Episode 12 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 12

Catherine Southon and Philip Serrell continue their adventure. Catherine finds a croquet set and a biscuit tin, and she has high hopes for both at the auction in Christchurch.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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That's cracking!

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-..with £200 each...

-Wonderful.

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..a classic car, and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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-That's exactly what I'm talking about.

-I'm all of a shiver!

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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-No-brainer.

-Going, going, gone.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory?

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-Push!

-Or the slow road to disaster?

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How awfully, awfully nice.

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to the second leg of the trip.

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The sun is shining

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and experts Catherine Southon and Philip Serrell

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are in a 1970 Citroen DS20. Fantastique, eh?

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-This is glorious!

-Hertford, Hereford and Hampshire.

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-Hampshire, are we in Hampshire?

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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-Do we talk posh down here?

-I say, how awfully, awfully nice.

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Rather! Last time, Catherine bought lots of small, pretty things,

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and Philip bought big lumps.

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And so far it's 1-0 to the lumps.

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Get in, dip your bread!

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I wonder if Catherine will change tack?

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-I'm going to start buying your things.

-What?

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I'm going to come out with wood, outdoorsy things,

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like a bench or something.

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So you're going to buy a wooden bench or a metal bench?

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Are you going for woodworm or rust?

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Catherine started the trip with £200, but she made

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a small loss last time, leaving her with £172.30 to spend today.

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Philip also started the trip with £200, but he's made

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a handsome profit, leaving him in the lead

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with £259.94 to spend on this leg.

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I want 100 lines, Miss Southon -

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"I must do better at auction. I must buy rust and woodworm."

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You are nasty.

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Once the teacher... Ha!

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The pair's road trip kicks off in Coleshill in Warwickshire,

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meanders round the Midlands,

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before heading due south towards the coast.

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Then, turning west down to the tip of Cornwall, before nipping briefly

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into South Wales and finishing up at auction in Wells, Somerset.

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Crikey!

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This leg sees our experts start in Winchester and end up

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for auction in the Dorset town of Christchurch.

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The city of Winchester was England's capital during the Middle Ages.

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It's famous for its medieval cathedral

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with the longest nave in Europe.

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Our experts are kicking off the day

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with a joint visit to Molly's Den Antiques Centre.

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Sounds fun!

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Come on! Right, what are you buying? I'll get it first.

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Give the poor man a chance, Catherine!

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-Hello!

-Hello.

-Are you Molly?

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-Welcome to The Den. I am Molly.

-Lovely to see you, Molly.

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-What's your real name?

-Matt.

-Matt.

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Matt or Molly are either top dog or top bitch round here,

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depending on how you look at it.

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Right, I think I'm going to get lost.

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I'm going to try, I'll see you later.

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While she's gone, what I really want to find is just a profit.

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-Are you the man to show me?

-We can find profit. We are good at that.

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-Come on, then.

-You naughty boy, Philip!

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That's nice, I like that.

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-This is a good stool.

-Those are nice as well.

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Are those separate, then, or are they all together?

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No, it's for the set, 18 of them.

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Look at that, Matt! 85 quid?

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-I thought that was £8.50!

-Instant discount with that.

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They look like 40 quid to me, Matt.

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What do you reckon?

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I do know him quite well,

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so I'm sure we'll have room for manoeuvring.

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What's this Phil's spied?

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This is a Royal Navy's Officers of the Watch telescope

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by Cooke of London.

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And I would think this is 1940s or '50s.

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There's no ships.

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The telescope is also priced at £85.

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I'm thinking, 40, 45 quid for the flags and 40 quid for that.

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-I think you're a bit far away there, Phil.

-Hark at this!

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£70 would be the best on that. And 60 for the flags. Bargain!

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-That's a no, then, Philip.

-50 quid and I'll have the flags.

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-I'll have to phone him up.

-Go phone him up.

-Shall I go and phone him up?

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Go and phone him up, Matt!

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Now, for the mathematically inclined amongst you,

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there's 18 flags at £50.

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That's roughly...

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I'm waiting.

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-CLEARS THROAT

-..pounds each, isn't it?

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It happens as you get older.

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Phil, the former teacher, is brushing up on his maths.

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Let's see what Catherine's up to.

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I do like this.

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So we've got a crane without, obviously, its original string.

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We've got the name Triang on the top, which is great.

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Because that's a good English manufacturer

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of tin plate and metal toys.

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The problem is, there's something missing here.

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I'm not quite sure what.

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But it just doesn't feel complete.

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It feels like there's a few bits missing.

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But I just like it, it looks good, it looks the part. How much is that?

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-£22.

-If I could get that for about £10, there is something there.

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Ah, Matt's back.

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The bad news is, he's not answering the phone.

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-Who's that bad news for, you or me?

-Both of us.

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Make a decision on those. 50 quid.

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-55.

-Oh, Matt!

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-50 quid, I thought we were getting on so well.

-Go on, then, 50 quid.

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You're a gentleman, thank you very much.

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That's first blood to Philip. What's Catherine found?

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Now, this is the business.

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That is just what I'm looking for.

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We are talking mid-20th-century, French vintage croquet set.

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And these are just lovely! The start and finish posts.

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I think there might be a ball missing,

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because there's six mallets,

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and I think there should be six balls, shouldn't there?

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I don't play croquet.

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There's only two hooks.

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It doesn't matter, it looks amazing. £55 is on that.

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If I can get that for 30, I will be home and dry.

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And Philip is going to be so jealous.

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You've yet to buy it, Catherine.

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Meanwhile, Phil's found another corner of the shop.

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This might be interesting.

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That was made about 200 yards from my office in Worcester.

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This was made about 1775.

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And if you turn it over,

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there will be, like, a half-crescent mark on the bottom.

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There it is. That tells you that was Worcester. Now, this is 60 quid.

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In auction, sadly,

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probably going to be around £50-£80 worth, no more.

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And if you think, that is the thick end of 250 years old,

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it's ridiculous!

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It might just be worth my while

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asking Matt what they can do on that.

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Because if I can get that for £40 or £45,

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there's a bit of a chance there.

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And it's a proper antique.

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-Matt, can I have a quick word?

-Yup.

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-Do come and sit down in my office.

-Oh, thank you.

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I quite like this.

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It's just a little bit of Worcester.

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What I do know is that that is worth 40 quid.

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The lowest I possibly could go is 50.

