Episode 9 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 9

Antiques challenge. In their penultimate leg, Charles Hanson and Margie Cooper start off in Nottingham and make their way towards an auction in Lincoln.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts!

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-This is beautiful!

-That's the way to do this.

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With £200 each, a classic car, and a goal - to scour for antiques.

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Joy!

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Hello!

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction but it's no mean feat.

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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The hand brake's on.

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This is Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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Welcome to a right old ramble around the country,

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in the company of delectable antiques experts, Charles and Margie.

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-Are you enjoying yourself?

-Of course I am.

-Really?

-In your company.

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-Really?

-You're a little bright spark!

-Am I really?

-Yes, you are.

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He's full of advice too.

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-Be yourself. Live the dream.

-And make sure you don't win.

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I...you know, always think about what you're looking for.

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Like yourself, you're in good condition.

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You're of a certain quality.

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You are becoming that fashionable lot, Margie Cooper.

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I don't know whether to be flattered or offended!

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Either way, dealer and Cheshire girl

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Margie Cooper is playing catch up on this road trip.

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-I feel like I'm going to break it, Mike.

-No, I'm just worried that...

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You'll lose the sale!

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Behind the wheel of their dashing 1959 Elva is the man in front,

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auctioneer and bright spark Charles Hanson.

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Sometimes, when you're going into a battle,

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you need your mates with you.

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Yeah...

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Our duo set off on this road trip with £200 each.

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After three trips to auction, Margie has £325.74.

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But with a clean sweep of victories so far,

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Charles is boasting £545.02.

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Their epic road trip started off

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in the Leicestershire town of Melton Mowbray.

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They've been touring around six counties

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and will end their week in Leicester.

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In this penultimate leg, our pair start off in Nottingham

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and will make their way towards auction in Lincoln.

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-This is the River Trent.

-Really?

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We are now literally - and over there,

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-that must be the forest where Robin Hood hung out.

-Oh, lovely.

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He's going to be in there, is he?

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You are the current, present-day Maid Marian.

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And I can be your Robin Hood.

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That would be a sight to see. Ha!

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Let's see what riches our experts can uncover in Nottingham.

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-Look at this! It's amazing! My jacket's off, Margie.

-Coats off.

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-Can I go for a wander? Is that OK?

-Good morning!

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They're on top form this morning.

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Look at him go!

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What do you think?

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Mmm...

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Yeah, I quite like that.

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Really?

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Oh, look here. Let's see if he growls.

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Right, here we go...

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BEAR GROWLS WEAKLY

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He sounds like a flock of sheep!

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Puzzling, that(!)

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HE BLOWS HORN TUNELESSLY

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Lordy, you need a mouthpiece.

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Now, what's this box? And it says Derbyshire Shrievalty.

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Or SHRIVE-alty... Francis Douglas Ley, Esquire,

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1956-1957.

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Something to do with the Sheriff's office or something? And it's £29.

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What else has caught Margie's eye?

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That's really nice. Lovely bit of Art Nouveau silver there.

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With that lovely Art Nouveau lady at the bottom.

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It's just a little bit...

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I mean, that could be replaced quite easily.

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£69, Art Nouveau, 1910, very, very nice indeed.

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Time to speak to assistant Lynn.

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It's verging on rude if I said £35.

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Right, we'll give it a go.

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While Lynn calls the dealer to see what can be done,

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what has Charles found?

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Isn't that a pretty shape? There's one word I've got for that.

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It could almost melt.

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It's almost organic.

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It's sinuous.

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It's quite unusual.

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And it's what I would call the Art Nouveau.

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That's a lot of words, Charles.

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These Chantilly sprigs are printed rather than being painted.

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That's quite nice. Condition? Oh, what a shame! What a shame!

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There's a chip on the inside of the rim. Oh, dear.

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But it is so stylish.

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And it's made in Limoges.

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Limoges is a city in central France

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that has lent its name to fine porcelain since the 18th century.

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This sugar box dates from around 1910.

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A great-looking object.

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Only £10, it's not expensive. Could be a fiver.

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He likes to run up, he likes to run down. Best find salesmen Tony, then.

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It's priced at a tenner.

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-I wonder whether you could do it for £5.

-Erm...

-To an old mate!

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-Yes.

-Is that a yes?

-Yes.

-Lovely. I'm going to take it.

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Well, that was worth the jog downstairs.

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A first purchase of the day and the battle has begun.

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-Get off!

-I've always liked gnomes. He is early, Margie. Very nice.

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-Get off!

-Would you like me to make an offer? Oh, he's nice!

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-He's an early one.

-It is not very early.

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When it comes to gnomes, Margie, and their history,

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-they are quite early and he's an early one.

-I was having a joke.

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I picked him up and realised he was old because he's so badly painted.

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-Somebody's painted it.

-It's deceptive.

-It is.

-Would you not...?

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-But you're not a gnome collector, are you?

-£13.50.

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I might have a go at that.

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Where was it, Margie? I never saw that.

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I didn't think we'd have to separate this pair over a gnome!

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I don't really want this guy. I was having a laugh with Charles, really.

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And I thought he was brand new. But he's not brand new.

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He's just horribly painted.

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Before you decide, let's find out

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what Lynn can do for the box and mirror.

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It would have to be 65...

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-For the two?

-For the two, yeah.

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Ahem, ahem! Don't forget old ugly mugs.

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You're never going to sell that, are you?

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You'd need a real mug punter to buy that.

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It's just that I happen to like gnomes. £69 and throw him in.

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OK, a deal.

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-Great stuff.

-A cracking haul for Margie.

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Three items in her first shop, all for £69.

