Episode 7 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 7

Antiques challenge. It is day two for Charles Hanson and Margie Cooper as they start in Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire, and head for auction in Bolton, Lancashire.


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It's the nation's favourite antique experts...

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-This is beautiful!

-That's the way to do this.

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal -

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to scour for antiques.

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Joy! Hello!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it is no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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The handbrake's on!

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to day two with Margie Cooper and Charles Hansen.

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Look at me.

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You are classy.

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The racy two-seater is a 1959 Elva Courier believed to be

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the only one of its kind on British roads.

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-We haven't changed gears for the last five minutes.

-It's in top gear.

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-Are you in top gear?

-Top gear. You are not back-seat driving, are you?

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No, I'm not.

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Sounds like it.

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100.

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The last auction was a rip-roaring success with both experts

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making a profit. But Charles was the big winner.

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-240.

-Anybody else? Wonderful!

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-Thank you very much. Thank you.

-Oh, my God!

-Thank you.

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This is a new day, Margie.

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The sun's shortly without his hat on.

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Well, let's hope the sun shines on Margie because although our

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experts each started with £200, she has some catching up to do.

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She currently has £266.56 to spend.

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Charles, meanwhile, is in the lead with £396.70.

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I look at you, and you just are glamorous.

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You know, just go Hollywood on me.

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Just spend it, Margie. You know, it's only money.

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These two are on one epic road trip.

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Starting in the Leicestershire town of Melton Mowbray,

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they're weaving their way across six counties before finishing

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their week near where they started, in Leicester.

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This leg starts off in Newark-on-Trent in Nottinghamshire

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and ends with an auction in Lancashire's Bolton.

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The first stop for both our experts is Newark-on-Trent.

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The castle here was a Royalist stronghold during the 17th-century

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Civil War, withstanding three sieges by Cromwell's Parliamentarian rebels.

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The first shop of this trip is a shared experience, so stand by.

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-It is huge.

-It is, isn't it?

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It certainly is.

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Good luck!

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Margie, remember, think of England.

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Oh, my word!

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-Sorry.

-Careful.

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Just trying to find something that's...a bit quirky, really.

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Hey there!

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Crikey.

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SHE EXHALES LOUDLY

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That is a sweet little chair, that, isn't it?

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Look at that little baby.

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You generally see them in slightly larger...

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in a Victorian drawing room suite, where you'd have a two-seater,

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you'd have the much bigger chairs like that.

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But this is a typical design of the mid-Victorian era.

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And quite usually...

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I think it's in walnut.

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I kind of like that.

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This Victorian nursing chair is priced at £115. Wow.

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That is such a nice little chair. It's perfect.

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HE HUMS

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Oh, Charles is humming. Is that a good sign?

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What I quite like... There's a wonderful,

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rusty old World War I

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German water bottle.

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It has clearly been buried for some time.

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And although we might think today militaria collectors

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need things in tiptop condition, when the object is wounded,

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it is an object which we never forget about

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because of what that bottle would have been part of.

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Priced at ten pounds, is it worth a closer look?

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As Charles seeks out the keys for the cabinet,

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Margie has tracked down dealer Jill.

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That furniture up there, is that your...?

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-Right at the far end?

-Right at the far end.

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I've just seen this sweet little chair up there.

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It has got 115 on it. It needs to really topple down.

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What... Where are we?

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-Let's have a start... Let's have a starting point.

-Oh, gosh.

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Well, I was thinking when I saw it - 68.

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-70 and I'll take the...

-Oh, go on.

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-OK?

-Yeah, thanks a lot.

-OK.

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Generous, Jill.

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£55 knocked off the Victorian nursing chair seals the first deal

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of this leg of the trip.

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-Thank you very much. Pop back and see us again.

-Yeah!

-Good.

-Will do.

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-Thank you.

-Bye.

-Bye-bye.

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Earlier, Charles spotted a First World War German water bottle,

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exhumed, apparently, from the Somme.

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Dealer Wendy is on hand.

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Wow.

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We've even got a bullet hole here.

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So when the World War I German water bottle....

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It is tin, basically, that has nearly severely corroded,

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having been in the ground.

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And to have unearthed this with this story takes my breath away.

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But what is its provenance?

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This bottle is a unique item, but it will only appeal to collectors

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if its origin can be verified.

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Wendy is only holding the keys for another dealer,

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so while Charles heads off to make a phone call...

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Hello, sir.

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..Margie has found a hidden corner of the shop...and Roger.

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-See, you're tucked away, I nearly missed you.

-We have so much.

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-All you have to do is say what you are looking for.

-Right.

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Well, I was looking for silver bits of jewellery.

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-I'm not looking for badges.

-We have got some little bits over there.

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You got any suggestions?

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-There is a lovely little brooch there.

-Very stylish, isn't it?

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Very Deco-looking, although it is quite modern.

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-Nine carat gold hallmark?

-It is hallmarked.

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But it is such a small mark, I need a really powerful magnifier.

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I always carry this with me.

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Good luck with it. The mark is on the edge.

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I can see 375 and I can see, you know...

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And it says £35.

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30 to you.

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-That's a gift.

-And I'm going to shake your hand at £30.

-OK.

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Thank you very much. Thank you very much.

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A nice nine carat gold brooch at £30?

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-Thank you once again.

-Wish me luck.

-Good luck.

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Two items in the first shop for Margie.

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Charles is still to get off the mark. How about that water bottle, Carlos?

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After we see polished medals and we see the finished item,

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but to see objects which of course were left abandoned really

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brings us into a certain time check.

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It's not so much on price, I think you can't buy history,

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but you can with that bottle.

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I'll shake Wendy's hand now. Ten pounds.

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-'You enjoy it.'