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I'll give you 45 quid for it, that's me finished.

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-No, can't do it, I'm afraid, Phil.

-OK, fine.

-It is 50.

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-Just too much money, really.

-All right.

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OK, thank you very much indeed.

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-I'd better pay you for what I have bought.

-Indeed. The flags.

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The flags. I'm very pleased with those.

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-There's 20, 40, there you are, that's lovely.

-Thank you, young man.

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Thank you very much indeed.

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Philip's happy and has headed off with his flags,

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leaving Catherine to collar Molly. I mean, Matt.

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This is what I like.

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-The croquet set.

-OK.

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The thing is, it's got a few things wrong with it.

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-I'm going to be mean because I'm in a bit of a position.

-Right.

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I'm going to offer you £20.

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Because it has its faults.

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I don't think he's going to accept that.

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-But I can phone him up.

-Right.

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-Give me five minutes and I shall pop back.

-Can you work some magic?

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-I shall do my male charm.

-Oh, good. I shall wait here.

-OK.

-All right.

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-Thank you, Matt.

-No problem.

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That sounded positive-ish.

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He wasn't horrified when I said £20.

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It was a cheeky offer, wasn't it?

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"She's" back. That was quick!

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OK. My male charm didn't work this time.

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-Oh... What do you mean, this time?

-£40. Normally does.

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£40 is too much. Can it be 35?

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-I'll tell you what, we'll do 38. How about 38?

-OK. Right.

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The other thing that I saw was back this way,

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there was a red crane, a Triang crane.

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-You've probably seen it, because it's quite prominent.

-Yeah.

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And I think that's got about 20-something on it.

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-And what would you bid on that?

-Eight.

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Cor, you're a hard woman, Catherine Southon.

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-Eight is probably too cheeky.

-Is it?

-Yes.

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What if you said sort of 12 and I'll give her a call?

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-You are wishing you'd never met me.

-No!

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Right, let's go and make some phone calls, yeah?

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-Shall I come with you?

-Time for some refreshments, then.

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I thought you might need something a bit stiffer than that.

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Matt and Molly are back with news on the Triang crane.

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OK, we've got the croquet set in the bag. Happy with that.

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38, that's done.

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-So, the Triang, the crane.

-15.

-15 is your best?

-Yeah.

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-You want me to have that, don't you?

-I do.

-I'm going to just go for it.

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What have I done? What have I done?

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So, Catherine's bought the croquet set and the Triang crane for £53.

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Come on, then. Let's go and pick up my goodies.

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Philip is taking a break from shopping.

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He's on his way to Southampton,

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a city famous for its port and the cruise liners that use it.

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But this year marks the anniversary of another grand form

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of transport that's synonymous with the city.

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It's 80 years since the first flying boat took off

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from the city's waterfront.

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Philip is meeting Alan Jones, a trustee of the Solent Sky Museum,

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to find out about the city's close links to flying boats.

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-Hi, Phil. Lovely to see you.

-How are you? All right?

-Fine, thank you very much.

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Now, they said to me, we're going to take you to Southampton and you're going to see some boats.

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I thought they meant boats that float, not boats that fly. What's all this about?

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In 1914, an eccentric millionaire came to Southampton and said

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he wanted to build boats that fly.

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That man was Noel Pemberton Billing, and the company that

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he founded started building flying boats for the military.

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At the end of the First World War,

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when the contracts for that all dried up,

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then they saw the potential to put passengers in these things.

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And in 1919, they put the first two passengers in,

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started Southampton Airport and the very first scheduled

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flying boat services to France, to Cherbourg.

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That piece of water was declared in 1919 as the world's first

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airport, and that's where the word comes from - air port.

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So, airport is nothing to do at all with strips of tarmac on the land?

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No, it's a port for landing aeroplanes.

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That's pretty cool, isn't it?

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They lack of runways during the early 20th century meant

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flying boats continued to be developed, and the Solent

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became the major air hub for flights servicing the British Empire.

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The idea was that if you could build an aeroplane that would take off

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on water and land on water, you could operate it anywhere,

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and that was the driving force.

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The time it took to travel to the furthest-flung corners

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of the Empire was drastically reduced.

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Six weeks to get a letter down through the Empire.

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By the time we got to 1938,

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we were doing it in six days with flying boats.

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But it wasn't just the mail that was speeding along in flying boats.

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Very wealthy passengers could also

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drastically reduce their travel time.

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OK, this is the Sandringham. As you can see, it's a big flying boat.

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That's a monster of a thing!

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This started life as a Sunderland, as a fighting aircraft.

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After the war, it was converted to a passenger aircraft,

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as we did with many of our military aircraft.

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-And this one went out to Australia.

-How many passengers did this take?

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This particular configuration was 40,

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but it wouldn't normally have been as much as that.

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-Probably nearer the 20, 25.

-And how many crew did it have?

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A minimum of five, because you had your radio operator, your

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engineer, your co-pilot, the pilot, a stewardess, perhaps two stewards.

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You'd have to be very well-off to fly in this, I can tell you,

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when you appreciate that they did a lot of the cooking on board,

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they had three-course meals,

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they had a bar on board, some of the best wines you can think of.

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It was quite an adventure, because when you stopped and you got

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out of this thing with your DJ on and your bowtie to go to

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the local hotel, you'd have to get out and get into a boat.

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Time for a peek inside the magnificent flying machine.

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Just watch your shoulders as you go up, OK? Here we go.

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That is going to be a quart into a pint pot, that is.

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Yes, it is a bit of a tight squeeze.

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This is so cool, isn't it? Where's the start button?

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You've got your mag switches up here, which turn your engines on.

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Imagine flying to Singapore in this.

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The physical stress, I should think, of just flying the thing.

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-Chocks away! Is that what they say?

-Not with this.

-Probably not.

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You wouldn't have chocks with this, would you?

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It's an absolute beast of a thing, isn't it?

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If you had to sum up, which era was the golden age of the flying boat?

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The late '30s, when you were getting into this business of

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flying across the Empire.

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That was the golden age of the flying boat.

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In the 1950s, the advent of runways and jet engines quickly hastened

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the demise of the flying boat, and it wasn't long before the sun

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was setting on Southampton's halcyon days of aviation,

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leaving the ocean liners as the only grand ladies

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still setting sail from Southampton.

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Meanwhile, Catherine's next stop is the pretty market town of Alton,

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which is home to the aptly named Tiny Shop.

