Episode 8 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 8

Antiques challenge. Charles Hanson and Margie Cooper are halfway through their trip. They start in Melbourne, south Derbyshire, and head for an auction in Aylsham.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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-This is beautiful.

-That's the way to do this.

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..with £200 each, a classic car and a goal - to scour for antiques.

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Joy.

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Hello!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction,

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but it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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The handbrake's on!

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This is Antiques Roadtrip.

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Yeah.

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It's the third leg of this week's road trip with antiques dealer

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Margie Cooper and Derbyshire man, auctioneer Charles Hanson.

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Welcome to Derbyshire, Margie!

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Smell the Derbyshire air.

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He is as excited as usual.

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Just as well Margie is in command of this 1959 Elva Courier.

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I would just change gear if I were you.

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I wouldn't... I would just gently caress the accelerator now, Margie.

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I was driving cars before you were even thought of.

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-Are you being serious?

-Yes.

-You're not that old, are you? Look at me.

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-GEARS CRUNCH

-Oh!

-Whoops.

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Both experts started this road trip with £200 and a complete gearbox.

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After two auctions, Margie has increased her loot to £280.32.

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But Charles is stretching ahead.

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He has £496.46 to flash about on this leg.

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I'll try... Oh!

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This epic road trip started in the Leicestershire town

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of Melton Mowbray.

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They're zipping around six counties

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before ending their trip in Leicester.

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This leg starts off from Melbourne in South Derbyshire,

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destined for an auction in the Norfolk town of Aylsham.

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Charles is shopping first today in the Georgian town of Melbourne,

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namesake of the Antipodean city down under.

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-Morning.

-Good morning. How are you?

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-All right, thank you.

-What a lovely shop.

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-Thank you very much.

-Charles Hanson.

-Welcome to Melbourne Antiques.

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The delightful Helen is on hand to help.

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I try to please everybody. I try to buy a bit of everything.

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-It's just awash with treasures, Helen.

-I know. It's just...

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I feel like a pirate.

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Really?

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These are nice.

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These are pretty, aren't they?

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Charles has uncovered a nice pair of Art Nouveau Royal Dux figurines,

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but I spy a problem.

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-What a shame. Oh, I don't believe it.

-That's...

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I was feeling so good and then I saw the instruments.

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-Her little harpsichord has been damaged.

-Yes.

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Missing that section there, but also missing a thumb

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and if we turn it round, we'll see, good quality,

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raised pink Triangle Mark for Royal Dux, but what a shame.

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Oh, no. I thought she was wearing a waistband.

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-She's been broken in half as well. Literally... Have you seen that?

-No.

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Her whole waist there has been off. Crack, crack, crack.

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They must be so cheap, Helen.

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They are very cheap. £20 for the pair.

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I'll think about them. Thanks, Helen. I'm going to wander on, OK?

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-Yes.

-Thank you.

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Charles seems interested

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but will have one last scout around the shop first.

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It's been a great shop to come to and I think the one thing that

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-I might make an offer on are your damaged Dux figures.

-Yes.

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-But because she's been literally split at the waist...

-Hard life.

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..through there, and the fact she's missing half her instrument too,

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-will you take £10?

-Yes, happy.

-Look at me, happy, she is happy.

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-Shake hands.

-I'll take the figures.

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The broken lady who's been chopped in half and missing...

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That's how hard it's been in Melbourne. Thanks a lot. Thank you.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you.

-£10.

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Thank you, Helen.

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Despite the damage, these two figurines could do well at auction.

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Thanks, Helen. Take care. Bye.

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Margie's motored her way to the north-west tip of Leicestershire

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and the town of Castle Donington.

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Her first shop today is Once Removed.

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The shop, that is.

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It's its name.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hi.

-Hi, I'm Philip.

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Oh, hello, Phil. Margie.

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-Good to meet you.

-Yeah, so, I'd love to have a look round.

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Sure, yes. Feel free to wander.

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Margie's got just over £280 to spend.

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What will she plump for?

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-That's been nice in its time, hasn't it?

-Yes.

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Margie's spotted an Edwardian ladies' toilet mirror.

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A nice bit of satinwood around here.

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Just turn it round to see what's going on at the back.

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-Yes, as is.

-All original, yes, it's not been...

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It's as original, nothing been tampered with at all or changed.

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-Phil, I quite like that.

-Yeah.

-So, how much is that?

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-Well, that could be £25.

-Oh.

-Which, you know...

-Oh, crumbs.

-Yeah.

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Very reasonable, Phil.

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I'm going to shake your hand on that.

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-Oh, right, thank you very much.

-Thank YOU very much.

-Cheers.

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One sale. You can wrap it then.

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One purchase already and Margie's still to explore Phil's basement.

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-I'm going to go down.

-OK.

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Small but packed with stock.

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Oh.

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A gramophone player.

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-Gosh, I've never, ever bought one in my life.

-Oh.

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-Does it work?

-Yes, I can give you a demonstration if you want.

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Crank it up for you.

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MUSIC PLAYS

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There you go.

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-It's not bad, is it?

-It's all right, yeah.

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And you've got the volume control there, you see. There you are.

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Volume control is shut the door.

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This 1920s gramophone comes with a few records, too.

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But what's the price, Phil?

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Well, I was... I was going to...

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-You know, £80, £90.

-Yes.

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But I could go a little bit...

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I'll go to 50. I could drop down to 50.

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50 quid for a 1920s...

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-I'll have another browse upstairs.

-OK.

-I know it's here.

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-Yeah, fair enough, yes.

-Right?

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After another quick look upstairs, it's decision time.

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So I bought that, so do I just leave it at that and move on?

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Or do I have a crack at your record player?

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I think that's what we're down to.

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-40 quid won't buy it?

-Say 43 then.

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Let's just cut it down to...

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Thanks.