-We will enjoy what it represents. Thanks awfully, sir.

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Bye-bye.

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Wow, so he was a teacher and he was on the Somme 20 or

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so years ago as a teacher and it was literally just uncovered

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and was sold to him for a sum of money.

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It was his teaching aid at school,

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when he used to teach our youngsters all about the Great War.

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It's amazing it survived THAT!

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Absolutely. And that is real history, isn't it?

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It can't be proven, but at least it gives SOME provenance.

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I take £20 out. There, give that to you.

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-Thank you. All the best to you. Thanks, Wendy. Bye-bye.

-Thank you.

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-Bye-bye.

-See you. Bye!

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Margie is taking a break from shopping to head to Laxton,

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in Nottinghamshire.

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She is visiting a centre set up to educate children about the glimmer

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of light that shone during one of the darkest periods in history.

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The guide for the afternoon is centre Chief Executive Phil Lyons.

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-Ah.

-Margie, hi.

-Hello, Phil.

-Welcome.

-Thank you.

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Welcome to Beth Shalom, house of peace.

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-Come on in.

-Thank you.

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Margie has come to hear how thousands of lives were saved from the Nazis

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by the children's transport known as Kindertransport in German.

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So, tell me the story of Kindertransport.

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Well, the story has a very, very complex background to it.

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It starts in the mid-'30s in Germany when Hitler came to power.

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And part of his programme was to remove, as best he could,

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the Jews from the German population.

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Simple as that.

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In the mid-'30s, anti-Semitism was on the rise in Europe.

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Jews were persecuted and their businesses destroyed.

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Synagogues were burned to the ground, shops,

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homes were trashed, were ruined.

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30,000 German Jewish men were arrested, sent to the camps.

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And in a sense, the State had engineered all of this.

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In 1935, new laws were announced by the Nazi party that excluded

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German Jews from citizenship.

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Effectively refugees in their own country,

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it was virtually impossible for them to leave.

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The international community started to take notice.

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This civilised country suddenly descending into this dreadful,

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oppressive regime.

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And here in the UK, the government passed

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through emergency legislation within a fortnight.

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And what it was saying is that they will take children

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refugees between ages of three and 17, mostly at the younger age...

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-Yeah.

-..and they could come into the country

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without travel documents.

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In an unprecedented undertaking, trains were arranged by charities

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and religious groups to save persecuted children.

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For nine months, the Nazis permitted the trains to leave Germany

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and Eastern Europe.

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Many ended up at train stations around Britain,

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just like this reconstruction at the museum.

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While a few were greeted by relatives, the majority of boys

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and girls were welcomed into the arms of foster families.

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When they arrived in the UK, what faced them?

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The vast majority if not all of them had no language,

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didn't speak English.

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We'd like to think that most of them had very quickly some love

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-and support offered to them.

-Yes.

-That is what you want for children,

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what you'd want for children. I'd want that.

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Through all the travesty, they did survive.

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-That is the most important thing.

-Yeah, survival.

-They did survive.

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And most of them went on to lead positive family lives of their own.

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One of those survivors was Bernard Grunberg,

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just 15 when his German Jewish parents feared for his safety.

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Now 92, he regularly shares his remarkable story of survival

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with schoolchildren who visit the centre.

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I came over with the second Kindertransport that left Berlin

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in December 1938.

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And that was the last time I ever saw anyone from my family again.

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Although I didn't know what was happening -

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nobody had told me anything.

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I didn't know why I was on that train,

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I didn't know where it was going.

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-I thought it was just a temporary way to be away from home...

-Yeah.

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..and, eventually, you'd meet up again and live like a family again.

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After the war, Bernard settled in northern England and married in 1947.

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Like some other Kindertransport children,

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he found an appointment as a farm labourer.

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Do you think Kindertransport saved your life?

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Out of the 10,000 children,

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I don't know how many, but there is very,

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very few that ever saw their parents again, or any relatives again.

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And I am sure they will know that Kindertransport

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-saved their lives...

-Yeah.

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..as it did mine. And I will never forget that.

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Approximately 10,000 children who made it to the safety of Britain were

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able to start new lives and, like Bernard, contribute to our society.

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Back in Newark-on-Trent, Charles has made the short walk across town

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to his next shop.

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-Around 50 dealers trade from here.

-Sir, Charles Hansen.

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Simon, what a lovely antiques centre you've got here.

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If I said to you I am after the more interesting objects,

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would you direct me anywhere in particular?

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I'd direct you into the backroom, yeah.

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-Right, OK. It is safe back there, isn't it?

-Oh, yeah, very safe.

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-Hope so. OK. See you shortly.

-OK. Thank you.

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Charles has just under £380 left to spend.

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Says it's nine pounds. It's new.

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But boys and toys... It's quite nice.

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SCRATCHING Oh! Mind the table, Charles.

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One thing I love about history is the sampler.

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And here you've got a wonderful sampler.

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And we marvel at samplers because they were a girl's education.

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Take a bow, Sarah McCune.

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Her sampler, it's on linen and this lovely stitched wool work

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and also needlework.

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I do like it.

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The embroidered crown with letters G and R

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probably date this sampler to around 1770.

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Simon, this sampler here, I can't see a price.

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-50.

-50, OK.

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You want to do £40?

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I'll meet you in the middle, 45.

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-I'll take it.

-OK.

-45.

-Sold.

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Despite the few holes, this is a nice item for £45.

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Anything else in here, Charles?

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What will sell well in Bolton? What will sell well in Bolton?

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Well, how about a pair of clogs?

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Aren't they wonderful?

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May I try one on? Do you mind?

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Knock yourself out there, Charles.

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Wow. These are early-19th-century clogs.

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And stepping back in time is fascinating.