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-Hi, there.

-Hello.

-Great shop. You are?

-Robert.

-Hi, Robert.

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I'm Catherine. Wow!

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It's not going to take me long, probably, to get round here.

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That's right, Catherine. The clue's in the name, love.

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Robert has been selling antiques here since 2008.

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That's cute.

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-Biscuits. Is it for biscuits?

-Yeah. From Scotland.

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In the form of a suitcase, with all the little travel stickers on,

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from White Star Line, P&O.

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That is dinky doo. And another one.

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See, this one's got the name on - Huntley and Palmers.

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In the 19th century, biscuit makers started packaging their goods

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in elaborately designed tins, making them very collectable today.

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That is worse for wear, isn't it?

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Can you imagine what that would have been like

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with the original colouring there?

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The base has got more of the colouring on.

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So, it's kind of like a wicker... It's supposed to be a wicker work.

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-It is a wicker basket.

-Clever. I actually like that one best.

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-You wouldn't get many biscuits in there, though, would you?

-No.

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So long as there's enough for me, eh?

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There's quite a lot of the original colour there. What's on that?

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I think the ticket's got 35 on that.

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Ouch! Right.

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What is your best price on that?

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I think probably 20.

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That's a... It's a possibility.

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-Still a little bit punchy for me.

-Right.

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I just want to see if there was anything in the window.

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The only thing I really like was that little biscuit suitcase.

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I thought that was fantastic.

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And it has got quite a nice bit of its original colour there.

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£20 isn't a lot. Normally, I would snap that up.

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I'm just hesitating a bit because I think I slightly overspent in

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the last shop.

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Right. I love your suitcase. Can I offer you £18 for it?

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-Yeah, I think so.

-Is that all right?

-Yeah.

0:15:080:15:11

I'm going to shake your hand at £18.

0:15:110:15:13

Because I think it's very dinky.

0:15:130:15:15

I suppose I'd better pay you for it now, hadn't I?

0:15:150:15:18

I can't believe I'm walking out of the Tiny Shop with a tiny suitcase.

0:15:180:15:23

And a whopping £17 discount.

0:15:230:15:25

-Thank you. Bye-bye.

-Bye-bye.

0:15:250:15:26

Catherine's had a busy day,

0:15:280:15:29

and her third item brings proceedings to a close.

0:15:290:15:33

So, nightie night.

0:15:330:15:34

Morning, chaps.

0:15:380:15:39

Today, Catherine's in the driving seat,

0:15:390:15:41

and the weather gods are not smiling.

0:15:410:15:44

How can the weather be so glorious yesterday and so dreadful today?

0:15:440:15:48

I mean, this is seriously bad.

0:15:480:15:51

It's grey, isn't it?

0:15:510:15:53

Look, these are on full.

0:15:530:15:54

Never mind. Let's have a refresher on their shopping trip thus far.

0:15:540:15:59

Catherine has three lots - the biscuit tin,

0:15:590:16:01

the toy crane, and a croquet set.

0:16:010:16:04

These are just lovely!

0:16:040:16:06

This gives Catherine £101.30 for the day ahead.

0:16:060:16:09

Philip's been a bit of a slow coach.

0:16:100:16:12

He only has one lot - the vintage naval flags.

0:16:120:16:15

They'd make a great quilt, wouldn't they?

0:16:150:16:18

He has a rather lovely £209.94 left to spend,

0:16:180:16:21

and he's not going to let a bit of rain dampen his spirit.

0:16:210:16:25

-Oh, no.

-Do you know, I love shopping.

0:16:250:16:27

-I really, really, really...

-You're not a normal man.

0:16:270:16:29

I don't like paying for it, but I like shopping.

0:16:290:16:32

Yeah, I bet you don't.

0:16:320:16:33

I bet that really hurts, doesn't it, having to get your cash out?

0:16:330:16:36

I've got a combination lock on my wallet.

0:16:360:16:38

Today, Philip and Catherine are starting off in the Dorset

0:16:380:16:41

market town of Blandford Forum, don't you know?

0:16:410:16:44

Famous for its Georgian architecture which was constructed after

0:16:480:16:51

a fire destroyed the town centre in the 1700s.

0:16:510:16:54

Catherine's kindly dropping Philip at his first shop, the Corner Shop.

0:16:550:17:00

Come back penniless.

0:17:000:17:01

Now, now, Catherine, play nicely.

0:17:010:17:03

-Come back potless. Bye.

-Bye!

0:17:030:17:06

BELL RINGS

0:17:070:17:10

-Hi.

-Good morning. How are you?

-You are?

0:17:100:17:13

-Tony.

-Tony, lovely to see you. Wow, goodness.

0:17:130:17:15

-How long have you been here?

-18 years.

0:17:150:17:18

18 years - getting the hang of it, then?

0:17:180:17:20

-Lots of things in here, haven't you?

-Bits and pieces.

0:17:200:17:23

Tony's got a lot of stock, and I can see he likes his pictures.

0:17:230:17:27

-I love things like this. You see these everywhere.

-Yeah.

0:17:270:17:30

And I think I'm probably old enough

0:17:300:17:31

to remember my grandmother using one of these.

0:17:310:17:34

-For crimping pies, isn't it?

-Yeah, that's right.

-No, I'm not that old.

0:17:340:17:37

I'm really, really not that old.

0:17:370:17:38

Of course not, Philip!

0:17:380:17:40

You keep telling yourself that, old boy.

0:17:400:17:42

These are interesting things, Tony. Were these bought right?

0:17:420:17:46

-Yeah, I bought them at a car-boot sale.

-Really? For pence?

0:17:460:17:50

-A few quid each.

-Can I give you a few more quid each for them?

0:17:500:17:53

-I'm sure you could.

-These are basically school photographs.

0:17:530:17:57

This one is the Eton Rowing 8 from 1905.

0:17:570:18:00

And you look at these, and you know there's a lot of these young

0:18:000:18:04

men who, eight years later, were fighting in the First World War.

0:18:040:18:08

-That's right.

-Oh, now we're into my spot - cricket.

0:18:080:18:10

This is the Harrow XI and the Eton XI from 1900.

0:18:100:18:13

But I just think they're interesting.

0:18:130:18:15

Let's get down to the money side of it. What could you do those for?

0:18:150:18:18

-If I bought all of them...

-Eight of them.

