Episode 6 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 6

Antiques challenge. Auctioneer Charles Hanson and dealer Margie Cooper embark on a new road trip, setting off from Melton Mowbray and taking in stops near Coventry and Lichfield.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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This is beautiful!

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That's the way to do this.

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal - to scour for antiques.

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Joy.

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Hello!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners...

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-Sorry, sorry!

-..and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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The handbrake's on!

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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MUSIC: The Boys Are Back In Town by Thin Lizzy

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Today heralds the start of a new road trip.

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This week we're in the company of Charles Hanson and Margie Cooper.

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That's going fast!

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-Stop it.

-Get out of here!

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There we go, Margie!

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-It's going to be a wonderful week.

-It is.

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I feel like I could be a Hollywood star.

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-GEAR GRINDS

-I do!

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I feel like I'm with a Bond girl.

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JAMES BOND THEME

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007 wouldn't crunch those gears.

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Margie may never have been a Bond girl,

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but by gosh, she was a model before starting out in the antiques biz -

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and our Charles is an auctioneer who appreciates the finer things in life.

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I look at you, Margie, and I think, "upmarket".

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How am I going to get through this week with you?

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But is that right?

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Look at me!

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You're gorgeous! Look at me!

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I'm going red now, under my glasses.

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They're in a very rare 1959 Elva Courier -

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only 400 or so were made,

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and this is believed to be the only one on British roads.

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-This car, Margie...

-GEAR GRINDS

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..it's quite racy, isn't it?

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-How am going to cope with this car?

-Get out of here!

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What if it rains?

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You are in this wild canary yellow ground sports car, Margie!

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It's not a sports car - it's a racing car.

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This trip starts in the Leicestershire town

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of Melton Mowbray, and meanders through Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire

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and Lincolnshire, then dips into Norfolk

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before arriving for the final sale in the city of Leicester.

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Today's leg starts from the market town of Melton Mowbray

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and heads to auction in the fine fair city of Nottingham.

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All I will say, Margie,

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is Leicestershire is in my neighbourhood.

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I hope we're not going into shops where you know people...

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-LAUGHS:

-Get out of here, Margie!

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-..who are going to do you favours.

-Get out of here!

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Our experts have £200 each to spend -

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if they ever make it to the shops, that is. Oh, no...

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-Margie!

-Yeah?

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-I've found it.

-SHE LAUGHS

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That's what's come off.

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-Oh, crikey. You said you'd heard a thump.

-That's what's come off.

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-Down...

-What is that?

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I don't know.

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-Hah!

-But it's something that came off the car.

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-Hold it, I've got a plan.

-No, no!

-Trust me, hold on.

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Oh, no, Charles.

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-Marge, I'm no mechanic...

-SHE LAUGHS

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-..but listen. Can you see that pipe there?

-Yes.

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All of this brown liquid, which could be a coolant...

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-Could I just say...?

-Yes.

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Wash my hands of anything to do with you with that.

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Quite right.

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I'm going to my first shop. Bye!

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See ya.

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Marge!

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Look at me!

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Bye!

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Well, fortunately, Margie hasn't got far to go -

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just down the road is the third-oldest market town

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in the country,

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and the birthplace of pork pies, Melton Mowbray.

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And in the centre of town, her first shop.

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-Good morning.

-Good morning.

-Morning.

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Lovely shop!

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-Thank you.

-Right, so, I'm Margie.

-I'm Sue.

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-And you are the owner?

-I'm the owner, John.

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-And you're John...?

-Bean.

-John Bean.

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Introductions over, time to shop.

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Oh, look at this!

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-That's an old porter's...

-Yeah, for railway stations and such.

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Yeah.

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Yeah, 175 - yeah, that's a bit... That's nearly my budget.

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But you're open to offers, aren't you?

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We are, yes.

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That's promising.

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Right - more stuff.

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Oh, and this African stool - they're hot at the moment, aren't they?

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-They are.

-These things.

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Margie's uncovered a West African tribal stool

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which is probably Ashanti.

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I'm not an expert in tribal stuff.

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Early 20th century African.

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That's it!

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Yeah...it's not in great condition, is it?

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No, it's cracked.

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It's seen better days, and is priced at £140. Wow.

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Right, I'm going to carry on a bit longer, and then all will be well.

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SHE LAUGHS

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Tribal, tribal, tribal.

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Mm...

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On an African theme,

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Margie's found a late 19th century carved hardwood stick

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ticketed at £35.

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Go on, give it a poke.

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Well, here you are - I'm going to get it pointing now!

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How much can that be?

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-Well, the stick could be £10 on its own...

-Yeah.

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The headrest could be 80, so that'd be £90 for the pair, then.

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Two possibilities for Margie to think about.

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Meanwhile, with the car fixed,

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Charles has motored 22 miles southwest

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to the outskirts of Leicester.

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His first shop is Hidden Treasures.

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-It's Mark, isn't it?

-Hello, how are you?

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Long time no see.

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-It's been a while.

-I'll have to shake with your left, unfortunately.

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There are goodies galore here.

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-I shall go for a wander...

-Yep.

-..and cross my fingers...

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-Help yourself.

-..that lurking in these murky antiques is a sleeper.

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Something soon stirs Charles.

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It looks a feast.

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It's got some weight to it.

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-Has it?

-Yeah.

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Oh, good, it has.

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-I believe it to be bronze.

-Yeah, I think you're right.

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It's a lovely...

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What we've got here is a big charger,

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-a big circular display dish...

-Yeah.

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..which you can see has been pierced for the purpose of hanging.

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How old is this?

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-1880?

-I would say around turn of the century, yeah.

-Yeah.

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-It's a nice thing, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-It's decorative.

-Yeah.

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How much is it?

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-Ooh, now, there's the...

-To an old mate.

-..there's the rub.

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-To an old mate.

-To an old mate...

