Episode 10 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 10

Antiques challenge. Charles Hanson and Margie Cooper's last leg starts in the village of Stickney, Lincolnshire, before they head to the final auction in Leicester.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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-This is beautiful!

-That's the way to do this.

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With two £200 each, a classic car, and a goal - to scour for antiques.

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-Joy!

-Hello!

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The aim?

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To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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LAUGHTER

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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The handbrake's on!

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's the final leg of the road trip for treasure hunters

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Margie Cooper and Charles Hanson.

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Hello!

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Hello! This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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So far, on this road trip, Margie has seen her profits soar.

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It's rolling in.

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But Charles's Civil War ammunition made a £200 profit,

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putting him in the lead from day one.

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Wonderful. Thank you very much. Thank you.

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Wow!

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Both our experts set out with £200.

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Margie has more than doubled her money - to £425.04.

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But on this trip, Charles is the leader of the pack.

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He has £545.98.

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There's only £120 between them.

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So, a single shrewd purchase on this leg could decide the overall winner.

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This is exciting stuff.

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Do you feel, Margie, you've now got the bit between your teeth?

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I'm catching you up. Today might be the day.

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We'll see.

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They've been clocking up the miles, though. In a nifty 1959 Elva Courier,

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starting in the Leicestershire town of Melton Mowbray,

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this epic road trip has woven its way all over central England

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and is destined for Leicester.

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The last leg starts in the flatlands of Lincolnshire

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and the village of Stickney,

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destined for that final Leicestershire auction.

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What are you going to do? Spend all your money, or what?

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You know, I've never been so up for it.

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To actually go out there with a bang.

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I think the way to do it is not just to play it safe.

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Let's both go with a bang.

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-Not even going to listen to you.

-No! I'm being serious.

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Let's just go for it.

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Sounds like he's going for a big finish.

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Stop number one is in Stickney,

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located in the centre of the Lincolnshire Fens.

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Margie's first shop is housed in the old village butcher's.

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What a carve-up!

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-Margie, look at this building. Margie, this is exciting.

-Is it?

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Give us a kiss!

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-Give us a kiss!

-Let me just get out!

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-I'm going to kiss you further round.

-Oh, Margie! Another great day.

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-Find those treasures, Margie. OK? Good luck. Bye-bye.

-Bye!

-Bye!

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Hello! Ooh, this looks nice!

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Margie gets straight to it and dealer Alan's happy to help.

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-Could have been made for you.

-All right?

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Great stuff!

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Suits you!

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Now, I want a look at that radio? Yeah? That's in good nick, isn't it?

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That's in good condition, but you can't pick up any stations on it.

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I think it needs an aerial.

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-What I like about it is the case is in good condition.

-Oh, it is.

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-It's in excellent condition.

-Oh, it's a Bush.

-Oh, right.

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They were a pretty good make in their day, I suppose.

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This valve radio dates back to the 1950s

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and, despite its age, the mahogany case is in pretty good nick.

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I mean, it looks good. Oh, yeah! If someone wants to do a 1950s room.

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That's right. Ideal.

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Yeah. Ideal.

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Yeah. What's the price, then, Alan?

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30, is that?

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Well, if you want to take the chance, I'll do it for half of that.

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Right. You're done. I'm going to take a chance.

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-15 quid.

-Yeah.

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A great deal. And she's not finished yet.

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I'll tell you something,

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you haven't got broken stuff in your shop, have you?

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One or two bits.

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It's very rare that you find all this stuff and it's not...

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This is chipped!

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Spoke too soon.

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Oh, dear! You'll always find an AF on it, if it is damaged.

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What a shame. I quite like that. Bohemian glass.

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Lovely cutting into the glass.

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That's quite nice.

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Shame about that chip. But Alan has something similar in mint condition.

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-The Cologne bottle.

-I quite like the Deco-like top on it.

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It's about 1930s, isn't it? It looks, sort of, '30s.

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-It's got a Deco look about it.

-Yeah.

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So, is that cheap and cheerful?

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-Oh, well, a fiver.

-I'm going to have that.

-OK. Well done.

-Thank you.

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Yeah. I shake you with that hand, because I'll drop it.

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Margie's picked up two items in her first shop.

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The 1930s cut glass cologne bottle for five pounds

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and the valve radio for 15.

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-Bye-bye.

-Bye, now. Mind how you go.

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Well done, Margie. Great start.

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Charles is headed to Boston

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to explore a very prominent local landmark.

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This 700-year-old church was once home

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to the forefathers of a new country

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and witnessed decisive moments in global history.

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-Hello there.

-Good morning.

-How are you?

-Pleased to meet you.

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-Your name is?

-I'm Steve. I'm the Associate Rector here.

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-Right. And this church is called St...

-Botolph.

-Bot-off?

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-St Bot-off?

-Botolph.

-Ball toff? Botolph!

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-The L is at the end. Botolph.

-Bot-OLPH? That's right. BOT-olph.

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-Bow-toll... Sorry.

-BOT-olph.

-Botolph.

-Botolph.

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That's it. I've got it now. I think I've got it.

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-Now, the outside is amazing. May we go indoors?

-Please do.

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-Thanks a lot.

-Mind the step and mind your head.

-I will. Thank you.

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In the Middle Ages the port of Boston was second only to London,

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prospering from the then-booming wool trade.

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The building of this impressive church

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reflected the vast wealth of local merchants.

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No expense was spared and the construction of the church

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and tower were twice as quick as others of its size.

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St Botolph's is the largest parish church in England.

