Episode 11 Antiques Road Trip


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Episode 11

Antiques challenge. Auctioneers Anita Manning and Philip Serrell begin their journey in the Lake District, heading to their first auction in Cleveleys near Blackpool.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 11. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

-It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

-This is beautiful.

0:00:020:00:05

That's the way to do this.

0:00:050:00:07

With £200 each, a classic car, and a goal -

0:00:070:00:09

to scour for antiques.

0:00:090:00:12

-Joy.

-Hello.

0:00:120:00:13

The aim -

0:00:130:00:14

to make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

0:00:140:00:17

There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

0:00:200:00:22

So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

0:00:230:00:28

The handbrake's on.

0:00:280:00:29

This is Antiques Road Trip.

0:00:290:00:31

Yeah.

0:00:330:00:35

Today, we begin a brand-new adventure with Road Trip royalty.

0:00:410:00:44

It's queen of auctions Anita Manning

0:00:440:00:47

and king of doing a deal Philip Serrell.

0:00:470:00:49

Philip, are you quite excited because it's a new adventure

0:00:520:00:55

-and you're sitting beside a beautiful woman?

-I am indeedy.

0:00:550:00:58

I am indeedy.

0:00:580:01:00

Everywhere I go, people say to me, "What's that lovely Anita Manning like?"

0:01:000:01:04

-and do you know what I say to them?

-What do you say, darling?

0:01:040:01:06

-She is awful.

-Oh, no!

-Absolutely awful.

0:01:060:01:09

-I don't believe you!

-You work with her...

0:01:090:01:12

What a diva. What an absolute diva.

0:01:120:01:14

Don't listen to him, Anita.

0:01:140:01:16

One of Scotland's first female auctioneers, our Anita

0:01:190:01:22

is more of a smiling assassin when it comes to getting a discount.

0:01:220:01:26

I was kind of looking to pay about £20.

0:01:260:01:30

Her rival on this journey is esteemed auctioneer Philip.

0:01:340:01:37

Full of fun and games.

0:01:370:01:39

Shame.

0:01:410:01:42

Starting this trip with £200 each, our expert pair will be

0:01:420:01:46

pootling around in a left-hand-drive 1966 Fiat 500.

0:01:460:01:51

Do you think I should get out and push? Do you?

0:01:510:01:55

It might go faster.

0:01:550:01:58

I think... I'm not sure whether you drive this or wear it.

0:01:580:02:01

They are snug in there, aren't they?

0:02:030:02:06

This Road Trip kicks off in Windermere in the Lake District

0:02:080:02:11

and travels over 1,200 miles around the north of England,

0:02:110:02:15

crossing the border into Scotland, before heading south again

0:02:150:02:18

and ending their trip in Crooklands, Cumbria.

0:02:180:02:21

This leg will kick off in Windermere

0:02:240:02:27

and finish up at auction in Cleveleys, near Blackpool.

0:02:270:02:30

Anita Manning, what have you done to this weather?

0:02:320:02:35

What have you done?

0:02:350:02:37

-Philip, it's lovely.

-What do you call this in Scotland, dreich?

0:02:370:02:42

But, Philip, there's sunshine in our heart

0:02:420:02:45

-because we're at the beginning of a new adventure.

-Oh, absolutely.

0:02:450:02:49

We are.

0:02:490:02:51

We're in the heart of the Lake District, in wonderful Windermere.

0:02:510:02:55

Philip's arrived at Courtyard Cottage Antiques.

0:02:570:03:00

How are you?

0:03:000:03:01

-Hello.

-We've met before, haven't we?

-We have, yes.

0:03:010:03:05

-I've seen you're selling your shop.

-We are.

-Now, my budget's £200.

0:03:050:03:08

-I don't suppose...? No?

-No, you're a little short. I'm sorry.

0:03:080:03:11

Story of my life, that.

0:03:110:03:13

-I'm going to have a look round and I'll catch you in a minute.

-OK.

0:03:130:03:16

Nice try, Philip. Best find something a bit more in your budget, eh?

0:03:160:03:20

-Jean?

-Yes?

0:03:260:03:29

What are these off here?

0:03:290:03:30

Are they off a buffalo or a bison or something?

0:03:300:03:33

Could be a Highlander.

0:03:330:03:35

Do you know what the difference is between a bison and a buffalo?

0:03:350:03:37

I'll try my best Birmingham accent.

0:03:370:03:39

-BIRMINGHAM ACCENT:

-You can wash your hands in a bi-son.

0:03:390:03:42

SAD TRUMPET SOUND It's the way you tell them. Oh, Lordy.

0:03:420:03:45

-Pitiful, really, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:03:450:03:48

-I'm sorry. You all right?

-Can you try harder?

-No.

0:03:480:03:51

Terrible jokes aside, let's get a closer look at those horns.

0:03:510:03:56

-How much are these, Jean?

-65.

-65.

0:03:560:03:58

-They're just a cow's horn, aren't they?

-Yes.

0:03:580:04:01

So it's just a by-product of what it is.

0:04:010:04:03

-There's no actual hunting gone on just for these.

-No.

0:04:030:04:06

What I'm trying to say is, they're not a trophy, are they?

0:04:060:04:08

-They are not.

-Right.

0:04:080:04:10

65...

0:04:100:04:11

-Look at this. Look at it.

-JEAN LAUGHS

0:04:140:04:17

Philip's putting the dusty cow horns aside as a possibility.

0:04:170:04:21

And it looks like a small leather-topped children's stool

0:04:300:04:34

has also caught Philip's eye.

0:04:340:04:36

Ticket price is £45.

0:04:360:04:38

That at auction is going to make... 20-30 quid, isn't it?

0:04:390:04:44

Ooh, 'eck.

0:04:440:04:46

I like it when it's "ooh, 'eck".

0:04:460:04:48

So is that a Lake District expression?

0:04:480:04:51

£30.

0:04:510:04:52

I want to buy the horns.

0:04:560:04:58

The horns can be 45.

0:04:580:05:00

How much can you do the two for?

0:05:000:05:02

-I'll be really generous.

-I like this.

0:05:020:05:05

-£60 for the two.

-50 quid for the two.