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And it's interesting, the clog market really took

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off in the 1840s, in the 1850s, in industrial England, in the North.

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Do they suit me or not? Not really, do they?

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But the reason I like these is because they are so crude.

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What is remarkable is these could've been cobbled together quite

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literally by a blacksmith.

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They almost look like a horse's horseshoe.

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What a find! I'm going to find Simon.

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The clogs are priced at £35.

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Simon, I love these.

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-Do you have clogs at home?

-No.

-My wife does.

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-Does your wife wear clogs?

-No.

-OK, OK.

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-What is the best price?

-20 then.

-Oh, I say! Really?

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-Yes.

-Sold. I'll take them. Thanks, Simon. Thanks a lot.

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Two in the old bag, eh, Charles? But is there still more?

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What we've got is a bronze Buddha, possibly 19th century.

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I just quite like it.

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It's got this dirty appeal of just being well-worn.

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Simon is asking £35 for this little Buddha.

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Simon, I quite like this.

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-I'll do it for 25.

-Would you really?

-Yeah.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

-Done, I'll take it.

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A successful shopping trip, I'd say,

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picking up an 18th-century sampler, a pair of 19th-century clogs

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and a bronze Buddha, all for a total of £90.

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-All the best.

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks, Simon, all the best to you.

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Bye-bye. See you. Bye.

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And with that, today's shopping comes to a close.

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Nighty-night.

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The next morning, it is a bit of a damp start.

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-You OK?

-I'm going under. So I'll say goodbye to you.

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THEY LAUGH

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Hold tight, Marge.

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Yesterday, Charles spent £100

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on a First World War German water bottle,

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a George III sampler, a bronze Buddha,

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and a pair of 19th-century clogs.

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Margie also splashed out £100.50

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but bought just two items - a gold brooch and a Victorian nursing chair.

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This morning, they are heading for Mansfield, in Nottinghamshire.

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This is, I think, a fairly untapped part of North Derbyshire.

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It is quite barren, yet it's fertile.

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-Are you feeling fertile today?

-SHE LAUGHS

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-Are you?

-Well, if we get in the right shops, I shall feel fertile.

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Thank you very much.

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THEY CHUCKLE

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Surrounded by the vestiges of Sherwood Forest,

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Mansfield was once a lodging place for medieval royalty.

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It is Margie's first shop today.

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Oh, my gosh, what a day.

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That won't fit through the door, love.

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I'll leave that there.

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-There. Luke.

-Very nice to meet you.

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-Nice to meet you too. What a horrible day.

-I know!

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Perhaps you'll find something to brighten up your day, Margie.

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So are all these old toys here?

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Oh, God, he's cute, isn't he?

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-They are called Mobo, aren't they?

-Yeah.

-And they had much bigger ones.

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And rocking horses. This is a little tiny one.

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He's dead sweet. He's not in bad nick, is he?

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-Considering his age, he is quite good.

-Yeah. What is he, '50s?

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-I'd say so, yeah.

-Yeah. Well, he's a thought.

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Well, that is one strong contender.

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Uh... So what have you got in here? Let's look.

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-What's that?

-That's a medical fleam.

-Yeah.

-Used for

-blood-letting. Eugh.

0:19:100:19:16

It was once believed blood-letting could treat

0:19:170:19:20

everything from fever to madness in both people and animals.

0:19:200:19:24

The three sharp blades of this fleam are likely to have been used

0:19:240:19:28

on farm livestock. Gruesome.

0:19:280:19:30

Yeah, I quite like things like that.

0:19:300:19:34

-It is a bit unusual.

-Yeah.

0:19:340:19:36

Georgian. That is Georgian.

0:19:360:19:39

My, I'm glad I didn't live then. Can you imagine?

0:19:390:19:42

Yeah! It is priced at £45. Cutting-edge, eh?

0:19:420:19:46

Is that the very best on that?

0:19:460:19:48

-I'll do it for 30, and that is my best.

-Mm.

0:19:480:19:51

Once somebody says that's the best,

0:19:510:19:54

I feel as though it is a bit rude to say 28.

0:19:540:19:56

THEY LAUGH

0:19:560:19:58

Go on, then.

0:20:000:20:02

Thank you very much.

0:20:020:20:04

Luke has kindly knocked £17 off the asking price,

0:20:040:20:08

and Margie has got something a little different.

0:20:080:20:12

See you! Oh, what awful weather!

0:20:120:20:16

-Oh!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:20:160:20:18

Oh, no!

0:20:180:20:20

Mary Poppins never had this trouble.

0:20:200:20:23

Oh, for flipping heck.

0:20:230:20:24

Oh, well, let's do it.

0:20:240:20:26

My brolly's broken!

0:20:280:20:29

SHE LAUGHS

0:20:290:20:31

Charles' next stop is sandwiched between the spectacular Peak District

0:20:350:20:40

and Sherwood Forest, near the village of Creswell.

0:20:400:20:43

Here, straddling the Nottinghamshire-Derbyshire

0:20:430:20:45

border, is Creswell Crags.

0:20:450:20:48

Hannah Boddy is Creswell's exhibition manager.

0:20:480:20:51

She wants to show Charles one of Europe's most important

0:20:510:20:55

archaeological finds.

0:20:550:20:57

This is Creswell Crags Gorge.

0:20:570:20:59

It is absolutely gorgeous, despite the weather today.

0:20:590:21:03

Tell me about this site, this backdrop behind me.

0:21:040:21:06

Well, it is amazing because we have evidence from the Ice Age.

0:21:060:21:10

Creswell was one of the most northerly points that people

0:21:100:21:13

could get to in the whole world during the Ice Age.

0:21:130:21:16

10,000 years ago, the polar ice cap was only a few miles north

0:21:180:21:23

of Creswell and the UK was joined to the rest of Europe.