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What we're looking at now has barely changed.

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Barely changed over the centuries, yes.

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Wonderful. I almost feel caught in time in the Middle Ages.

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The finest church in the country

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attracted the most influential clergyman.

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In 1612, John Cotton had just completed his second degree

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at Cambridge when he accepted the position of minister

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at St Botolph's.

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Although he was just 27 years old, his persuasive preaching

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made him one of the most prominent ministers in the country.

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Those who flocked to hear him preach made use of St Botolph's unique pews.

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The wooden carvings over there almost glow. Are they original too?

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-Yes.

-May we take a look?

-By all means.

-Can't wait.

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John Cotton wanted to rid the Anglican Church of corruption

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and immorality.

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Rather than separating from it, he attempted to change it from within.

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People travelled from far and wide to hear his lengthy puritan sermons.

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Families even relocated to Boston

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specifically to be part of his congregation.

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Some of the services went on for over five hours.

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So there's an ingenious device that was built.

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These are called our misericords.

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Misericordia is Latin for "act of mercy".

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So these are the mercy seats.

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These seats give some comfort to those who came to hear Cotton

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and other clergymen preach.

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-You could lift that.

-Yes.

-You could perch yourself,

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stand your back against there, perch yourself,

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and you give the impression that you are stood.

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Rector, I am standing.

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-You are standing.

-My legs are slightly bent but I can stand still.

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And I'm sure it was in mercy for you to be able to sit down.

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Quite. Cotton thrived at St Botolph's for nearly 20 years.

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Controversially, though, in 1630, Cotton sparked an exodus from Boston.

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Encouraged by his puritan preaching,

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ten percent of the town emigrated to one of the new colonies in America.

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Cotton joined his several hundred former parishioners

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two years later,

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settling in the town that had been named Boston.

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You almost feel the warmth from the actual history.

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I put my hands on there

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and I think about the people who sat here.

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What was going on in the world outside, at the time.

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Charles can follow in the footsteps of John Cotton, not to America,

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but up St Botolph's tower.

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209 steps. OK. This way.

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I do suffer a bit from vertigo, you know.

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St Botolph's tower is the tallest of any parish church in the country.

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You're panting a bit, Steve. Keep going.

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We're getting there. That's the good news.

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And is the tallest non-cathedral tower in the world.

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Oh, I say. Goodness gracious me.

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You can see for miles, can't you?

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You can really see for miles. I just cannot believe that view.

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-You're 145 feet off the ground. I can't believe it.

-What a view!

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BELLS CHIME

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I feel a bit giddy up here.

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That's maybe a cue for me to get down. I feel a bit sick.

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-Do you mind if I go?

-Not at all.

-Thanks a lot.

-All right. Good luck.

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-It's been a real joy. Thanks ever so much. I'm going down.

-Good luck.

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-All the best. Thank you, Steve.

-Bye.

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Saint Botolph's is a permanent reminder of Boston's past glory

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as Britain's most powerful coastal town,

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but also a memorial to its former parishioners

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who left to build a new Boston

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and were the forefathers of the American Revolution.

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Margie's made her way across the county border

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to Norfolk and King's Lynn.

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This harbour town is rich in heritage and maritime history.

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Margie's heading to an antique centre,

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a stone's throw from the River Ouse.

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-Hello. So you're Rachel.

-I am.

-You're...

-June.

-June.

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-It's a glorious day out there.

-Beautiful.

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Time to shop.

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Those are cute, aren't they? Just look at these.

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Margie has £405.05 left to spend and something soon catches her eye.

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-They're Victorian, aren't they?

-I think they are.

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-I love stained glass, don't you?

-I do. I love it.

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-And with these ships on, as well.

-I know.

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People put them into doors and make windows up of them, don't they?

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So, 90 for the big one, 70 for the small one.

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-So, what's the best on the two of those?

-Wish me luck.

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OK.

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See how they bought them and everything.

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Rachel shot off to call the dealer. Fingers crossed.

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-OK. A hundred. For the two.

-A hundred for the two.

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Hang on. Margie loves a haggle. Brace yourselves, girls.

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OK. She's going to have a word.

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Hi, Ruth. Are you going to let me buy these, or not?

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Well... SHE LAUGHS

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Another tenner off? That's 90.

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Yeah, I had 80 in mind.

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Go on, then.

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OK. Deal done. And thank you very much.

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Bye-bye.

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80. Nice haggle.

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LAUGHTER

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Well done!

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There's that the happy face.

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Margie's got these two Victorian stained-glass panels for half price.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you.

-Bye-bye, Rachel.

-Bye-bye.

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A nice way to end the day. Well done, Margie.

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Time to get some shuteye.

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Nighty-night, you two.

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Welcome to day two of the Road Trip.

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Learn anything yesterday, Charles?

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-Botolph.

-Botolph?

-That's how you pronounce it.

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Good.

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Yesterday Margie haggled hard

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and picked up three lots for auction for £100.

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A 1950s valve radio.

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A 1930s cut-glass cologne bottle.

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And a pair of Victorian stained-glass panels.

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Leaving her £325.04 to spend today.

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Charles, on the other hand, didn't spend a penny.

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So, he still has £545.98 to spend today.

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On this very land we now drive. I will make a memory today, Margie.

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I will not be defeated.

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He always comes good.

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Our experts are headed south to Hitchin.

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This historic market town is one of the oldest continuously occupied

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urban centres in Hertfordshire.

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Interesting, that.

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My shop awaits, and I can't wait. Look at this landscape!