0:05:060:05:09

I agree with you at £50.

0:05:120:05:14

-You sure?

-Yes.

-I want you to be happy.

-I'm happy.

0:05:140:05:17

Go on. I'll shake you by the hand, my love. Thank you very much.

0:05:170:05:21

Philip's kicked off his Road Trip with two generous deals,

0:05:210:05:24

securing the cow horns for £25 and another 25 for the stool.

0:05:240:05:29

He's so bullish. Ha!

0:05:300:05:33

Anita has made her way to Kendal...

0:05:340:05:37

..known as the Auld Grey Town thanks to its grey limestone.

0:05:400:05:44

Kendal is well known for its mint cake, though,

0:05:440:05:47

an essential prerequisite of today's explorers and mountaineers.

0:05:470:05:52

Anita's first shop of this trip is the Antiques Emporium.

0:05:520:05:56

How lovely.

0:05:560:05:58

-Hello, there. Hello.

-I'm Anita.

-Hi, I'm Chris.

0:05:580:06:01

With a wide range of antiques, collectables and vintage pieces,

0:06:010:06:06

there's bound to be something to suit Anita's taste here.

0:06:060:06:09

A woman's work is never done.

0:06:110:06:14

Cabinets always fascinate me. I'm always drawn to the cabinets.

0:06:220:06:26

First to spark Anita's interest

0:06:270:06:30

are a yellow-metal amethyst-set bar brooch and an Art Deco clip.

0:06:300:06:34

This style is 1930s.

0:06:370:06:40

Maybe...between '20s and '40s.

0:06:400:06:43

And I think it might be a wee bit more modern than that.

0:06:430:06:48

I think that it's a replica, rather than a period one.

0:06:480:06:53

It's not absolutely right, but at the same time, it's a nice thing.

0:06:530:06:59

It's a nice piece.

0:06:590:07:00

And it's nice and fresh,

0:07:000:07:02

and I'm hoping that it would appeal to the ladies who

0:07:020:07:06

come along to auction and fancy giving themselves a wee treat.

0:07:060:07:10

I'm sure it will.

0:07:100:07:12

Chris has headed off to phone the dealer to see

0:07:130:07:15

if there's any movement on the ticket price of £42.

0:07:150:07:18

-The very best I can do is £32.

-32?

-Mm-hmm.

0:07:200:07:24

I'm awful tempted.

0:07:240:07:25

Because I like it and I think that it's nice.

0:07:270:07:30

It's only the sort of period that worries me a wee bit.

0:07:300:07:35

Do you think they would go to 30?

0:07:350:07:37

-Go on. You've twisted my arm.

-I don't want to twist your arm.

-Oh.

0:07:400:07:45

-You've sweet-talked me into it. We'll do 30 for you.

-Thank you very much.

0:07:450:07:48

That's great, that's terrific.

0:07:480:07:50

Anita's not stopping there.

0:07:500:07:52

She's spotted something else in the cabinets.

0:07:520:07:55

I'm intrigued by this little plaque at the back.

0:07:550:07:59

Joan of Arc.

0:07:590:08:02

-Could I have a wee look at it, please?

-Certainly.

0:08:020:08:05

This is a copper plaque that's been plated with white metal

0:08:060:08:09

and there's probably a bit of age to it,

0:08:090:08:11

but neither Chris nor the dealer know anything more.

0:08:110:08:14

Is Anita willing to risk purchasing this mysterious lot?

0:08:140:08:18

The ticket price is £22.

0:08:180:08:20

There's a little bit of leeway on it.

0:08:220:08:25

We can do £18 for it, and that's his bottom line.

0:08:250:08:28

-That's his bottom line?

-Yes.

-I'm tempted.

0:08:280:08:31

Like, my heart's saying yes, but my head's saying,

0:08:310:08:34

is somebody else going to be as interested in it as me?

0:08:340:08:36

-It just needs somebody interested on the day, doesn't it?

-Yeah.

0:08:360:08:40

-Yeah, I'm going to go for it.

-OK, lovely.

-Thank you very much.

0:08:410:08:44

Thank you very much.

0:08:440:08:45

That's the commemorative Joan of Arc plaque and the brooch

0:08:450:08:49

and Art Deco pin bought for £48.

0:08:490:08:53

Philip is now joining Anita in Kendal.

0:08:570:09:01

He's come to Sleddall Hall Antiques Centre,

0:09:010:09:04

housed in a 17th-century manor house.

0:09:040:09:06

Philip's being looked after today by dealer Andrew.

0:09:090:09:12

-You've got interesting things everywhere here.

-It's amazing.

0:09:120:09:16

I've got to ask you,

0:09:160:09:17

what's the longest you've ever had anything in stock for?

0:09:170:09:21

Well, we sold something the other day that we'd had for 40 years.

0:09:210:09:24

-40 years?! That's nearly as old as me.

-That was incredible.

0:09:240:09:28

-Did you make profit on it?

-We did make a profit on it.

0:09:280:09:31

-We got pretty close to the asking price, so...

-Really?

0:09:310:09:34

Yes, it was very good.

0:09:340:09:36

-I tell you what, I love that, Andrew.

-That's amazing.

0:09:360:09:38

You've got a handcrafted pub game there, skittles.

0:09:380:09:42

-Somebody's made this who goes to the pub, haven't they?

-Absolutely.

0:09:420:09:46

All you've got is a bit of stained hardboard here.

0:09:460:09:48

-Or plywood, isn't it?

-It is plywood.

0:09:480:09:51

It was probably made in the '50s, just post-war.

0:09:510:09:54

-I would say post-war.

-Just post-war.

0:09:540:09:56

Well, have a go, then.

0:09:560:09:58

Oh, here we go.

0:09:580:09:59

-There we go.

-Are you ready for this?

-I'm ready for this.

-How many?

0:09:590:10:02

I'd say you'll get five.

0:10:020:10:04

There you are, four.

0:10:060:10:07

So close.

0:10:070:10:09

So, what's the ticket price on that, Andrew?

0:10:090:10:12

We've got a ticket price of £80.

0:10:120:10:14

-And there's some movement in price on that?

-We can always negotiate.

0:10:140:10:18

-OK.