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£43. We're done. I'm on my way.

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That's the Edwardian toilet mirror

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and a gramophone with a dozen old 78s thrown in

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for a total of £68.

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Nice find.

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What's that little glass over there?

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Well, I think that's a French vase, 1950s-ish I think.

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-I quite like that.

-Yes, it's different, isn't it?

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-It looks very nice in the light.

-How much would you throw that in for?

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Well, I bought that, again, very well,

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so you could have that for a bargain £8.

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-Oh! I can't leave that, can I? £8.

-Yes.

-Yes.

-Oh, brilliant.

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-Another £8. Great. Glad I spotted it.

-Yeah.

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Right, so I'll give you some more money then.

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Oh, right, brilliant. There we are. Right.

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An impulse buy. A 1950s vase, a snip at just £8.

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Great work, Margie.

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Meanwhile, Charles has made his way across the county border to

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the Derbyshire town of Matlock.

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Here we are.

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This antiques centre has nearly 70 dealers.

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With £486 to splash,

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he dives straight in.

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Come on, objects, talk to me.

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Having a hard time then, Charles?

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Can you go away, please? I'm struggling.

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He's onto something.

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Just found the best thing in the shop

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and what I've found is pretty mundane to many eyes.

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It's a piece of timber, carved with acanthus foliage

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and these lovely scroll volutes.

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So, many years ago, this piece of timber was very important.

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It probably formed part of a very elaborate Florentine frame.

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If you had the whole frame and there was a mirror,

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it might be £5,000.

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Sadly this is only a quarter of that frame and is priced at £65.

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And in fact this piece of timber will date to around 1730,

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it's that early. A really exciting find.

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It's all about the history in this.

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It's a great piece of timber.

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I might just see if I can spot...

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anything else.

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That's quite sweet.

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What I like about this box is it's no cheap, square box.

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In fact, what we've got here is a good rosewood inlaid, veneered box

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with this star motif on top in ebony.

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There's your interior.

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I think it has got some age.

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It's what you call Tunbridge Ware,

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traditionally made in that region of Tunbridge Wells.

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It is probably 1900 in date

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and, actually, if it was in the cabinet here,

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it ought to be about £75.

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Hidden away, out the way, it's £14,

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so it's almost been missed.

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He always finds something interesting.

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The dealer trading from this corner of the shop isn't here today

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so it's back up the stairs.

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When the going gets tough...

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we get going.

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To make a phone call.

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Head honcho Lynne gets dealer Bernadette on the blower.

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I'll put him on, Bernadette.

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I just wondered, I'm just intrigued.

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This almost scroll acanthus panel...

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..I just quite like it because it's got some age.

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Any idea where it came from?

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It came out the Brunswick Rooms in Whitby.

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Is that a Georgian building?

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It's a beautiful Georgian building.

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So I like that.

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What's your best price...

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to an old mate?

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48.

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I will say, "Thank you very much."

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I'll take that for 48,

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and I also like the inlaid box as well that...

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-So that for a tenner.

-Right.

-Thank you, Bernadette.

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Wasn't she nice?

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The 18th century cornice and the rosewood box for a total of £58.

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-Take care. See you. Bye-bye.

-Bye-bye.

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Margie's taking a break from shopping to head to Ticknall,

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a few miles south of Derby.

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She's visiting Calke Abbey, a country house frozen in time,

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giving a snapshot of Victorian Britain like no other.

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It's a Marie Celeste-like relic that glimpses into the lives of

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one of the last traditional British upper-class families.

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The National Trust's Yanni Simpson is the assistant house manager.

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-Yanni.

-Margie.

-Hello, nice to meet you.

-You too. Welcome to Calke.

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Thank you very much.

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For generations, Britain's upper classes enjoyed untold wealth thanks

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to the country's economic strength and the largest empire in history.

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One such aristocratic family were wealthy landowners the Harpur-Crewes.

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They owned the Calke Abbey estate for over 400 years,

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a reclusive family that shunned the upper-class social scene, choosing

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to spend time and the family money on their natural history collection.

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Oh.

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Gorgeous room.

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So this is what we call the saloon,

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-and it was designed as the main entrance hall to the house.

-Right.

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-Very grand.

-The bigger the room, the more money you've got.

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So this is where the family start to take over the space,

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not as a social room but as a private museum.

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-Right, to house the collections.

-Yeah.

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It was the Ninth Baronet, Sir John Harpur-Crewe,

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who started the collection, decorating the house with

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hunting trophies, but his son, Sir Vauncey, outdid his father.

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Animals he couldn't hunt on his own estate were

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purchased from taxidermy dealers around the world.

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Collecting became an all-consuming hobby for the increasingly reclusive

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aristocrat, and proved detrimental to his relationship with his family.

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-So he didn't necessarily talk to his daughters.

-Oh, dear.

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He'd send notes, either by the butler,

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-so they get an instruction on a silver salver...

-Oh, dear.

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-..or he used an internal postal system.

-Dear, dear, dear.

-Yeah.

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That's not very good, is it?

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No.

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Then the Harpur-Crewes, like other landed gentry,

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were hit by the financial crisis of the 1920s.

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To help control the country's ballooning debt

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caused by the First World War, upper-class families were hammered

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by a 32% increase in the death tax.

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So when Sir Vauncey passed away in 1924,

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his wife and daughters were faced with a crippling tax bill.

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So a lot of the estate and collection

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-was sold off to pay for that...

-Goodness.

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-..and Calke was not worth what the inheritance tax was.

-No.

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Sir Vauncey's remaining collection was placed under dust sheets

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behind closed doors.

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The Harpur-Crewes retreated to a tiny corner of their decaying mansion,

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unable to pay for repairs.

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Despite clinging on to Calke for the next 60 years, the family had no

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choice in the 1980s but to hand over the estate to the government,

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in lieu of an unpaid multi-million-pound tax bill.