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Charles is back on the road and is making his way to Southwell

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in rural Nottinghamshire.

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He is visiting an imposing building with a bleak history.

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Behind these walls, a harsh new way of treating the poorest in society

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was created to tackle one of the biggest problems in Victorian Britain.

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-Hello.

-Hi!

-You must be Sam.

-Hi.

-Sam, I'm Charles Hanson.

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-Hi, Charles. Pleased to meet you.

-What an amazing building!

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This is a workhouse and it was built in 1824,

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and it was to house the destitute in society.

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At the end of the 18th century,

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the labouring classes were at the mercy of the harvests,

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and poverty was regarded as an unavoidable part of life.

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At a time before the welfare state,

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hand-outs in local parishes of money and food were the only

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thing preventing the poor from being left to die on the streets.

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But in the newly industrialised world of the 19th century,

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poverty was also rife. The strain to provide for the poor

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created a crisis and a new solution was required.

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Some believed charity should be made less desirable.

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From that idea sprung a new type of poor relief,

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and Southwell was part of the social revolution that emerged.

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Reverend Beecher, who was local to Southwell and a clergyman,

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looked at a new way of a workhouse,

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and this was to be different.

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The way that the poor would ask for relief would change from being given

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help in their own homes to being compelled to come into a workhouse.

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This was the only choice.

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Beecher's idea meant that hand-outs were no longer provided.

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Instead, the underprivileged were brought here

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and made to work in return for food and shelter.

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This significantly reduced the cost of looking after the poor.

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But for this system to prosper,

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conditions in the workhouse needed to be so harsh that only the truly

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destitute would be willing to go there in the first place for help.

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If you came here as a family, it must've been the hardest decision

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you would ever make as a family, because you were separated once you were in.

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And you would only see each other once a week, on a Sunday,

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if you behaved yourself.

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Regardless of age, inmates, as they were known,

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were divided by gender and then into those able and those unable to work.

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Each group was kept separate at all times.

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It was a harsh life, with real rules and regulations.

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Is that what Beecher wanted?

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Was he behind the poor and looking after them?

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Well, yes, he was, because, you know, he gave a home

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and a place of refuge to people that were really in need,

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that potentially had nobody else to look after them.

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This building was designed to hold around 160 inmates.

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By the mid 19th century,

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there were hundreds of thousands of workhouse inmates across the country.

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Poverty in Victorian Britain was so severe that the shelter

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of the workhouse was the only thing that would keep them alive.

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-So this duvet cover actually feels like it's filled with...

-Straw.

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-Straw. It's straw?

-Yeah.

-It's straw.

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Gosh, I mean...that's not very comfortable at all, is it?

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No comfort. You can, yeah...

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Golly, I just wonder how many eyes looked at the ceiling

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and thought, "Is this my life?"

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Because the bed is so uncomfortable and this cover I suppose

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did add warmth, but it's not overly nice, even against my rough hands.

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-But that was life.

-It was.

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And it was better than a hedgerow, I should imagine.

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Work was considered important to improve the moral outlook

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of the inmates, but it also generated income.

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For around 10 hours each day,

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the inhabitants could be subjected to backbreaking physical labour.

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Some would work in the fields,

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while others would break up rocks to sell for road building.

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The phrase "money for old rope" comes from inmates teasing

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the fibres from ropes to be recycled and sold on.

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This was the price paid for basic food and shelter.

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It was a form of welfare.

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It provided relief and it provided warmth and shelter

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and a home for those that had no alternative.

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The system used here became the model for the treatment of the poor

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over the next century.

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Workhouses were rolled out across the country

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and all other forms of poor relief were abolished.

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Over time, they became feared and hated places.

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It was only with welfare reform and the creation of the National Health Service in the 1940s

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that these brutal workhouses, that were once viewed as revolutionary, were finally brought to an end.

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Close by, Margie is scouring the streets of Southwell to find

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herself something to purchase.

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This looks just the job.

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-Ah, Terry!

-Hello!

-Terry, I must say, how great to see that.

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The old-fashioned sign for an antique shop.

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Ah, yes. The barber's pole of the antiques world.

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-Good to meet you.

-And you. Margie, and you're Terry?

-Yeah, I'm Terry.

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Introductions over, what takes your fancy?

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-I see you've got lots of nice shiny stuff.

-Yes! I like my silver.

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-Some of it's reasonably modern and other pieces are...

-These are old.

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-There is a little piece there that is a Victorian.

-That's lovely.

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But I can't see a price there.

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Oh, here we go! Time for a closer look, Terry?

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See, we've got that, we've got that on at £59. You'll get that at £59.

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Absolutely cracking nick, late Victorian.

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-What a lovely thing to give somebody for a gift, eh?

-Mm.

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I'm trying to find the mark at the moment.

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Oh, yeah. Oh, God, that's nice. Nice little Chester hallmark.

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That's really nice. Right, OK. That's a little start.

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And I'm going to start having a little wander, if I may?

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Have a wander and if you spot anything,

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I'll always do a price for you. I'm well known for it.

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Aw, Terry, that's really nice.

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Two feet from the till and Margie's got her eye on some silver. Anything else?

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Right, let's just have a look.

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OK, what's this?

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This looks quite nice, doesn't it?

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It's a marriage.

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I think the base is rosewood.

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A different top to how it started life.

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Mahogany.

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Really?

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The ticket price is £65.

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If it's not a lot of money, it doesn't really matter

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about the marriage. But if you're spending a lot of money,

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you've got to have the right top with the right base.

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-Oh, yeah. One to think about, then.

-What are these here?

-The cards?

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They are, I believe, from 19... Well, First World War, 1914.