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-A Derby lad.

-..who makes lots of money out of me.

-Get out of here!

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It's a funny old game.

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£30.

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25?

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Oh - to an old mate.

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£25 for a really handsome bronze charger, I think, is really good.

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-I'll leave it there for the time being, go for a wander...

-All right.

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..and just see what else takes my fancy.

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-Thanks a lot.

-OK.

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Good price on a nice item.

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Back in Melton Mowbray, Margie's getting excited.

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Dealer John has new stock hidden behind his counter,

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and it's silver - right up Margie's street.

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So, have we got any sets of anything in there?

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Er...a few of these are quite good.

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Hm...

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-Ah, you've got six.

-Got those.

-Yeah.

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They look to me as though they're early 20th century.

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I would think so.

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But sadly they might end up melting - going in the pot.

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But look how crisp they are. They have not been used, hardly.

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They've got quite a bit of life in them.

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To buy those new would be hundreds of pounds -

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hundreds and hundreds of pounds to buy those new now.

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Sadly, antique silver isn't reaching the money it once did,

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so Margie is buying these at scrap value.

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Handily enough, John has some scales.

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-11 ounces. Yeah.

-Right. And you're telling me how much?

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That would come to about £43.

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Yeah. You don't want to round it off?

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Call it 40?

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So, does that soften that a bit?

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Tell you what, 70 including the stick, then.

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-70 and 40...

-Yeah.

-..is a hundred and...

-Ten.

-..ten.

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Yeah.

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JOHN LAUGHS

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Deal - that's £60 for the African stool, the stick for £10,

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and the silver weighed in at £40.

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That's cheap.

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-Thank you very much for your patience.

-No problems at all.

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Three lots in the first shop - not bad at all.

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I wonder if Charles is having any luck.

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What I do quite like is...

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-..this davenport here.

-OK.

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A davenport is a small desk with a lifting lid -

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named after Captain Davenport,

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who commissioned the first design about 200 years ago.

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This example in walnut dates from around 1870.

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It's only been in about a week.

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-Um... So, it's fresh.

-Fresh on the market, yeah.

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-Yes.

-Yes. It's quite tired, isn't it?

-Yeah. Pretty much all there.

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I think they're ingenious, because the cupboard door, here -

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open it up, and these... delicious drawers, aren't they?

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They are very nice, yeah.

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And look at that original colour.

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What I love is this drawer here -

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and this drawer, in the heyday, if you were a Victorian lady,

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-back in 1870, you'd have your pens in here, I presume...

-Yeah.

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..or your quill pen, and it's just a charming object.

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I do like it.

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It's a nice little piece.

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It's ticketed at £50, but as it's new in, is there any chance of a deal?

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What's your rock bottom?

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For you to still make a profit.

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-Oh...

-And a small margin.

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Very, very small profit - 35.

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That's good.

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That is a deal to write home about, hey, Charles?

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If I'd been a Victorian gent, if I was writing a letter now,

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and saying, "Margie Cooper - Margie, I could buy this davenport for £35,

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"although it's so rickety," she'll say, "Buy it."

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-Well, there we go.

-I'll take it.

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-You're taking that?

-Thanks a lot.

-Lovely, thanks.

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Crikey, a flying start for Charles, there. Two deals in his first shop.

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The bronze charger for £25 and the Victorian davenport for 35.

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-Thanks a lot, Mark!

-Thank you!

-It's been great.

-Thanks very much.

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I hope they take a fortune.

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-And you. Hope you do well.

-Cheers, Mark.

-Thank you.

-See you!

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Just down the road from Bosworth Battlefield

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is the medieval village of Shenton.

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That is Margie's next shop - at Whitemoors Antiques Centre.

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She has £90 left to spend.

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Fine bowl.

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IT CHIMES

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Fine bowl.

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It's got clarity, hasn't it?

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It certainly has. Anything else?

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Just looking at these...

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A pair of uplighters for 50 quid.

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Hm! Can you imagine those in a... cleaned up in a room?

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They could be very nice, couldn't they?

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They're all electrified.

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-TUTS:

-But they could be trouble.

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Yeah - time to speak to the top man.

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Hi, Robert.

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-Right, now, I've had a wander round...

-Yes, my dear.

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..and as much as I like those two brass uplighters,

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-I just think that they're trouble.

-OK.

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-I mean, I love the bowl...

-Mm-hm.

-Your bowl?

-My bowl.

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-Is it 15?

-I've... No, it wasn't!

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I've got 30 on it.

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And my absolute bottom, which I paid, was 20 -

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and you can have it for what I paid for it.

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Well, I shall stroll over and have a look at it.

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It is - it's a magnificent thing, isn't it?

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Oh, crikey - no, I'm not going to do that.

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-Can you hand it...?

-Yes.

-Can you? You're a nice big strong man.

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It's heavy.

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Yeah, that's lovely.

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IT CHIMES

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-Yeah, I'm going to go for that.

-Deal done.

-Thank you.

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£20 for that cut-glass bowl is a steal.

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Cor, you could do well later.

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Meanwhile, Charles is back on the open road.

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ENGINE KNOCKS

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Oh, lordy, that doesn't sound good.

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Oh, no!

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HE COUGHS

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There we go.

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I've got smoke coming out of the heater.

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Charles! Not again!

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It's a lovely, lovely car...

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but it's not made for me.

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I think what I'm going to do is...

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Walk.

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..let it cool down, and hopefully I'll cool down as well,

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and my road trip can be up and running again.

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Could take ages, this, Charles.

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Dear, oh, dear.

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While the car gets some TLC, Charles heads to Ashby-de-la-Zouch...

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..a Leicestershire town with a very pretty name.

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Here they celebrate a female pioneer of a dangerous sport

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who could probably thrill the thousands

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who flocked to see her death-defying stunt in the early 1900s.