-Knock it down a bit. Sounds like the skittles are in the running.

0:10:180:10:22

Anything else?

0:10:220:10:23

Andrew, this is fantastic, isn't it?

0:10:260:10:28

That's a wonderful example of polished fossils, isn't it?

0:10:280:10:32

-What's interesting... I used to teach geography.

-Yes.

-Badly.

0:10:320:10:35

So I should know Jurassic

0:10:350:10:38

and all the other different periods of history,

0:10:380:10:42

but I don't.

0:10:420:10:43

But I would think this is several million years in age.

0:10:430:10:46

-Really ancient.

-And as you say, it's been polished.

0:10:460:10:50

Would this have come from Africa or Morocco or somewhere?

0:10:500:10:54

I would imagine, or even China,

0:10:540:10:56

you never know where these things come from these days.

0:10:560:10:58

-How much is that?

-We've got a ticket price on that of £75.

0:10:580:11:02

I quite like that. I do think that's quite a...

0:11:020:11:05

..fun thing, and I'm willing to bet that it would be the oldest thing

0:11:070:11:10

-in the auction.

-I would imagine it would be.

0:11:100:11:12

It's probably one of the oldest things in the shop.

0:11:120:11:15

-It's not as old as you and me, is it?

-Not quite!

0:11:150:11:17

The slab of Mesozoic-era fossils

0:11:190:11:21

and that pub skittles game

0:11:210:11:24

have a combined ticket price of £155.

0:11:240:11:28

-The fossils will make £40-£60.

-Yes.

0:11:300:11:32

Realistically, I think I can give £30-£35 for them.

0:11:320:11:38

For me, the game is £20-£25 worth.

0:11:380:11:42

So you're wanting to pay...

0:11:420:11:44

60 quid for the two. Well, £55, £60 for the two.

0:11:440:11:48

Call it £65 and we'll have a deal for you at that.

0:11:480:11:51

-So what we're talking about is £35 for the fossils.

-Correct.

0:11:510:11:54

-And £30 for the game.

-Correct.

-You're happy with that?

-Yes.

0:11:540:11:57

I will shake you by the hand.

0:11:570:11:58

-Thank you very much, I'd better give you some money now!

-Yes, please.

0:11:580:12:02

A very generous discount, and a great deal done. Marvellous!

0:12:030:12:06

Anita is still in Kendal and has travelled five minutes

0:12:090:12:13

down the road to the Museum of Lakeland Life and Industry

0:12:130:12:16

at Abbot Hall.

0:12:160:12:17

She's come to find out about the mysterious author behind one

0:12:170:12:21

of the most famous children's novels of all time, Swallows And Amazons.

0:12:210:12:26

Arthur Ransome had a lifelong love affair with the Lake District

0:12:310:12:35

but also spent many, many years in Bolshevik Russia,

0:12:350:12:38

and rumours still persist that he may have been a spy.

0:12:380:12:42

Here to tell Anita all about this fascinating man

0:12:450:12:48

is Geraint Lewis from the Arthur Ransome Trust.

0:12:480:12:51

We associate Arthur Ransome with the Lakes.

0:12:520:12:56

-How did this association start? Was he born here?

-He wasn't, no.

0:12:560:13:00

He was born in Leeds.

0:13:000:13:02

When he was just born, his father carried Arthur Ransome up to the top

0:13:020:13:07

of the Old Man of Coniston as a sort of welcome to the area.

0:13:070:13:10

Arthur Ransome just developed that love from his earliest beginnings,

0:13:100:13:14

from childhood holidays at Coniston Water.

0:13:140:13:17

I suppose he carried this area in his heart with him.

0:13:170:13:20

He did in his heart, and quite literally as well, because

0:13:200:13:23

he carried a little rock throughout his life when he travelled.

0:13:230:13:26

I love that idea, of carrying a bit of this wonderful area with him

0:13:260:13:31

throughout his travels.

0:13:310:13:32

Ransome had a passion for writing from an early age, and in 1902,

0:13:340:13:39

aged 18, he moved to London, where he mixed with the artistic scene

0:13:390:13:43

and started publishing his work to great acclaim.

0:13:430:13:46

But an interest in folklore

0:13:460:13:48

led Ransome to St Petersburg in Russia.

0:13:480:13:51

Did he do any work over there, apart from his writing at that point?

0:13:530:13:57

Initially he was interested in the writing, but of course in 1914

0:13:570:14:01

the war began and an opportunity came up by accident, really,

0:14:010:14:05

for him to become a war correspondent for the Daily News.

0:14:050:14:08

That is the perfect job for him, telling stories.

0:14:080:14:12

In 1917, the Russian Revolution happened,

0:14:120:14:16

so he was excellently placed to become a political journalist,

0:14:160:14:19

reporting on the rapidly evolving politics of Russia.

0:14:190:14:23

It must have been a very scary time to be in Russia at that point.

0:14:230:14:27

I think so.

0:14:270:14:28

He was one of a few Westerners, really, who were in Russia

0:14:280:14:32

through that kind of period.

0:14:320:14:34

That made him of interest to the Bolshevik and British governments,

0:14:340:14:39

because he was one of the very few people who could actually

0:14:390:14:43

give first-hand knowledge of what the other side was thinking,

0:14:430:14:46

and what their mind-set was.

0:14:460:14:48

Are you telling me that he was a spy?

0:14:480:14:51

It's difficult to say,

0:14:510:14:53

but we do know that he was recruited by MI6 in 1919

0:14:530:14:57

when he was in Stockholm

0:14:570:14:59

and the evidence suggests that they helped to persuade,

0:14:590:15:03

or encourage, the Russian government to let him back into Russia.

0:15:030:15:07

For two reasons.

0:15:070:15:09

One, because he wanted to write a history of the Russian Revolution,

0:15:090:15:12

which the Bolshevik government was very keen on his doing,

0:15:120:15:15

but also so the British government could get a report from him of

0:15:150:15:19

what was going on in a country which at the time they knew nothing about.

0:15:190:15:23

Rumours persisted about Ransome's sympathy for the Bolsheviks,

0:15:230:15:28

as he mixed with many of the leading Communists,

0:15:280:15:31

including Lenin and Trotsky.