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I think they're called sweetheart cards.

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Sweetheart cards were postcards created for soldiers to send

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back home to their loved ones. These are dated from the First World War.

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-They haven't been written on.

-So you bought them as a collection?

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Yeah, yeah. Some people prefer them to be written on.

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-Oh, my goodness me. A little bit dramatic, aren't they?

-Mm.

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-But why not?

-Why not? It was dramatic times!

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It was, yeah. So how much are those, Terry?

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-Well, it's £25 for the whole lot.

-Doesn't sound a lot, does it?

-I don't think it's a lot.

-No.

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-I've also seen - in the other room - the little table.

-Yeah.

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-Maybe we could go and look together?

-Yeah, yeah. Have a look.

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Got something in your eye, Margie?

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So it's on at 65, I believe.

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Yeah, which is, you know, you'd be lucky if it gets that.

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-What are you looking at?

-So, for the three...

-For the three, yeah?

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85.

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Sorry?

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Well, the cards are bit...

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90, and they're all yours.

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Done it!

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And just like that, Margie polishes off a very productive day.

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Nighty-night.

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-It's another day and another county.

-Wakey-wakey!

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We're shopping in our great country.

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-We are.

-Give me an L.

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-Leicestershire.

-Lincolnshire!

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Geography aside, Margie went straight to the head of the class

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yesterday, grabbing a silver hand mirror, a document trunk,

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a painted gnome, a silver sweetmeat dish,

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a set of World War I postcards and a side table -

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leaving her with £166.74.

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Charles had a rather more sedate start to proceedings,

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picking up a Limoges sugar box,

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so he still has a rather large

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£540.02 to spend today.

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And with some ground to make up,

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Charles is hopping out to Navenby to visit his first emporium of the day.

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-Pull in here, Margie. Thanks, Marge. See you later.

-Bye-bye!

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-Bye!

-See you!

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-Good morning, how are you?

-Good morning, Charles!

-Nice to see you.

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Nice to see you again.

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Do you know, I was about to say, it looks vaguely familiar.

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-You were here three or four years ago. You were.

-Yes, I was.

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A long time ago.

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Hopefully, there's plenty of new stock for you by now, Charles.

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These are quite sweet. Let me hold one.

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If you close your eyes... and you grab the other one...

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-And I think these are cut, aren't they?

-Yes.

-So, they're not moulded.

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If they were moulded, they'd be quite smooth and not so crisp.

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On my collar here, a very clear hallmark, which is for Birmingham.

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And the date code, I suspect, is probably 1910, 1912.

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They're probably George V. One is slightly bigger than the other one.

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Hallmark for the same date code as well,

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so they are a pair, which is great to see.

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That's a pair of perfume bottles for a ticket price of £125.

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Laura, I think what I'll do...

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I will earmark these as a definitely-maybe.

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-Yes, absolutely, I'll pop them on the counter for you.

-And then come back to them.

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But there's so much to see here in your shop.

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-I'm going to wander on.

-I'd watch out, Laura.

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Charles looks like he's going to get stuck in this morning.

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This is a lovely mahogany box.

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On the inside, it's pine.

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And what's interesting is this dealer has put

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a flame mahogany two-section tea caddy, circa 1890.

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In fact, it's more like 1790.

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And of course, tea, back in 1790, was very expensive.

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Tea was kept under lock and key, to keep the butler out.

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You can buy - not a late Victorian tea caddy -

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but a Georgian tea caddy for £14.

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And that's amazing. Interesting.

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That's a great find, and he's not hanging about...

0:18:270:18:31

Wow!

0:18:310:18:33

What we've got here is probably a panel, which is very much

0:18:350:18:40

in the Gothic taste.

0:18:400:18:42

That panel may have come off a pew, but it's certainly

0:18:420:18:46

a piece of timber that has come off something perhaps ecclesiastical.

0:18:460:18:50

This big, heavily carved piece of yew, that is probably circa 1600.

0:18:500:18:58

I really think it's that early.

0:18:580:19:01

And of course, to celebrate the panel, what somebody has done,

0:19:010:19:05

in maybe the 20th century, is put these oak legs

0:19:050:19:12

and stretcher onto it.

0:19:120:19:15

And it could be £65. But next to it is this.

0:19:150:19:20

And I love this. This stool is tribal. And it reads here,

0:19:200:19:26

"African? Stool?"

0:19:260:19:30

All we know is it's £85.

0:19:300:19:34

But it certainly is African and it's well-carved, with great colour.

0:19:340:19:39

You could almost eat off it.

0:19:390:19:41

It is such a well-patinated original African stool,

0:19:410:19:47

of circa 1890.

0:19:470:19:49

And that stool really has legs.

0:19:490:19:51

Hey, he's unearthing a lot in here.

0:19:530:19:55

That's nice.

0:19:570:20:00

That's lovely, isn't it?

0:20:000:20:02

This actually is Scottish.

0:20:020:20:05

And it's just so different.

0:20:050:20:07

What I like, again, if you look very closely,

0:20:070:20:10

is the gold specks within the actual glass body.

0:20:100:20:14

It's only priced at £75, which, to me,

0:20:140:20:18

is a fairly conservative retail price.

0:20:180:20:23

Importantly, has it got a good ring?

0:20:230:20:26

Yes, it has! It's lovely.

0:20:260:20:29

Again, I might go and query that, alongside the stools, with Laura.

0:20:290:20:34

I think Laura's got a calculator. Let's start with the bowl.

0:20:340:20:38

-Dean says he will do that for you...

-Look at me...

0:20:380:20:41

..at what he paid for it.

0:20:410:20:43

-Oh, crikey!

-And he'll do that for you at £40.