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Charles is meeting Ashby-de-la-Zouch museum trustee Ken to find out more.

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-Oh, good afternoon, Charles.

-Is it Ken?

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Good to see you - it is, yes. Welcome to Ashby-de-la-Zouch.

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Ken, it's good to be here.

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-Now, I'm here to learn about a lady.

-Yes.

-A lady by the name of...

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-Dolly Shepherd. Come and have a look at what she's about.

-I can't wait.

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-Go on through.

-Thanks, Ken.

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In 1903, aged 17, Dolly Shepherd was working as a waitress.

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A chance conversation with a diner

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led to Dolly taking up one of the most dangerous sports of the day.

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She was probably quite a young go-getter - 17 years old, she sat...

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-She was a tomboy.

-She was a tomboy.

-An admitted tomboy.

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The diner Dolly was serving was a balloonist.

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He was looking for a pretty girl to help draw paying crowds

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to witness his balloon show, and Dolly would soon become its star.

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Here's a photograph of her

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sitting for one of these Edwardian studio photographs -

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and there is the Union Jack, which she used to float and fly.

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And fly she did.

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Dolly pioneered the sport of parachuting for women 110 years ago,

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when it was as far from respectable as an Edwardian lady could get.

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-So, to be ignorant, Ken...

-Yeah.

-She would have gone up on a balloon...?

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Well, below the balloon -

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-the parachute is attached to the balloon...

-OK.

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-..she then holds on with a trapeze bar...

-How does she ascend?

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-How will she ascend?

-She ascends simply by hanging on.

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She had a very strong grip, apparently, and she comes down

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holding on to a trapeze bar, and simply hangs on for the 2,000 feet.

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Taking your life into your own hands and doing these fearless jumps -

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was she well paid for it?

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£2.50.

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That's around £270 in today's money.

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Dolly would tour the country,

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but claimed Ashby-de-la-Zouch as her favourite place to jump.

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Did she become a celebrity?

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Absolutely - Dolly Shepherd the Parachute Queen.

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After four years of jumps, Dolly - now 21 -

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was becoming renowned for her dangerous act.

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In 1908, she hit the headlines -

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she agreed to accompany a young girl on her maiden jump.

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But disaster struck.

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The decision was made that Dolly and Louie would go up

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under the same balloon and come down in two parachutes -

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Louie first and then Dolly to follow her.

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So they got up to the usual 2,500 feet

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and Louie was told to jump by Dolly.

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"It's OK, jump."

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Nothing happened.

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She pulled the cord, nothing happened.

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You mean the parachute didn't open?

0:15:310:15:33

-Well, no. They couldn't get the parachute to pull away from the balloon.

-Oh, dear.

0:15:330:15:36

Well, Louie, this was her first jump remember, was terrified.

0:15:360:15:40

This is Dolly Shepherd's drawing, many years later,

0:15:400:15:42

showing what happened.

0:15:420:15:44

And essentially she got Louie to swing towards her,

0:15:440:15:47

to grasp her round the neck, Dolly round the neck,

0:15:470:15:51

and then they would cut the cord attaching her to the other parachute

0:15:510:15:56

and they'd come down together.

0:15:560:15:58

By the time the two girls were ready to jump,

0:16:000:16:02

the balloon had reached 12,000 feet.

0:16:020:16:06

Four times higher than usual.

0:16:060:16:08

They come down far too fast.

0:16:090:16:12

Dolly lands on her back, as she should do.

0:16:120:16:15

The problem is Louie then landed on Dolly.

0:16:150:16:18

This was the first ever mid-air rescue.

0:16:180:16:21

Although Louie was able to walk away,

0:16:220:16:25

the crash to earth in a remote field left Dolly severely injured.

0:16:250:16:30

She was carried to a nearby farm, and under strict doctor's orders,

0:16:300:16:33

remained there for a fortnight.

0:16:330:16:35

It was feared Dolly was paralysed.

0:16:350:16:37

The local doctor had this great idea after one or two weeks

0:16:390:16:44

to give her an electric shock.

0:16:440:16:47

She was put on her front, electrodes were pulled onto her back,

0:16:470:16:51

and she said it was like a double-decker bus or something hitting her,

0:16:510:16:55

because there was this huge electric volt went through her and bounced up.

0:16:550:17:00

This was not an accepted therapy - then or now.

0:17:000:17:05

But Dolly's luck came through.

0:17:050:17:07

The story goes the shock unlocked her paralysis.

0:17:070:17:11

She was told she was never going to walk again.

0:17:110:17:13

And would you believe it,

0:17:130:17:15

within eight weeks she was back in Ashby-de-la-Zouch going up again.

0:17:150:17:20

-She was almost a wonder woman.

-Yes, or mad.

0:17:200:17:22

Dolly became a national figure - the heroine who saved her friend.

0:17:240:17:28

After eight years of jumps, Dolly retired from parachuting.

0:17:280:17:32

Though this wasn't an end to her bravery.

0:17:320:17:35

In the First World War, Dolly served as a driver and mechanic in France.

0:17:350:17:39

And in World War II was an air raid warden in London's Lewisham during the Blitz.

0:17:390:17:44

She got to nearly 97.

0:17:440:17:46

She died in 1983 in September.

0:17:460:17:48

Not before, about a year and a bit earlier,

0:17:480:17:51

she had met up with the Red Devils and she went up with them

0:17:510:17:55

into the sky, and she said she wished she was young again.

0:17:550:17:58

So she was a marvellous woman and we're very proud of her in Ashby.

0:17:580:18:02

-So, Ken, in that firm grip of Dolly's. I've enjoyed it.

-Good seeing you.

0:18:020:18:05

Thanks so much, Ken.

0:18:050:18:06

It's been a great day, apart from for the car.

0:18:060:18:10

Time for some well-earned rest. Nighty-night, everyone.