0:15:310:15:33

Within this elite circle, he got to know one person particularly well.

0:15:330:15:38

He married Evgenia Shelepina, who was Trotsky's secretary, in 1924.

0:15:380:15:44

He moved straight back to Britain after that

0:15:440:15:46

and they went to live near Windermere.

0:15:460:15:50

So he came back, he brought his Russian bride to live in the Lakes.

0:15:500:15:56

It was a far cry from the turbulent world of post-war Russia,

0:15:570:16:01

and it was in this calm and remote landscape that Ransome

0:16:010:16:05

conceived the idea for his children's novel Swallows And Amazons.

0:16:050:16:10

What inspired him to write this book?

0:16:110:16:13

It was two inspirations, really.

0:16:130:16:15

One was his own childhood in and around Coniston Water,

0:16:150:16:19

and memories of that.

0:16:190:16:20

Those were really reignited in 1928

0:16:200:16:23

when he spent a lot of time with the daughter and grandchildren

0:16:230:16:27

of WG Collingwood, and between them acquired two dinghies, which they

0:16:270:16:31

spent a lot of time sailing in during the time they were there,

0:16:310:16:35

and that I think reignited his thoughts, and eventually

0:16:350:16:39

led to the creative inspiration for Swallows And Amazons.

0:16:390:16:42

Swallows And Amazons was to be the first in a series of 12 novels

0:16:420:16:47

that Ransome wrote about the outdoor adventures

0:16:470:16:50

enjoyed by two families of children.

0:16:500:16:52

Everyone has heard of Swallows And Amazons,

0:16:520:16:55

and Arthur Ransome must have been one of the most popular

0:16:550:16:58

children's authors of all time.

0:16:580:17:01

Yes, I think that's true.

0:17:010:17:03

And I think one of the most respected as well.

0:17:030:17:05

In 1936 they brought out an award, an annual award,

0:17:050:17:08

called the Carnegie Medal for Outstanding Children's Literature,

0:17:080:17:12

and he was awarded the first medal for the sixth book in the

0:17:120:17:16

Swallows And Amazons series, Pigeon Post, and we have the medal here.

0:17:160:17:19

That is quite something, isn't it?

0:17:190:17:21

Subsequent winners of this include authors such as CS Lewis

0:17:210:17:25

and Richard Adams and Philip Pullman,

0:17:250:17:28

so it's certainly an award to treasure.

0:17:280:17:30

After a life full of intrigue and adventure, Arthur Ransome

0:17:310:17:35

died in June 1967 and was buried in his beloved Lake District.

0:17:350:17:40

His children's novels remain in print today,

0:17:410:17:44

and have sold millions of copies worldwide.

0:17:440:17:47

It's been a busy old day for our experts,

0:17:500:17:53

who are back together again for some well-earned rest.

0:17:530:17:56

So, nighty-night.

0:17:560:17:57

It's the next morning, and, hello, what's going on here, then?

0:18:020:18:06

-Philip?

-What?

-What are we going to do?

0:18:060:18:10

I don't know.

0:18:100:18:11

Looks like the car has finally packed in.

0:18:130:18:16

Our experts will have to think of a new mode of transport.

0:18:160:18:19

There she goes.

0:18:190:18:21

There's a couple of gee-gees up there.

0:18:210:18:23

No, I don't like horses.

0:18:230:18:25

I think we should retitle the programme.

0:18:250:18:27

What about The Great Antiques Walk?

0:18:270:18:31

Let's go for it.

0:18:310:18:32

I think it's a bit optimistic to think you can walk the whole way,

0:18:350:18:38

you two.

0:18:380:18:40

Or should I say skip?

0:18:400:18:41

Yesterday, Philip secured himself four lots.

0:18:440:18:47

The cow horns, the children's stool, the bar skittles

0:18:470:18:51

and the slab of fossils, which means he still has £85 in his pocket.

0:18:510:18:56

While Anita only bought two lots.

0:18:590:19:01

The brooch with the Art Deco clip

0:19:010:19:02

and the commemorative Joan of Arc plaque,

0:19:020:19:05

leaving her £152 available to spend.

0:19:050:19:09

So, Anita has walked, and been driven,

0:19:090:19:13

to her first stop of the day, in Cullingworth, West Yorkshire.

0:19:130:19:18

Situated in the heart of Bronte country,

0:19:180:19:20

the pretty village of Cullingworth is home to Antiques at the Mill.

0:19:200:19:25

Look at that!

0:19:250:19:26

-Hi, I'm Anita.

-How are you? How do you do?

-It's lovely to be here.

0:19:300:19:35

What a fabulous place. Was this originally a textile mill?

0:19:350:19:40

That's right, an old textile mill that goes back to the 1800s.

0:19:400:19:45

It's now filled with the wares of over 30 independent dealers.

0:19:450:19:49

This is the type of object

0:19:550:19:58

that Phil Serrell would be immediately drawn to.

0:19:580:20:01

A big old broken rustic piece

0:20:010:20:06

of what some people might call junk,

0:20:060:20:09

but it's an interesting looking thing and it has age about it.

0:20:090:20:15

It's had a wee bit of repair.

0:20:150:20:17

So, it says on the ticket that there is a rustic rake and shovel.

0:20:170:20:23

So we've got a rake as well.

0:20:230:20:25

Steve, do we have the rake for this?

0:20:250:20:29

We do have the rake. It's right above my head.

0:20:290:20:32

That is fabulous.

0:20:320:20:34

-Can I see it down?

-You can indeed.

0:20:340:20:36

-There we go.

-OK.

0:20:370:20:40

So, no great quality, but probably late 19th, early 20th century stuff.

0:20:400:20:47

She sounds keen, so it's time to phone dealer Paul.

0:20:470:20:52

Ticket price is £50.

0:20:520:20:54

I was kind of looking to pay about £20 on them.

0:20:560:20:59

Well... You don't get if you don't ask.

0:21:010:21:04

£25? Could you take £25?

0:21:040:21:07

You are an absolute darling! An absolute darling at £25.

0:21:110:21:16

I'm really delighted. OK, bye-bye. Bye.

0:21:160:21:20

-£25.

-You got a really good deal there. Well done.