-So, at cost price. Wowee, that's good!

0:20:430:20:47

Have you got a pen? May I borrow a pen and paper?

0:20:470:20:50

-Yes!

-Because when I get a bit nervous and we talk money...

0:20:500:20:53

-You need to start writing some notes.

-My mind can go a bit blank.

0:20:530:20:56

Yeah... Paper at the ready, Laura also offers £30 for the church stool

0:20:560:21:01

and £40 for the African tribal fellow.

0:21:010:21:04

-£10 for the tea caddy and knocks £55 off the scent bottles.

-Wow!

0:21:040:21:08

I need to lie down. I've got a sweat on. I've got a sweat on!

0:21:080:21:12

That leaves Charles staring at a generous £174 discount.

0:21:120:21:17

And I will say for £190, I'm going, going, gone.

0:21:170:21:22

-Excellent!

-Thank you so much, Laura. Thank you so much!

0:21:220:21:25

-Hey, a huge haul for £190.

-Thank you.

0:21:250:21:28

-Very welcome. Aw!

-See you, Laura. Take care. Bye!

0:21:280:21:31

Keeps on kissing hands. What a charmer!

0:21:310:21:33

Oh, dear! I feel a bit dizzy now. Take care.

0:21:330:21:36

And no wonder. Top work, Charles!

0:21:360:21:38

Margie has toddled north to the cathedral city of Lincoln,

0:21:390:21:43

to learn about one of the most popular men in Victorian Britain.

0:21:430:21:48

Grace Timmons is introducing Margie to the Alfred Tennyson Collection,

0:21:480:21:52

which tells of a man

0:21:520:21:54

who not only became one of our most celebrated poets,

0:21:540:21:58

but changed the way the public viewed

0:21:580:22:01

and interacted with poetry forever.

0:22:010:22:03

In this corner, we've got the books that Tennyson grew up with.

0:22:030:22:07

-This is his father's library, which was in Somersby.

-Yeah.

0:22:070:22:11

Tennyson was born in 1809, he was one of 11 children born in 13 years.

0:22:110:22:17

Gosh! Tennyson's father was a scholar, who tutored Tennyson

0:22:170:22:21

and his brothers with a classical education.

0:22:210:22:24

I've got a book here that I can show you.

0:22:240:22:26

It's Virgil, which indicates a lot of his approach to the study

0:22:260:22:31

that his father set him to do.

0:22:310:22:33

-So we see a lot of...

-He made comments all the time.

-Yeah.

0:22:330:22:36

And there's a lot of translation and comments here

0:22:360:22:39

and this is probably his teenage work.

0:22:390:22:41

But what I like best, though, is if you look at the front,

0:22:410:22:45

apart from all the doodles that are here, we've got this,

0:22:450:22:48

which says Tennyson, Somersby, in Lincolnshire, in England,

0:22:480:22:53

in Europe, in the world, in the air, in space!

0:22:530:22:56

So, he's got a bit of attitude, hasn't he?

0:22:560:23:00

But life in the rectory wasn't always a happy place.

0:23:000:23:03

Alfred's father is believed

0:23:030:23:05

to have been prone to alcoholism and violence.

0:23:050:23:08

Poetry was Alfred's escape.

0:23:080:23:10

At the age of 18, he published a collection of poems,

0:23:100:23:14

with his brothers, before leaving home for Cambridge University.

0:23:140:23:17

When he arrived in Cambridge,

0:23:170:23:19

suddenly he's meeting a whole group of young men who are

0:23:190:23:22

like-minded but who had a very different background to him.

0:23:220:23:26

So, they're urbane, sophisticated, well travelled. But they really enjoyed what he was writing.

0:23:260:23:31

And Arthur Hallam, a friend he made, who became his best friend,

0:23:310:23:35

was particularly constructive about Tennyson's work

0:23:350:23:39

and very supportive of his creativity.

0:23:390:23:43

They became inseparable friends

0:23:430:23:45

but when Hallam died suddenly at the age of 22,

0:23:450:23:48

Tennyson was hit hard by grief.

0:23:480:23:50

He then embarked on a journey of poetic therapy,

0:23:500:23:54

that would last 15 years and result in one of his most celebrated works.

0:23:540:23:58

Probably his most famous couplet is from In Memoriam,

0:24:000:24:03

when he finally decided, the grief he was experiencing from

0:24:030:24:06

the death of Hallam was kind of worth it. He says,

0:24:060:24:09

I felt it, when I sorrow'd most,

0:24:090:24:12

'Tis better to have loved and lost, Than never to have loved at all.

0:24:120:24:16

Published in 1850, his work became an instant success.

0:24:160:24:20

His popularity was cemented that same year, when Queen Victoria

0:24:200:24:24

named him Wordsworth's successor as poet laureate,

0:24:240:24:27

thanks in part to the support of Prince Albert.

0:24:270:24:30

So, this is a letter from Prince Albert to Tennyson,

0:24:300:24:33

asking him to write his name in his copy of Idylls of the King.

0:24:330:24:36

He actually sends him his copy of Idylls of the King.

0:24:360:24:39

-He's not asking for a signed copy.

-So, do it!

0:24:390:24:41

Yes and he says, "You'll add a peculiar value to this book."

0:24:410:24:44

So, it's a very interesting autograph request, I think.

0:24:440:24:48

Tennyson was now a voice of the people.

0:24:480:24:51

In the Crimean War, he put this position to good use

0:24:510:24:53

when he wrote of the ill-fated miscommunication that sent

0:24:530:24:57

British cavalry headlong into the Russian troops with heavy losses.

0:24:570:25:00

The resulting poem was The Charge Of The Light Brigade.