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Are you stuck then, Charles?

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Uh-oh! Gosh!

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Don't you want to leave me?

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He is accident prone. Oh, there we go.

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I'm out of here. Good luck!

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-And to you, too.

-See you later.

-Have a good day, love.

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-Good morning.

-Good morning.

-How are you?

-I'm fine, thank you.

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-A gorgeous day.

-Beautiful day.

-The sun is shining again.

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That's right, you couldn't have chosen a better day.

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Let's hope the sun is shining on Charles

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because he needs to buy something to take to auction.

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That's what the programme's about.

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What I'm drawn to actually is not so much the glassware

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or the jewellery - not really my thing.

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What I quite like is this top deck here of oriental artefacts.

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There's some lovely, lovely objects of eastern promise

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which as we know in the auction market, can really move.

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This vase, I'm sure, is Chinese.

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Again, what we would call Cantonese type. It's badly damaged.

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We can see across this section here

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is almost this jagged crack

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but I love the decoration,

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the ingenious way in which the Chinese potter

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used the exterior as a palette for painting.

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Because of the damage, there's no ticket price

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but Marie is open to offers.

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If I said 30, what would you say?

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-I'd say done.

-Done?

-Done.

-Done, done. Sold. £30. Let's go.

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-Happy?

-Yes.

-Good.

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Well done.

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This Chinese Famille Rose vase is Charles' first buy on this leg.

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At last!

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You know what? I've had a really hard struggle so far

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and I feel relieved now that I've bought one thing.

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-Thank you.

-Well done.

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-Thank you very much. Right, I'm and up and running. Thanks, Marie.

-OK.

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How sweet!

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Meanwhile, Margie has made the short drive across Hitchin town centre

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to the British Schools Museum.

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She is meeting curator Andy Gibbs to hear the incredible story

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of one man's mission to revolutionise education around the world.

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Good morning.

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Morning, Margie, welcome to the British Schools Museum.

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If you'd like to come this way?

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In the early 19th century, Britain had become the workshop of the world.

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The Industrial Revolution had created a country filled with pioneers

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in engineering and science.

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It went on to acquire an empire covering a quarter of the globe.

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This success was, in part, down to an illiterate workforce.

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Education was really the preserve only of the rich.

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There were very limited opportunities for education

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for younger people from working class and poorer families.

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But one man was determined to educate all children.

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Joseph Lancaster, a Quaker who wanted every child to read the Bible.

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Lancaster came from very humble origins.

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He was born in Southwark in south London in 1778.

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Lancaster started a school in his father's house in Southwark

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when he was a very young man and by the age of 20,

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so successful was he that he got visitors coming to his schools

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and it was becoming quite a spectacle.

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Lancaster's school was the first to offer lessons

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to children from every background.

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Within a short space of time, it was oversubscribed.

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He asked parents to pay only what they could afford

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and many didn't pay a penny.

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Broke and unable to afford the wage of another teacher,

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Lancaster devised a ground-breaking method of teaching.

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The monitorial system.

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Andy, what is monitorial education?

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This is a monitorial schoolroom.

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It's a schoolroom, not a classroom, because the entire school,

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in this case, all of the boys, were taught in one classroom.

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-300 boys.

-Gosh!

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Two books, one master and the master would pick out the brightest

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and they would take little classes of their own.

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10 or 12 children would learn the lessons from the monitor

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and the master would look after how they were getting on.

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Stood in a semicircle, the brightest children passed on

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what the teacher had taught them to other six to 10-year-olds.

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For the first time, children from the poorest backgrounds

0:17:530:17:56

were learning the basic three Rs, reading, writing and arithmetic.

0:17:560:18:02

Lancastrian schools opened around the country, preparing boys

0:18:030:18:06

and girls for work in the new age of industrial Britain.

0:18:060:18:11

We have eyewitness accounts of people going into these schools

0:18:110:18:15

and testing the boys and girls,

0:18:150:18:17

asking them the cube root of five-figure numbers,

0:18:170:18:20

working out complex rates of interest

0:18:200:18:23

and they answered quickly and accurately

0:18:230:18:25

so it was a very, very effective method.

0:18:250:18:28

Toys and books were placed around Lancaster's

0:18:280:18:30

schoolrooms as the best behaved and hardest working children were

0:18:300:18:34

given tokens to exchange for these rewards.

0:18:340:18:38

His teachers were encouraged to support their children

0:18:380:18:41

in finding employment too.

0:18:410:18:42

This is a copy of a lovely letter, one of our headmasters here,

0:18:450:18:48

Mr Fitch, wrote as a letter of reference for a young lad called

0:18:480:18:52

George Thomas Cooper who was born from very, very poor origins.

0:18:520:18:57

Had an education here at the school

0:18:570:18:59

and got quite a good job as a clerk with

0:18:590:19:01

the Railway at King's Cross station

0:19:010:19:04

and went on to live a much happier and more comfortable life than

0:19:040:19:10

he would have done without the great inspiration of Joseph Lancaster

0:19:100:19:15

and the dedication of the teachers here.

0:19:150:19:17

I don't think the Victorians envisaged huge amounts

0:19:170:19:20

of social mobility but it certainly gave children

0:19:200:19:22

an opportunity to escape from their very, very poor origins.

0:19:220:19:26

Joseph Lancaster's monitorial system may have limited the curriculum

0:19:260:19:31

to just the three Rs, but it set the path towards a modern

0:19:310:19:34

system of universal education used around the world today.