0:18:100:18:13

It's a brand-new day. And good news, because the car is back up and running.

0:18:170:18:20

Margie's taking on the driving duties.

0:18:200:18:23

Watch these nettles. Crikey me.

0:18:230:18:26

So how did you get on yesterday?

0:18:260:18:28

Yesterday was OK, Margie.

0:18:280:18:30

I always say, "Never live a with a regret."

0:18:300:18:33

Because if you leave that object in that cabinet you never know.

0:18:330:18:36

It could be rags to riches.

0:18:360:18:38

-Do you think so?

-Yes.

0:18:380:18:40

Yesterday, Margie was the big spender, splashing £130 on four lots.

0:18:430:18:48

An African stool, an engraved stick,

0:18:480:18:50

six silver spoons

0:18:500:18:52

and a cut glass bowl.

0:18:520:18:53

That leaves her with just £70 to spend today.

0:18:530:18:56

Charles had a far less fruitful day,

0:18:590:19:01

spending only £60 on a bronze charger and a davenport desk.

0:19:010:19:06

His pockets are pretty full, with £140 left to spend today.

0:19:060:19:11

We're in Warwick this morning,

0:19:110:19:13

the most impressive local attraction here is the 1,100-year-old castle.

0:19:130:19:19

But, there's no opportunity for sightseeing.

0:19:190:19:22

Charles is here to shop.

0:19:220:19:24

Drive carefully. See you later. Bye.

0:19:240:19:27

Warwick Antique Centre is home to around 25 dealers,

0:19:310:19:34

covering a wide range of antiques and collectables.

0:19:340:19:37

Charles gets straight on the hunt.

0:19:370:19:39

I feel in the mood to really...

0:19:440:19:46

Well, find a bargain.

0:19:460:19:49

Any opinion on the competition, Charles?

0:19:490:19:52

I think Margie is maturer,

0:19:520:19:55

-Margie is a lady who has been around longer than me...

-Steady, Charles.

0:19:550:19:58

But she certainly knows the finer things in life.

0:19:580:20:01

I think she'd be a hard act to follow,

0:20:010:20:03

so I've got to impress her by not buying, shall we say,

0:20:030:20:05

nobly knick-knacks,

0:20:050:20:07

but very much buying the finer things for my friend Margie.

0:20:070:20:12

Back to the cabinets, Charles.

0:20:120:20:14

If only these objects could talk. Oh, wow!

0:20:150:20:19

They could be good. A group of three pieces of iron grape shot.

0:20:190:20:23

Gosh, they're interesting.

0:20:230:20:25

I might just have to get this cabinet open.

0:20:250:20:27

Grape shot consisted of small balls wrapped tightly in a canvas bag

0:20:290:20:34

and loaded with gunpowder into canon.

0:20:340:20:36

The dealer claims these were found in Nottinghamshire

0:20:360:20:39

and could have been fired in the battle between Cromwell

0:20:390:20:42

and King Charles I. Peter has the keys.

0:20:420:20:44

Those English civil war iron grape shots

0:20:440:20:48

could be quite expensive, I bet.

0:20:480:20:50

£70 the asking price.

0:20:500:20:53

-So these would have been fired in the 1640s?

-Indeed.

0:20:530:20:57

Isn't that wonderful?

0:20:570:20:59

And to handle this and to think what damage did they do?

0:20:590:21:03

What people did they knock? What buildings were destroyed?

0:21:030:21:07

What excites me, Peter, we're going to Nottinghamshire,

0:21:070:21:11

I want to obviously shoot Margery down,

0:21:110:21:12

and I just would hope that people of Nottinghamshire

0:21:120:21:16

might look at these balls and think,

0:21:160:21:18

"Goodness me. What great balls of history.

0:21:180:21:20

"We ought to really celebrate these and bring them home."

0:21:200:21:23

The gentleman's whose cabinet this is

0:21:230:21:26

-only deals in authentic antiquities.

-Good for him.

0:21:260:21:29

Every item is guaranteed and it comes with a certificate.

0:21:290:21:33

Sounds promising.

0:21:330:21:35

That could be a very good spot,

0:21:350:21:37

but is there any wiggle room on the price?

0:21:370:21:40

The very best would be 50.

0:21:410:21:44

I just think they're balls of fire

0:21:440:21:46

and for what they might ignite in terms of Nottinghamshire history,

0:21:460:21:49

they could do quite well in a local sale in Nottingham.

0:21:490:21:55

Sounds like you've settled on your next buy.

0:21:550:21:58

-So your bet is 50?

-It is.

-Look at me.

0:22:000:22:03

Afraid so.

0:22:030:22:04

Margie Cooper, you're in that bunker.

0:22:040:22:07

-Watch out, I'm coming to get you!

-Thank you.

-Thanks, Peter.

0:22:070:22:11

A piece of local history for £50, that could do very well at auction.

0:22:110:22:15

Thank you so much and I shall see how they fire in Nottinghamshire.

0:22:150:22:20

Meanwhile, Margie is headed to Baginton

0:22:250:22:28

on the outskirts of Coventry...

0:22:280:22:30

..not far from the birthplace of a man who changed the course of history,

0:22:310:22:37

the way we live and how we travel.

0:22:370:22:39

His invention has arguably had the greatest impact on the world

0:22:390:22:44

over the past 85 years.

0:22:440:22:46

Margie's meeting Midland Air Museum curator Barry.

0:22:460:22:50

-How are you?

-Welcome.

-Shall we go on?

-By all means.

0:22:500:22:53

Frank Whittle was born in 1907.

0:22:540:22:57

As a boy he was fascinated by the new flying machines taking to the sky.

0:22:570:23:02

There he is as a young lad with his first model aeroplane.

0:23:030:23:06

And basically as a young lad

0:23:060:23:08

that's how he got to sort of handle the planes of that period.