0:25:000:25:04

-Is that his original draft?

-Yes, it is.

0:25:050:25:07

This is a particularly interesting one

0:25:070:25:10

because it's got the writing of his wife, as well as his own writing.

0:25:100:25:13

He says it was written after reading the first report of The Times.

0:25:130:25:18

The Crimean War was the first conflict to be covered

0:25:180:25:20

by photographers and reporters.

0:25:200:25:23

Tennyson's poem was published

0:25:230:25:25

in the newspaper just weeks after the tragic event.

0:25:250:25:28

"Forward, the Light Brigade!" Was there a man dismay'd?

0:25:280:25:32

Not tho' the soldier knew Someone had blunder'd:

0:25:320:25:35

Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why,

0:25:350:25:39

Theirs but to do and die:

0:25:390:25:42

Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred.

0:25:420:25:47

It helped shape public perception of the entire war.

0:25:470:25:51

His work signalled a new journalistic style that changed people's

0:25:510:25:55

engagement with poetry.

0:25:550:25:57

It was so successful that soldiers took copies of it with them to war.

0:25:570:26:01

Tennyson had become one of the most recognisable

0:26:010:26:04

and influential men in the country, via poetry.

0:26:040:26:08

I think it's difficult for people to comprehend now just how popular

0:26:080:26:12

a poet could be in those days.

0:26:120:26:14

But in fact, he had the popularity of a songwriter

0:26:140:26:17

because he was writing the songs, really,

0:26:170:26:19

that, in the time of non-recorded music, that people would be

0:26:190:26:22

able to use to describe what was going on in their lives.

0:26:220:26:25

So, it meant that when it came to his last illness and death,

0:26:250:26:28

it was followed in the newspapers.

0:26:280:26:31

And his family labelled and kept lots of quite intimate things,

0:26:310:26:35

really, to do with his final illness. On this box is the label,

0:26:350:26:40

"Last medicine drop glass used by him and for him."

0:26:400:26:45

And that's the date of his death, October 6th, 1892.

0:26:450:26:48

Very Victorian.

0:26:480:26:50

And in here, is the handkerchief which covered the dear face.

0:26:500:26:55

And that was put on his face when he died.

0:26:550:26:59

-And this is meant to be the book that was in his hands when he died.

-When he died...

0:26:590:27:03

And his son has actually marked the page that was meant to be

0:27:030:27:07

open on his deathbed, in his hands.

0:27:070:27:11

So, to the very end, he was reading.

0:27:110:27:14

That was what they wanted to portray.

0:27:140:27:17

11,000 people applied for tickets to attend Tennyson's funeral

0:27:180:27:22

at Westminster Abbey.

0:27:220:27:25

His work changed the immediacy and relevance of poetry

0:27:250:27:28

and his immortal lines continue for generations to appreciate.

0:27:280:27:33

Meanwhile, Charles is 20 miles north,

0:27:360:27:39

nestled on the banks of the River Trent

0:27:390:27:41

in a place called Gainsborough.

0:27:410:27:43

Once the location of Britain's most inland port,

0:27:430:27:46

it is now home to what claims to be Europe's largest antiques centre.

0:27:460:27:51

Stand by.

0:27:510:27:52

Where do I start?

0:27:520:27:54

Something to really impress.

0:27:590:28:01

There's some wonderful things, it's just where to start.

0:28:020:28:05

But what I'm really after is that object which just speaks history.

0:28:050:28:11

It'll be here. It will be here.

0:28:120:28:15

Perhaps some help from Diane will keep you on track.

0:28:150:28:18

I quite like that little Georgian cordial glass down there,

0:28:180:28:21

-that's quite a sweet thing, isn't it?

-It is.

0:28:210:28:23

But it's almost like what I would call a toasting glass.

0:28:230:28:26

Don't you agree? It's got quite a heavy base.

0:28:260:28:30

So almost, to come to attention...

0:28:300:28:32

CLASS CLINKS

0:28:320:28:35

-Perfect.

-I shall make an announcement.

0:28:350:28:37

I would like to declare...

0:28:370:28:38

you are a fine lady.

0:28:380:28:40

And that's almost what it was.

0:28:400:28:42

And of course, the Georgians did enjoy their different

0:28:420:28:46

air twists and other wine glasses of the period. It is a lead glass.

0:28:460:28:51

I would say it dates to around 1780, and it's £23.

0:28:510:28:56

But if I said to you, what would be the best price on a toasting glass

0:28:560:29:01

made, let's say, 10 years before the French Revolution?

0:29:010:29:05

-And I'd say £21.

-Really?

0:29:050:29:08

There we go, that's really good.

0:29:080:29:10

-Could I reserve it for a wee while?

-Of course.

0:29:100:29:12

And then just possibly come back and make an announcement.

0:29:120:29:15

I might buy it.

0:29:150:29:17

Well, we'll wait with bated breath then.

0:29:170:29:20

Oh, look, Margie has arrived.

0:29:200:29:22

If something leaps out at me, I will buy,

0:29:250:29:28

but I've actually got enough...

0:29:280:29:30

for this leg. But gosh, look at it.

0:29:300:29:33

Yes, with six lots tucked away, there's no pressure.

0:29:330:29:37

But you never know what you might find, Margie.

0:29:370:29:39

-Hello, how are you?

-Very well.

0:29:390:29:41

Hold on, can I help you at all?

0:29:410:29:44

-What a lovely place.

-Isn't it?

-Are you enjoying it?

0:29:440:29:48

-How's your day been so far?

-Not too bad. How's your day been?

0:29:480:29:50

Isn't it amazing? You know this is one of four buildings?