0:18:180:18:21

How about if we said something like 70 quid for the eight?

0:18:210:18:24

No, that wouldn't sound at all good.

0:18:240:18:25

Would that not sound good, Philip?

0:18:250:18:27

No, that wouldn't sound very good at all.

0:18:270:18:29

You and I both know that the money immediately is the framing of them.

0:18:290:18:32

-Yeah, that's right.

-And in an ideal world,

0:18:320:18:34

I'd like to give you three quid each for them.

0:18:340:18:35

That's what I'd like to do.

0:18:350:18:37

How about if we said, say, 40 quid for the lot?

0:18:370:18:41

-Can I meet you halfway and give you 30 quid for them?

-How about 35?

0:18:410:18:44

If you're happy with that.

0:18:440:18:46

Go on, I'll shake your hand, because I like them.

0:18:460:18:49

Tony, I think that's me probably done. So, I'll pay for these.

0:18:490:18:52

There we are. You're a gentleman, sir. Lovely job.

0:18:520:18:54

Thank you very, very much indeed.

0:18:540:18:56

-Nice to have met you.

-Take care now.

-And you.

0:18:560:18:58

Well, Philip seems happy with his collection of pictures.

0:18:580:19:01

Meanwhile, Catherine's on her way to the nearby army garrison,

0:19:030:19:07

home to the Royal Signals Museum.

0:19:070:19:09

Her mission is to find out about a group of exceptional women

0:19:090:19:13

from World War Two's Special Operations Executive.

0:19:130:19:17

Adam Forty is the collections manager. He doesn't look it, though.

0:19:170:19:21

So, Adam, who were the SOE?

0:19:220:19:24

They were formed in the 1940s by Churchill, and they were

0:19:240:19:27

really agents who were sent to liaise with resistance in different

0:19:270:19:30

countries and create any kind of subversive sabotage and information

0:19:300:19:37

gathering that they possibly could, and report that back to London.

0:19:370:19:41

The SOE itself was really begun with the realisation that people

0:19:420:19:46

would be working in foreign countries,

0:19:460:19:47

so they would seek out from all sorts of different military

0:19:470:19:51

units, including the WAAF and others, people who were

0:19:510:19:55

fluent in Norwegian, Spanish, French, any foreign language.

0:19:550:20:01

The female side generally were recruited from all sorts of

0:20:010:20:04

different organisations and were given training in espionage

0:20:040:20:08

skills, parachuting, explosives.

0:20:080:20:11

In all, there was something like 3,200 female operators.

0:20:110:20:15

Not all of those were agents who got sent abroad,

0:20:150:20:18

but they might be doing activities here.

0:20:180:20:20

These women must have been pretty tough characters.

0:20:200:20:23

I mean, to do this sort of thing.

0:20:230:20:24

Not just tough, but astonishingly brave.

0:20:240:20:27

There was just a characteristic, perhaps of all people,

0:20:270:20:30

but particularly the female agents who went to France,

0:20:300:20:33

who were just determined to go and fulfil their task,

0:20:330:20:36

and if they were caught, not to give any information away.

0:20:360:20:39

Communications were vital for SOE field operatives passing

0:20:410:20:45

information back and forth between resistance groups and London.

0:20:450:20:49

The standard piece of kit was the suitcase radio.

0:20:490:20:52

The first one you can see here, which is the Type 3 Mk I.

0:20:520:20:56

This would have been carried...?

0:20:560:20:57

By the female operators going to France.

0:20:570:21:00

Have a go and see how heavy this actually is.

0:21:000:21:03

No.

0:21:040:21:05

That's impossible!

0:21:060:21:08

Oh, my goodness me.

0:21:090:21:10

32lb in weight.

0:21:120:21:13

So you can imagine trying to get off incognito, keeping it quiet,

0:21:130:21:17

looking like...

0:21:170:21:18

-Blending in.

-Blending in and all with a 32lb case walking out.

0:21:180:21:22

Clearly, a terrifying prospect of carrying that around France.

0:21:220:21:26

Yes, back in London, radio operators like Jean Argyle carried out

0:21:260:21:30

a vital role supporting agents in the field.

0:21:300:21:33

She was just 18 when she was recruited into the SOE.

0:21:330:21:36

My main responsibility was to decipher messages received

0:21:360:21:40

during the night and also to encipher those

0:21:400:21:43

which we were sending out.

0:21:430:21:45

I found the most exciting thing was when you were given one of

0:21:450:21:48

these messages which hadn't worked out and nobody could work it out

0:21:480:21:52

and you were untangling it like a lot of wool,

0:21:520:21:57

almost like a game but you knew that it was more than a game.

0:21:570:22:01

Lives depended on getting it right.

0:22:010:22:03

If there was a crisis going on,

0:22:030:22:05

people were perhaps in danger of being caught by the Gestapo

0:22:050:22:09

and having to move and let us know where they were going.

0:22:090:22:12

The threat from the Germans was ever present

0:22:120:22:15

to SOE operatives in France.

0:22:150:22:17

They reckon that if you were transmitting any more than

0:22:170:22:20

about six to nine minutes,

0:22:200:22:21

the opportunity would give the Germans enough chance to actually

0:22:210:22:26

find you and potentially be knocking at your door shortly afterwards.

0:22:260:22:29

To drastically cut down transmitting time,

0:22:290:22:31

the SOE invented the squirt bar.

0:22:310:22:34

-So how do I do this, then?

-If we do something very simple like SOS.

0:22:340:22:37

Can you remember your Morse code at all?

0:22:370:22:39

Dot, dot, dot, dash, dash, dash.

0:22:390:22:41

So if we get three dots out.

0:22:410:22:42

You won't want to do this in a rush, would you?

0:22:420:22:44

I'm not sure I've done that right.

0:22:440:22:46

No, that's right - three dots. Then a space.

0:22:460:22:48

-This is a space because it's between two letters?

-Yes.

0:22:480:22:51

And now you start your dash, dash, dash.

0:22:510:22:53

The Type A Mk III has got a little probe and the idea is

0:22:530:22:57

that you very quickly start transmitting,

0:22:570:23:00

you would put your probe down that device

0:23:000:23:02

and that would send your transmission in a very quick time.

0:23:020:23:06

Even with this quick transmitting radio,

0:23:060:23:08

operatives were still at risk of capture.

0:23:080:23:11

The Germans, of course, were quite aware of this system going on.