0:23:080:23:11

And there's an image here as him as a young lad

0:23:110:23:14

seeing an aeroplane taking off.

0:23:140:23:15

But this is very much his early days

0:23:150:23:17

and when he got to sort of be excitable the idea of flying.

0:23:170:23:21

Frank's dreams of flying came true when he joined the RAF

0:23:210:23:25

and his career soon took off.

0:23:250:23:27

-He was a trained pilot.

-He was a very well trained pilot.

0:23:300:23:33

And in fact, he was renowned for being a little bit...chancy.

0:23:330:23:38

-Oh!

-He took chances. He was overconfident.

-Daredevil.

0:23:380:23:42

Frank was a maverick and pushed planes to their limit.

0:23:440:23:47

His fighter pilot training taught him that flying higher and faster

0:23:470:23:51

gave you the upper hand in dogfights.

0:23:510:23:55

Frank knew if he wanted to increase altitude and speed

0:23:550:23:57

he needed a new type of thrust,

0:23:570:24:00

one better than a propeller attached to a piston engine.

0:24:000:24:04

So in 1928, fuelled by wild ambition,

0:24:040:24:07

he designed the turbo jet, a revolutionary form of propulsion.

0:24:070:24:12

He was coming out with something, a cutting edge of technology.

0:24:120:24:16

This was totally in a new field.

0:24:160:24:19

And this was something the people of the day

0:24:190:24:22

really didn't fully comprehend.

0:24:220:24:24

The RAF was unimpressed and rejected his idea.

0:24:250:24:29

Undeterred, Frank found funding to make a prototype in his spare time.

0:24:290:24:33

This is a Whittle engine.

0:24:350:24:37

Comes in at that end, comes through, fuel is put into here,

0:24:370:24:41

spark plugs ignite the fuel to give it burning

0:24:410:24:44

and then it goes back out that way.

0:24:440:24:47

Long before modern health and safety,

0:24:470:24:49

Frank and his colleagues ran a series of dangerous tests,

0:24:490:24:53

some of which Frank later helped to reconstruct

0:24:530:24:56

in this government information film.

0:24:560:24:58

MAN SHOUTS

0:25:030:25:05

LOUD BANG

0:25:070:25:09

He was very brave to stand there while it blew up.

0:25:110:25:14

There are other words you could use.

0:25:140:25:16

Despite the setbacks

0:25:190:25:20

he was determined to get his invention in the air.

0:25:200:25:23

A decade later, and as the Nazi threat grew,

0:25:230:25:26

the RAF put Frank on special duties to develop his jet engine.

0:25:260:25:31

He thought it was a war winner. This would give Britain the edge.

0:25:310:25:36

There was a race to get the first fighter into the air

0:25:360:25:39

as the Germans were developing their own jet engine.

0:25:390:25:42

But by 1944, British jets powered by Frank's engines

0:25:420:25:46

were taking to the skies.

0:25:460:25:48

This plane in front of us is a Meteor.

0:25:490:25:52

This was Britain's first operational jet fighter.

0:25:520:25:54

They went into operation in July, 1944

0:25:540:25:57

and they were largely used to take on the doodlebugs, the flying bombs.

0:25:570:26:01

Had the authorities listened to young Frank, Allied pilots might have been

0:26:040:26:08

flying jets rather than Spitfires sooner

0:26:080:26:12

and the Luftwaffe almost certainly would not have picked a fight.

0:26:120:26:15

History might have been very different.

0:26:150:26:17

These machines were operating at speeds

0:26:190:26:22

that were far in excess of anything like the Spitfires of the day.

0:26:220:26:24

-Yeah.

-So they took you another, 2-300 mile faster.

0:26:240:26:28

-Gosh!

-Double the speed almost.

0:26:280:26:31

When the public heard about the new jet engine,

0:26:310:26:34

Frank Whittle became a household name and the skies echoed to a new sound.

0:26:340:26:39

There's a Meteor!

0:26:390:26:40

Look!

0:26:410:26:43

That's a Vampire.

0:26:450:26:47

After the war, Britain led the way in jet propulsion.

0:26:500:26:55

Frank's invention revolutionised travel,

0:26:550:26:58

commercial jet liners permitted further,

0:26:580:27:00

faster more comfortable journeys.

0:27:000:27:03

Frank Whittle could have been a rich man,

0:27:040:27:06

but he was not motivated by money.

0:27:060:27:08

He was, however, recognised with a knighthood in 1948,

0:27:080:27:12

the year he retired from the RAF.

0:27:120:27:15

We are all beneficiaries of this modest,

0:27:150:27:18

British boffin who shrank the globe.

0:27:180:27:20

A genius responsible for a remarkable achievement.

0:27:200:27:24

Frank Whittle died in 1996.

0:27:240:27:27

The next stop for both experts is in Staffordshire

0:27:360:27:39

and the city of Lichfield.

0:27:390:27:41

Margie's a few miles behind,

0:27:420:27:44

so Charles will get the first picks at Lichfield Antiques Centre.

0:27:440:27:48

A Leslie Harradine. Beautiful figure. Royal Doulton. But 790.

0:27:480:27:53

Oh, that's gorgeous!

0:27:530:27:55

William Moorcroft. Pomegranate pattern vase.

0:27:550:27:58

550.

0:27:580:28:00

I've only got about £90 to spend, so very much think big, but think...

0:28:010:28:07

-Small?

-Cheap. More barato, in Spanish.

0:28:070:28:10

Come on, Charles. Put your back into it, lad.

0:28:140:28:17

I've only got £90, haven't I?

0:28:200:28:23

You have,

0:28:250:28:26

but maybe your local knowledge will get you out of this hole.

0:28:260:28:30

CHUCKLING

0:28:300:28:32

-Oh! Look who's here!

-Have you had a good day?

0:28:320:28:35

Not bad.

0:28:360:28:37

I'm going to get in. One more thing to buy.

