Episode 11 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 11

Philip Serrell and Catherine Southon set off on a brand new road trip. They hunt for antiques in Birmingham and Stratford-upon-Avon before heading to an auction in Salisbury.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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GONG ECHOES

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That's cracking!

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-..with £200 each...

-Wonderful.

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..a classic car, and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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That's exactly what I'm talking about!

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I'm all over a-shiver.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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-No-brainer.

-Going, going, gone.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory?

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Push!

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Or the slow road to disaster? HE GRUNTS

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How awfully, awfully nice.

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Well, ho-ho! It's a brand-new Road Trip

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for two fine antiques experts,

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Catherine Southon and Philip Serrell.

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You're looking very glamorous today.

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-Am I?

-Yeah.

-Why are you being so nice to me?

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-Because I love you and I haven't seen you for so long.

-Aww!

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Isn't he sweet?

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When she's not road tripping, Catherine's a veteran auctioneer.

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Mountains of cash.

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Auctioneer Philip is also no stranger to the Antiques Road Trip.

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I do like lumps of stone.

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Lovely. Each of our experts have £200 in their pocket.

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But, to make a profit at auction, they'll have to spend it tactically.

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I wouldn't buy any sort of

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too high-price risky items, I don't think.

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-OK.

-But, erm...

-More safe? Play it safe.

-Well...

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-Is that what you're saying?

-You can't...

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-Are you giving me top tips?

-Catherine, you can't play it safe.

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They're gliding around the country

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in this very French left-hand drive 1970s Citroen DS 20.

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-I have a beret.

-Yeah.

-I could put a nice little beret on you.

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-We should be going, "Hee-haw, hee-haw, hee-haw!"

-Ah-ha!

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THEY CHUCKLE IN FRENCH ACCENTS

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-Oh, c'est bon!

-CATHERINE MIMICS FRENCH

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We have gone from Birmingham to France in two seconds.

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-FRENCH ACCENT:

-I am with the great Catherine. Ha, ha, ha.

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IN FRENCH ACCENT: Haw-haw-haw!

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Famed for its smooth ride...

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It's an absolute doddle.

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Ah, told you so.

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-It is.

-What's this bit?

-That's the gear lever.

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Well done.

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This pair's road trip kicks off in Coleshill in Warwickshire,

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meanders around the Midlands,

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before heading due south

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to the tip of Cornwall.

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Then, nips briefly into South Wales and finishes up

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for an auction in Wells, Somerset.

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Today, our experts are in Coleshill

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and they'll end up at auction

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in Salisbury, Wiltshire - lovely.

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If you were a car...

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Yeah, I would not be a Citroen.

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Would you be something sleek and classic,

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or would you be an old banger?

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I'd probably be an old banger, wouldn't I?

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-I think you probably would, actually.

-That's not very nice.

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The Warwickshire market town of Coleshill

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was first settled during the Iron Age.

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It's home to the parish church of St Peter and St Paul,

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one of the finest in the county.

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Catherine's first stop is here -

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Remember When?

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But, hang on. What this?

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Whoa!

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Am I in the right place?

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You certainly are. Most definitely.

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-Catherine - you are...?

-Pleased to meet you.

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I'm Kim, welcome to Remember When?

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-This is...different from the norm.

-It is. Antiques is my profession.

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The wool is my hobby. And we decided to combine the two.

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Well, I'm going to give this a go, then, the antiques.

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But if I don't find anything, I'm going to come back

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and I'm going to buy lots of chunky wool.

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-Yes, that's fine.

-And knit myself a blanket to wear in the car.

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Oh, look at the wool. This is fabulous!

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Come on, Catherine. You're here for antiques.

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I'm going to restrain.

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-I'm going to look at the antiques.

-OK.

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Good job. Meanwhile, Philip has made his way

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to the Moseley area of Birmingham, the childhood home

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of Lord of the Rings author JRR Tolkien.

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His first opportunity to shop is here, The Moseley Emporium,

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run by a nice chap called Maurice.

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Maurice, how are you?

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I'm fine, thank you. How are you?

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-Yeah, really lovely to be here.

-Yeah.

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-I'm looking for something very, very specific.

-OK.

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What I'm looking for is a really large...profit.

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LAUGHTER

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-Aren't we all?

-That's what I'm looking for.

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-I sort of, kind of, know what I want.

-Yep.

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I'll leave you to it then.

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You have a wander and I'm here, if you need me.

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I like your flags.

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You've got some more here. All your flags for sale?

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The flags are all part of the decor.

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That'll be a no, then.

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Yeah, irreplaceable, aren't they, really?

