

0:35:590:36:03

£60 for this lot.

0:36:030:36:05

-Come on.

-40, 30, 20.

0:36:050:36:08

-Oh, please.

-10.

0:36:080:36:11

Nobody interested? 10 here.

0:36:110:36:13

Any advance? 12 - we're off now.

0:36:130:36:15

-Oh, don't be off now.

-15, 18, 20,

0:36:150:36:17

22, 25. 25...

0:36:170:36:20

-No. No, no, no.

-Shut up!

-How can that happen?

0:36:200:36:25

-That's it.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:36:250:36:26

Oh, I'm so happy.

0:36:260:36:28

Oh, well, he really mustn't grumble.

0:36:280:36:31

These people are going already.

0:36:310:36:34

These people that were bidding on your lots...

0:36:340:36:36

-They're going.

-Don't go!

0:36:360:36:37

Quite. But not when her carpet bowls are up for grabs.

0:36:370:36:41

£50 for these nice bowls.

0:36:410:36:43

-30, 10.

-Oh...

-No-one's interested? £10. 10 bid, thank you, sir.

0:36:430:36:48

-One bid at 10 for the Victorian carpet bowls.

-No!

0:36:480:36:51

Going to be sold at £10 only.

0:36:510:36:54

12, 15, 18, 20...

0:36:540:36:56

-Come on!

-..22, 25.

0:36:560:36:59

25. All done and finished at 25.

0:36:590:37:03

GAVEL BANGS

0:37:030:37:04

Ouch. I mean...

0:37:040:37:06

Not convincing, Paul.

0:37:070:37:09

Someone has got some nice lumps of lignum vitae there.

0:37:090:37:12

I would be genuinely upset if it was you.

0:37:120:37:16

-No, you wouldn't!

-I would!

-You'd be dancing a jig.

0:37:160:37:19

Time for Paul's stylish stick stand.

0:37:190:37:22

30 for the stand.

0:37:220:37:24

20.

0:37:240:37:25

20, 22, 25, 28,

0:37:250:37:28

30, 32, 35 - new place.

0:37:280:37:32

38, 40...

0:37:320:37:33

-Fresh outbreak.

-They all want it now.

0:37:330:37:35

45 - I'll be with you in a minute. 48...

0:37:350:37:38

They're queuing up, forming a queue. Form an organised queue.

0:37:380:37:40

I'll sell for 50. Are we all done?

0:37:400:37:42

GAVEL BANGS

0:37:420:37:44

That's all right, that's all right, that's all right.

0:37:440:37:47

Like the man said, a fair reward.

0:37:470:37:49

How will her colourful compact fare?

0:37:500:37:53

20.

0:37:530:37:55

£10 for the Art Deco. 10 bid.

0:37:550:37:58

12, 15, 18,

0:37:580:38:00

-20, 22, 25...

-All right.

0:38:000:38:03

Going to sell it, if we're all done and sure, at £25.

0:38:030:38:06

GAVEL BANGS

0:38:060:38:08

No shame. No glory, but no shame.

0:38:080:38:10

Don't gloat.

0:38:100:38:12

A loss after costs, but she just about got away with that one.

0:38:120:38:16

Time for one of Paul's stranger buys - the thimbles.

0:38:160:38:20

£30, then, for the silver thimbles.

0:38:200:38:23

20.

0:38:230:38:24

Bid. Any advance on 20?

0:38:240:38:27

I've got one bid standing in the room at £20.

0:38:270:38:30

-One bidder.

-All finished at 20...

0:38:300:38:32

GAVEL BANGS

0:38:320:38:33

# So happy I could do a dance! #

0:38:330:38:36

The huge profit from the brooch more than makes up for it.

0:38:360:38:40

Catherine's big draw - no lens cap, remember, though.

0:38:410:38:44

And I'll start bidding with me at £40 on this lot.

0:38:440:38:48

Is there any advance on 40 for the scope? It's on commission at 40.

0:38:480:38:53

-Oh, come on.

-Are we all done and all sure at £40?

0:38:530:38:56

-GAVEL BANGS

-That's all right, you did OK there.

0:38:560:38:59

Yeah, buck up! A clear profit.

0:38:590:39:02

Now it's champagne for one.

0:39:020:39:04

£10 for the champagne glass.

0:39:040:39:06

5 for a nice decorative glass.

0:39:060:39:08

5 bid.

0:39:080:39:10

-This should make 60.

-10, 12,

0:39:100:39:12

15, 18.

0:39:120:39:14

I am going to sell for 18 if we're all done.

0:39:140:39:17

-GAVEL BANGS

-No! Why?

0:39:170:39:20

Why?

0:39:200:39:22

If only we knew.

0:39:220:39:24

What can Paul's shiny mirror manage?

0:39:240:39:27

40 for this Victorian mirror.

0:39:270:39:29

30.

0:39:290:39:31

£20 only for the mirror is bid. Thank you, sir.

0:39:310:39:34

22, 25, 28, 30.