0:21:230:21:26

As Ice Age hunters travelled north,

0:21:260:21:29

the caves in this gorge offered vital shelter through a crucial period

0:21:290:21:34

of human evolution.

0:21:340:21:35

Wow, Hannah!

0:21:360:21:38

-This is inviting. And very exciting.

-Yes.

0:21:380:21:41

-It is, isn't it?

-Unbelievable.

0:21:410:21:43

Wow, Hannah.

0:21:470:21:48

Hannah, is there today much evidence of human occupation still

0:21:510:21:55

left within these caves?

0:21:550:21:57

In 2003, some archaeologists found Britain's only Ice Age rock art,

0:21:570:22:02

Britain's oldest artwork, in this cave.

0:22:020:22:04

-Oldest and only rock art.

-Yeah. Oldest, only Ice Age rock art.

0:22:040:22:09

I'm looking hard, and I can't see any.

0:22:090:22:12

This cave kept a secret for over 12,000 years.

0:22:120:22:15

The damp environment hasn't been kind to the Ice Age art, which is

0:22:160:22:21

why they remained undiscovered until 2003.

0:22:210:22:24

When they were found, they rewrote history, proving not only that

0:22:240:22:29

Ice Age man walked this far north but that he brought his art with him too.

0:22:290:22:35

Hannah, I can't see anything yet.

0:22:350:22:37

So, here we have a deer stag on the wall.

0:22:370:22:40

-They've used a natural feature for the mouth.

-Oh, I can see it.

0:22:400:22:43

Over on the muzzle.

0:22:430:22:44

-And then just... I can see two ears as well.

-Here are the horns.

0:22:440:22:48

-Oh, my goodness me.

-The ear.

0:22:480:22:50

Oh, it's wonderful. I can't believe it.

0:22:500:22:52

23 drawings were discovered in this one cave.

0:22:520:22:56

The images of bison and birds made this damp, dark hole

0:22:560:23:00

in Derbyshire one of international importance.

0:23:000:23:04

The art here resembles better preserved drawings found

0:23:040:23:08

in warmer climates.

0:23:080:23:09

Cave paintings in Spain

0:23:090:23:10

and France feature animals drawn in a similar style.

0:23:100:23:13

But, Hannah, how can we date this cave art?

0:23:150:23:18

This one is the easiest of all of them to date because you can

0:23:180:23:22

see this area here of flowstone, which is growing on top of it.

0:23:220:23:27

Flowstone is similar to stalactite and stalagmite formations.

0:23:270:23:32

Scientists proved the flowstone growing over the rock art was 12,500

0:23:320:23:38

years old, proving the deer and other pictures were drawn by Ice Age man.

0:23:380:23:43

That is quite amazing.

0:23:430:23:44

I can't believe I'm looking at a work of art from 13...or

0:23:440:23:49

circa 13,000 years ago.

0:23:490:23:51

Creswell Crags is now one of the most heavily protected

0:23:530:23:57

archaeologically and geological sites in Britain.

0:23:570:24:01

I suppose, in many respects, Hannah, these men and ladies

0:24:010:24:05

12,000 years ago were real explorers.

0:24:050:24:08

They were going as far north as was humanly possible.

0:24:080:24:11

They were clever people. They were hardy people.

0:24:110:24:13

-Oh, hugely clever people.

-Thanks, Hannah.

-Good luck.

0:24:130:24:16

Now, which way is out?

0:24:160:24:17

More importantly, which way is the bison?

0:24:170:24:19

Hm. Over there.

0:24:190:24:20

I am on the hunt. See you later.

0:24:200:24:22

Don't forget to give back the helmet, Charles.

0:24:220:24:25

Hey!

0:24:250:24:27

I've got no spear!

0:24:270:24:28

Back in the present day, Margie has taken herself over the county

0:24:330:24:37

border, into Derbyshire and the market town of Belper.

0:24:370:24:40

Her next shop is a big'un, set in a former Victorian mill.

0:24:400:24:44

Colin is in charge today.

0:24:440:24:46

Look out.

0:24:460:24:48

-Hello, good afternoon.

-Hello there. How are you?

-Are you Colin?

0:24:480:24:51

-I am, yeah.

-I'm Margie.

-Hello, Margie.

-It looks enormous.

0:24:510:24:55

You can have a wander around.

0:24:550:24:56

Also, while I'm doing that, yesterday I bought a little brooch.

0:24:560:25:01

-Right.

-You haven't got a little box, have you?

0:25:010:25:03

-I might find one, see.

-We might find one for you.

-I'll even pay you.

-Oh!

0:25:030:25:07

Well, we will find you one then.

0:25:070:25:08

Margie has £138.56 to spend.

0:25:110:25:15

This is her last opportunity to buy before the auction.

0:25:150:25:18

That's nice, isn't it? Lovely old gate, look.

0:25:200:25:23

I love that. Don't you? Magnifico.

0:25:230:25:27

Isn't that something else?

0:25:270:25:30

And that is...

0:25:300:25:32

Architectural antiques, they are good.

0:25:320:25:35

Margie has fallen for this Victorian iron gate, priced at £90.

0:25:370:25:41

Here comes Colin, though.

0:25:410:25:43

It is not the prettiest thing we've got, is it?

0:25:460:25:48

-Are you surprised I selected that?

-I am a little, yeah.

-Are you?

0:25:480:25:51

-Yeah.

-Good, it'll be cheap then.

-HE LAUGHS

0:25:510:25:54

-Well, where has it got to be?

-Well, I would be happy buying that for 40.

0:25:540:25:58

-I tell you what...

-Yeah.

0:25:580:25:59

-Add a fiver to it so I can have me tea and it is yours.