0:21:220:21:25

I was chatting him up.

0:21:250:21:27

Smooth talking, Anita.

0:21:310:21:34

And she's not done yet.

0:21:340:21:35

This little sewing box here would be from the 1950s.

0:21:390:21:45

The top opens out.

0:21:450:21:47

We can see all the little compartments for threads

0:21:500:21:53

and needles and scissors and so on,

0:21:530:21:56

and it's decorated with this quite crazy Fablon material here.

0:21:560:22:02

Cheap, but stylish.

0:22:020:22:06

I quite like that.

0:22:060:22:09

And I think that it might be appealing.

0:22:100:22:13

Ticket price is £60,

0:22:140:22:16

but Anita has asked Steve to contact the dealer with a cheeky bid of £30.

0:22:160:22:21

-Any luck?

-Right...

0:22:240:22:26

Because it's such a popular item, he knows he can shift that,

0:22:280:22:32

so £30 is a bit low.

0:22:320:22:34

He will shift it at £40.

0:22:340:22:37

How does that sound?

0:22:370:22:38

-Let's go for that, thank you very much. I'm delighted.

-Fantastic.

0:22:380:22:42

Yeah, I bet!

0:22:420:22:43

That's the 1950s sewing box

0:22:430:22:45

and the rustic rake and shovel for a canny £65 total.

0:22:450:22:50

Philip is now taking our trip to Saltaire,

0:22:510:22:54

a few miles north of Bradford.

0:22:540:22:56

An area that played an important part in the Industrial Revolution

0:22:580:23:02

with its population increasing by 90,000 in just 50 years,

0:23:020:23:07

thanks to the textile boom.

0:23:070:23:09

But the rapid growth of the city brought with it

0:23:100:23:13

terrible social squalor.

0:23:130:23:14

There was one local businessman, Titus Salt,

0:23:160:23:18

who decided that his workers would not live

0:23:180:23:22

in those horrific conditions,

0:23:220:23:23

so he created a vision of industrial utopia.

0:23:230:23:27

Philip has arrived at Salt's Mill

0:23:280:23:30

to meet curator Jen Hallam to find out more.

0:23:300:23:32

Titus started off his career as a wool stapler.

0:23:340:23:37

-What's a wool stapler?

-It's somebody who buys and sells wool.

0:23:370:23:41

-So he's a wool trader?

-Indeed, yes.

0:23:410:23:43

It was on one of his visits to Liverpool

0:23:430:23:45

that he spotted a load of greasy bales in the corner of a warehouse,

0:23:450:23:48

and they were full of alpaca fleece that nobody wanted.

0:23:480:23:52

He found a way of processing it,

0:23:520:23:54

so this is the product of that invention.

0:23:540:23:59

What differentiates this from other weaves or yarns,

0:23:590:24:02

or wools, or whatever?

0:24:020:24:03

The alpaca that Titus was able to create

0:24:030:24:06

is incredibly fine and lustrous fabric - very, very popular.

0:24:060:24:10

So popular that in fact Queen Victoria, who had a small

0:24:100:24:15

flock of alpacas at Windsor, used to send the fleece up to Saltaire.

0:24:150:24:20

Titus Salt's successful business flourished.

0:24:200:24:23

He soon had five factories in Bradford,

0:24:230:24:25

but was aware of the terrible living conditions of his workers.

0:24:250:24:29

Living conditions in Bradford were absolutely appalling.

0:24:290:24:33

There are horrendous reports of, you know, a family of eight

0:24:330:24:37

living in a damp cellar,

0:24:370:24:39

with five children sleeping in one bed

0:24:390:24:41

and the father, mother and grandmother sleeping in another bed.

0:24:410:24:45

It really was appalling.

0:24:450:24:47

There was no sewerage, no water supply.

0:24:470:24:49

The canal and the Bradford Beck were basically open sewers.

0:24:490:24:54

Cholera, typhoid were both rife

0:24:540:24:56

and there were some very severe outbreaks

0:24:560:25:00

and an awful lot of people died.

0:25:000:25:01

-So they didn't live overly long, did they?

-They didn't.

0:25:010:25:04

The average lifespan in Bradford at that time was just 18.5 years.

0:25:040:25:08

-18... Under 20 years?!

-Under 20 years.

0:25:100:25:12

Under 20 years, and in fact over half of all the wool combers'

0:25:120:25:17

children didn't make it to the age of 15.

0:25:170:25:20

Oh, dear.

0:25:200:25:22

It was because of this horrendous public health disaster

0:25:220:25:25

that Salt decided to move away from the city

0:25:250:25:27

and build a brand-new modern super mill,

0:25:270:25:30

thought to be the largest in Europe when it opened.

0:25:300:25:33

Situated on the banks of the River Aire, Salt didn't just build a mill,

0:25:330:25:38

he planned to create a whole new township called Saltaire,

0:25:380:25:43

declaring that it would become a community

0:25:430:25:45

of well-fed and happy operatives.

0:25:450:25:47

This mill building opened in 1853 and over the next 20 years,

0:25:470:25:52

Salt actually built a village for his workers with 800 houses.

0:25:520:25:57

He built churches, a school, a hospital, almshouses.

0:25:570:26:01

There was a canteen, a factory canteen,

0:26:010:26:04

that could accommodate 700-800 people at one sitting.

0:26:040:26:08

Every house had its own water supply, gas supply.

0:26:080:26:12

It had a minimum of two bedrooms.

0:26:120:26:14

Each house had its own outside toilet which,

0:26:140:26:17

compared to the conditions in Bradford at the time,

0:26:170:26:19

must've been absolutely astounding.

0:26:190:26:22

In 1876, the last building at Saltaire was completed.

0:26:230:26:26

Later that year, Sir Titus Salt died at home.

0:26:260:26:31

Along with Robert Owen, who created New Lanark,

0:26:310:26:34

and the Cadbury family who built Bournville Village,

0:26:340:26:37

Salt was a prominent reformer in the movement to improve

0:26:370:26:41

the terrible living conditions of industrial workers.

0:26:410:26:44

Back in Cullingworth, with the car still being fixed,

0:26:450:26:49

Anita is using her initiative.