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And they cover bad patches up.

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# You ain't nothing but a hound dog! #

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-MIMICS ELVIS PRESLEY:

-Ladies and gentlemen, thank you very much.

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Hey, a little less conversation, Philip!

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Get back to the job in hand.

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I tell you what, that F Plan diet's a winner, innit?

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What's the food like then, mate?

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-He doesn't say much, does he?

-No.

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How much is he, Maurice? I like him.

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Again, what have you done?

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Oh, no.

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You've picked the piece that's a part of the shop.

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Bad luck, Philip. But what's in here, then?

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Now that is just ridiculous, isn't it? Utterly ridiculous.

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What's up, Philip?

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It come out of a garage, I would imagine.

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-Out of a factory, yes.

-Out of a factory.

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And it had tools and all the rest of it in it.

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And now this piece of 1950s industrial metalware...

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Bang-on, yeah.

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..is now worth more than a Victorian mahogany chest of drawers.

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-Absolutely.

-The world's gone mad.

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That's a cool thing, but I'm not sure it would be sensible

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to buy that here and take it to a country auction.

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HE BANGS METAL

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-That wants to go to London, doesn't it?

-You're the expert, Phil.

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-What did you just call me?

-An expert.

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Don't you start using that sort of language, Maurice.

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-What I want to ask you, Maurice...

-Yep?

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-..these stoneware barrels...

-Yep.

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..I'm thinking that they're probably part of the shop?

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-LAUGHING:

-No, you're lucky.

-No, really?!

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You've actually picked something that I can sell you.

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-How much are they?

-Well, that one's 35

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and the top one's 25.

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-That's 35, is it?

-Yeah.

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OK, so there's a possibility there, isn't there?

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We'll keep it as a possibility.

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What we need to do is convert possibilities into probabilities.

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Absolutely.

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Back in Coleshill, Catherine's finally found the antiques.

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Toys, lots of toys.

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Yes, that is my speciality, toys.

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Especially dolls and teddies.

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And do you knit them little cardigans and things?

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I have been known to.

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Oh! Little matching woolly hats!

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Oh, that's nice.

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BLEATING

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That sounds like a sheep or a cow.

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That does not sound like a teddy bear,

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which is what it's supposed to sound like.

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That's not a good sound.

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"Meeeh!"

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I'm going to have that in my head all day long now.

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Mm, she's easily distracted at times.

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-I do like your little ladies' RAF compact.

-Yes.

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And then I also spotted, down there, another compact.

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Right, OK, the large one.

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Compacts are collectable.

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It's nice to have that RAF emblem on it, which is super.

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Ticket price, 18 smackers.

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-Oh, it's made by Stratton.

-Mm.

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-It's a common name.

-Yes, it is.

-As you know.

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It's ones that you find all day long.

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OK, that is a possibility, along with that one.

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-May I have a look at that one?

-You certainly can.

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Kim's priced the second compact at £36.

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"Vogue". You've put "vogue". Why? Is it actually stamped...?

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It is marked.

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What have you put this out as, '40s?

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I think it's 1948. I've actually done some research on it.

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Cos it is in remarkably good condition for being...

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It's in a very good condition.

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..'40s, isn't it? May I put these two aside.

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-You certainly can.

-I don't know if you would perhaps do a little...

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-..something on those?

-Oh...

-We won't talk money yet.

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I'm sure we can do something. I'm sure we can.

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Kim, you and I are going to get on very well.

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I'm also looking at these.

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The amber beads, yep.

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-The thing is, you've got to be so careful with amber...

-Yes.

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..as to whether it really is amber.

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-There's so many different ways that you can tell.

-Of course.

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Some people say get a basin of water,

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drop them in, they will sink.

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And then if you put salt in, or something, they will float.

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But I often find the only way to really tell

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is to get a pin and just touch it.

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And if bits start coming off, then it is amber.

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Careful, all breakages must be paid for.

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-Ooh, you've got a pin?

-I have a pin.

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-Let me see. You don't mind me doing this?

-No. Of course not.

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-You have to check, cos otherwise I could be doing...

-I know.

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So, if we just prick that into there

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and you can see, instantly, it fragments.

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I think we can safely say that they are amber.

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But, as you know, they're not the most collectable colour.

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It's more that butterscotch that is more desirable.

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And I think, also,

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they do look a little bit...slightly worse for wear.

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65, you've got quite a lot on that, though, haven't you?

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-OK. Can I put those to one side as well?

-Yes, you can.

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-I'm going to give you the whole shop to hold in a minute.

-It's all right.

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This is good, for me. I've only been in the shop a few minutes.