0:19:340:19:38

Meanwhile, across town,

0:19:440:19:46

Charles is looking to add to his solitary purchase.

0:19:460:19:49

-Is this a silver bowl here?

-You mean the commemoration one?

0:19:490:19:54

Yes, the commemorative one.

0:19:540:19:55

This piece of silver was produced in 1981 to commemorate

0:19:570:20:01

the marriage of Charles and Diana.

0:20:010:20:03

Priced at £110 and complete with an original box and certificate.

0:20:030:20:08

What's nice, I suppose, is Royal commemoratives,

0:20:080:20:12

unless they're really early, can be of nominal value.

0:20:120:20:15

They're more valuable if they're made in precious materials

0:20:150:20:18

-like silver.

-Exactly.

-Which this one is.

0:20:180:20:21

One to keep in mind, then,

0:20:210:20:22

but Marie has lots of sparkly things in her cabinet too.

0:20:220:20:27

Oh, you have got some nice jewellery.

0:20:270:20:29

The pair of cuff links, not silver gilt or white metal.

0:20:290:20:33

-Gold?

-They're actually gold.

0:20:330:20:35

They're lovely, aren't they? Aren't they beautiful?

0:20:370:20:40

They almost have a silver sheen about them when in fact they are...

0:20:400:20:45

-They are gold.

-A yellow metal and they are hallmarked gold.

0:20:450:20:49

These early 20th-century cuff links are priced at £110. Cor!

0:20:490:20:55

-OK, may I leave those out for a second?

-Sure.

-Thank you.

0:20:550:20:59

Charles is firing on all cylinders today.

0:20:590:21:01

He has spotted a late 19th-century brooch priced at £160.

0:21:010:21:06

That's a rock crystal.

0:21:060:21:08

It's a natural crystal found in nature

0:21:080:21:12

and selected for its clarity and then carved.

0:21:120:21:15

That is really pretty.

0:21:150:21:17

I agree.

0:21:170:21:19

While Charles gives that some thought, though,

0:21:190:21:21

Margie is on her way to Central Bedfordshire

0:21:210:21:24

and the picturesque village of Barton Le Clay.

0:21:240:21:27

Margie still has £325.04 at her disposal and she isn't hanging about.

0:21:310:21:37

Oh, no.

0:21:370:21:39

Right, what's this?

0:21:390:21:41

I don't really like it very much but I've just seen a very cheap ticket!

0:21:430:21:47

Which says, French clock with birds and garniture.

0:21:470:21:51

Garniture means the three pieces. £35!

0:21:510:21:55

Oh, I wonder if it will ever go.

0:22:000:22:02

You could give it a try.

0:22:020:22:06

CLOCK TICKING

0:22:060:22:09

CLOCK STOPS

0:22:120:22:15

Oh, well.

0:22:150:22:17

Maybe this early 20th century clock is cheap

0:22:170:22:19

because it's not running like clockwork.

0:22:190:22:21

Still, one to consider.

0:22:210:22:22

Back in Hitchin, Charles has bought a Chinese vase

0:22:240:22:27

and looked at some commemorative silverware,

0:22:270:22:29

hallmarked cuff links and a rock crystal brooch.

0:22:290:22:32

Now, there's one more thing I'm going to look at

0:22:330:22:37

and then I'm going to make a couple of decisions.

0:22:370:22:39

The oval brooch with that central stone. Victorian?

0:22:390:22:44

-Victorian.

-Gold?

0:22:440:22:46

It's Agate and it's inscribed.

0:22:460:22:49

-And it's got hair in the back.

-Oh, yes.

0:22:490:22:51

So this really is an object which was a mourning piece,

0:22:510:22:55

-do you believe?

-It's a mourning piece.

0:22:550:22:58

And it's inscribed,

0:22:580:23:00

"In memory of Ann Webb. Aged 43 years old."

0:23:000:23:06

With a lock of her hair in there as well.

0:23:060:23:09

Marie's priced this brooch at £160.

0:23:090:23:13

Time to make some decisions, Charles.

0:23:130:23:15

I like the cuff links because they're fabulous.

0:23:150:23:20

Would you do them for £50?

0:23:200:23:22

-55.

-Sold. I'll take them. Sold.

0:23:220:23:26

Half price. Well done.

0:23:260:23:29

How about that commemorative silver, ticketed at £110?

0:23:290:23:33

But what's Marie's very best?

0:23:330:23:36

Well, what about 50?

0:23:360:23:38

-I'll take it. Thanks a lot.

-Crikey!

0:23:400:23:42

That's three deals, and Charles is still interested in

0:23:420:23:45

the two brooches priced at £160 each.

0:23:450:23:49

Decisions, decisions.

0:23:490:23:51

If I said to you the best on the flag brooch

0:23:530:23:56

and the best on the mourning brooch...

0:23:560:23:58

120.

0:24:000:24:02

£60 each.

0:24:020:24:04

That's a £200 discount. Charles, come on.

0:24:040:24:08

I'll take them. Thank you. £120.

0:24:080:24:11

He's bought five items from Marie, totalling £255. The boy's on fire.

0:24:110:24:17

-Well, I think I need to sit down now.

-So do I.

0:24:180:24:22

Meanwhile, over in Bedfordshire...

0:24:220:24:23

Just having a quick whizz.

0:24:230:24:25

..Margie's found her favourite things in the cabinets.

0:24:250:24:29

Oh, look.

0:24:300:24:32

I bought that on my first day buying.

0:24:320:24:34

Seems like such a long time ago.