0:29:500:29:53

-Really?

-What are you doing here?

0:29:530:29:55

Don't be silly, course there isn't! Why are you always teasing me?

0:29:550:29:58

-It's huge, this building is huge.

-You're trying to put me off.

0:29:580:30:01

Get out of here, Margie Cooper! See you later.

0:30:010:30:04

-Are there more buildings?

-Yes, there are. There are three more buildings.

0:30:040:30:08

-As big as this?

-Yes.

0:30:080:30:09

There are more buildings.

0:30:090:30:11

Good gracious me.

0:30:110:30:13

Overwhelming, eh?

0:30:130:30:16

This is quite a good place.

0:30:200:30:23

Crikey, you could get lost in here.

0:30:290:30:32

My word.

0:30:350:30:37

Numbered coat hooks.

0:30:370:30:38

Must be from the school, mustn't it?

0:30:400:30:43

£75.

0:30:430:30:45

It's quite nice having them numbered though.

0:30:450:30:48

Put that in a kitchen.

0:30:480:30:50

No. No.

0:30:500:30:53

Maybe a friend for your gnome.

0:30:530:30:55

Dogs?

0:30:550:30:57

So convincing, but they are brand new.

0:30:570:31:00

Well, Margie, you have quite enough already,

0:31:000:31:03

so if you can find your way out, perhaps you should leave it at that.

0:31:030:31:07

Bye-bye!

0:31:070:31:08

Diane, just over a year, I wonder, if I have a quick peek,

0:31:110:31:15

I've seen a toasting glass down there,

0:31:150:31:17

but the other glass which is interesting because the dealer

0:31:170:31:20

has put 19th-century Victorian -

0:31:200:31:23

it could be an 18th-century glass.

0:31:230:31:25

There we are.

0:31:280:31:29

"Victorian double-air twist-stem ale glass."

0:31:290:31:32

A big tell-tale sign is the foot room must always be wider

0:31:320:31:36

than the rim of the bowl - or it's a very good guideline.

0:31:360:31:40

So I'm happy that's 18th century.

0:31:400:31:42

It's actually quite heavy. Lead glass, not soda.

0:31:420:31:45

Actually, I quite like that.

0:31:450:31:47

-Got to be careful. It's got a big chip there. Can you see?

-Yeah.

0:31:470:31:50

Priced at £58. What could be the best on that?

0:31:500:31:54

-52.

-52.

0:31:540:31:56

If I said to you, I was going to put this with the other toasting glass,

0:31:560:32:02

that makes 73.

0:32:020:32:04

-Would you round it off to 70?

-We can't, I'm sorry,

0:32:040:32:07

-it's two different dealers.

-Sure. OK.

0:32:070:32:09

Never mind, Charles, nice try.

0:32:090:32:12

I'll take them. Two together. Yeah, put it there.

0:32:130:32:17

Thank you very much, Diana. Fine. Thank you.

0:32:170:32:20

The old Hanson charm never wanes.

0:32:200:32:23

Two glasses for £73 rounds off our shopping.

0:32:230:32:26

And what a spree it's been.

0:32:280:32:30

Margie spent £159 on a hand mirror,

0:32:320:32:35

a document trunk,

0:32:350:32:37

a painted gnome,

0:32:370:32:38

a silver sweetmeat dish,

0:32:380:32:41

a side table

0:32:410:32:42

and a collection of First World War postcards.

0:32:420:32:46

Charles spent £268 on a Limoges sugar box

0:32:460:32:51

which he's pairing with the wooden tea caddy,

0:32:510:32:54

a pair of scent bottles,

0:32:540:32:56

a Scottish glass bowl,

0:32:560:32:58

an ecclesiastic stool,

0:32:580:33:00

a tribal stool,

0:33:000:33:02

and his final lot will be his toasting glass

0:33:020:33:05

and a Victorian wine glass.

0:33:050:33:06

What do they think of each other's purchases?

0:33:060:33:09

If I was a gambling man, I would say, "Go, Hanson, go!"

0:33:090:33:13

But, Margie, you never know.

0:33:130:33:15

She's a bit of a lethal weapon

0:33:150:33:16

and I do like very much her table and her silverware.

0:33:160:33:20

Yes, I'm quietly confident tomorrow that I will make small profits.

0:33:200:33:24

And I'm not that worried about his.

0:33:240:33:27

Apart from maybe that stool, the African stool. They can be a worry.

0:33:270:33:32

So hopefully that all goes wrong for him.

0:33:320:33:35

After starting out in Nottingham,

0:33:370:33:39

our pair have zipped their way through Nottinghamshire

0:33:390:33:43

up and around Lincolnshire and ending this leg at an auction in Lincoln.

0:33:430:33:48

-Margie, I honestly can't believe how misty it is.

-Awful.

0:33:480:33:52

Many years ago at school, I had a maths teacher called Mr Misty.

0:33:520:33:57

Maybe there's a formula there.

0:33:570:33:59

-Maybe Charles x Margie = profit all around.

-Mr Misty!

0:33:590:34:04

Well, let's hope that calculation all adds up to a thrilling encounter

0:34:050:34:09

at Unique Auctions in Lincoln.

0:34:090:34:12

Come on, follow your lion. I'll follow this one.

0:34:120:34:14

Margie spent £159 on six lots.

0:34:180:34:21

Charles also picked up six lots for £268.

0:34:230:34:27

Unfortunately, his beautiful glass bowl was broken on its way

0:34:270:34:31

to the auction and has been given an insurance valuation of £50.

0:34:310:34:35

So the bowl may be shattered,

0:34:350:34:36

but Charles does get a £10 profit to start him off.