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When the National Trust took over,

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they found a stately home frozen in the 1920s.

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Everything you see you today is as we walked in in 1985.

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So, peeling paint, dirty walls, all the worn textiles, chairs,

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that's as found.

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It sort of stands as a monument to all the other country houses

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that went into decline,

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last sold off as golf hotels,

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and just simply pulled down to get rid of the family debt.

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Although creatures in cabinets are a somewhat sad and strange legacy,

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Calke Abbey is a unique survivor,

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a snapshot of late-19th-century Britain

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preserved as a grand tribute to days gone by.

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And, with that, an exciting day on the road comes to a close.

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So nighty-night, you two lovebirds.

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Charles is behind the wheel this morning, so watch out.

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For Queen and country, Margie.

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Hold tight.

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-GEARS CRUNCH

-Oh, sorry. Sorry, Margie.

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Yesterday, Margie splashed out £76 on a gramophone in an oak cabinet,

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an Edwardian toilet mirror and a 1950s glass vase.

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Charles, meanwhile, spent £68 on a pair of Royal Dux figurines,

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a Victorian rosewood box and an 18th-century carved cornice.

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But he struggled to find objects he really loved.

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It's hard because you want the objects to say,

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"Look at me, come to me."

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You do, eh?

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First stop is in Kimberley, Nottinghamshire.

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Margie's shopping in one of the oldest streets in the town.

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Good morning.

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Curiously, the chap in charge isn't called Alice.

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He goes by the name of Michael. Hello, Michael.

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I'm looking for some little, quirky smalls.

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OK.

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Off she goes.

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Wow.

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Right so it's, yeah... What have we got up here? This is all...

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-Shabby chic.

-Yeah, shabby chic, yes. Go round here.

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I don't really want to buy stepladders but they do sort of...

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-Yeah.

-They're popular now, aren't they? People paint them as well.

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Yeah, they do, and put them in the bedrooms and put, you know,

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ornaments on them.

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Or shoes.

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Hm. They're not the best pair I've ever seen. I mean...

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But, you know, there's something rather nice about them.

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They've been used.

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It's a good idea to stick them in a bathroom if you paint them up.

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Paint them up and they look good, don't they?

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Actually, to use them for the purpose

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they were made for is out now.

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-It's all aluminium, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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They won't be used as stepladders, they'll be displaying something.

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I mean, you know, people find them quite heavy, don't they?

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Careful, Margie.

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-Afraid I'm going to break it, Mike?

-I'm just worried that you are...

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-You're going to lose the sale.

-You've got a lot to do today, still.

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These steps were priced at £35

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but, as luck would have it, they're in the sale.

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The only way I can buy this, Michael, is if it was

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really, really cheap, because it's going to have to be so cheap,

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and that's not cheap enough.

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So if you can sell me that for 15 quid, I'll buy it.

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Well, I don't want you to leave without buying...

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-Right, well, there we go. 15.

-£15.

-OK, Mike, thanks very much indeed.

0:18:170:18:21

Thank you.

0:18:210:18:22

Michael's been most kind and Margie has another item to take to auction.

0:18:220:18:27

Thank you.

0:18:270:18:28

Charles has travelled north of Nottingham,

0:18:340:18:36

near to the village of Papplewick.

0:18:360:18:38

He's visiting this unassuming building to hear how

0:18:400:18:43

the pumping equipment inside saved millions of lives.

0:18:430:18:46

Tony Keyworth is the local expert on Victorian engineer Thomas Hawksley,

0:18:470:18:52

the forgotten hero of Nottingham.

0:18:520:18:54

-Mr Keyworth.

-Call me Tony.

-Tony. Charles Hanson.

0:18:560:18:59

-Nice to meet you and welcome.

-Great to hear. What a building.

0:18:590:19:01

It is, isn't it? It's beautiful. It was built by Thomas Hawksley,

0:19:010:19:04

the best water engineer of the 19th century.

0:19:040:19:08

Wow. It looks amazing.

0:19:080:19:10

-May we go for a wander indoors?

-Let's do that, yes.

-Thanks a lot.

0:19:100:19:14

In the 19th century, the Industrial Revolution saw

0:19:140:19:17

a boom in textile industries, mining and engineering.

0:19:170:19:20

Thousands left life in the country to seek work.

0:19:200:19:24

Cities soon became overcrowded, and Nottingham was no exception.

0:19:240:19:28

The population by 1830 had risen to about 50,000,

0:19:300:19:34

from 10,000 in the mid-18th century.

0:19:340:19:37

They were cramped into houses

0:19:370:19:39

that were built specifically to house them by speculative landlords.

0:19:390:19:44

They had no drainage, no water supply,

0:19:440:19:46

didn't even have a back door.

0:19:460:19:48

It was an appalling way to live.

0:19:480:19:51

60% of children below five years old died.

0:19:510:19:54

Overcrowding led to outbreaks of disease.

0:19:570:20:00

One of the most feared was water-borne cholera.

0:20:000:20:04

How was cholera getting into the system?

0:20:040:20:06

There was an attempt by some water companies to pump

0:20:060:20:08

water into the town to standpipes. Some into the houses.

0:20:080:20:12

But it leaked, basically,

0:20:120:20:14

and in order to prevent this leakage from exhausting the water

0:20:140:20:18

supply and costing too much money, they turned the water off,

0:20:180:20:24

and only turned it back on again in a certain area of the town

0:20:240:20:26

for two hours a day, and when the pipes emptied,

0:20:260:20:30

they drew in the contaminated waste in the ground.

0:20:300:20:33

Sewage, basically.

0:20:330:20:34

So people were actually infecting themselves by drinking the water.

0:20:340:20:38

-And that obviously gave that low life expectancy.