0:26:490:26:52

Oh, this is great.

0:26:520:26:53

I feel like the queen of the road!

0:26:530:26:55

I'll look after him and I'll be careful.

0:26:550:26:58

All right, see you later.

0:26:580:27:00

Bye!

0:27:000:27:01

Thank you, kind driver.

0:27:010:27:03

OK, darling, we're off. Forward, Macduff!

0:27:060:27:08

And you're a lot better looking than Phil Serrell.

0:27:080:27:11

Hey, cheeky!

0:27:110:27:13

A lorry and a car ride later and Anita has arrived in Hebden Bridge.

0:27:160:27:21

The town sits on the Rochdale Canal,

0:27:230:27:25

popular with those who prefer a more sedate way to cross the Pennines.

0:27:250:27:30

Anita is here to visit Caldene Antiques Centre.

0:27:320:27:36

That looks like Anita's sort of thing, a 1940s lady's watch,

0:27:470:27:51

possibly gold.

0:27:510:27:52

-Can I have a wee look outside?

-Course you can.

0:27:570:27:59

-I want to try and find a hallmark.

-See if there is a hallmark.

0:27:590:28:03

I'm going to have a look at this watch,

0:28:050:28:07

which is from the 1930s or 1940s.

0:28:070:28:11

It's marked up at £22.

0:28:110:28:14

Now, if that is gold, that's not a lot of money because,

0:28:140:28:19

although the watch might not be working,

0:28:190:28:22

there would be interest from people who buy gold.

0:28:220:28:28

But I like the colour.

0:28:280:28:30

I like the colour of the watch case and I think that might be gold.

0:28:300:28:36

If I just open it gently, remove the mechanism...

0:28:370:28:41

..and then I am looking in here for the hallmark.

0:28:430:28:46

And that tells us that it is...

0:28:480:28:51

..nine carat gold.

0:28:530:28:55

So that's a good buy at £22.

0:28:550:28:58

Great spot, even better if she could get it for less.

0:28:580:29:02

Time to check with Carol.

0:29:020:29:04

Watch out, Carol.

0:29:040:29:06

Is there any movement on that price?

0:29:060:29:09

I'll have a look for you.

0:29:090:29:11

Have a wee look.

0:29:110:29:12

-Are they both out of the same cabinet?

-Mm-hm.

0:29:140:29:16

-We could do that one for £20.

-You could do it for £20.

0:29:180:29:21

Could you do it for £18?

0:29:210:29:23

-Yes, take 18.

-Yes, 18.

-You can do it for 18. That's fine, that's fine.

0:29:270:29:30

-That's great. Well, I'm very pleased.

-OK, my love.

0:29:300:29:34

So that's a nine carat gold cased lady's wristwatch for only £18.

0:29:340:29:40

Well done.

0:29:400:29:41

Philip is also heading towards Hebden Bridge.

0:29:440:29:47

It's a lovely part of the world, isn't it?

0:29:470:29:50

He's hitched a ride with Roy and his grandson George.

0:29:500:29:53

This is fantastic. Really, really kind of you.

0:29:530:29:56

Roy is a man of few words.

0:29:560:29:58

A tractor, though,

0:29:580:30:00

not surprising as Philip hails from generations of farmers.

0:30:000:30:03

And PE teachers.

0:30:030:30:05

Thank you very, very much.

0:30:050:30:06

And dropped off right at the door of his final shop. Lucky devil.

0:30:100:30:14

What a lovely man.

0:30:170:30:18

What a really, really nice man.

0:30:190:30:21

Right, down to business at Hebden Bridge Antiques.

0:30:220:30:25

-Peter, how are you?

-Nice to meet you.

0:30:260:30:28

-That was some entrance, that was.

-Well, you know, travelling in style.

0:30:280:30:32

You're welcome to have a look around.

0:30:320:30:35

That's interesting because at the back there,

0:30:450:30:48

there's that silver ship's light and it looks like it's 47 quid.

0:30:480:30:53

It's a cigar lighter. Hugely collectable.

0:30:530:30:56

So if that's all the money, that is just for nothing.

0:30:580:31:01

There's a problem. £475.

0:31:030:31:05

What's that expression?

0:31:050:31:07

"It's better to travel in expectation

0:31:070:31:09

"than to arrive in disappointment."

0:31:090:31:11

Anything else silver and cheaper take your fancy?

0:31:110:31:15

That's quite nice.

0:31:210:31:22

Very often, these have had an armorial or something here.

0:31:220:31:26

-Yes. Quite often they do, yes.

-That has been polished out, hasn't it?

0:31:260:31:29

But it's got some nice gilding to the interior.

0:31:290:31:33

This is a helmet-shaped cream jug.

0:31:330:31:36

Chester hallmarks.

0:31:360:31:37

This is a Georgian design that's been copied 100 or 80 years later.

0:31:380:31:43

What do you think that'll make at auction?

0:31:430:31:46

-£30-£50.

-Yes, that's exactly what I think.

0:31:460:31:49

Which means I've got to try and buy it off you for £20-£25.

0:31:500:31:54

-Well, yes.

-What's the price ticket? £80!

0:31:540:31:57

Um... What can you do it for?

0:31:590:32:02

For me, it's got to come in under £30, otherwise I can't look at it.

0:32:020:32:07

Why don't we try £45?

0:32:080:32:10

-That's not under £30, is it?

-No.

0:32:100:32:13

For me to buy it, it's got to come under £30, really, I think.

0:32:130:32:17

£35?

0:32:170:32:18

That's still got to make £40 for me to stand still with it.

0:32:200:32:24

I could go to £25 for it, if that's any good to you.

0:32:240:32:27

If it isn't it doesn't matter, but I could give that for it.

0:32:270:32:31

How about pushing it slightly and go £28?

0:32:320:32:34

Go on, then, you're a gentleman. Thank you very much indeed.

0:32:350:32:38

With that very generous deal, both our experts are all bought up.

0:32:380:32:42

Philip spent a total of £143 on five lots -

0:32:470:32:51

the cow horns,

0:32:510:32:53

the children's stool,

0:32:530:32:55

the bar skittles,

0:32:550:32:56

the slab of fossils

0:32:560:32:58

and the Georgian-style cream jug.