0:39:340:39:37

30, then, back where we started.

0:39:370:39:39

Are we all done and sure at 30? I will sell at 30.

0:39:390:39:42

GAVEL BANGS

0:39:420:39:44

-Is it a loss?

-After taxes.

-Brilliant.

0:39:440:39:47

I'm going out with a whimper.

0:39:470:39:49

He can afford it, mind you.

0:39:490:39:51

Now, will Catherine finally ring up a profit with this?

0:39:520:39:56

My stomach's going over and over.

0:39:560:39:58

This is not good, I'm not normally like this.

0:39:580:40:01

£30, then, for this bell.

0:40:010:40:03

20.

0:40:030:40:05

-£10.

-Why isn't he ringing it?

0:40:050:40:07

Is bid, 10 with the gentleman.

0:40:070:40:09

-Any advance on 10?

-It's been broken!

0:40:090:40:11

Not exactly tolling.

0:40:110:40:13

20, 22.

0:40:130:40:16

It's 22 with the lady. 25.

0:40:160:40:18

-Come on.

-Any advance on 25?

0:40:180:40:21

I'm going to sell it at 25.

0:40:210:40:23

GAVEL BANGS

0:40:230:40:24

-It's a profit.

-Yeah.

-But it's minimal.

0:40:240:40:26

It's a faint tinkle, that's what it is.

0:40:260:40:30

Remember the auctioneer predicted good things for Paul's militaria.

0:40:300:40:34

-Some interest on the sheet starts me at £40 for this.

-What?!

0:40:340:40:38

It's a commission bid at 40, 42, 45,

0:40:380:40:41

-48, 50...

-Oh, Paul.

-..52,

0:40:410:40:44

55, 58, 60,

0:40:440:40:47

65, then, clears me.

0:40:470:40:49

Is there any advance on 65? Being sold at 65, all sure?

0:40:490:40:53

-GAVEL BANGS

-Slightly awkward.

0:40:530:40:56

Aberdeen wanted it, whatever it was.

0:40:560:40:59

Almost everyone likes cats, don't they?

0:41:000:41:03

This book has to make

0:41:030:41:06

about £450 for me to be on the same level as you.

0:41:060:41:10

40.

0:41:100:41:12

30.

0:41:120:41:13

20. I've got 20 on my right.

0:41:130:41:16

-Come on.

-22, 25, 28, 30,

0:41:160:41:19

32, 35, 38, 40.

0:41:190:41:24

-Come on.

-OK, 40, then, back where we started.

0:41:240:41:27

Are we all done and selling at 40?

0:41:270:41:28

He's back at 42, 45, 48...

0:41:280:41:31

-Yes!

-..50, 55, 60.

0:41:310:41:36

-At 60 on my right again.

-Please!

0:41:360:41:38

Is there any advance on £60?

0:41:380:41:40

GAVEL BANGS

0:41:400:41:42

I'm coming back, I'm coming back.

0:41:420:41:44

Well, it was certainly good to end on a profit.

0:41:440:41:48

Right, come on, that was brilliant.

0:41:480:41:51

Catherine started out with £257.92 and after paying auction costs,

0:41:510:41:57

she made a loss of £44.74,

0:41:570:42:01

leaving her with £213.18.

0:42:010:42:04

While Paul began with £402.46,

0:42:040:42:09

after paying auction costs he's made a profit of £82.10.

0:42:090:42:15

So his final total is £484.56.

0:42:150:42:19

All profits, of course, go to Children In Need.

0:42:190:42:23

-Go on, then, be nice, be nice - for once.

-Your chariot awaits.

0:42:230:42:26

-Oh, thank you, sir. It's been fun, hasn't it?

-Yeah.

-It's been amazing.

0:42:260:42:30

-And at the last minute, you peaked.

-Over the horizon once again.

0:42:300:42:33

Off we go.

0:42:330:42:35

-The end.

-Almost!

0:42:350:42:38

And what a week they've had, eh?

0:42:380:42:40

Oh!

0:42:400:42:41

Could be a brush for a very small house.

0:42:410:42:43

Do I buy the brooch?

0:42:460:42:49

I do buy the brooch. Oh!

0:42:490:42:51

Yeah!

0:42:510:42:53

The Philistines!

0:42:530:42:54

Would you please remove yourself from this cabinet?

0:42:560:43:00

SHE HUMS

0:43:010:43:02

Whoo-hoo!

0:43:020:43:03

PAUL LAUGHS

0:43:030:43:06

Next time, Charles Hanson takes Margie Cooper for a spin...

0:43:070:43:12

That's going fast!

0:43:120:43:14

-..Margie spots great deals...

-Going to point to you now.

0:43:140:43:17

..and Charles sniffs out bargains.

0:43:170:43:20

Yes, yes.

0:43:200:43:21

Auctioneers Catherine Southon and Paul Laidlaw embark on the last leg of their road trip, shopping in Perthshire and Angus. Who will win the final decisive battle in Aberdeen?