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I've picked out three things.

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You're so decisive, Catherine!

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Over in Moseley, though,

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Philip's still taken by the stoneware barrels.

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NORTHERN ACCENT: Ooh, he does love a barrel!

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See, what you really want is buy one...get one free.

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That's the ideal deal here.

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BOGOF.

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Maurice is too canny for that.

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So, what I want to look for...is I just want to see

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if there's any cracks in it.

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This is salt-glazed stoneware.

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And I quite like this.

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This is going to date to about...1880, 1900.

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Just a little bit before my time.

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Just a tad.

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This would have been a spirit barrel in a pub or something like that.

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You see this often with little upholstered tops put on here.

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It converts them into a stool.

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I think it would dress or decorate an old kitchen, that type of thing.

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It's a bit old-school, but I quite like it.

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-I like that one barrel upstairs, the big one.

-OK.

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That was the 35 quidder.

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I'll be truthful with you, it's been here a while.

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25 was... £20, that's it, finished. End of deal.

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I always said you were one of the finest blokes, Maurice.

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Haven't I always about? I've always said that.

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Oh, yes. Flattery gets you everywhere.

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£20 seals Phil's first deal.

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-Go on, I'll have the big one.

-You've actually made me cry.

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Oh, God, Maurice! Don't start!

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-Right, let's see if we can find something else.

-OK.

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I'd better pay... Shall I pay you for that first?

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-If you want to.

-Hold on, mate.

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You might forget, you see?

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Maurice has got the measure of you.

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Thank you.

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One deal done, but Maurice knows Philip likes a bit of rust

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and there's a potential sale to be had in his workshop.

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Maurice, is that one of those, like what we saw upstairs?

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It is, but it's in the unfinished state.

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PHIL BANGS METAL

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It turns into a lovely piece of furniture

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-in the end, though, doesn't it, really?

-Yeah.

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If you want to spend a day-and-a-half putting it right.

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So, I'm guessing that most of your value in these is labour?

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Absolutely. A lot of labour goes into it.

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-A lot of labour.

-And people don't realise that.

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So, if there's no labour gone into it,

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-that could be really cheap.

-Ooh, you naughty boy!

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LAUGHTER

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For me, as it stands, it's 20 quid.

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METAL CLANGS

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-Ooh, 20 quid, you're making me cry.

-Yeah.

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That will be the finish for me as well.

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I tell you what, you can take it away for 20 quid.

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-You're a star. Thank you very much indeed, Maurice.

-And you.

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There you are. Let me give you some money.

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-You can give me more, if you like.

-No, no, no.

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I think that's just lovely.

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The thing is...

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..is Salisbury ready...for a rusting tin cabinet?

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Oh-ho-ho! We'll soon find out!

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-You take care, thanks very much.

-Please call again.

-Bye-bye.

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See you again, bye.

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Down the road in Coleshill,

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Catherine is still looking through Kim's cabinets.

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I didn't know whether you might be interested

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in the miniature dominoes set in the little mahogany box?

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Do you know what? I did see that.

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Is it bone or is it ivory?

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I believe it's bone.

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-Right, OK.

-I don't think it's ivory.

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-May I have a little quick look?

-You can.

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Ticket price, £32.

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-These are complete, aren't they?

-Yes, they are.

-OK.

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-They're impossible to get out.

-KIM LAUGHS

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You need the little tiny fingers to go with it.

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If they're bone, you normally get these lots of little flecks,

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-so you can see...

-Mm-hm.

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But I'm not sure that they are bone, you know.

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I think they might be ivory.

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Today, the trade in ivory is illegal.

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However, items can be bought and sold as long as they predate 1947.

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These dominoes were made sometime in the early 1900s.

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I thought maybe the price was a little bit high for what they are.

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-I know that sounds mean.

-Mm-hm.

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But I thought, "Mm, maybe not."

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And I'm...I was just not sure.

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But you're kind of convincing me.

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You're good at this.

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KIM LAUGHS

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You're obviously a very good saleswoman.

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I do try. I do try.

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-Can we have a little...chatette about these pieces?

-Yes.

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I thought what I might do is perhaps buy those compacts

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and put those together as one lot.

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Now, you've...

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Oh, dear, we've lost the tag. What a shame!

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Kim's not going to fall for that old chestnut.

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We've got £18 for that one

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and 36 for that.

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So, what could you do on those, Kim? What do you think?

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45?

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In an ideal world, I'd like to tuck it a little bit under 40.

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Right, OK. 38.

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-OK, 38.

-If that helps you.

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And the dominoes set?