0:24:340:24:36

But I made about 40, £50 profit.

0:24:360:24:39

Yeah, a near identical brooch cost you £30.50 and it sold for 74.

0:24:390:24:45

So buying an identical one may not be such a bad idea after all.

0:24:450:24:49

Doubt they'll catch up.

0:24:490:24:51

Yeah. Yeah, it's marked. Right in the middle.

0:24:510:24:54

Yeah, this Art Deco style 9 carat gold brooch is priced at £55.

0:24:540:25:00

Are you going to be lucky and beat Mr Hanson?

0:25:000:25:04

I don't think it's talking to you.

0:25:040:25:07

He, though, is still in Hitchin.

0:25:070:25:09

He's bought five items,

0:25:090:25:10

but with just over £290 burning a hole in his pocket, are there more?

0:25:100:25:15

-In your window, I do like that scent bottle.

-I thought you might.

0:25:150:25:20

How much is it? It is silver, isn't it?

0:25:200:25:23

Of course it is silver.

0:25:230:25:25

-It's £250.

-Is it really?

-Yeah.

0:25:250:25:28

I mustn't get carried away. I bought really well so far.

0:25:280:25:30

But I just like it. If I said to you...

0:25:300:25:33

..160.

0:25:340:25:36

It needs to be about 180.

0:25:360:25:38

Oh, don't say that.

0:25:380:25:39

You're buying with your heart, Charles, rather than your...

0:25:390:25:42

I am buying with my heart.

0:25:420:25:44

Well, split the difference.

0:25:440:25:46

You're offering to me at 170.

0:25:460:25:49

And I think that's worth a gamble.

0:25:490:25:51

Bold move, Charles.

0:25:510:25:52

He's spent big on his sixth lot,

0:25:520:25:55

but this pricey 1818 scent bottle is a real gamble for the final auction.

0:25:550:26:00

I owe you... Are you ready for this?

0:26:010:26:03

£425.

0:26:030:26:06

-Good grief.

-I know, don't say it.

-Good grief.

-Hold tight.

0:26:060:26:11

That is a lot of cash.

0:26:110:26:13

It secures him a damaged Chinese vase, some commemorative silver,

0:26:130:26:17

gold cuff links, two brooches and a silver scent bottle.

0:26:170:26:21

60, 80, 100 and £25.

0:26:210:26:24

-Thank you so much.

-Good luck.

0:26:240:26:26

Thanks, Marie. I shall hit the high road and have a lie down. Thank you.

0:26:260:26:30

-See you. Bye.

-Well done, Charles.

0:26:300:26:34

Back in Bedfordshire, Margie's found dealer Steve in charge,

0:26:370:26:40

-and looking smart, Steve.

-I've spotted this.

0:26:400:26:43

Have you got an offer you'd like to put on that?

0:26:430:26:46

Yeah, well, I don't to offend her. 38.

0:26:460:26:49

So that's one phone call for Steve to make.

0:26:510:26:54

How about that clock?

0:26:540:26:56

-I was just looking at this.

-Right.

0:26:560:26:59

What you want to offer for that?

0:26:590:27:01

20, really.

0:27:010:27:03

-Give me a couple of minutes on that.

-Yeah. Thank you.

0:27:030:27:06

Hello. Look who's arrived in Bedfordshire.

0:27:080:27:11

The sun's shining and for the first time ever

0:27:130:27:15

on a Friday on the Antiques Road Trip I feel it's time to relax.

0:27:150:27:20

He's in a good mood.

0:27:200:27:21

Despite his earlier big spend, Charles still has £120.98.

0:27:210:27:27

And what's he found here?

0:27:300:27:32

Careful, Charles. Not in a china shop.

0:27:330:27:35

Oh, dear. Stop showing off.

0:27:370:27:40

There we go. I'm up.

0:27:400:27:42

Stilts, with your accident-prone record?

0:27:460:27:49

This is not a good idea, Charles.

0:27:490:27:51

Will you get off them?

0:27:510:27:54

Oh!

0:27:540:27:56

Now here's Margie.

0:27:570:27:59

Hello. Look.

0:27:590:28:01

I've had a very tiring morning.

0:28:010:28:03

Sorry.

0:28:030:28:05

The last thing I want is Hanson on stilts.

0:28:050:28:09

No, don't crash into those glass cabinets.

0:28:090:28:12

See you later.

0:28:120:28:13

It's nearly closing time. Margie's just a few minutes for one last look.

0:28:130:28:17

And as for Charles...

0:28:180:28:20

I've had a great look around and I'm quite happy.

0:28:200:28:24

I feel my buying time is done.

0:28:240:28:27

And there's one thing for it. Cup of tea.

0:28:270:28:29

No rest for Margie yet, though, and Steve's back with news.

0:28:310:28:35

-You offered £20 on that one?

-Yeah.

0:28:350:28:37

-I'm having a punt, really.

-Right.

0:28:370:28:40

Well, I'm probably going to get killed for this,

0:28:400:28:42

-but we'll take £20 off you.

-Oh, right.

0:28:420:28:44

-And we accept the offer of £38.

-That's brilliant.

0:28:440:28:48

-Thank you very much, Steve. Do you want a cup of tea?

-Yeah.

0:28:480:28:51

I don't mind if I do. Thank you.

0:28:510:28:53

Very generous, Steve.

0:28:530:28:54

Margie's last buys are an Art Deco brooch

0:28:540:28:58

and clock garniture all for £58.

0:28:580:29:01

-Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

0:29:010:29:03

And that concludes the shopping.