0:23:110:23:16

There were agents all over the occupied countries.

0:23:160:23:19

A lot of people were captured as a result of this and they would

0:23:190:23:23

sometimes make them go on sending messages and they would try

0:23:230:23:26

to put some message inside it to convey that all was not well

0:23:260:23:31

and that they had been captured.

0:23:310:23:33

This was always rather frightening.

0:23:330:23:36

Several SOE women never made it back from Europe,

0:23:360:23:39

including George Cross winner, Violette Szabo.

0:23:390:23:42

Violette Szabo was a radio operator.

0:23:420:23:45

She went in slightly after D-Day and they got stopped at

0:23:450:23:48

a roadblock, they ran off, she jumped over a fence,

0:23:480:23:50

damaged her ankle and had a Sten gun and eight clips of ammunition,

0:23:500:23:55

so told her colleague that she was with to scarper and she then

0:23:550:24:00

ended up with a gunfight with the Gestapo

0:24:000:24:01

until all her bullets ran out and she was captured

0:24:010:24:06

and sadly tortured and murdered.

0:24:060:24:08

The women of the Special Operations Executive played a major role during

0:24:090:24:13

World War II, both behind enemy lines

0:24:130:24:15

and behind-the-scenes back in London.

0:24:150:24:17

We had all these very heroic people who were risking their lives and

0:24:190:24:23

it did depend, amongst others, on me,

0:24:230:24:26

to make sure that they came back.

0:24:260:24:28

It's still raining in Blandford and Philip, who's got just

0:24:310:24:34

over £174 left to spend has arrived at Milton Antiques.

0:24:340:24:39

-Hello!

-Hi.

-Hi, a voice from upstairs. Shall I can come on up?

0:24:420:24:46

-Yes, please do.

-Goodness me.

-They're quite steep, aren't they?

0:24:460:24:49

For a man of advanced years, they are.

0:24:490:24:52

It's OK, Philip, we've got plenty of time.

0:24:520:24:54

-Is it all right if I hang my brolly?

-Please do.

0:24:540:24:57

-Is it all right to have a look around?

-Have a look.

-Thank you.

0:24:570:25:00

This has got some really good proper antiques in here.

0:25:020:25:04

This is a great place.

0:25:040:25:05

People today, they like decorative items and these Ottomans with

0:25:050:25:10

this upholstered rising lid, concave sides,

0:25:100:25:12

that's 19th-century and this might be for me, actually.

0:25:120:25:15

Look at this - this has got a lift up lid that you put your linen in.

0:25:150:25:20

What is the most attractive for me is the potential price

0:25:200:25:23

because this has got £95 crossed out.

0:25:230:25:27

£60, crossed out. Now £40.

0:25:270:25:30

Just hoping it might be a little less in ten minutes' time.

0:25:300:25:32

Only time will tell, Philip.

0:25:320:25:34

What have you got your eye on now?

0:25:340:25:37

This is quite a nice little bijouterie table.

0:25:370:25:39

This is a table that you put your little silver collectables in

0:25:390:25:43

and other items that people used to search eagerly for

0:25:430:25:49

about 20 years ago.

0:25:490:25:50

This is satinwood cross banding, ebonised inlay.

0:25:500:25:54

It's got a plant shelf underneath and what's interesting about

0:25:540:25:57

this, this is the way the antiques business flatters the eye

0:25:570:26:01

because on top, look, you've got this piece of bevelled plate here

0:26:010:26:06

and bevelled glass is expensive.

0:26:060:26:08

But, look, on the sides, they cheated a bit

0:26:080:26:11

and that's just plain, plain glass.

0:26:110:26:13

It's £135.

0:26:130:26:15

That's sweet, isn't it?

0:26:150:26:16

Philip is obviously taken by the bijouterie table and the Ottoman.

0:26:160:26:20

Would he find any more treasures downstairs?

0:26:200:26:23

This is such a cool little thing.

0:26:230:26:26

This looks like a primitive object of torture.

0:26:260:26:29

I'll tell you quickly what this is.

0:26:290:26:30

What you do is you take that out, you put your baby in there,

0:26:300:26:35

you put your food or whatever in there and, there you are,

0:26:350:26:38

you've got a baby walker.

0:26:380:26:39

What I love about this, if you turn it upside down, look,

0:26:390:26:42

wooden casters on it.

0:26:420:26:45

How cool are they?

0:26:450:26:47

I think that is absolutely lovely

0:26:470:26:50

but is the rest of the world as mad as I am?

0:26:500:26:54

Probably not, but what about the other two things you liked?

0:26:540:26:57

-Jules?

-Yeah?

-Your Ottoman stall on the bijouterie table.

0:26:570:27:02

What's the best you could do on each of those, please?

0:27:020:27:05

-On the bijouterie...

-You've got 135...

-On the ticket.

0:27:050:27:08

-We could go to 110 on that one.

-OK. And on the Ottoman?

0:27:080:27:13

It's already been reduced. I think it's a fair price.

0:27:130:27:16

-So it's £150 for the two?

-Yup.

0:27:160:27:20

Would £140 buy them?

0:27:200:27:22

-148?

-Oh, hark at this!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:27:220:27:25

-£140, the two. Would that be a deal?

-45.

0:27:250:27:29

-145.

-You're a star. Thank you, my love.

0:27:290:27:31

Thank very much indeed.

0:27:310:27:32

-I had better pay you that, haven't I?

-Please.

0:27:320:27:34

Just think how much easier it would have been if it had been 140.

0:27:340:27:37

-You've got to find some change now.

-You could always pay me 150.

0:27:370:27:40

Don't say things like that!

0:27:400:27:41

I'll get you some change.

0:27:410:27:43

I'm very, very pleased with those two items because, I think,

0:27:430:27:46

they are southern beaters.

0:27:460:27:48

TIM CHUCKLES Very confident, Philip.

0:27:480:27:50

Meanwhile Catherine has headed to Shaftesbury.

0:27:540:27:58

Pretty town on the Dorset and Wiltshire border.

0:27:580:28:00

Roundheads and Cavaliers fought over the place

0:28:000:28:02

during the English Civil War.

0:28:020:28:04

Dairy House Antiques is Catherine's next stop.

0:28:040:28:08

She's got just over £100 to spend at the centre which is home to

0:28:080:28:12

several antique dealers, and dealer Debbie is on hand to help.