-OK.

0:25:590:26:03

-I think we'll go for that.

-45. Excellent.

-Thank you, sir.

0:26:030:26:05

45? That's half-price. Well done, Margie.

0:26:050:26:08

Does anything else take your fancy?

0:26:090:26:12

Well, this is one of these boots that a pony...a pony...

0:26:120:26:15

Well, it's quite a big pony.

0:26:150:26:18

It is a bootie to wear on its hoof to stop

0:26:180:26:22

digging into the garden

0:26:220:26:24

when he's pulling on a lawnmower. Back in the day.

0:26:240:26:29

Before motorised motors pony-drawn cutters were used.

0:26:300:26:34

These booties prevented a neat lawn from being cut up by the hooves.

0:26:340:26:40

This one boot is priced at £55.

0:26:400:26:43

I just like the memory of this.

0:26:430:26:45

You know, of the horse with these little boots on.

0:26:450:26:47

But I don't know whether you've noticed, there is only one,

0:26:470:26:50

-so there's three missing.

-SHE CHUCKLES

0:26:500:26:53

I really like it, though.

0:26:530:26:56

Oh, Colin!

0:26:560:26:58

-What have we found?

-What have we found? Something really daft.

0:26:580:27:02

-I'm just looking at this, which I find really interesting.

-OK, yeah.

0:27:020:27:05

-It would be nice if...

-And you know what it is?

-I do know what it is.

0:27:050:27:08

Yeah. Interesting piece.

0:27:080:27:10

-It is an interesting piece.

-You could make something of it.

0:27:100:27:12

Yeah, but it all depends... OK, here, there is a bit...

0:27:120:27:15

-Somebody has written on here...

-OK.

-..£55.

-Yeah.

0:27:150:27:19

-What do you think a nice bottle of wine would cost you?

-25 quid?

0:27:190:27:22

-35.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:27:220:27:24

Oh, Colin. How about if we split that? And then we can be friends.

0:27:240:27:29

-32.50?

-Yeah. Go on, then.

0:27:290:27:31

THEY LAUGH

0:27:310:27:34

We got there in the end.

0:27:340:27:36

Margie has her last lots for auction -

0:27:360:27:39

an iron gate and a pony boot,

0:27:390:27:41

together costing £77.50.

0:27:410:27:45

-That's marvellous. That's very kind of you, Colin.

-Thank you very much.

0:27:450:27:48

-Now, earlier you said...

-Yeah.

-"Have you got a little box for me?"

0:27:480:27:51

-Yeah, have you got one?

-Well, would that suit?

0:27:510:27:54

Oh, that would suit. I feel as though I should offer...

0:27:540:27:57

What about 50p? Thank you. That feels like a win.

0:27:570:28:01

-Bye-bye.

-Bye now.

0:28:010:28:03

Brilliant. A wise 50p spent.

0:28:030:28:06

Well done, Margie.

0:28:060:28:07

Charles' last stop today is in Derbyshire,

0:28:110:28:13

in the former mining town of Bolsover.

0:28:130:28:16

He still has £296.70 left to spend here,

0:28:180:28:22

at Bolsover Antique Centre.

0:28:220:28:25

-GLASS CLINKS

-Sorry.

0:28:280:28:31

She's quite nice. I quite like this lady in here.

0:28:340:28:38

This 1930s figurine is made of an alloy of zinc, also known as spelter.

0:28:380:28:45

She's been given a coating of bronze to give the impression

0:28:450:28:48

she's the real McCoy.

0:28:480:28:50

She is quite nice. I'm quite surprised.

0:28:500:28:53

£18. To me, she is striking.

0:28:530:28:57

She is Art Deco. She is glamorous.

0:28:570:28:59

She is almost as glamorous as Margie Cooper.

0:28:590:29:02

For that purpose, I need to go find the key for cabinet number six.

0:29:020:29:08

£18 is surprisingly cheap.

0:29:080:29:10

I wonder why. Perhaps Carol knows.

0:29:100:29:13

Carol?

0:29:130:29:15

Oh, she is gorgeous, Carol.

0:29:170:29:19

-Hello! Margie Cooper-esque. Isn't she lovely?

-She is.

0:29:210:29:25

-Just got one problem. You've got them, she hasn't.

-Yeah.

-Thumbs.

0:29:250:29:30

-It's a shame, yeah.

-Where have her thumbs gone, Carol?

0:29:300:29:33

-Has she been nibbling her nails and gone too far?

-Must have, yes.

0:29:330:29:35

She is missing her thumbs.

0:29:350:29:37

She is missing both of her thumbs,

0:29:370:29:39

hence why the dealer has put on here AF.

0:29:390:29:42

But turning it round, look at that lovely back.

0:29:420:29:45

It's quite exceptional - i.e.,

0:29:450:29:48

hasn't been dropped or dented.

0:29:480:29:49

It is in particularly nice condition.

0:29:490:29:52

Carol, she is missing her thumbs, but she can still dance.

0:29:520:29:56

-Do you like her?

-I do, yeah.

0:29:560:29:57

-Take £12?

-Do you want me to go and check?

-Could you for me?

0:29:570:30:00

I won't be long.

0:30:000:30:01

Carol, if you want to take a chance...

0:30:010:30:03

-# On me... # Try a tenner.

-Right!

0:30:030:30:06

-All right. We'll try.

-Thanks, Carol.

0:30:060:30:08

Ten pounds? He is trying his luck.

0:30:100:30:13

-Hold tight.

-I've had a word.

-Yeah.

0:30:180:30:20

-Whisper it in my...

-The best we can do is 15.

0:30:200:30:22

For that sort of price, I'd be rude not to.

0:30:220:30:26

-Cos I think at £15...