0:29:030:29:05

To go with her last two buys, Margie has three other lots.

0:29:050:29:10

The 1950s valve radio, a pair of Victorian stained glass panels

0:29:100:29:15

and a 1930s cologne bottle.

0:29:150:29:17

All that cost her £158.

0:29:170:29:21

While Charles spent a whopping £425 for six lots.

0:29:220:29:26

A damaged Chinese porcelain vase,

0:29:260:29:29

a pair of 9 carat gold cuff links,

0:29:290:29:32

some royal commemorative silverware, a 19th century rock crystal brooch,

0:29:320:29:38

a Victorian mourning brooch and one big spend on a silver scent bottle.

0:29:380:29:44

Wow. What's he up to now?

0:29:440:29:47

Oh, delicious, Charles. Pity you've dropped it.

0:29:470:29:49

Oh, don't eat it.

0:29:510:29:52

Anyway, light refreshments devoured,

0:29:520:29:54

what do they make of each other's final lots?

0:29:540:29:56

I saw that clock garniture in the shop. It's what you call kitsch.

0:29:560:30:00

And in terms of market demand today, well, it needs to go some.

0:30:000:30:04

So Charles has really spent his money.

0:30:040:30:06

I didn't think he was going to do that.

0:30:060:30:08

And he's bought a silver spiral scent bottle.

0:30:080:30:11

Well, I still think he's got a clear 200 to get a profit on that.

0:30:110:30:16

Margie, I told you I would spend wisely, go big, and I have done.

0:30:160:30:21

Good luck and roll on the auction.

0:30:210:30:25

It's been an eventful final leg for our two experts.

0:30:250:30:29

After a mammoth journey they're making a beeline for Leicester

0:30:290:30:32

and the big auction showdown.

0:30:320:30:35

What fun. But there's time to take in the scenery.

0:30:350:30:38

-Breath that.

-Margie, let's breathe in that Leicester air.

0:30:380:30:42

-I'm breathing it.

-Isn't it wonderful? The sky's blue.

0:30:420:30:45

-The leaves are turning.

-Nearly time for the last auction together.

0:30:450:30:48

-The Friday farewell.

-Yeah.

0:30:480:30:50

-It is quite sad, isn't it?

-It is quite sad.

0:30:500:30:52

I've had a really good time.

0:30:520:30:54

But if I go out on the big one, it doesn't matter,

0:30:540:30:58

because hopefully you'll say, "Charles, I impressed you."

0:30:580:31:01

And from a humble man from humble origins, Margie, you'll say,

0:31:010:31:06

"I'm a glamour girl and, Charles, you did it for me."

0:31:060:31:09

-Used to be.

-You still are, Margie.

0:31:090:31:12

On to the auction which takes place at Gildings,

0:31:130:31:16

one of the region's leading salerooms,

0:31:160:31:18

and it's here our winner will be anointed.

0:31:180:31:21

Gildings Auctioneers. This is it.

0:31:220:31:25

-This is our farewell.

-It is.

0:31:250:31:28

And on the last day I've realised

0:31:280:31:30

there's an easier way of getting out of this car.

0:31:300:31:35

-And this is the easy way...

-I like it.

0:31:350:31:38

-You ready?

-Yeah. On the count of three, it's all over.

0:31:380:31:42

Auctioneer John Gilding will be on the podium today.

0:31:470:31:50

What does he make of Charles and Margie's choices?

0:31:500:31:53

I quite like those little stained glass panels.

0:31:550:31:57

They're decorator's pieces.

0:31:570:31:59

And I think sort of put an estimate of 30 to £40.

0:31:590:32:02

Well, I'd be very disappointed

0:32:020:32:04

if they don't make a bit more than that, to be honest.

0:32:040:32:07

I mean, mourning brooches are a little bit like they suggest,

0:32:070:32:11

a bit depressing, so we never know on that one.

0:32:110:32:13

Keep your fingers crossed.

0:32:130:32:15

They're crossed and the auction's about to start.

0:32:150:32:18

Time for Charles and Margie to make themselves comfortable.

0:32:180:32:21

-We'll sit here, Margie.

-Great stuff.

0:32:210:32:24

These two nice comfy chairs. Hold tight.

0:32:240:32:27

First up is Charles' vase.

0:32:270:32:30

A little knocked about, but bought at a knock-down price.

0:32:300:32:32

-Stand by.

-This was a wonderful piece, of course.

0:32:320:32:35

It still is.

0:32:350:32:37

-Sorry.

-I'm going to start the bidding.

-Come on.

0:32:370:32:41

£20. I bid 20. 25. 28.

0:32:410:32:46

Come on.

0:32:460:32:47

I bid 28. Bid 30.

0:32:470:32:50

-On the net. 32.

-Come on.

-5.

0:32:500:32:53

-35.

-Don't.

0:32:530:32:55

38 in the room.

0:32:550:32:57

First profit of the day gets Charles going.

0:32:590:33:02

To the young collector, it's a lovely vase, it's completely right.

0:33:020:33:07

It's just broken. But over years, if you're 140 years old, how would you?

0:33:070:33:11

Steady. Now Margie's turn. Her two stained glass panels are next.

0:33:110:33:15

These look great.

0:33:150:33:16

Start here at £25.

0:33:160:33:18

25. 28. 30.

0:33:200:33:23

32. 35. 38.

0:33:230:33:26

There's no reserve.

0:33:260:33:27

£38, seated. 40.

0:33:270:33:31

5. 50. 5. Still seated at 55.