-It caused havoc.

0:20:380:20:42

Even in the best part of Nottingham,

0:20:420:20:43

the life expectancy was somewhere between 12

0:20:430:20:47

and, in some of the wards, 18.

0:20:470:20:50

Local engineer Thomas Hawksley believed those

0:20:500:20:53

suffering from illness would benefit from clean water.

0:20:530:20:56

He set out to revolutionise the supply system by replacing

0:20:560:21:00

the leaky pipes and pumping a continuous supply of water.

0:21:000:21:04

He had the good sense to recognise that when you stopped

0:21:040:21:08

a pipe from having pressure inside it and it emptied,

0:21:080:21:12

sewage would get in and contaminate people, so his idea was to keep it

0:21:120:21:16

under pressure all the time to keep the contamination out.

0:21:160:21:20

Without knowing it, Hawksley wasn't just offering a supply of fresh

0:21:200:21:23

water, he was also stopping outbreaks of cholera.

0:21:230:21:27

When he put forward his idea of pumping fresh water 24 hours a day

0:21:270:21:32

to a sceptical establishment, he faced stiff opposition.

0:21:320:21:36

His revolutionary piece of engineering didn't come cheap.

0:21:360:21:40

What did he say to get them on board?

0:21:410:21:44

Hawksley worked out later in his life the mortality cost,

0:21:440:21:48

the consequences of people dying early.

0:21:480:21:50

A man would die, he would leave a wife and children

0:21:500:21:53

and if they became ill,

0:21:530:21:55

they couldn't pay for the hospital treatment,

0:21:550:21:57

that had to be paid for by the town.

0:21:570:22:01

So if they lived long enough, of course,

0:22:010:22:02

-they would be able to pay more taxes.

-Absolutely, yeah.

0:22:020:22:05

Hawksley raised financial backing from a water company to build

0:22:080:22:11

this steam-powered pumping station at Papplewick.

0:22:110:22:15

Fresh water was pumped through leak-proof pipes

0:22:150:22:18

to taps in people's homes.

0:22:180:22:20

-Did it work, Tony?

-It did. It did work extremely well.

0:22:200:22:23

Almost on cue, a couple of years later, there was

0:22:230:22:26

a cholera outbreak in the country.

0:22:260:22:28

Nottingham didn't have any problems at all. Nobody died in Nottingham.

0:22:280:22:32

Thousands died around the rest of the country.

0:22:320:22:36

Hawksley had proved his doubters wrong

0:22:360:22:38

and his system was soon adopted by other cities.

0:22:380:22:41

His ingenuity saved countless lives

0:22:410:22:43

and is one reason why Britain's health and prosperity

0:22:430:22:46

accelerated ahead of many others in the following decades.

0:22:460:22:49

He's a man I never knew but it's certainly got me

0:22:510:22:54

pumped up now on the Antiques Roadtrip.

0:22:540:22:56

My pressure is increasing, Tony.

0:22:560:22:59

I'm feeling, you know, a sweat coming on and I shall head off

0:22:590:23:02

and attempt to find my next few antique buys.

0:23:020:23:05

Thank you for a wonderful visit. It's been really, really rewarding.

0:23:050:23:08

-It's a pleasure.

-Thanks, Tony.

0:23:080:23:10

Although Thomas Hawksley has never been officially

0:23:100:23:13

recognised in the United Kingdom, he received knighthoods

0:23:130:23:16

from Sweden, Denmark, Brazil and other grateful countries

0:23:160:23:20

for solving their drinking water problems,

0:23:200:23:23

a tribute to a man who saved millions of lives around the world.

0:23:230:23:27

The final shop for both our experts is in Grantham, Lincolnshire.

0:23:320:23:36

Charles is running a little late...

0:23:370:23:39

..giving Margie first dibs at Notions Antiques Centre.

0:23:410:23:44

Over 30 dealers trade from here,

0:23:460:23:47

selling all sorts of collectables and antiques...

0:23:470:23:50

and ladders.

0:23:500:23:52

Oh, no! More ladders.

0:23:520:23:56

Proves they're popular, Margie.

0:23:570:24:00

-Good afternoon. How are you?

-Hello.

-And you are?

-Sharon.

0:24:000:24:04

Sharon, I should call like that.

0:24:040:24:07

-And you're Lewis.

-I am Lewis, yes.

-All right. Margie.

-Hello.

0:24:070:24:10

Desperately looking for a couple of items

0:24:100:24:12

so I'm going to have a look around.

0:24:120:24:14

-Fine.

-I'll be back.

-OK.

0:24:140:24:16

Margie still has £189.32 to spend.

0:24:190:24:24

What is she on to here?

0:24:290:24:30

Cigarette dispenser?

0:24:320:24:34

Torpedo boat cigarette dispenser.

0:24:350:24:38

Hm!

0:24:380:24:39

How does this work, Lewis?

0:24:400:24:42

-Oh. That's quite unusual, actually.

-Torpedo boat.

0:24:420:24:46

-That's a cigarette dispenser.

-Yeah.

0:24:460:24:49

What you basically do is pull that lever back...

0:24:490:24:52

Yeah. A cigarette pops up.

0:24:520:24:55

-You pop your cigarette in there, right?

-Yeah.

0:24:550:24:57

Pull that lever and it shoots the cigarette through the torpedo hole.

0:24:580:25:04

Oh.

0:25:040:25:05

Why would you want to do that

0:25:050:25:07

if you've had to put it in in the first place?

0:25:070:25:09

-If you stand in the right direction and the right height...

-Yeah?

0:25:090:25:14

-..it shoots it straight into your mouth.

-Oh, for goodness' sake!

0:25:140:25:18

Very good, Lewis.

0:25:200:25:21

This boat is likely to date from the 1940s

0:25:210:25:24

and Margie thinks it falls into the collectable category of trench art,

0:25:240:25:29

as it may have been made by a soldier or a POW during the war.