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Erm, that's a nice piece.

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25.

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25 on those, OK.

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And what about the amber?

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See, I think I'd like to go quite low on those.

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-Only because of their condition.

-How low is low?

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How low is low? Erm...

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Well, you tell me. What do you think?

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-All right, OK.

-What do you think is reasonable?

0:12:480:12:51

40.

0:12:510:12:52

I don't have a problem with those.

0:12:520:12:54

That's the only thing I would prefer...

0:12:540:12:56

If you can't do it, don't worry.

0:12:570:12:59

What about 35?

0:12:590:13:01

-Yeah, I think we'll give a go on those, shall we?

-OK, yeah.

0:13:010:13:04

And I have no idea what that's added up to.

0:13:040:13:07

It is...

0:13:070:13:08

£98.

0:13:080:13:09

God, you're good at this.

0:13:090:13:11

-Thank you very much. Thank you.

-You're very welcome.

0:13:110:13:13

Kind Kim has agreed to a £53 discount,

0:13:130:13:16

giving Catherine her first three lots for auction.

0:13:160:13:19

Can I go and have a look at your knitting now?

0:13:190:13:21

-You can.

-Can I have a look at all the wool?

0:13:210:13:23

I've been dying to do that!

0:13:230:13:25

-Forget the antiques, let's go and look at the wool.

-OK.

0:13:250:13:28

Let's leave the lady in the hat

0:13:280:13:30

and find out where the fella in the scarf has got to.

0:13:300:13:32

LAUGHTER

0:13:320:13:33

Philip is on his way to the centre of Birmingham

0:13:360:13:39

to find out how a local had a big hand

0:13:390:13:41

in the development of lawn tennis.

0:13:410:13:44

-You must be Bob.

-Good morning, Phil.

-Good to see you.

0:13:450:13:47

-Good to see you. Would you like to come in?

-I'd love to. Yes, please.

0:13:470:13:50

At the library of Birmingham,

0:13:500:13:52

local historian Bob Holland has been piecing together

0:13:520:13:55

the story of Harry Gem, who lived and worked in the city

0:13:550:13:58

during the 19th century.

0:13:580:14:00

He was born in 1819

0:14:000:14:03

and Harry was a great sportsman.

0:14:030:14:04

He was a swimmer, he was a runner,

0:14:040:14:06

he played cricket, he was a rider,

0:14:060:14:08

he played racquets down in the centre of Birmingham.

0:14:080:14:11

-He was a sportsman?

-Very much so.

0:14:110:14:13

When he was the secretary of the racquets club,

0:14:130:14:15

down in Bath Street in Birmingham,

0:14:150:14:18

he'd met a Spanish guy called Augurio Perera

0:14:180:14:20

who lived in Edgbaston,

0:14:200:14:22

who was also a great racquets player.

0:14:220:14:23

This meeting would prove instrumental

0:14:230:14:26

in the development of a new game.

0:14:260:14:28

The two of them got their heads together and they were looking

0:14:280:14:31

at the idea of inventing a game which they could play outside.

0:14:310:14:34

The advent of India rubber allowed balls to bounce on grass

0:14:340:14:38

for the first time.

0:14:380:14:39

And the Victorian obsession with croquet meant

0:14:390:14:41

there was no shortage of lawns to use as courts.

0:14:410:14:44

The two friends started to develop their new game.

0:14:440:14:46

This particular book here, in the Birmingham Library,

0:14:460:14:49

is what's known as the Gem Scrapbook.

0:14:490:14:52

Basically, it's interesting items through Gem's life.

0:14:520:14:56

And this particular page is open at his rules of lawn tennis.

0:14:560:15:00

When did they first appear in public?

0:15:000:15:03

This particular set of rules appeared in November 1874

0:15:030:15:07

in Field Magazine.

0:15:070:15:08

-Is that Gem's court?

-That's Gem's court, yes.

0:15:080:15:11

The net looks a lot bigger.

0:15:110:15:12

It is, actually. It's four feet high

0:15:120:15:15

from side to side.

0:15:150:15:17

The modern net is only three feet.

0:15:170:15:19

Whereabouts was this court first set up?

0:15:190:15:22

This was in the garden of Perera's house,

0:15:220:15:24

-in Ampton Road, Edgbaston.

-Where is that?

0:15:240:15:26

It's just yonder there, about a mile-and-a-half.

0:15:260:15:28

-A mile-and-a-half that way?

-Absolutely.

0:15:280:15:30

-Literally as the crow flies.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:15:300:15:32

So, is that court still there, or...?