0:28:120:28:16

Oh, I love the rocker. That's cute, isn't it? This one rocker.

0:28:160:28:21

I've bought a toy already, I bought a tin plate crane.

0:28:210:28:25

-That's what I bought earlier.

-Oh, that'll be good.

0:28:250:28:27

So it'll be quite nice to buy another toy. What's on the rocker?

0:28:270:28:32

48. I suppose something like that now, you wouldn't put your child

0:28:320:28:36

in it, you'd buy it for a piece to decorate the nursery, wouldn't you?

0:28:360:28:39

-You would, really.

-Maybe paint it or something. I don't know, though.

0:28:390:28:43

-Would a child be quite scared of that swan?

-Scares me.

0:28:430:28:47

Anyway, what else is there there?

0:28:470:28:49

Debbie, this is quite nice.

0:28:490:28:51

-Bone letter opener. The thing is it's nibbled.

-Yes.

0:28:510:28:56

It's a little bit nibbled. It's not perfect.

0:28:560:28:59

But I tell you what I like, I love the enamelled Union Jack there.

0:28:590:29:04

The problem is it has lost a bit of enamel and I'm guessing,

0:29:040:29:07

hence the price.

0:29:070:29:09

-Which is?

-18.

0:29:090:29:11

And that's going to be the price, as well. I can't do anything on that.

0:29:110:29:14

-Nothing at all?

-I don't discount under £20.

0:29:140:29:17

Just when I thought I'd found something.

0:29:190:29:21

Honestly, Debbie, to be in with the chance,

0:29:210:29:23

I really need to get some sort of reduction.

0:29:230:29:27

-I'll see what I can do.

-I would be very, very grateful.

0:29:270:29:29

-I appreciate that.

-I'll go and give her a ring.

-This is a lovely thing.

0:29:290:29:33

Letter openers, we do see quite often.

0:29:330:29:35

It's lovely and tactile, it feels good and the enamel is lovely.

0:29:350:29:39

Can you imagine what this was like when it was absolutely perfect?

0:29:390:29:42

Because the colours are bright, they're so good, but having

0:29:420:29:45

a little chip to the enamel is bad news because you can't repair that.

0:29:450:29:52

I can't get her on the phone, I'm afraid.

0:29:520:29:55

I will take a risk and say 15 but that's as good as I'm going

0:29:550:29:59

to be able to do, I'm afraid.

0:29:590:30:00

-OK, that's fine. I'll take that for 15.

-OK, brilliant.

0:30:000:30:04

-Thank you very much.

-I'll put it on the desk for you.

0:30:040:30:07

Well, who'd have thought it?

0:30:070:30:08

Now, Catherine is still taken with that swan and Debbie is speaking to its owner.

0:30:080:30:12

Hello, Simon, it's Debbie.

0:30:120:30:14

What's your best price on the swan rocking chair?

0:30:140:30:17

It's got £48 on it at the moment.

0:30:170:30:20

30?

0:30:200:30:21

Can he do a little bit more?

0:30:230:30:25

-He won't go any more?

-Is that your limit, Simon? 30?

0:30:250:30:29

-SIMON:

-Who is this?

0:30:290:30:32

-This could be interesting.

-Who is it?

0:30:320:30:34

What do you mean, "Who is it?" It's Catherine. For you, 25.

0:30:340:30:38

-Can I say thank you?

-Yeah, course you can.

0:30:390:30:41

Simon, that's really kind of you. Fantastic.

0:30:410:30:45

That's brilliant. Thank you so much.

0:30:450:30:47

So, Catherine has bagged the letter opener for £15

0:30:470:30:51

and the swan rocker for 25.

0:30:510:30:53

I owe you £40.

0:30:530:30:56

While Catherine is swanning off with her latest buys...

0:30:560:30:59

..Philip has come to the pretty village of Lytchett Minster

0:31:010:31:04

which is nestled on the Dorset coastline.

0:31:040:31:07

He's come to The Old Button Shop to try and bag one last bargain

0:31:070:31:12

but he's running low on funds.

0:31:120:31:13

-Thelma, it's you.

-Hello.

-I've been here before, haven't I?

0:31:140:31:18

-Yes, you have.

-About two years ago, wasn't it? On a road trip.

0:31:180:31:21

-Couple of years ago.

-Now, the thing is, I've bought four items.

0:31:210:31:24

I've got a set amount of money to spend and I can't go over it.

0:31:240:31:28

I won't tell you what that is just yet.

0:31:280:31:30

You're going to knock me down and jump on me.

0:31:300:31:32

Don't worry, Thelma, he's much better behaved these days.

0:31:320:31:35

Shall we have a look?

0:31:350:31:36

Thelma has got plenty of stock in here.

0:31:360:31:40

I quite like these glasses. Let me put them on the table by you.

0:31:400:31:43

They're really nice, those are.

0:31:430:31:46

They are 19th century, I think, aren't they?

0:31:460:31:48

So you've got those at £18 a pair and £17 pair.

0:31:480:31:51

That's £35 for the four. What could you do those for?

0:31:510:31:55

20 quid.

0:31:550:31:56

-Those are a possibility, aren't they?

-Are they a possibility?

0:31:560:32:00

They are a possibility but I haven't finished yet.

0:32:000:32:02

Got your eye on another glass, then, Phil?

0:32:020:32:04

Now those, Thelma, are they £4 each?

0:32:040:32:07

-Yeah.

-What can you do those four for?

-£10.

0:32:070:32:12

-Ten? You can do better than that. You're not trying.

-Eight.

0:32:120:32:15

You're still not trying. Hold on a minute. I haven't finished yet.

0:32:150:32:20

More glasses?

0:32:200:32:21

Little custard glass. I reckon I can do that for a fiver.

0:32:230:32:27

Let me tell you something.

0:32:270:32:28

We know that these are green glass,

0:32:280:32:30

probably little cordial glasses or whatever. 1900.

0:32:300:32:33

-Yes.

-1890, 1910, something like that.

0:32:330:32:35

Now these, you've called them sherry glasses but I don't think they are.

0:32:350:32:40

These are illusion glasses.

0:32:400:32:42

They're called illusion glasses because the bottom is so much thicker.

0:32:420:32:45

Basically, these don't hold as much so, whoever you were drinking with,

0:32:450:32:49

you could drink half as much as them and they all thought

0:32:490:32:52

you were drinking the same amount as them.