0:28:370:28:39

-Over there, OK?

-Yeah, OK.

0:28:390:28:41

-See you later. Good luck.

-Bye.

0:28:410:28:43

I wonder where he's off to.

0:28:430:28:45

Maybe Margie will have better luck here with her remaining £70,

0:28:450:28:49

but the clock is ticking.

0:28:490:28:51

3:40pm now and I need to be buying something.

0:28:510:28:56

I don't really want to buy any silver.

0:28:590:29:01

Brand-new.

0:29:050:29:08

Leave that there.

0:29:080:29:10

Not finding anything at the moment.

0:29:100:29:13

Margie's now realised why Charles was headed in the other direction.

0:29:130:29:16

We're suppose to be in this shop together.

0:29:160:29:19

He's been in and he's disappeared. I think he's up to no good.

0:29:190:29:24

I really do.

0:29:240:29:26

You're right to be a little suspicious, my girl.

0:29:260:29:29

Charles, on his home patch, knows of another shop a short walk away.

0:29:330:29:37

James A Jordon Antiques.

0:29:370:29:39

Jim specialises in watches and clocks,

0:29:390:29:41

but Charles may well find a few things here for auction.

0:29:410:29:45

I like your teapot, Jim, in the window.

0:29:490:29:53

-Yes.

-The cockerel.

0:29:530:29:54

-Mm-hm.

-May I pick it up, Jim?

-Of course you can.

0:29:540:29:57

Are you a man for tea?

0:29:570:30:00

-I am.

-Isn't that a fine cockerel?

0:30:000:30:03

If you want that happy, good morning wake up call,

0:30:030:30:06

why not have a cockerel teapot?

0:30:060:30:09

And a real cup of tea.

0:30:090:30:11

And a real blend of the finest tea mixed up in this rooster teapot.

0:30:110:30:18

There's no maker's mark, but this pot dates to the 1930s.

0:30:180:30:23

It's priced at £45.

0:30:230:30:25

For a good Art Deco rooster teapot with a cover, Jim.

0:30:250:30:29

What's the best price on that?

0:30:290:30:31

-How does £25 sound?

-That's a good discount, from 45. Wow!

0:30:320:30:37

-I'll give it some thought.

-Right. Pleasure.

-I'll put him back.

0:30:370:30:41

Great discount. Is that home advantage paying off?

0:30:410:30:45

I think Margie thinks I know everybody, which I might do,

0:30:450:30:49

but at the same time that doesn't mean I'm going to get discounts.

0:30:490:30:53

And I always say, with Margie's charm, Margie's swagger

0:30:530:30:57

and smile, she's got one up on me.

0:30:570:31:00

Back with Margie, and with a bit of luck,

0:31:020:31:06

dealer Madeline has had an idea.

0:31:060:31:08

-There's that one there.

-Oh, yeah!

0:31:080:31:10

How creative is this?

0:31:120:31:14

Quite nice, that. That's nice.

0:31:140:31:18

And it says, Skinner and Rook.

0:31:190:31:22

Wine merchants. Nottingham.

0:31:240:31:26

For around 100 years,

0:31:260:31:28

Skinner and Rook wine merchants were a big business in Nottingham.

0:31:280:31:31

Closing in the 1950s.

0:31:310:31:33

The auction's taking place in Nottingham,

0:31:330:31:35

so Margie might be on to something here.

0:31:350:31:37

It's funny, isn't it?

0:31:390:31:40

The fact it's Nottingham makes it really good. Yeah, I like that.

0:31:400:31:44

Madeline has priced the crate at £28. Wow!

0:31:440:31:48

Could that be 15 quid?

0:31:480:31:50

-Go on, Margie.

-Thank you very much.

0:31:510:31:54

Well, that's Margie's fifth and final lot for auction.

0:31:550:31:59

-Bye.

-Bye.

0:31:590:32:00

Just around the corner, Charles has struck lucky.

0:32:050:32:08

Dealer Jim's found some old pocket watches.

0:32:080:32:10

Oh, great, Jim!

0:32:100:32:13

I don't know if there's anything there...

0:32:130:32:15

-Wow, Jim!

-..that interests you.

0:32:150:32:18

Amazing!

0:32:180:32:20

Jim has three late 19th century pocket watches.

0:32:200:32:23

This nice silver pocket watch, probably around 1900.

0:32:230:32:28

It's tired, but you've got the intrinsic worth of the silver.

0:32:280:32:31

And this one here, Jim?

0:32:310:32:33

-That's a Victorian...

-Is that continental?

-It is.

0:32:330:32:37

They're pretty, aren't they?

0:32:370:32:39

-And that's a sign with the top one.

-Oh, that's nice.

0:32:390:32:43

-That must be what? 1900 again?

-1900. 1890, 1900.

0:32:430:32:47

What could that job lot be in terms of price?

0:32:470:32:51

Make a tenner a piece. 30.

0:32:510:32:53

I'll be a fool to say no. Jim, I'll take them.

0:32:530:32:57

-Sold.

-Thanks so much. Tick-tock. Thanks.

-Charles isn't finished yet.

0:32:570:33:01

Jim, I'm back again.

0:33:010:33:03

-Right.

-With the teapot.

0:33:030:33:05

-It's humorous, isn't it?

-It is.

0:33:050:33:08

What would be your very best on the pot to an old mate?

0:33:080:33:12

You give me £20.

0:33:120:33:14

Going, going...

0:33:140:33:17

-gone. Thanks, Jim.

-Pleasure.

-I'll take those two lots.

0:33:170:33:21

Those two final lots add to Charles' booty.

0:33:220:33:25

Including a bronze charger, a Victorian davenport

0:33:270:33:30

and three pieces of civil war grape shot.

0:33:300:33:33

All that lot came to £160.