-She stands a chance.

0:30:260:30:28

She is gorgeous. She is stunning.

0:30:280:30:30

And I'll take her.

0:30:300:30:31

She may be thumbless, but at that price, she is worth taking a punt on.

0:30:310:30:37

And Charles isn't finished here just yet.

0:30:370:30:40

I'm quite taken by this cabinet here.

0:30:400:30:41

It has got quite a few reproduction wrist watches in.

0:30:410:30:45

But more importantly, it has almost got a lot of sentiment in.

0:30:450:30:50

Charles' eye has been drawn to the militaria.

0:30:500:30:54

Utah Beach.

0:30:540:30:55

World War II relic.

0:30:550:30:58

June 6, 1944, D-Day landing.

0:30:580:31:02

How interesting.

0:31:020:31:04

This, of course, represents a very important day

0:31:040:31:07

when, sadly, so many individuals lost their lives.

0:31:070:31:11

And this could just be a piece of relic

0:31:110:31:15

from that D-Day landing,

0:31:150:31:17

who knows, brought back by a soldier.

0:31:170:31:20

I doubt it.

0:31:200:31:21

If it's right, a military collector would pay well over ten pounds

0:31:210:31:26

for something which has such emotive value to such a day.

0:31:260:31:32

I'd love to learn more about this.

0:31:320:31:34

Best call the owner, then.

0:31:340:31:35

Fortunately, Carol has his number at hand. Go, Carol.

0:31:350:31:39

Can I just pass you over?

0:31:390:31:43

Hi, mate. Just a really interesting cabinet of curios.

0:31:430:31:46

And obviously, it's a piece of cement and a bit of barbed wire.

0:31:460:31:50

And folks might say,

0:31:500:31:51

"Goodness me, Hansen, you're not really buying antiques."

0:31:510:31:54

But then, you are buying an object which indirectly is linked to

0:31:540:31:58

such history and to one such day in particular.

0:31:580:32:04

The owner claims it came from a specialist dealer.

0:32:040:32:07

Provenance here is hard to prove, but Charles is taking a risk.

0:32:070:32:11

What is your best price? On at ten pounds.

0:32:110:32:14

A fiver?

0:32:140:32:16

I think for what it potentially represents,

0:32:160:32:19

I'd be a fool to say no.

0:32:190:32:21

I'm going to say I'll buy it and thanks ever so much. Thanks, mate!

0:32:210:32:26

And that concludes the shopping.

0:32:260:32:28

-15 and five is 20.

-Thank you.

0:32:280:32:30

Thank you so much. Thanks, Carol. Thanks again for the memories.

0:32:300:32:33

-Thank you.

-Bye.

-Bye.

0:32:330:32:36

They've been busy on this trip.

0:32:360:32:38

Charles has paired the possible Utah Beach barbed wire with

0:32:380:32:42

the First World War German water bottle to make a militaria lot.

0:32:420:32:46

He has four other items, including the bronze Buddha,

0:32:460:32:49

a George III sampler,

0:32:490:32:51

a pair of 18th-century clogs,

0:32:510:32:53

and an Art Deco figurine.

0:32:530:32:55

All that lot cost him £120.

0:32:550:32:58

While Margie parted with £206 for a Victorian nursing chair,

0:33:010:33:06

a gold brooch with box,

0:33:060:33:08

the Georgian fleam,

0:33:080:33:10

a Victorian iron gate

0:33:100:33:12

and one leather pony boot.

0:33:120:33:14

So, what do they make of each other's buys?

0:33:140:33:17

I love that Art Deco brooch.

0:33:180:33:20

And heaven forbid, for £30.50, you have bought real gold.

0:33:200:33:25

I can't believe he's bought a pair of clogs. I mean,

0:33:250:33:28

-the saleroom is in Lancashire.

-SHE GIGGLES

0:33:280:33:32

And that is taking coals to Newcastle.

0:33:320:33:34

There are lots and lots of clogs in Lancashire.

0:33:340:33:36

I am quite happy to go to Lancashire with my bootie to take on hers.

0:33:360:33:40

And hopefully, I'll be victorious.

0:33:400:33:42

We'll soon see, for it is across the Peak District

0:33:440:33:48

they head for an auction in Bolton, Lancashire.

0:33:480:33:51

-Ay up, me duck!

-Yeah, yeah. Ay up.

-Ay up, me duck.

0:33:510:33:54

Bolton was a 19th-century boom town.

0:33:550:33:58

It once had over 200 cotton mills,

0:33:580:34:01

making it one of the most productive cotton spinning towns in the world.

0:34:010:34:05

I'm fairly sure, Margie, at this auction house in Bolton,

0:34:050:34:08

where there's muck, there's grass.

0:34:080:34:10

And where they see our mucky buys, there's grassy treasures.

0:34:100:34:13

I think muck and grass is Yorkshire, but never mind.

0:34:130:34:16

-Oh, Margie...

-Who cares?

0:34:160:34:18

Today's sale is taking place at Bolton auction room,

0:34:180:34:21

housed in the former Metropolitan Library building.

0:34:210:34:25

-I shouldn't have worn a skirt.

-It's all to come.

0:34:250:34:29

-It's all to come, Margie.

-Oh, gosh, this car'll be the death...

0:34:290:34:33

That's the way, Margie, a Lancashire lass does it.

0:34:330:34:36

-I was that before you.

-And I'm a Derbyshire man.

0:34:370:34:40

Presiding over proceedings is auctioneer Stephen Sloan.

0:34:400:34:44

What does he make of our experts' buys?

0:34:440:34:46

The Buddha, quite a nice lot. He is a good colour and, I think,

0:34:490:34:52

a jolly good collector's item.

0:34:520:34:54

And I think he should do quite well today.