0:32:520:32:54

So I think these are really lovely. Right, Thelma.

0:32:540:32:57

One for the road.

0:32:570:32:58

You can have that for a fiver as well.

0:32:580:33:01

The combined ticket price on the glassware is £81.

0:33:010:33:04

-20, 30, 5.

-No, all of this is irrelevant, Thelma.

-Why?

0:33:040:33:10

Because however much you want, I'm going to tell you how much I've got.

0:33:100:33:14

It's a good job you're sitting down.

0:33:140:33:16

I've got £29.94.

0:33:160:33:20

-Go on a bit, please.

-For these?

-Yes.

-I'll have those.

0:33:200:33:24

Thelma, what a lady. You're a star. Thank you very much.

0:33:240:33:29

That last buy means Philip has spent every last penny.

0:33:290:33:33

He adds his 19th-century glassware to some vintage naval signal flags,

0:33:330:33:37

an Edwardian bijouterie table,

0:33:370:33:40

a Victorian ottoman and a set of historic sporting prints.

0:33:400:33:44

Catherine has spent £111.

0:33:440:33:47

Her haul includes a tin plate crane, a 1930s biscuit tin, a croquet set,

0:33:470:33:52

a bone letter opener and a child's swan rocker.

0:33:520:33:56

So, what do our experts make of each other's buys?

0:33:560:33:59

Well, Mr Serrell has done it again.

0:33:590:34:01

He has bought those fantastic signals for £50. How did he do that?

0:34:010:34:05

-I do not know.

-So you bought a plywood child's rocking swan?

0:34:050:34:11

But what I do like, that bone letter opener or page turner,

0:34:110:34:15

I think that's a lovely, lovely thing.

0:34:150:34:16

But the best thing of all by far is that bijouterie table and I

0:34:160:34:21

am jealous with a capital J.

0:34:210:34:23

That was super.

0:34:230:34:25

After setting off from Salisbury,

0:34:250:34:27

our experts are now heading for auction in the town of Christchurch.

0:34:270:34:31

You had me spending every last bean.

0:34:310:34:34

-You bought five lots and spent 85 quid or something.

-No, I didn't!

0:34:340:34:37

-How much have you spent, then?

-One of my items was £50.

-Really?

0:34:370:34:42

Or did I make that up?

0:34:420:34:44

If I'd have gambled all my money, would you have given me some? No.

0:34:440:34:48

Certainly not. You know where charity begins, don't you? At home.

0:34:480:34:52

Today's auction takes place at family run Bulstrodes Saleroom.

0:34:520:34:56

What does auctioneer Kate Howe think of our expert's lots?

0:34:560:34:59

The vintage signalling flags is a lot I particularly love.

0:34:590:35:02

You've got a good number, they are very,

0:35:020:35:04

very strong in the decorator's market at the moment and I think

0:35:040:35:07

they're going to do very well.

0:35:070:35:09

We've got a lot of interest in those already.

0:35:090:35:11

The vintage croquet set with the hand-painting looks the part,

0:35:110:35:15

lovely age to it.

0:35:150:35:16

We've got the summer months coming up

0:35:160:35:18

so I'm sure that will do very well.

0:35:180:35:19

The ottoman box, we've got gloss paint,

0:35:190:35:22

we've got tired upholstery and we've got damage.

0:35:220:35:25

All three key characteristics for a star lot.

0:35:250:35:27

I think we're going to struggle with that one, if I'm honest.

0:35:270:35:30

Oh, dear, Philip. Anyway, experts, take your seats.

0:35:300:35:33

It's busy in here today and the auction house also accepts

0:35:330:35:37

internet bids.

0:35:370:35:38

First up, though, Philip's 19th-century glassware. All of it.

0:35:380:35:42

£20 for them. Start me at 20, surely.

0:35:430:35:46

£10 then. They've got to go.

0:35:460:35:47

-Thank you, ten.

-Might have helped if she'd mentioned the word "illusion."

0:35:470:35:51

Yes. 12 on the internet. 14 in the room. Any more from the internet?

0:35:510:35:56

Put the hammer down. Smash the lot. 18 in the room.

0:35:560:36:00

20? Thank you. £20. £22. Internet against. Yes, 24.

0:36:000:36:06

26 in the room. 28. 30. Now we go five.

0:36:060:36:12

35. Shakes her head.

0:36:120:36:14

-Internet buyer will hold it, the room is out at £35.

-See?

0:36:140:36:20

-I don't know how that happened.

-Well done.

-Thanks, hon.

0:36:220:36:24

Don't break the champagne out just yet, Philip.

0:36:240:36:28

Next up is Catherine's bone letter opener.

0:36:280:36:31

£20, little bit of enamel there. Decoration. 20. Two. 24.

0:36:310:36:36

-You're off to the races.

-Bit more, bit more.

-26 on the internet.

0:36:360:36:41

Any more? We'll sell to the internet at £26.

0:36:410:36:45

-A little.

-It's a profit.

-A little bit.

0:36:450:36:48

-A little profit is better than a big loss.

-Small acorns and all that.

0:36:480:36:52

Now, can Catherine keep her winning streak going with her next lot,

0:36:520:36:56

a vintage tin plate crane?

0:36:560:36:58

-£10 to start me, then. Come on, £10.

-Oh, come on.

-£10. Ten is bid.

0:36:580:37:03

-Thank you. 12, 14 is bid. right at the back.

-Sit still, woman.

0:37:030:37:08

-16. All is fair in love and war.

-Oh, yes. Keep going.

-At 16. Anyone else?

0:37:080:37:14

-At 16. We'll sell to the room.

-Oh, dear.

-Never mind, Catherine.

0:37:140:37:20

There's still time to make a profit, girl.

0:37:200:37:21

It wasn't my type of thing, really.

0:37:210:37:23

You'd never catch me buying rusty stuff. I'm not into that type thing.

0:37:230:37:28

Really, Philip? Next up is your Eaton and Harrow sporting prints.

0:37:280:37:32

-£20, let's start then. Two, 24.

-He's bidding over there.

0:37:320:37:37

26, 28, 30, five,

0:37:370:37:40

40, five at the back,

0:37:400:37:43

50, five, 60, five,

0:37:430:37:47

-70, five, 80.

-Phil?

0:37:470:37:50

-It sort of helps.

-Internet is out. We sell to the room at 80.