0:25:290:25:33

Fire.

0:25:330:25:34

LEVER CLICKS

0:25:340:25:36

Ticketed at £49.

0:25:360:25:38

-I must say I quite like that.

-Yeah.

-Right, well, I mustn't linger.

0:25:380:25:42

No. One to think about.

0:25:420:25:44

Right, what's spinning round in here?

0:25:440:25:46

Let's have a look.

0:25:480:25:49

Just have a look at this. What's this little chap here? Hey.

0:25:500:25:55

This little wooden boot is a Victorian inkwell, priced at £52.

0:25:550:26:00

It's very cute. It's got the original little bottle in.

0:26:000:26:04

We've got a bit of damage.

0:26:040:26:07

Oh, that's cute, isn't it? I quite like that.

0:26:070:26:09

Margie seems to like it so that's her second possible.

0:26:120:26:15

I will go for either the boot or the trench art, but I've got

0:26:160:26:20

to make my mind up soon cos Charles Hanson is about to arrive.

0:26:200:26:23

Speak of the devil.

0:26:260:26:27

Lordy. Margie's on the move. Look at her shift.

0:26:270:26:31

Oh, I can hear his car outside.

0:26:310:26:34

If I bought the two items...

0:26:340:26:36

Perfect.

0:26:370:26:39

-30 for that.

-Quick, quick.

-30 for that.

-Yeah?

-And...

0:26:390:26:43

-Could that be 20?

-30...

0:26:430:26:45

-I can't do... I can't...

-50 for the two.

-I can't sanction that.

0:26:450:26:49

-It's not my stock so...

-I know it's not.

-..I'm limited.

0:26:490:26:51

-You don't want to ring her?

-We can phone, yeah.

0:26:510:26:54

Hurry up, Lewis. I hope that dealer's on speed dial.

0:26:540:26:57

Oops.

0:26:570:26:59

-28 you can have it. That'll do.

-I've got the two in the bag.

0:26:590:27:02

Got the 28 and I've got yours at...

0:27:020:27:04

25.

0:27:040:27:06

53.

0:27:060:27:08

For £53, she takes the 1940s cigarette dispenser

0:27:080:27:11

and the Victorian inkwell,

0:27:110:27:13

and just in time cos here comes Charles.

0:27:130:27:16

Hello.

0:27:200:27:21

-How are you?

-Fine, thank you.

-Charles Hanson.

0:27:250:27:29

-Is she here yet?

-She is. She is. She's been.

-She's been and gone?

0:27:290:27:33

-No, she's here.

-She's not here now, is she? Margie Cooper's here?

-Yes.

0:27:330:27:37

OK, fine.

0:27:370:27:38

I'll go for a little mingle round and if you see her...

0:27:380:27:41

I'm incognito.

0:27:410:27:42

-Oh, it's you! You!

-How are you?

-Well, late. I'm late!

0:27:420:27:47

I know you're late. It's been terrific. I've had hours here.

0:27:470:27:51

-Have you been a magpie around the entire...?

-I'm done and dusted.

0:27:510:27:56

-You're joking.

-You're on your own, kid. Good luck, mate. See you.

0:27:560:28:01

Right, I'm out.

0:28:010:28:02

I bought two items, I've got six in total, and I'm glad to be

0:28:020:28:06

finished now that Hanson's in there, cos he causes chaos sometimes.

0:28:060:28:10

Margie leaves Charles to it, with over £428 still in his pocket.

0:28:110:28:17

It's always quite nice to begin at the bottom and work up. Follow me.

0:28:210:28:25

Margie never found the basement.

0:28:270:28:29

Yes. What's great is down here,

0:28:320:28:34

this teapot goes back to 1810.

0:28:340:28:37

We're talking what essentially is a boat-shaped, octagonal teapot,

0:28:370:28:43

beautifully painted in a whimsical, regency style.

0:28:430:28:48

What's really nice is you get the teapot stand as well.

0:28:480:28:51

Yeah, priced at just £12.50, it's one to leave to brew.

0:28:530:28:57

What I do quite like, having just come upstairs, and sometimes

0:28:570:29:00

you need your mates with you, are the seven dwarfs down here,

0:29:000:29:04

and they're really quite sweet.

0:29:040:29:06

This one I think could be Happy. How are you, Happy?

0:29:060:29:11

They're quite nice. They're just weathered. But they're quite sweet.

0:29:110:29:15

They are complete, but sometimes when you're going into a battle,

0:29:150:29:19

you need your mates with you to keep the Hansen line up and running.

0:29:190:29:23

Hey, guys, you fancy coming to Norfolk with me?

0:29:230:29:26

These seven chaps are priced at £49.

0:29:280:29:30

With nothing else to tease him on this floor, Charles heads upstairs.

0:29:300:29:34

That's nice. What we've got here is a very nice dish from circa 1810.

0:29:380:29:44

This dish, although it is very oriental,

0:29:440:29:47

was in fact made in Staffordshire, and the body,

0:29:470:29:49

you'll see from the slightly bluish glaze, is a pearlware.

0:29:490:29:56

This could appeal to collectors.

0:29:560:29:59

Ticketed at £20, Charles is interested.

0:29:590:30:02

I'll leave that down there.

0:30:050:30:07

-Sharon?

-Yes?

-I just wonder, this jardiniere over here...

-Yes.

0:30:090:30:14

..which has a plant in it, is it for sale?

0:30:140:30:16

-Yes, it is.

-How much is it? Is it yours?

-Yeah.

0:30:160:30:19

-Has it not got a price mark?

-It's a bit cracked.

-I know it is.

0:30:190:30:23

-Let me give you that plant.

-It's not wet, is it?

0:30:230:30:26

This porcelain jardiniere is Japanese and is over 100 years old.