0:34:540:34:56

A pony boot, yes, obviously one of four.

0:34:560:35:00

Now, I must say, this one is in exceptional condition.

0:35:000:35:03

Now, what you would do with it, I have no idea.

0:35:030:35:06

As Stephen readies himself,

0:35:060:35:08

his colleague Mia is primed to receive online bids.

0:35:080:35:12

Time for our experts to take their seats.

0:35:120:35:15

-Here we go.

-Thank you. Wow.

0:35:150:35:17

-How are you, Margie?

-Very well. How are you?

-This is Bolton, isn't it?

0:35:170:35:20

-Are you trembling in Bolton?

-Trembling in anticipation.

0:35:200:35:23

Calm those auction nerves.

0:35:230:35:25

It's Charles's pair of clogs first.

0:35:270:35:29

-I have never seen such a big pair of clogs.

-Thank you.

0:35:290:35:31

-I tried them on.

-You know, you brought clogs to Lancashire.

0:35:310:35:34

There are a heck of a lot of them around.

0:35:340:35:36

-Are there really?

-Hopefully.

0:35:360:35:37

Thank you, sir. 30, bid. 30.

0:35:370:35:39

-Come on.

-32. 34.

0:35:390:35:42

-34. 36.

-Come on, they are wonderful boots.

0:35:420:35:45

-40.

-Let's go.

-And two.

0:35:450:35:47

-42, thank you.

-Happy with that.

-At £42, this is for two.

0:35:470:35:51

-21 each.

-MARGIE LAUGHS

0:35:510:35:53

-21 each!

-At 42. Thanks.

0:35:530:35:55

-Welcome to Lancashire, Margie.

-Are you sure?

-I'm delighted.

0:35:550:35:59

And so you should be.

0:35:590:36:00

You've walked away with a £22 profit.

0:36:000:36:03

Next up, Margie's 19th-century fleam.

0:36:050:36:07

Gosh, I feel quite squirmish now.

0:36:080:36:10

I'm even more nervous for you.

0:36:100:36:12

-Squeamish.

-Squeamish, right.

0:36:120:36:14

-25 bid, thank you.

-Good.

-That's OK, isn't it?

-On the net.

0:36:140:36:18

-'31!'

-Yes.

-31?

0:36:180:36:20

32. 34? At £34.

0:36:200:36:24

-36. 38?

-Come on, crawl a bit more.

0:36:240:36:27

-38. 40? £40. And two? 42.

-Gosh,

0:36:270:36:31

-it is giving me heart failure.

-42. Are you sure?

0:36:310:36:34

That is Charles and Margie both making a profit on their first lots.

0:36:360:36:40

A great start. Now, time for Charles' sampler.

0:36:410:36:45

-Anybody got £40 for it? £40?

-HE SIGHS

0:36:450:36:49

30 bid. 30. Five anywhere? At £30.

0:36:490:36:52

And five anywhere else?

0:36:520:36:54

-Come on, let's go!

-At 40. At £40.

0:36:540:36:57

-Keep selling.

-£50, give me five.

0:36:570:36:58

-55.

-I should think so.

-Quite right, I like her style.

0:36:580:37:02

-£60. Five.

-Come on!

0:37:020:37:04

-All done at £60? It is here to be sold.

-A little profit.

0:37:040:37:08

That's great, I'm very happy. It could've gone the other way.

0:37:090:37:12

But it didn't, and you're faring well.

0:37:120:37:15

Margie's gate is next to go under the gavel.

0:37:150:37:18

-£30, kick it in.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:37:180:37:21

Gracious me, scrap metal now.

0:37:210:37:23

20 bid, thank you. 20. Two.

0:37:230:37:26

-24? 24. 26?

-That's better.

-28? 28.

-Go on keep going.

0:37:260:37:30

30. 30, and two? Two, thank you.

0:37:300:37:33

-34? 34. 36? 36.

-Still going. Come on.

-38, thank you.

0:37:330:37:38

-That's better, Margie. Good.

-£40. And two.

0:37:380:37:41

42. 44. At 42.

0:37:410:37:44

I am selling at £42. This is no money at all.

0:37:440:37:47

SHE EXHALES LOUDLY

0:37:490:37:51

Oh, Margie, so close.

0:37:510:37:54

The auctioneer thought this next lot could do well for Charles.

0:37:550:37:59

It could be full of Eastern promise. We are live online.

0:37:590:38:02

-Say what, £100 to start me?

-HE BREATHES QUICKLY

0:38:020:38:05

-£70. 70 bid.

-70 bid! Come on, let's go!

-Five anywhere?

-Come on!

0:38:050:38:09

At £70 bid.

0:38:090:38:10

-Shut up!

-It is a very rare opportunity.

-It is rare.

0:38:100:38:13

All done at 70? Last time, gavel's up...

0:38:130:38:17

-Well done.

-Very good. Thank you very much. Thanks, partner.

0:38:170:38:19

A brilliant profit on that little chap. Well done, Charles.

0:38:190:38:24

First clogs and now Margie's pony boot.

0:38:240:38:27

But will our second footwear lot be as successful?

0:38:270:38:31

Say what, kick it in at £20?

0:38:310:38:33

20 in the room. £20, thank you. And two.

0:38:330:38:36

-Two. 22.

-Come on, Margie.

0:38:360:38:38

24. 26. 28.

0:38:380:38:39

-30. 32? 32.

-Good.

0:38:390:38:42

-Profit.

-Oh, no!

-Profit.

0:38:420:38:45

34!

0:38:450:38:46

-'Oh, she's at it.'

-36, new money. 38? Try two.

0:38:460:38:49

-38!

-Yeah! Well done, Margie.

0:38:490:38:51

-38.

-Good job.