0:33:330:33:36

Margie parted with £145 for an African stool, a hardwood stick,

0:33:380:33:44

six silver dessert spoons, a cut glass bowl and a wine crate.

0:33:440:33:48

So what do they make of each other's buys?

0:33:490:33:53

Margie's objects are quite exotic.

0:33:530:33:55

I really like the headrest.

0:33:550:33:57

I like the tribal stick as well, that was a really good buy.

0:33:570:34:02

Charles Hanson, bless him, he's never straightforward.

0:34:020:34:04

He looks, he digs deep, he looks for the interesting.

0:34:040:34:08

Then there's some grape shot.

0:34:080:34:11

£50 he's paid for somebody who wants to have three lumps of iron.

0:34:110:34:15

Interesting, though. Interesting.

0:34:150:34:17

I think it really is game on and I think this first Road Trip auction

0:34:170:34:23

could be Cooper - 1, Hanson - 0.

0:34:230:34:26

After setting off from Melton Mowbray

0:34:300:34:32

our experts are now heading for auction in the city of Nottingham.

0:34:320:34:36

It's a good job I've got this roll bar to hang onto.

0:34:360:34:40

Margie, hold tight. It could be a ropey ride today in this auction.

0:34:400:34:43

I think you'll fly high today.

0:34:430:34:45

What excites me is the auctioneer thinks those are 18th century.

0:34:450:34:48

But they're not.

0:34:480:34:50

-They could be.

-I don't think they are.

0:34:500:34:52

Yeah, but believe. Half the battle is belief.

0:34:520:34:56

Business is brisk at Arthur Johnson and Sons,

0:34:560:34:59

with six saleroom auctions taking place today.

0:34:590:35:02

What an atmosphere, Margie. What a crowd.

0:35:020:35:04

-I have got to try and get out of here.

-There we go.

0:35:040:35:08

Come on. Here we go.

0:35:090:35:11

Morning.

0:35:130:35:14

What does auctioneer Phil Poyser make of our lots?

0:35:140:35:17

It's a mixed bunch of lots. The musket balls is an interesting lot.

0:35:200:35:28

I'm hoping for a bit of interest from a lot of local private buyers.

0:35:280:35:32

I like the dessert spoons, they're my favourite lot.

0:35:320:35:35

Nice Dutch silver, good maker, Johan van Kempen.

0:35:350:35:39

I'd estimate them at 80 to 120.

0:35:390:35:41

Sounds promising for Margie.

0:35:410:35:43

Come on, chaps, take your seats.

0:35:430:35:46

Here we are. Wow!

0:35:460:35:47

-Are you ready?

-Yeah, I'm ready.

0:35:470:35:50

Hold tight. This is going to be an exciting one.

0:35:500:35:53

First up, Charles teapot.

0:35:550:35:56

Hope it won't go cheap, cheap, cheap.

0:35:580:36:00

It will go cock-a-doodle-doo!

0:36:000:36:02

An ideal breakfast teapot.

0:36:030:36:05

Absolutely. Sorry!

0:36:050:36:08

£20. 20 I've got.

0:36:100:36:13

-5. 30. 5. 40.

-Thank you.

0:36:130:36:17

Are you sure? I'll take 42.

0:36:170:36:19

-One more.

-42.

-Thank you.

-45.

0:36:190:36:23

I'm selling at £45.

0:36:230:36:25

That's a good start.

0:36:250:36:26

-You've got ants in your pants.

-I twitch. I get nervous.

0:36:260:36:30

No need for nerves, Charlie.

0:36:300:36:32

That rooster has pocketed you a decent profit.

0:36:320:36:34

Next up, Margie's large cut glass bowl.

0:36:360:36:39

I've got two commission bids here. The lowest is 30. I'm going 35.

0:36:390:36:43

£35 bid. 40. 5.

0:36:430:36:45

-45 bid. 50. 55. 60.

-Go on.

0:36:450:36:49

65. Lady at the back at 65. 70.

0:36:490:36:53

-5. 75 bid.

-This is getting annoying now.

0:36:530:36:57

80 online.

0:36:570:36:59

-That's amazing.

-85. 90. Being sold, done at 90.

0:36:590:37:05

Well, you have surprised me.

0:37:050:37:09

Well done, Margie.

0:37:090:37:11

Racing ahead.

0:37:110:37:12

You are. A great return on an item bought for £20.

0:37:120:37:16

Next is Charles' bronze charger, or is it an electrotype?

0:37:160:37:21

-£40. 20.

-Oh, no!

0:37:210:37:24

-I really hate this.

-I've got 12 only bid with me. At 12. £12 bid.

0:37:240:37:28

15. 18. 20. I'm selling at £20.

0:37:280:37:34

I really hate that.

0:37:340:37:36

I like his style.

0:37:360:37:38

Bad luck. First loss of the day, but there's still time to make it up.

0:37:380:37:43

Margie's African stool is next.

0:37:430:37:46

-Help yourselves here. At £20. 5. 30. 5. 40.

-Going to run.

0:37:460:37:52

5. 50. 5? 55. On the back wall at 55.

0:37:520:37:57

-You're joking.

-Done at £55?

0:37:570:37:59

No, 60.

0:37:590:38:02

Bad luck. It's only a small loss, Margie.

0:38:020:38:06

Time now for Charles' pocket watches.

0:38:060:38:08

£30 to start. Bid. 30 I've got.

0:38:080:38:11

-Come on.

-35. 40. In the room at 40.

0:38:110:38:14

5. 45 bid. In France at 45.

0:38:140:38:16

In France!

0:38:160:38:18

-It's a French bid on the internet.

-Come on, France.

0:38:180:38:21

Online at 50. The three together go at £50.

0:38:210:38:24

That's a small profit.

0:38:240:38:26

Well done.

0:38:260:38:28

Sparking global interest too, Charles.

0:38:280:38:32

Margie hoped the Nottingham link would attract some bids. Let's see.