0:32:580:33:00

Anita spent a little less, shelling out £131

0:33:020:33:07

on her five lots,

0:33:070:33:09

buying the brooch with the Art Deco clip,

0:33:090:33:12

the commemorative plaque,

0:33:120:33:14

the rustic rake and shovel,

0:33:140:33:16

the 1950s sewing box

0:33:160:33:19

and the vintage lady's wristwatch.

0:33:190:33:21

So, what do they make of each other's lots?

0:33:220:33:25

I love Phil's items, they are so Phil.

0:33:250:33:29

That lovely little stool, it's dinky, it's sweet,

0:33:290:33:33

it's in good condition.

0:33:330:33:35

Anita has bought some really good Anita lots.

0:33:350:33:39

But she has also bought a couple of Phil Serrell lots.

0:33:390:33:42

The rake and the fork... I mean, that's Serrell country, Manning.

0:33:420:33:45

What are you doing?

0:33:450:33:47

You know, she's bought them right enough, they should do money.

0:33:470:33:50

That sewing box, I just do not understand that.

0:33:500:33:54

I just don't like it.

0:33:540:33:55

The cow horns, or the bull horns, they don't press any of my buttons.

0:33:550:34:00

I don't care if I lose every penny today

0:34:000:34:03

because I have had a ride on a tractor.

0:34:030:34:07

I'd rather have a ride on a tractor than a concrete lorry. Hmph!

0:34:070:34:10

After starting in Windermere, our experts are now en route

0:34:120:34:16

to their very first auction of the trip in Cleveleys, near Blackpool.

0:34:160:34:20

Let's hope their now-fixed car makes it.

0:34:200:34:25

Do you know, the thing is, our road trip is like a rollercoaster.

0:34:250:34:29

ANITA LAUGHS

0:34:290:34:30

The "Auction Sale Big Dipper".

0:34:300:34:33

We've had the highs, we've got the lows to come now.

0:34:330:34:36

Well, don't worry, Phil, as you've made it safely to the auction house.

0:34:380:34:42

OK, my old fossil, are you ready for this?

0:34:430:34:46

I'm going to find a fossil, I think. In we go, then, happy days.

0:34:460:34:50

-Here we go.

-Presiding over today's proceedings

0:34:500:34:52

is auctioneer Shaun Smythe.

0:34:520:34:55

So, what does he make of our experts' lots?

0:34:550:34:58

The two agricultural items,

0:34:580:35:00

possibly maybe for a themed pub or something of that interest.

0:35:000:35:03

The cow horns, we haven't had a great deal of interest in these,

0:35:030:35:08

to be absolutely honest with you.

0:35:080:35:09

The mid-century sewing box, they are quite collectable, these, at the moment,

0:35:090:35:13

these particular 1950s, 1960s items, so might do well.

0:35:130:35:17

Time will soon tell. Get comfortable, everyone.

0:35:200:35:23

-Whoa. Packed room, isn't it?

-Yeah, it's busy.

0:35:240:35:28

-It's good.

-Absolutely.

0:35:280:35:31

First up is Philip's child stool. Will it prove to be a crowd-pleaser?

0:35:310:35:36

-Do you need me to hold your hand?

-£20 for this. 10. 10 I have. 12.

0:35:360:35:40

-14, 16, 18.

-Yes!

-20.

0:35:400:35:43

At £20 at the back. 22.

0:35:430:35:46

-ANITA GASPS

-24. 26.

0:35:460:35:49

At £26 on the front row. 28 anywhere? At £26.

0:35:490:35:53

-26, are we all finished? At £26...

-Why are you cheering for me?

0:35:530:35:58

-Because I love you.

-Can't argue with that, really, can you?

0:35:580:36:02

There was a little love in the room for Philip's stool, too.

0:36:020:36:06

Will there be any left over for Anita's commemorative

0:36:080:36:11

Joan of Arc plaque?

0:36:110:36:13

Just a little question here. Is Joan of Arc big in Blackpool?

0:36:130:36:17

-We'll see in a minute.

-So, for this one, £30.

0:36:170:36:20

20 I have. 22. At £22.

0:36:200:36:22

24 anywhere? 24. 26. 28.

0:36:220:36:25

At £28 on the staircase. 30.

0:36:250:36:29

32. 34.

0:36:290:36:31

-She IS big in Blackpool.

-36, 38.

0:36:310:36:34

-She's very big in Blackpool.

-40.

0:36:340:36:36

-It is getting bigger by the minute.

-£38 on the second row. 40.

0:36:360:36:41

42. 44.

0:36:410:36:45

At £44, are we all done at 44?

0:36:450:36:48

-Yes!

-It's put me firmly in my place, hasn't it?

0:36:480:36:52

Indeed. That's a storming start for Anita.

0:36:520:36:54

-I wonder if it will be lady's day today.

-Oh, do shut up.

0:36:560:37:00

Now, now, no need to be bitter.

0:37:010:37:03

Let's see if your pub skittles game will prove popular.

0:37:030:37:07

£50 for this. 40.

0:37:070:37:09

Come on, 30 I have, 32. At £32. 34 anywhere?

0:37:090:37:12

34. 36. 38. 40. 42.

0:37:120:37:16

At £42 at the back. 44 anywhere?

0:37:160:37:19

At £42 for the skittles game, then.

0:37:190:37:21

£42. 44 anywhere? Are we all finished at £42?

0:37:210:37:27

-Are you happy?

-Moderately.

0:37:270:37:29

Surely you can crack a bit of a smile over that result.

0:37:290:37:33

If you're in Liverpool, you're a Liverpudlian.

0:37:330:37:35

If you're in Blackpool, are you a Blackpudlian?

0:37:350:37:38

-I think I've lost her.

-Sometimes I worry about you, Phil.

0:37:390:37:43

Right, next up it's Anita's Serrell-like lot,

0:37:430:37:47

the rustic rake and shovel.

0:37:470:37:49

-£40 for this. £30.

-Yes!

-20 I have.

0:37:490:37:52

22. 24, £24 at the back. £24.

0:37:520:37:56

-Yes!

-26 anywhere? At £24 at the back of the room.