-Spoilsport.

0:38:510:38:54

Back to the net then at 38. 38. 40 anywhere else?

0:38:540:38:57

-At £38.

-Well done, partner. They're all in the room.

0:38:570:39:02

-And two?

-Tight.

-40?

-It's kicking.

0:39:020:39:04

Wonderful.

0:39:050:39:07

Another profit for Margie.

0:39:070:39:09

Next up, Charles' thumbless figurine.

0:39:110:39:14

-Are you sure she's not repro?

-Get out of here!

0:39:140:39:17

-Where would you like to be with her?

-Anywhere.

-You needn't say what.

0:39:170:39:20

-£30 to start me. Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:39:200:39:23

In the room at £30. 30. And two.

0:39:230:39:25

-32.

-Come on, let's go.

-34. 36?

0:39:250:39:27

-36. 38? 38. 40?

-She's coming home.

0:39:270:39:31

-£40, and two.

-Let's go.

0:39:310:39:32

-Two, sir, thank you.

-The Lancashire lady.

0:39:320:39:34

Thank you very much, sir. Thank you.

0:39:340:39:36

-44.

-Come on, sir.

-46.

0:39:360:39:38

46 in the room. All done at 46?

0:39:380:39:41

I can't believe it.

0:39:410:39:42

She had no thumbs but she was a lovely lady. I am really pleased.

0:39:440:39:48

Super profit.

0:39:480:39:49

Margie's brooch is next. And in a new box.

0:39:510:39:54

The auction house have kindly found a smarter box than the one she bought.

0:39:540:39:58

Could have saved yourself 50p, Margie.

0:39:580:40:01

Where would you like to be with this one? Say what, £40 for it?

0:40:010:40:04

-40 bid, sir.

-Margie! Brilliant!

-Two anywhere? On the bloke at 42.

0:40:040:40:09

-You watch, Margie.

-44. 46.

0:40:090:40:11

-48. 50.

-Good buy, Margie.

-52.

0:40:110:40:14

Four. 56.

0:40:140:40:16

-58. £60. 62.

-Oh, good.

0:40:160:40:19

-64.

-Funny old game, Margie.

0:40:190:40:21

-68. £70.

-I didn't think it would...

0:40:210:40:23

72? At 70.

0:40:230:40:25

Wow, Margie Cooper, take a bow!

0:40:250:40:28

-Two. 72.

-Oh, Margie.

-In two places. 74, sir?

-Wow!

-74, is it?

0:40:280:40:34

In the room at 74. 76? At 74 in the room. Gentleman's bid in the room.

0:40:340:40:39

-Marge, they've all been waiting for this.

-£74...

0:40:390:40:42

Good girl, Margie.

0:40:420:40:43

Margie has bagged another great profit.

0:40:430:40:46

And she's up again with her Victorian nursing chair.

0:40:480:40:51

Where would you like to be with that one for me?

0:40:510:40:54

65, thanks. There we go.

0:40:540:40:55

-That's what I should've paid.

-Good, Margie.

-We are starting.

0:40:550:40:58

-Is that profit?

-70 anywhere?

0:40:580:41:00

-£70. 70 here. And five.

-Hold tight, Margie.

0:41:000:41:03

That's 70 here. £70.

0:41:030:41:05

Golden opportunity.

0:41:050:41:06

SHE LAUGHS

0:41:080:41:11

I just love buying things and selling them at the same price.

0:41:110:41:14

It's wiped its face, Margie.

0:41:140:41:17

Our pair's last lot now.

0:41:170:41:20

It is Charles' wartime memorabilia.

0:41:200:41:23

They were both risky buys as the provenance is questionable.

0:41:230:41:26

Thank you, sir. 20, and we're away. 20, and two. I have 20. Two.

0:41:260:41:31

22. 24? 24. 26. 28?

0:41:310:41:34

28, thank you.

0:41:340:41:35

It is all about the history, Margie, forget the money.

0:41:350:41:38

-It is just to see a bit of history.

-34. And six? Six, thank you.

0:41:380:41:42

-38? 38, thank you.

-Ah! You are getting there.

0:41:420:41:46

-42. 44? 44.

-Ooooh...

-46? 46.

0:41:460:41:49

-48? 48.

-It is real history, Margie.

0:41:490:41:53

You can't buy history, but you can today.

0:41:530:41:55

-A rare opportunity.

-Margie... And that's history.

0:41:550:41:59

And ending on another profit for Charles. Well done, both of you.

0:42:000:42:04

-Come on.

-Let's go.

0:42:040:42:05

Time to tally up who's today's winner.

0:42:070:42:10

Margie started this leg with £266.56.

0:42:100:42:14

Today, after paying auction house fees,

0:42:140:42:17

she has made a profit of £13.76.

0:42:170:42:20

This means she carries forward £280.32.

0:42:200:42:25

Charles, meanwhile, started with £396.70.

0:42:300:42:35

Today, he has made an impressive profit of £99.76,

0:42:350:42:40

which means he is stretching ahead with £496.46

0:42:400:42:46

to spend on the next leg.

0:42:460:42:48

MOTOR REVS

0:42:490:42:51

Bye-bye! See you, Lancashire!

0:42:510:42:54

Bye-bye, Road Trippers!

0:42:540:42:56

Next time on Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:000:43:02

Whoa!

0:43:020:43:04

..the weather doesn't dampen Charles' spirits...

0:43:040:43:06

I feel like a pirate.

0:43:060:43:08

..and Margie reaches new heights.

0:43:080:43:10

I feel like I am going to break it.

0:43:100:43:12

You're going to lose the sale!

0:43:120:43:15

It's day two for Charles Hanson and Margie Cooper as they start in Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire, and head for auction in Bolton, Lancashire.