0:38:320:38:36

10 I've got. At 10. 12. 15 with me now.

0:38:360:38:39

18. 20. 5. 25. It's the lady at the back at 25.

0:38:390:38:44

-A bit more.

-It goes at 25.

0:38:440:38:48

A good profit for Margie.

0:38:490:38:51

Charles is still on catch up. Can his davenport turn a profit?

0:38:520:38:56

£100 to start me.

0:38:560:38:58

£50. Come one.

0:38:580:39:01

Well, I've got various commission bids,

0:39:010:39:03

-so I can start the bidding at 35.

-There you go.

0:39:030:39:06

At 35. 40. 5. 50. 50 in the room.

0:39:060:39:11

It's on the back wall at 50.

0:39:110:39:13

-I'm selling... 5. 55.

-Yes!

0:39:130:39:17

60. 60 still in the room.

0:39:170:39:18

Is there a fire?

0:39:180:39:20

65 online. 70 in the room.

0:39:200:39:23

Being sold at £70.

0:39:230:39:26

Done at 70.

0:39:260:39:27

-I'm over the moon.

-Doubled your money.

-Thanks, partner.

0:39:270:39:31

Well done, Charles.

0:39:310:39:33

Margie's carved hardwood stick is up next.

0:39:330:39:35

-10. Front row at

-10. Oh, no!

0:39:350:39:39

At 10. Help yourselves here.

0:39:390:39:42

12. 15. 18.

0:39:420:39:44

18 bid right at the back.

0:39:440:39:46

I'll take 20. At £18.

0:39:460:39:49

I'm selling. It goes. Done at £18.

0:39:490:39:52

Profit. Put it there, partner.

0:39:530:39:56

No, I'm miffed. I'm not doing it.

0:39:570:40:00

Chin up, Margie. You nearly doubled your money there.

0:40:000:40:03

And your silver dessert spoons are coming up.

0:40:030:40:06

My finale coming up. My Dutch spoons.

0:40:060:40:10

They look gorgeous. Absolutely gorgeous.

0:40:100:40:12

-I've got 60 bid. 60 online.

-Wow!

0:40:140:40:17

-At 60.

-Well done.

0:40:170:40:20

-Put the hand down.

-Fantastic. Put it there.

-No!

0:40:200:40:24

Put your hand down.

0:40:240:40:25

-70.

-There you go. Put your hand down.

0:40:250:40:28

At £70.

0:40:280:40:29

I'm selling on commission at £70.

0:40:290:40:33

-Wonderful.

-Oh!

0:40:330:40:35

They made £70 and another great profit for Margie.

0:40:350:40:38

The final lot for our pair now. Charles' grape shot.

0:40:400:40:44

Will there be a whiff of interest?

0:40:440:40:46

They don't present very well, do they?

0:40:460:40:48

Margie, these are important balls.

0:40:480:40:51

These hopefully today will become balls of fire

0:40:510:40:54

in a frenzied competition ignites

0:40:540:40:57

like they did 400 years ago.

0:40:570:40:59

This will be very interesting.

0:40:590:41:01

I've got two commission bids.

0:41:010:41:02

-20 is only bid.

-No!

0:41:020:41:04

5. 30. 5. 40. 40 bid with me.

0:41:040:41:10

-5. 50. 5. 60.

-It's history.

0:41:100:41:13

60 bid.

0:41:130:41:15

-5. 70. 5. 80.

-Come on.

0:41:150:41:20

5. 90. 5. 100.

0:41:200:41:23

110. 120. It's all online now.

0:41:230:41:26

-130. 140. 150.

-This is history.

0:41:260:41:30

160. 170. 180. 190.

0:41:300:41:33

-200. 210.

-Crickey!

0:41:330:41:35

-220. 230.

-Oh, my goodness!

0:41:350:41:38

-240.

-Wonderful!

-250.

-History!

0:41:380:41:40

-250 bid.

-Oh!

0:41:410:41:43

At 250. £250 bid online. At 250.

0:41:430:41:47

Anybody else?

0:41:470:41:48

Being sold at 250.

0:41:500:41:52

Thank you very much.

0:41:530:41:55

Here we are in Nottinghamshire, and that's history.

0:41:570:42:00

Well done, Charles. What an amazing profit.

0:42:000:42:02

What a great way to end the first auction of this week's Road Trip.

0:42:020:42:06

We're going. Come on. Thank you, auctioneer.

0:42:060:42:10

Margie started out with £200.

0:42:100:42:12

After paying auction house costs she's made a respectable profit of

0:42:120:42:17

£66.56, leaving her with £266.56 to spend next time.

0:42:170:42:24

Charles also started with £200.

0:42:260:42:28

After fees were paid he made a remarkable profit of £196.70.

0:42:280:42:35

So he's the winner today and takes forward £396.70 for the next leg.

0:42:350:42:41

All I can say, musket balls.

0:42:430:42:46

Absolutely. Let's roll, OK?

0:42:460:42:51

See you. Bye. Give 'em a wave, Margie.

0:42:510:42:53

The handbrake's on!

0:42:530:42:55

-Bye!

-Cheerio, chaps.

0:42:580:43:00

Next time, our experts continue their epic road trip.

0:43:020:43:06

You are classy.

0:43:060:43:07

While Charles tries to shoe in some deals...

0:43:070:43:11

They suit me or not? Not really, do they?

0:43:110:43:13

..our Margie just gets blown away.

0:43:130:43:15

Oh!

0:43:150:43:16

SHE LAUGHS

0:43:160:43:18

Auctioneer Charles Hanson and dealer Margie Cooper embark on a new road trip, setting off from Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire and taking in stops near Coventry and Lichfield, headed for auction in Nottingham. While Margie learns about a local man who changed the world, Charles unearths some objects with strong local interest - but will they fly at auction?