0:30:280:30:32

Sharon and Lewis even have a stand to go with it.

0:30:320:30:36

Oh, that's nice. I just need something which has a look.

0:30:360:30:40

Indeed, a grand stand for a Japanese pot.

0:30:400:30:44

If I said to you...

0:30:460:30:47

.."Would you sell the two together," what would be your best price?

0:30:490:30:52

75 for the two.

0:30:520:30:54

I'm going to come to some decisions now, if that's OK with you, Sharon.

0:30:550:30:58

-Yeah.

-OK. Let me show you over here.

0:30:580:31:01

-I brought this downstairs from your top floor.

-Yes. Yes.

0:31:010:31:04

That's a nice dish. What would be the best on that?

0:31:040:31:08

15 on that.

0:31:080:31:10

You wouldn't take ten for it, would you?

0:31:100:31:13

Meet me halfway at 12?

0:31:130:31:14

-Go on, I'll do it for 12.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

0:31:140:31:16

Sold one. We've got a deal. Thank you, Sharon. That's great.

0:31:160:31:19

-So I've bought one thing.

-Yes.

0:31:190:31:21

-In your cellar, there is a teapot and cover on stand.

-Right.

0:31:210:31:27

-May I just run and get it for you now very quickly?

-Yes, yes.

-OK.

0:31:270:31:31

-I'll be back in ten seconds, OK? Count me in.

-I will.

0:31:310:31:34

-Nine, ten.

-Oh, yes.

0:31:420:31:44

-Is it yours?

-That is ours, yeah.

-Oh, well done. £12.50.

0:31:440:31:47

-We're doing that for 12, aren't we?

-Yeah.

-8. So 20 for the two.

0:31:470:31:51

I'll take that. That's one more down. What else have I seen?

0:31:520:31:56

-I like the dwarves. Are they yours?

-Yes.

-Where do they come from?

0:31:560:31:59

-The garden in Lincolnshire.

-Did they?

0:31:590:32:01

I think they've been almost highlighted.

0:32:010:32:04

Their colours are so flashy, aren't they?

0:32:040:32:06

They're priced at £49 for seven.

0:32:060:32:11

-Would you take £25?

-Yes.

-Done.

0:32:110:32:14

Thank you very much.

0:32:140:32:15

There we go. We're not hanging around, now. Bang, bang, bang.

0:32:150:32:18

Going, going, gone.

0:32:180:32:19

-That's three things.

-Yes.

-I do like this.

-What were we at, 75?

0:32:190:32:25

-50 and our wagons roll.

-If you're happy on that. Yes?

0:32:250:32:29

-I'm happy and you know it. Clap your hands.

-Yes.

-I'll take it.

0:32:290:32:35

Thanks a lot. Thank you so much.

0:32:350:32:36

-That's all right.

-Give us a kiss. Thanks very much.

0:32:360:32:40

After struggling yesterday,

0:32:400:32:41

Charles has bought four items in as many minutes.

0:32:410:32:44

The pearlware plate,

0:32:440:32:46

the Staffordshire teapot,

0:32:460:32:49

a large Japanese jardiniere with a stand,

0:32:490:32:52

and seven garden gnomes,

0:32:520:32:54

all for £95,

0:32:540:32:56

and that brings our shopping to an end.

0:32:560:32:58

Until next time. Bye!

0:32:590:33:01

On the last haul, Charles married together the pearlware plate

0:33:030:33:07

and Staffordshire teapot into one lot.

0:33:070:33:10

His other buys include a pair of Royal Dux figurines,

0:33:100:33:13

a Victorian rosewood box,

0:33:130:33:15

and an 18th-century cornice.

0:33:150:33:17

All that lot cost him £163.

0:33:170:33:20

Margie parted with £144,

0:33:220:33:26

buying an Edwardian toilet mirror,

0:33:260:33:28

a gramophone,

0:33:280:33:29

a 1950s glass vase,

0:33:290:33:31

a 1930s stepladder,

0:33:310:33:33

a Victorian inkwell

0:33:330:33:35

and a wooden cigarette dispenser.

0:33:350:33:38

Like the look of the competition, guys?

0:33:380:33:40

Margie's bought really well this time.

0:33:400:33:42

The gramophone, well, Margie,

0:33:420:33:43

we all like sweet music and roll back the years because

0:33:430:33:47

they're wonderful objects, it's in a great case and that's a star buy.

0:33:470:33:50

I think that stands out, that carved piece of wood.

0:33:500:33:53

Probably 18th century. Gilded. I like it very much.

0:33:530:33:57

The final stop of this leg is located in the Norfolk countryside

0:33:580:34:02

in the attractive market town of Aylsham.

0:34:020:34:04

Oh!

0:34:060:34:07

Oh, it's a bit damp today.

0:34:070:34:10

-I've got a wet leg.

-I know. My leg's wet.

0:34:100:34:12

I'm not sure what's happened, Margie.

0:34:120:34:14

It's either the nerves or it's the rain.

0:34:140:34:17

Not a good thought, that.

0:34:170:34:19

Today's auction is taking place at Keys Auctioneers, a local

0:34:190:34:22

institution, and they've been selling from here for well over 60 years.

0:34:220:34:26

-This must be it, Margie.

-This is it.

-This must be it.

0:34:260:34:29

-The rain is ceasing, Margie. We're here.

-Right, turn it off.

0:34:290:34:34

-I can't get out.

-I think there's two things.

0:34:340:34:36

It's getting out of the car

0:34:360:34:38

and also getting out here without a huge loss.

0:34:380:34:40

Come on, man.

0:34:420:34:44

-Oh. There. I'm out. Margie, stretch, be ready.

-Oh!

0:34:440:34:50

-Let's go.

-Are you ready?

-Let's go.