0:34:360:34:40

What does auctioneer Terence Woodcock make of the remaining items?

0:34:400:34:45

Smashing?

0:34:450:34:46

Postcards, very speculative lot, the postcards.

0:34:460:34:49

They could do £30. They could to £80.

0:34:490:34:53

The toasting glass is an early-Georgian toasting glass.

0:34:530:34:56

The hair-twist wine glass. Very nice. Could be between £60 to £80.

0:34:560:35:02

We'll soon find out. It's time to take your seats.

0:35:020:35:05

The auction is about to start.

0:35:050:35:07

Hold tight.

0:35:090:35:10

Our first lot of the day is Margie's silver sweetmeat dish.

0:35:120:35:15

20 I've got there. 25. 30.

0:35:150:35:18

35. 40, fresh bid. At 45.

0:35:180:35:21

-At 45. 50.

-Marge, you're flying.

0:35:210:35:24

-You're flying.

-At 50, I'll take five now. At £50, have you all done?

0:35:240:35:28

I'm selling, the second row.

0:35:280:35:30

-That's good, that's good.

-Fish!

0:35:300:35:32

Is it fish? Margie, Margie, like a flying fish, you have flown.

0:35:320:35:37

It may be small fry to you, Margie,

0:35:370:35:40

but that's a decent profit to get you started.

0:35:400:35:42

The day has started well.

0:35:420:35:45

Well, surely you can be optimistic about your silver hand mirror.

0:35:450:35:49

£40 straight in. At £40. I'll take five now. 50 now.

0:35:490:35:54

-55 now.

-Wow, Margie.

-I'll take 60 now.

0:35:540:35:58

At 55, have you all done?

0:35:580:35:59

£55, it is yours.

0:35:590:36:02

A good steady profit.

0:36:020:36:04

That's all it's worth in that condition.

0:36:040:36:06

Charles's first purchase is up, the cut glass perfume bottles. Lovely.

0:36:060:36:11

You'll get...maybe get your money back.

0:36:110:36:15

-Who'll start me at £100 the pair?

-Come on, come on.

0:36:150:36:18

-Come on, 30. 30 I've got there.

-I'm in trouble, come on, let's go.

0:36:180:36:21

-At 40...

-Come on!

-Ssh!

-Sorry.

-LAUGHTER

0:36:210:36:25

Let the man do his job, Charles.

0:36:250:36:27

-I'm so embarrassed.

-I'm doing my best.

0:36:270:36:31

40 I've got there. 40. At 45.

0:36:310:36:34

At 55 I've got there. 55, I'm looking for 60 I've got.

0:36:340:36:38

At 60, I'll take five. Now 65 in the front.

0:36:380:36:40

I'm looking for 70 now. At 65 I sell.

0:36:400:36:44

Sold.

0:36:440:36:46

That's a small loss. But there's plenty of time to make that back.

0:36:460:36:51

-How often do you make a loss?

-Margie...

-I'm really enjoying it.

0:36:510:36:55

Margie, it could be a big one loss today, I tell you.

0:36:550:36:59

Can Margie fare any better with her First World War postcards?

0:36:590:37:03

50 straight in. 50 I've got there. At £50. I'll take five now.

0:37:030:37:07

At 55, straight in at 55.

0:37:070:37:09

I'll take 60. 60, fresh bid.

0:37:090:37:11

At £60 in the room, I'll take five.

0:37:110:37:13

Marge, I'm in the bunker.

0:37:130:37:15

I'm staying in the bunker, I'm not coming out yet.

0:37:150:37:17

70 back in. At 75, 75, 80.

0:37:170:37:19

80, I'm looking for five. 85.

0:37:190:37:21

Margie, you know what, sometimes there is an escape to victory.

0:37:210:37:25

And I'm going to salute you.

0:37:250:37:27

I sell to the gentleman at £85.

0:37:270:37:29

Well, that bought the sale room to attention,

0:37:290:37:32

and a cracking profit for Margie. Well done.

0:37:320:37:35

Hold on, Margie. I'm surrendering now.

0:37:350:37:37

Well, there's no giving up,

0:37:400:37:41

and your sugar box and tea caddy could just get you back in the game.

0:37:410:37:45

Straight in at 10, 12, 14, 16, 18.

0:37:450:37:49

-I need some help now.

-20, fresh bid.

-Come on, let's move.

0:37:490:37:53

-Get the caddy out, man.

-28, £30. At £30, are you all done?

0:37:530:37:57

It's in the doorway at 30, and I sell at £30.

0:37:570:38:00

Doubling his money. This could be the start of a comeback for Mr Hanson.

0:38:000:38:06

The rollercoaster is now at the big dipper and I'm about to come down.

0:38:060:38:10

I thought we were supposed to be going up, not down.

0:38:100:38:13

That's it, Margie, going up.

0:38:130:38:14

It almost started a fight in the antique shop,

0:38:140:38:17

but will there be a brawl in the sale room for Margie's gnome?

0:38:170:38:21

Who'll start me at £50 on the garden gnome?

0:38:210:38:23

-£30 on the garden gnome?

-Get out of here.

0:38:230:38:25

Come on, somebody, please.

0:38:250:38:27

10 on the garden gnome?

0:38:270:38:30

Thank you, sir. At 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22.

0:38:300:38:34

-Oh, no.

-At 26, 28.

0:38:340:38:39

£30. At £30, £30 still in the doorway.

0:38:390:38:42

-That's brilliant.

-At £30. £30 it is. Have you all done?

0:38:420:38:47

It's Margie's lucky day.

0:38:470:38:48

They might not be paying for the paintwork,

0:38:480:38:51

but that's still a great profit.