0:37:560:37:59

26. 28. 30.

0:37:590:38:02

-At £30 at the back.

-£30.

-30, then. Are we all done at £30? 32 anywhere?

0:38:020:38:06

-All done at 30. All finished.

-Yes!

0:38:060:38:09

That's another profit for Anita. Great stuff.

0:38:110:38:13

-Philip is playing catch-up with his cow horns next.

-At £10, then, now.

0:38:160:38:21

At 10. 12, at £12. 14. 16.

0:38:210:38:24

18. 20. £20 on the front row. 22 anywhere?

0:38:240:38:29

At £20 for the cow horns. Are we all done at 20? All finished?

0:38:290:38:32

ANITA LAUGHS

0:38:360:38:37

Ah, that will take the sting out of that loss.

0:38:370:38:40

Next up it's Anita's great find, the gold wristwatch.

0:38:440:38:48

£40, 30 I have.

0:38:480:38:50

32, 34, 36. At £36. 38 anywhere?

0:38:500:38:53

At £36, then, now.

0:38:530:38:55

36, are we all finished?

0:38:550:38:57

At £36, all done at 36?

0:38:570:38:59

Another marvellous profit for our Lady Manning.

0:39:010:39:04

And she's up again with that lot that Philip rubbished,

0:39:060:39:10

her 1950s sewing box.

0:39:100:39:13

For me, that's got that sort of November 5th look.

0:39:130:39:16

-Bonfire?

-Yeah.

0:39:160:39:18

Very popular, these. What can I say for this one? £40, or 30 I have?

0:39:180:39:21

-32. 34. At £34. 36 at the back.

-ANITA LAUGHS

0:39:210:39:25

-At £36. 38.

-Come on!

-40.

0:39:250:39:28

-42. 44.

-I don't believe it, I just do not believe it.

0:39:280:39:32

-Firewood is making profit.

-£55 on my right.

0:39:320:39:34

-60 anywhere?

-Absolute...

0:39:340:39:36

-My flabber is completely gasted.

-£65.

0:39:360:39:40

-60. At £60...

-ANITA LAUGHS

0:39:400:39:44

At £60, are we all done at £60? All done.

0:39:440:39:47

Look at that, she's done it again!

0:39:480:39:50

Oh, Philip, this is not your day, is it?

0:39:500:39:52

Can you redeem yourself with your slab of fossils?

0:39:540:39:58

20. Well, 20 I have. 22.

0:39:580:40:01

At £22. 24 anywhere? At £22. 24, 26.

0:40:010:40:05

28. 30. 32.

0:40:050:40:09

At £32, the gentleman sat down on the second row.

0:40:090:40:12

-34 anywhere?

-Come on!

-At £32, then, now.

0:40:120:40:15

At 32. Are we all finished at 32?

0:40:150:40:17

For the last time.

0:40:170:40:20

I think you've bought the right things for this room

0:40:200:40:22

and I don't think I have.

0:40:220:40:24

Do you know, I think you've hit the nail on the head there, Phil.

0:40:260:40:29

It's Anita's last lot now.

0:40:310:40:33

Can she continue her run of profits with her brooch and Art Deco clip?

0:40:330:40:37

£30 for those. 20. 10 I have. 12, 14. At £14.

0:40:390:40:42

16 on the stairs. 18.

0:40:420:40:44

20, 22. 24, 26, 28.

0:40:440:40:48

30. 32. 34. 36.

0:40:480:40:52

38. At £38. 40 anywhere? 40.

0:40:520:40:55

At £40, then. £40 at the back of the room.

0:40:560:40:59

Have we all finished at 40?

0:40:590:41:01

40 is good enough for me.

0:41:030:41:05

THEY LAUGH

0:41:050:41:07

I'll say so. Anita ends on a high.

0:41:070:41:11

I think for you to win, your cream jug will have to get £3,000.

0:41:110:41:15

SHE LAUGHS

0:41:160:41:18

Hey, it's unlikely, but stranger things have happened.

0:41:180:41:21

50. 40 I have.

0:41:210:41:24

-And £40. 42. 44.

-And you're away, you're away.

0:41:240:41:27

-44. 46. 46. At £46.

-Come on, come on!

0:41:270:41:32

At £46. All finished at 46? 48.

0:41:320:41:36

50. So £50 at the back, then.

0:41:360:41:38

At 50, then. Are we all done at 50? All done.

0:41:380:41:42

Might just have clawed me back to what I started with.

0:41:420:41:46

A great result to end on, so well done.

0:41:460:41:50

-Go on, then.

-Cup of tea?

-Why not? Arsenic.

0:41:500:41:54

Before you have tea, let's work out the final figures.

0:41:540:41:58

Philip started this leg with £200.

0:41:590:42:02

Unfortunately, he made a small loss of £3.60 after auction costs,

0:42:020:42:06

leaving him with £196.40. Bad luck, old chap.

0:42:060:42:11

Anita also began with £200.

0:42:130:42:16

She made an impressive profit of £42.43 after auction costs,

0:42:160:42:21

which means today she is winner

0:42:210:42:24

and goes into the next leg with £242.43.

0:42:240:42:28

Phew! Well, well, well, well.

0:42:310:42:34

I've done some sums, and you, Joan of Arc...

0:42:340:42:39

-Genie of Arc.

-Yeah. You are up about 40 quid,

0:42:390:42:42

and me and my fossils are down about a fiver.

0:42:420:42:45

-Go on, get in.

-That's not too bad.

0:42:450:42:48

SHE LAUGHS

0:42:480:42:50

See you next time, road trippers. Not sure about the car, though.

0:42:530:42:56

Next time, our antiquers head to north-east England.

0:42:560:43:00

Do you think we are on the right road?

0:43:000:43:02

Phil is a man with a plan...

0:43:020:43:04

Don't let that Anita Manning anywhere near them.

0:43:040:43:06

..and Anita wants to hang on to her lead.

0:43:060:43:09

I wonder if I can give Phil Serrell a hammering with that?

0:43:090:43:12

Auctioneers Anita Manning and Philip Serrell begin their journey in the Lake District, continuing on to West Yorkshire before heading to their first auction in Cleveleys near Blackpool.