0:34:500:34:53

Our auctioneer today is Dave Gould. What does he think will do well?

0:34:540:34:59

The nice 20th-century oriental jardiniere and stand.

0:34:590:35:02

And again I would have thought that would be estimated sort of

0:35:020:35:06

40-50, 40-60, that sort of area.

0:35:060:35:08

Gramophone, again, they're great little cabinet.

0:35:080:35:10

It's a nice, light, oak one. I would have thought you'd be looking

0:35:100:35:13

sort of anywhere in the area of sort of £30-£50 on that, realistically.

0:35:130:35:18

Time now for Charles and Margie to take their seats.

0:35:180:35:21

The first lot to go under Dave's gavel is Charles's seven gnomes.

0:35:230:35:28

I've got to start these on commissions at £30 here.

0:35:280:35:31

Come on, let's go. Come on. Let's go. Come on.

0:35:310:35:35

-32, 35.

-Let's go.

0:35:350:35:38

-It's sticky.

-35. It's with me.

-Come on, sell. One more. 35. One more.

0:35:380:35:43

-They were cheap.

-They were cheap. Doesn't matter.

0:35:430:35:46

Doesn't matter, Margie.

0:35:460:35:47

Kicking off with a profit.

0:35:470:35:49

Next up, Margie's Edwardian toilet mirror.

0:35:510:35:54

Unfortunately replacement glass...

0:35:540:35:56

Oh... What did he say that for?

0:35:560:35:58

30? 30.

0:35:580:36:00

30? 30. 30? 30.

0:36:000:36:02

32, 35.

0:36:020:36:03

You're flying high, Margie. Doubled up.

0:36:030:36:07

48. 48? 48. 50.

0:36:070:36:10

Margie Cooper, take a bow.

0:36:100:36:12

Come on.

0:36:120:36:14

All out now then at 50.

0:36:140:36:17

-Margie Cooper!

-It's not that brilliant.

-25.

0:36:170:36:19

That's the biggest profit of the day so far. Take a bow.

0:36:190:36:23

We're only two lots in, Charles. But, yes, Margie's doubled her money.

0:36:230:36:27

This chap with a stick is telling us

0:36:270:36:29

Charles's Japanese jardiniere and stand is up next.

0:36:290:36:33

Who wants a jardiniere? Any bids? Any bids?

0:36:330:36:36

I've got to start that one here at 35.

0:36:360:36:38

Come on. I'm behind. Come on.

0:36:380:36:42

-38, 40.

-Come on, sir.

0:36:420:36:44

-Come on.

-49. 50.

0:36:440:36:47

-55, 60.

-Come on!

0:36:470:36:49

Yes, over there. Sorry. Sorry.

0:36:490:36:53

-With you, madam.

-Thank you very much, madam.

-Anyone else now?

0:36:530:36:56

-Away now then at 65.

-OK. That's OK.

0:36:560:37:01

A strong profit for Charles. Well done.

0:37:010:37:04

It's that stick again. Margie's stepladders are up now.

0:37:040:37:08

Start this here at £15.

0:37:080:37:11

-My money back.

-£50? £50?

-15, 15.

0:37:110:37:14

Maiden bid with commissions and I'll sell away now at 15.

0:37:140:37:18

-Got away with it. Got away with it.

-That's good. £15. Broken even.

0:37:180:37:23

It will be a small loss after commission, though.

0:37:230:37:26

But it's early days.

0:37:260:37:28

Charles loved the carved 18th-century cornice. How will it do?

0:37:290:37:33

I've got to start this at £30 I'm bid.

0:37:340:37:37

-It could bomb.

-30? 30. 30? 30.

0:37:370:37:39

-Doesn't matter. That's OK.

-35? 35.

0:37:390:37:44

-38. 40.

-Go on. One more.

0:37:440:37:47

-42. 45.

-Go on, sir. One more.

0:37:470:37:50

-I'll sell them at 45.

-History.

0:37:500:37:53

Someone's got a so-called 300-year-old cornice for a steal.

0:37:530:37:57

The next lot is Margie's 1950s glass vase.

0:37:580:38:01

£10 here for that at 10.

0:38:010:38:03

10? 10. At 12? 12.

0:38:030:38:05

15? At 15. 15. 18? At 18.

0:38:050:38:08

18? 18. 18?

0:38:080:38:10

Go on. At 18. 18. 18. It's in front.

0:38:100:38:12

It goes now at 18.

0:38:120:38:15

-18. Got a tenner.

-That's good. Oh, that's great.

0:38:150:38:18

It is. And Margie's slowly stretching ahead.

0:38:180:38:21

Charles's next lot was supposed to be the pearlware plate and the teapot.

0:38:210:38:24

However, the plate was broken during the auction viewing - a tragedy.

0:38:240:38:28

The auction house has given an insurance valuation of £45

0:38:280:38:32

for both items and if the teapot on its own sells for any less,

0:38:320:38:35

Charles will still receive 45.

0:38:350:38:37

Make sense? Good.

0:38:370:38:39

What a shame.

0:38:390:38:41

Yeah, the teapot's great. OK. I'm still standing, Margie.

0:38:410:38:44

At £10. At 10. 10, 10, 10,

0:38:440:38:46

-12, 15.

-Very attractive.

-At 15, 18.

0:38:460:38:49

-Very lovely, yeah. I love it.

-£20.

0:38:490:38:52

20. Commission takes it away again.

0:38:520:38:54

That's broken even.

0:38:540:38:55

Hammer's gone down at 20, but the insurance was 45,

0:38:560:39:00

so Charles walks away with a £25 profit.

0:39:000:39:02

Smashing.

0:39:020:39:04

No, I'm very happy with that. Helps me out. Helps a poor man out today.

0:39:040:39:07

Now time for Margie's cigarette dispenser.

0:39:070:39:10

I love this. This will do well.