0:33:310:33:36

I thought they'd be more.

0:33:360:33:38

Seated then at £55. All done?

0:33:380:33:41

That is a shame. First loss of the day and bad luck, Margie.

0:33:410:33:45

Lost 25 quid.

0:33:450:33:49

I truly felt they were going to make a £120 bluff.

0:33:490:33:51

Will you be quiet from now on?

0:33:510:33:53

Not likely.

0:33:530:33:55

Charles' Victorian mourning brooch is next.

0:33:560:33:59

-It's beautifully made.

-I know. It's lovely.

0:33:590:34:01

-And I think it's a lovely object.

-And you dated it, 1869.

0:34:010:34:05

And where were you in that year 1869?

0:34:050:34:08

Look at me.

0:34:080:34:11

Bidding starts with me at £45.

0:34:110:34:15

If this was in an antique mourning jewellery set...

0:34:150:34:18

Hey, pay attention, you two!

0:34:180:34:20

80. 5. 90. 5.

0:34:200:34:25

One man's profit or gain.

0:34:250:34:28

-And whatever it makes is history.

-On the net at 100.

0:34:280:34:30

-Are we even finished?

-It doesn't...

0:34:300:34:33

All done? Selling to the net. £110.

0:34:330:34:37

-Is this it?

-No.

-No, it's just gone.

0:34:390:34:42

We've missed it.

0:34:430:34:46

You joking. What did it make?

0:34:460:34:47

Did we miss the mourning brooch?

0:34:470:34:49

-MAN:

-110.

-There you go. Well done.

0:34:490:34:52

Yeah, well done. A £50 profit.

0:34:520:34:55

I can't believe it.

0:34:550:34:57

-Well, you were chatting.

-I missed the triumph.

0:34:570:34:59

You've made 50 quid.

0:34:590:35:01

I've missed a profit.

0:35:010:35:03

Up next is Margie's valve radio.

0:35:030:35:06

Hold tight, Margie.

0:35:060:35:09

-£10. 12.

-Come on.

-15 in the room. 18. 20 in the room.

0:35:090:35:14

20. 22. And 5. 28. 30.

0:35:140:35:20

Oh, come on. Let's recoup some of my losses.

0:35:200:35:23

5. 38. All out in the room?

0:35:230:35:26

£38. All done?

0:35:260:35:28

I can't grumble at that.

0:35:280:35:30

Sold for 38.

0:35:300:35:33

More than doubled your money. Margie, well done.

0:35:330:35:37

-Fair enough, that, wasn't it?

-Yes.

0:35:370:35:40

Charles' second brooch now. The Essex rock crystal.

0:35:400:35:44

I think this is going to do really well.

0:35:440:35:46

-It cost me £60.

-Anything that says, "rock crystal."

-Yeah.

0:35:460:35:49

-And bidding starts with me at £20.

-Oh, no. It's got to move.

0:35:490:35:53

20. 22. 25. 28.

0:35:530:35:56

30. 5. 40. 5. 50.

0:35:560:36:00

5. 60. 5. 70. 5...

0:36:000:36:04

-£70 it is.

-That's OK, Margie.

-I'm surprised at that.

0:36:040:36:08

80. 5. 90. 5.

0:36:090:36:14

100.

0:36:140:36:16

10. Is gone.

0:36:160:36:19

It's in the room at £110.

0:36:190:36:21

All done? Sold at 110.

0:36:210:36:24

Another brooch, another £50. Well done, Charles.

0:36:260:36:29

Profit on your jewellery.

0:36:290:36:32

Oh, wow!

0:36:320:36:33

Margie's cologne bottle is next to go under the gavel.

0:36:330:36:37

£20. Lovely piece, this. At 22.

0:36:370:36:43

-Happy with that.

-25.

0:36:430:36:45

28. 30. 2.

0:36:450:36:48

-Standing in the middle at 32. 35.

-That's good.

-38.

0:36:480:36:53

Standing at £38. Away at 38.

0:36:540:36:58

Ah, the sweet smell of success. Well done, Margie.

0:36:580:37:02

-How do you feel?

-Cheered up.

0:37:020:37:05

Charles spent big on this lot. It was a gamble.

0:37:050:37:08

Will the silver scent bottle cost him dear?

0:37:080:37:11

Lovely little piece, this. At £80.

0:37:110:37:13

5. 90. 5. 100.

0:37:130:37:16

10. 20. 30. 40.

0:37:160:37:20

-150. 160.

-Come on, let's go.

0:37:200:37:24

£160. All done? Selling it at 160.

0:37:240:37:30

Someone's walked away with a lovely piece of silver at a great price.

0:37:310:37:34

Charles has suffered his first loss of the day.

0:37:340:37:37

But it's only a small one.

0:37:370:37:39

Not too much gone on that.

0:37:390:37:41

Margie's brooch next.

0:37:420:37:44

She sold one just like this earlier in the week and made £40 profit.

0:37:450:37:49

Can this one do the same?

0:37:490:37:51

Look at the bids!

0:37:510:37:53

And £65.

0:37:530:37:55

-That's good. Profit.

-70.

-It's done all right, again.

0:37:550:38:00

£70. I bid 70.

0:38:000:38:02

Come on, a bit more.

0:38:020:38:03

-£70. Are we all done? 5. 80.

-It's amazing, Margie.

0:38:030:38:09

At £80.

0:38:090:38:11

-It's amazing.

-Brilliant.

0:38:110:38:13

Finished at £80.