0:38:510:38:53

-It's rolling in.

-And the gap here in Lincolnshire

0:38:530:38:56

-is widening and widening.

-It's rolling in.

0:38:560:38:58

A chance for Charles to claw back with his two glasses.

0:38:580:39:02

£30, I've got. At £30. At 30,

0:39:020:39:04

-I'm expecting this to make 100.

-Come on.

-At £30.

0:39:040:39:08

-And 35, 45, 50, 55.

-Come on, let's move, come on.

0:39:080:39:12

The little twist one used to make 200.

0:39:120:39:15

-Absolutely. Come on, let's go.

-At 65. At 65 and I sell now at £65.

0:39:150:39:20

Oh, dear me!

0:39:210:39:24

That's an amazing price for two glasses that are over 200 years old.

0:39:250:39:29

-Oh, dear, I don't know what to say.

-I could cry.

0:39:300:39:33

Yeah, we feel your sympathy, Margie. Time for your document trunk.

0:39:340:39:39

30 I've got. At £30.

0:39:390:39:41

-I'll take five now.

-Profit? Is that a profit?

-At £30, are we all done?

0:39:410:39:44

What's wrong with this? 35, thank you. 40 with the original bidder.

0:39:440:39:48

45, I'll take 50 now.

0:39:480:39:50

At 45, I'm going to sell it, and I think it's very, very cheap,

0:39:500:39:53

at 45, but there you are.

0:39:530:39:55

That's another good profit and edges Margie further into the lead.

0:39:550:39:59

Well chuffed.

0:39:590:40:01

Time for the first of Charles's wooden stools.

0:40:020:40:05

20 I've got there. At £20.

0:40:050:40:07

-Let's go.

-25 straight in.

0:40:070:40:11

30. 35. 38, thank you.

0:40:110:40:14

38, eight pounds profit.

0:40:140:40:16

I'll take one if it will help.

0:40:160:40:18

It might do.

0:40:180:40:19

I'll tell you the provenance afterwards. 41.

0:40:190:40:23

I'll tell you as well. 42.

0:40:230:40:25

-When the going gets tough, squeeze a bit.

-43.

0:40:250:40:29

-44. 45.

-He's really working hard.

0:40:300:40:34

Now, after what I've done, you've got to go 46. 46.

0:40:340:40:39

We could be up to 200 in a minute.

0:40:390:40:41

Good lad. I like your style.

0:40:410:40:43

Stylish work from Terence and a profit for Charles.

0:40:450:40:48

-Happy, Margie, I'm happy.

-Happy.

-Very happy indeed.

0:40:480:40:51

Margie wasn't convinced by the married sidetable,

0:40:510:40:54

but will it come back to haunt her?

0:40:540:40:57

I'm not holding out, but I think I might be lucky

0:40:570:40:59

because it's my lucky day, isn't it?

0:40:590:41:01

I've got the lady at 20, 25 straight in.

0:41:010:41:04

I'll take 30 now, at £30.

0:41:040:41:06

35, 35, I'll take 40. £40 I've got.

0:41:060:41:08

At £40 now. At £40, come on now, at £40.

0:41:080:41:12

-45.

-45, 45, £50.

0:41:120:41:15

At 50. Have you all done, at £50?

0:41:150:41:18

-That's good.

-Made a profit all day.

0:41:180:41:20

That nice little profit seals a 100% record on the day.

0:41:200:41:24

Something special is about to happen. I can feel it.

0:41:260:41:30

Will you stop it?

0:41:300:41:31

No pressure then, but Charles's final lot is his big hope

0:41:310:41:35

and the last chance to catch Margie today.

0:41:350:41:38

-50 I've got, thank you. At £50 now.

-Come on, guys.

-At 50.

0:41:380:41:42

-At 55. At 55.

-Need to run a bit here.

0:41:420:41:46

65, fresh bid. At 65. 70. At 70.

0:41:460:41:51

I'll take two if it will help.

0:41:510:41:53

70 I've got. Back in, 72.

0:41:530:41:55

75, I'm looking for now.

0:41:550:41:58

No, at 72 and I sell. At 72.

0:41:580:42:02

-That's our game over, Margie.

-Not bad.

0:42:020:42:04

That's a good profit, but was it enough? Time to find out.

0:42:040:42:08

Give me a high five. Margie, give me a high five. There we go.

0:42:090:42:13

Keep going, get out of here.

0:42:130:42:14

Charles started with £545.02,

0:42:140:42:18

and after auction costs he made 96p profit - ha! -

0:42:180:42:23

giving him a total of £545.98p.

0:42:230:42:27

Margie had £325.74p at the start of this leg.

0:42:300:42:35

After auction costs, she racked up a fantastic profit of £99.30p.

0:42:350:42:40

She wins the day and edges ever closer to Charles,

0:42:400:42:44

going into the final leg.

0:42:440:42:46

-What a turn-up for the books.

-I don't know what to say, Margie.

-I won at auction.

0:42:460:42:50

-Another day yet.

-Exactly, Margie.

-There's another day.

-One big day.

0:42:520:42:56

-Bye, everybody!

-Bye! See you, bye!

0:42:560:42:59

Cheerio!

0:42:590:43:01

Next time, the last chance to shop before the final auction...

0:43:030:43:07

-Let's just go for it.

-..as Margie races to the finish line...

0:43:070:43:10

I'm going to take a chance.

0:43:100:43:12

..Charles walks all over the competition.

0:43:120:43:14

The last thing I want is Hanson on stilts.

0:43:140:43:17

In their penultimate leg, Charles Hanson and Margie Cooper start off in Nottingham and make their way towards an auction in Lincoln.