0:39:100:39:12

Maritime interest. You watch his move, Margie Cooper.

0:39:120:39:15

Start me then at 10. 10, 12, 15.

0:39:150:39:18

18, 20? At 20. 2, do you want? 22.

0:39:180:39:21

-25.

-Margie, you're flying high.

-No, I'm not.

0:39:210:39:24

At 22. 22. 25. 25.

0:39:240:39:27

28. 28. 28, you're sure?

0:39:270:39:29

-Come on.

-At 28. 28.

0:39:290:39:30

-28. 28. With Nelson, away it goes now.

-That's good, Margie.

0:39:300:39:33

No, it's not!

0:39:330:39:34

Is that profit for you?

0:39:340:39:35

If should have made about £70.

0:39:350:39:38

It made Margie a few pounds' profit.

0:39:380:39:40

Now it's the turn of Charles's Royal Dux figurines.

0:39:410:39:44

-Unfortunately, a bit of damage.

-Don't say that!

0:39:440:39:47

One hand been cut in half and glued together, but still a nice pair.

0:39:470:39:50

Well, that's killed them.

0:39:500:39:52

Hey, let's see.

0:39:520:39:53

25. 25.

0:39:530:39:56

-28. 30...

-Hey, there you go.

0:39:560:39:59

-35.

-Come on!

-38.

0:39:590:40:02

At 38. 38. 40.

0:40:020:40:04

-At 40. 40, 40, 40, 40.

-Come on. Let's go.

0:40:040:40:07

That's where we're stuck now then at £40.

0:40:070:40:09

I'm delighted with that, Margie. I'm over the moon.

0:40:090:40:12

-That's a great return.

-Well done.

-Thanks, Margie.

0:40:120:40:14

Well done indeed. A cracking return.

0:40:140:40:16

Next, Margie's Victorian ink well.

0:40:190:40:23

-We'll start that at £10 here.

-Oh, Margie Cooper!

0:40:230:40:26

12, 15. At 15. 15, 18.

0:40:260:40:28

At 18. 18, 20.

0:40:280:40:31

-At 20.

-2.

-At 20. Lady takes a seat and you're all out?

0:40:310:40:34

Away it goes, then, at 20.

0:40:340:40:36

That was so cheap. That was so cheap!

0:40:370:40:40

That's a shame, Margie.

0:40:400:40:42

Will Charles have better luck with his piece of Victoriana?

0:40:420:40:46

His rosewood box is up now.

0:40:460:40:48

I'm going to start that here at £5 only.

0:40:480:40:50

-Oh, no. Come on!

-At 5, 6, 8...

0:40:500:40:52

Let's go. Come on, let's go.

0:40:520:40:53

At 10. 12, 15? At 15. 18. 20. At 20.

0:40:530:40:58

-22, 25.

-Come on!

0:40:580:41:02

Anybody else? 28 there!

0:41:020:41:03

-28. 28, 28, 28.

-Go on, madam.

0:41:030:41:06

-28, standing near...

-One for the road!

0:41:060:41:09

One for Norfolk.

0:41:090:41:10

And that's all, folks.

0:41:100:41:11

-That's you done.

-I'm happy.

0:41:110:41:13

Well done, Charles. You're ending on a profit.

0:41:130:41:15

Ooh, stick's back, look. And pointing out our pair's last lot,

0:41:170:41:21

Margie's gramophone and records.

0:41:210:41:24

-This gramophone is big, £43.

-We must wind it up.

0:41:240:41:27

I think it will wind them up. You watch.

0:41:270:41:30

-Start this here at £35.

-Get in! Well played.

0:41:300:41:34

-40. 2, 45.

-You're flying, Margie Cooper!

0:41:340:41:38

50. 55? 55.

0:41:380:41:39

-60.

-Yeah, £60!

0:41:390:41:41

-70. 75.

-Margie Cooper!

0:41:410:41:43

75. 80. 85. 90.

0:41:430:41:47

-Hey!

-5, do you want?

-Oh, my goodness!

0:41:470:41:50

Coming out in a hot flush!

0:41:500:41:52

-100. At 100.

-MARGIE LAUGHS

0:41:520:41:56

-Margie, you're the queen of the east.

-That's brilliant.

0:41:560:42:00

A brilliant profit for Margie to end the auction,

0:42:010:42:04

but is it enough to win this leg?

0:42:040:42:06

Margie started off with £280.32.

0:42:080:42:11

After paying auction house fees, she's made a profit today of £45.42,

0:42:110:42:17

meaning she has £325.74 for next time.

0:42:170:42:23

Charles started this leg with £496.46.

0:42:250:42:30

After costs, he's made a profit of £48.56,

0:42:300:42:34

which means - by a slim margin of just over £3 -

0:42:340:42:38

he's today's winner and carries forward £545.02

0:42:380:42:43

to the next leg. Wow!

0:42:430:42:46

-Pipped at the post, that's what I've been.

-It was a funny old game today.

0:42:460:42:49

It was high and low. The helter-skelter of the road trip.

0:42:490:42:52

-You've got the luck of the Irish, you have.

-Get out of here!

0:42:520:42:55

Until next time, then, bye-bye.

0:42:550:42:58

Bye!

0:42:580:42:59

Next time on Antiques Roadtrip... WEAK NOTE

0:43:010:43:03

..it starts like a fairytale for Charles and Margie...

0:43:030:43:06

You are Maid Marian. I can be your Robin Hood.

0:43:060:43:10

..but will it turn into a brawl?

0:43:100:43:12

-Get off! He's being very...

-Do you want me to make an offer for it?

0:43:120:43:16

Auctioneer Charles Hanson and dealer Margie Cooper are halfway through their road trip. They start in Melbourne, south Derbyshire, and head for an auction in the Norfolk town of Aylsham.