0:38:130:38:15

Margie Cooper, I admire you.

0:38:160:38:20

It was a great spot, Margie. And it's earned you another profit.

0:38:200:38:23

I wonder how many more of these brooches around the UK,

0:38:230:38:26

floating ready for the Cooper clutch?

0:38:260:38:30

Next up, the royal commemorative silver

0:38:300:38:33

Charles bought at a discounted price.

0:38:330:38:36

-And we've got a bid here, then, of £55.

-That's good.

0:38:360:38:39

-65. 70.

-That's going.

0:38:390:38:42

£70 I'm bid.

0:38:420:38:44

-That's good. Cost me 50.

-All done?

0:38:440:38:48

Finish at £70.

0:38:480:38:50

Another profit, Charles. Good stuff.

0:38:520:38:55

-I'm happy. Margie, I'm happy.

-Skimmed a profit.

0:38:550:38:58

It's time for Margie's early 20th century clock garniture now.

0:38:580:39:02

And £45 open to bidding.

0:39:020:39:05

Do I see 50 anywhere? 50 bid.

0:39:050:39:07

In the room at 50.

0:39:070:39:09

That's fantastic.

0:39:090:39:10

The internet is out at £50.

0:39:100:39:12

It's in the room.

0:39:120:39:14

-55 on the net.

-Margie Cooper.

-At 55.

0:39:140:39:18

I thought this would make a lot more than this.

0:39:180:39:20

-60.

-Say it's all over.

0:39:200:39:22

At £60. £65 bid.

0:39:220:39:26

-65. All done?

-Doesn't it surprise you?

0:39:260:39:30

£65. Finished?

0:39:300:39:33

A good profit, but is it good enough to win?

0:39:350:39:37

-Well done.

-Now the final lot.

0:39:400:39:44

Charles' cuff links. Very nice.

0:39:440:39:47

These are really nice, indeed. 75. 85 bid.

0:39:470:39:51

You're in.

0:39:510:39:53

85. 90.

0:39:530:39:55

-5.

-Come on.

0:39:550:39:57

110.

0:39:570:39:58

-Here we go.

-120.

0:39:580:40:00

120 bid. 130.

0:40:000:40:02

140. 150.

0:40:020:40:06

160. Still on the net at 160.

0:40:060:40:10

-£160.

-Good.

-Put it there.

-Not finished yet.

0:40:100:40:14

Still in.

0:40:140:40:15

170 bid now.

0:40:150:40:18

At 170. Still with the net, but it's up to you.

0:40:180:40:20

Bid quickly if you need them. At £170.

0:40:200:40:24

-Well done.

-Give us a kiss.

-Do you want lips...?

0:40:240:40:28

Give us a kiss. That's fine. Give us a kiss.

0:40:280:40:31

What a brilliant profit

0:40:310:40:33

to end today's auction and this Road Trip.

0:40:330:40:36

-Where do you want it?

-On my left cheek.

0:40:360:40:39

Thank you. Oh, Margie.

0:40:390:40:42

Margie started this final leg with £425.04.

0:40:440:40:48

After paying auction house fees, she's made a profit today of £68.32.

0:40:480:40:54

Ending the week with an outstanding total of £493.36.

0:40:540:40:59

Charles started with £545.98.

0:41:030:41:08

After fees he made a profit of £114.56.

0:41:080:41:13

Winning today's auction and this Road Trip with an exceptional £660.54.

0:41:130:41:20

Well done, Charles.

0:41:200:41:22

Remember, all profits from the series go to Children In Need.

0:41:230:41:28

You must be happy. You done well.

0:41:280:41:29

I'm happy, but that song is, we'll meet again. I hope so, Margie.

0:41:290:41:34

In one sunny...

0:41:340:41:35

Well, at least I've achieved something.

0:41:350:41:38

Getting in this car is so much easier.

0:41:380:41:40

-Shall I drive you one more time?

-Do it, do it.

0:41:400:41:44

-Margie, I won!

-Don't rub it in.

0:41:440:41:47

One last time. Don't be slippy.

0:41:490:41:51

EXHAUST ROARS

0:41:510:41:52

Sorry. I'm not in gear.

0:41:520:41:55

-It's been an eventful week for our road trippers...

-What is that?

0:41:590:42:04

I don't know. Something which came off the car.

0:42:040:42:07

-I'm no mechanic, but listen.

-There have been highs...

0:42:070:42:11

I'm going to break it.

0:42:110:42:12

SHE CHUCKLES

0:42:120:42:14

There have been lows...

0:42:200:42:22

Oh!

0:42:220:42:24

Brolly's broken.

0:42:240:42:26

Margie picked up deals for a song...

0:42:270:42:30

MUSIC PLAYS

0:42:300:42:31

But Charles had victory in his sights from the off...

0:42:310:42:36

I want to shoot Margie down.

0:42:360:42:38

Most of all they've gained some memories to cherish.

0:42:380:42:41

That's going fast.

0:42:430:42:45

Get out of here! Wonderful. Thank you very much.

0:42:450:42:49

So long, you two.

0:42:510:42:53

Next week, a new battle of the experts begins,

0:42:580:43:01

as zealous Anita Manning...

0:43:010:43:03

A woman's work is never done.

0:43:030:43:06

..takes on playful Philip Serrell.

0:43:060:43:08

Charles Hanson and Margie Cooper have been clocking up the miles around England in an Elva Courier on their road trip. Their last leg starts in the village of Stickney, Lincolnshire, and heads to that final auction in Leicester.