0:37:500:37:57

-Thank you.

-Wow, you hit that one in six, Philip.

0:37:570:38:00

Now it's time for Catherine's 1930s biscuit tin.

0:38:000:38:04

-Jealous?

-Has it got any rust?

-Yes, it's got rust.

-Start at £30.

0:38:040:38:08

£30, low estimate. 35 and 40, five,

0:38:080:38:13

-50...

-Yes!

-Well done.

-..five, 60, five, 70.

0:38:130:38:17

-At 70 and five is bid.

-Keep going.

-80. Five. At £85 for this lot.

0:38:170:38:24

-So excited for you.

-We sell at £85.

0:38:240:38:28

That is a top buy, wasn't it?

0:38:280:38:30

-Crikey, Catherine. That's a whopping profit.

-Rust, you see.

0:38:300:38:35

I am the queen of rust.

0:38:350:38:37

Auctioneer Robin has taken over the hot seat from his

0:38:370:38:40

daughter just in time for Philip's Victorian ottoman.

0:38:400:38:43

£20 straight in, anyone. £20 bid.

0:38:430:38:48

22, the lady. 24, 26, 28, £30.

0:38:480:38:53

-Someone has your vision, Philip.

-New bidder. 45, I'm bid.

0:38:530:38:59

-At 45, selling it now.

-I'll settle for that.

-Yes, yes.

0:38:590:39:04

Its condition probably didn't help. It's Catherine's swan rocker next.

0:39:040:39:10

-I just don't know why I bought it. It's firewood, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:39:110:39:15

£20 to start me off. Ten then. £10. 12 in the front.

0:39:150:39:21

14, 16, 18, 20, £20 front row.

0:39:210:39:27

-22. 22 at the back of the room now.

-Always knew I liked it.

0:39:270:39:31

-All done then at 22.

-Too bad, Catherine.

0:39:310:39:35

-No swansong with that lot.

-It's a loss but it's a happy loss.

0:39:350:39:41

-Now we've got Philip's naval flags.

-£50, anyone. Start me off then.

0:39:410:39:47

Ten for these, £10. 12, 14, 16, 18,

0:39:470:39:51

20, two, four, six, eight, 28. 30 here.

0:39:510:39:58

Five, 40, five, 50, new bidder.

0:39:580:40:02

She's got a bid over there, as well.

0:40:020:40:05

65. 70?

0:40:050:40:08

75. 75. £80 for the flags.

0:40:080:40:12

-£80.

-That seems quite low to me.

0:40:120:40:17

Blimey, someone's got a bargain. How will Catherine's croquet set do?

0:40:170:40:22

-I liked your croquet set.

-Did you?

-I looked at it.

0:40:220:40:25

It was either the flags or the croquet set.

0:40:250:40:27

-So we're going to see in a minute which I should have bought.

-Oh.

-£50.

0:40:270:40:31

He wants that down the end, my new friend.

0:40:310:40:35

£60. 65. 70. 75. And again? Come on.

0:40:350:40:40

-Yes, come on, come on.

-£80.

0:40:400:40:43

-Five, 85.

-See?

-Absolutely...

-Shh!

0:40:430:40:48

-90 at the back.

-90 at the back, shush.

0:40:480:40:51

-Any more then? Last time.

-Bidding.

-Back in again.

0:40:510:40:56

-I think he's done this before.

-95, any more now?

0:40:560:40:59

-100 at the back.

-100 at the back.

0:40:590:41:02

Are you going to have another go for a fiver? 105 it is. At £105.

0:41:020:41:08

-I think you've got your answer there, Philip.

-Never buy flags.

0:41:100:41:14

Always buy croquet sets. You made the wrong decision.

0:41:140:41:17

Next up is Philip's last lot, the Edwardian bijouterie table.

0:41:190:41:23

£60 on this, straight in. 65,

0:41:230:41:26

70, five, 80, five, 90. It's jumped on the net. £90.

0:41:260:41:32

-100, it has gone too now. 120. 130.

-No problems with this.

0:41:320:41:36

140, internet bidder.

0:41:360:41:38

-150, waving the arm. 160, 170, 180.

-I told you, 200.

0:41:380:41:44

-190, internet.

-190. 200?

-200, yes, please.

0:41:440:41:48

-200 it is. £200. 210 on the internet.

-220.

-220. 230 on the net.

0:41:480:41:54

230 I'm bid.

0:41:540:41:56

-Internet holds it at £230.

-That's a good find.

0:41:560:42:00

-That's all right, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:42:000:42:03

That's brilliant.

0:42:030:42:05

Blimey, that is a stonking profit for Philip.

0:42:050:42:07

It has been real swings and roundabouts.

0:42:070:42:10

-Or even ducks and bijouterie tables.

-Come on.

0:42:100:42:14

That's the second auction completed, so let's do the sums.

0:42:140:42:18

Catherine started off with £172.30.

0:42:180:42:20

After paying auction costs,

0:42:200:42:22

she made a profit of £97.28,

0:42:220:42:25

leaving her a total of £269.58 to spend next time.

0:42:250:42:30

Philip started off with £259.94.

0:42:310:42:34

After paying auction costs, he made a profit of £125.46.

0:42:340:42:40

Wow! Leaving him with the princely sum of £385.40 to spend next time.

0:42:400:42:46

-Well, good enough day, I think, for you to drive.

-Yes. Are you ready for this?

-Drive on, drive on.

0:42:460:42:53

-Ready?

-As I'll ever be.

0:42:530:42:55

Why are you closing your eyes? Yee-ha, we are on the way!

0:42:550:43:00

Cheerio, then. Next time on the Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:000:43:03

-Change gear, change gear.

-Go.

-Catherine is on a roll.

0:43:030:43:07

-Could it be a bargain?

-Could be.

-Could be a bargain.

0:43:070:43:11

-And Philip is all at sea.

-I'm not sure who's done who here.

0:43:110:43:14

Catherine Southon and Philip Serrell continue their antiques adventure in a classic Citroen. In Winchester, Catherine finds a jolly nice croquet set and, in Alton, she finds a rare 1930s novelty biscuit tin, both of which give her a chance of huge profits at auction in Christchurch.

Meanwhile, Phil learns how flying boats gave us the word airport. Catherine unravels the story of a top-secret unit of World War II spies working in occupied Europe and the crack team of code deciphers back here in Blighty tasked with keeping their undercover colleagues alive.