0:15:320:15:34

It has a garden at the back of it,

0:15:340:15:35

but the area of grass where they'd have laid out their court

0:15:350:15:38

is still there.

0:15:380:15:40

I don't suppose we could...?

0:15:400:15:42

We can, most certainly.

0:15:420:15:43

I know the owners, so we can go over and have a game.

0:15:430:15:45

PHIL MUMBLES

0:15:450:15:47

Bob, this is clearly a really special piece of grass.

0:15:490:15:52

It is, indeed. This is the spiritual home of lawn tennis,

0:15:520:15:55

where two gentlemen took up two racquets and devised a game,

0:15:550:15:59

which is very similar to the modern game of lawn tennis.

0:15:590:16:02

When the All England Croquet Club started playing tennis,

0:16:020:16:05

they adopted rectangular courts, similar to Gem's.

0:16:050:16:08

The Croquet Club then became the All England Lawn Tennis Club

0:16:080:16:12

and the rest, as they say, is history.

0:16:120:16:15

Chris Elks shares Bob's passion for early racket sport.

0:16:150:16:18

Chris, this is your collection?

0:16:180:16:20

Yes, it is. Part of it.

0:16:200:16:22

-You've almost got a history of the racket here.

-That's right.

0:16:220:16:26

Out of all these rackets, the thing I love

0:16:260:16:28

is that racket on the end,

0:16:280:16:30

because that's just a work of art, isn't it?

0:16:300:16:32

All of the other rackets were played with by men, essentially.

0:16:320:16:36

Of course, ladies bring a special aspect to tennis, don't they?

0:16:360:16:40

-Yeah, absolutely.

-No self-respecting male would pick up that racket

0:16:400:16:44

to choose to play with.

0:16:440:16:45

I love this. Is this some sort of cleaner or washer, or something?

0:16:450:16:47

This is a ball cleaner.

0:16:470:16:49

Balls were more difficult to make than rackets.

0:16:490:16:51

-As you can see, this is an old tennis ball.

-Yeah.

0:16:510:16:53

You would keep them clean by placing it like this

0:16:530:16:57

and then giving a quick turn and scrub.

0:16:570:17:00

Now it's time for a knock-about.

0:17:000:17:02

But, when it comes to sport, ex-PE teacher Philip

0:17:020:17:05

has got a really competitive streak.

0:17:050:17:08

I think I've got an advantage here, cos what Bob doesn't realise is

0:17:080:17:11

that I've stuffed him up with some old racket and I've got a new one.

0:17:110:17:15

So, hopefully, I'm going to win it.

0:17:150:17:17

Oh, hi, Bob. All right?

0:17:170:17:19

Yes, fine. I've got some balls.

0:17:190:17:20

Oh, excellent stuff.

0:17:200:17:23

Right, off we go then. Ha-ha-ha!

0:17:230:17:24

This isn't working out too well, really, is it?

0:17:330:17:34

LAUGHTER

0:17:340:17:36

-Less of this spin stuff.

-LAUGHTER

0:17:370:17:39

It looks like Philip is channelling

0:17:390:17:41

the spirit of Harry Gem for this game.

0:17:410:17:43

-BOTH:

-Oh!

-Get in there!

0:17:430:17:46

-There we go, Bob. Excellent stuff.

-BOB PANTS

0:17:460:17:47

But I've got to go and buy antiques.

0:17:470:17:49

-Thank you very, much indeed.

-Not at all.

-Thank you.

0:17:490:17:51

It's been absolutely fantastic and, I have to say, as courts go,

0:17:510:17:54

that's a real GEM.

0:17:540:17:56

-Thank you very much.

-BOB LAUGHS

0:17:560:17:58

Meanwhile, Catherine has travelled

0:17:580:18:00

to the Warwickshire village of Middleton.

0:18:000:18:02

It's the home of the Middleton Lakes Nature Reserve,

0:18:020:18:05

which boasts over 100 different species of birds.

0:18:050:18:09

Catherine's second shop today

0:18:090:18:11

is in Meadowview Antiques and she has £102 left to spend.

0:18:110:18:15

-Ooh, hello.

-Hi, Catherine.

0:18:170:18:19

-Who might you be?

-I'm Mike.

-Hello, Mike.

0:18:190:18:22

You've got a lot of stuff in here.

0:18:220:18:24

Have you got any space in here?

0:18:240:18:26

Only the ceiling.

0:18:260:18:28

This is absolutely rammed, isn't it?

0:18:280:18:31

What I like is that everything looks very different.

0:18:310:18:34

We don't buy the run-of-the-mill things.

0:18:340:18:36

You don't buy run-of-the-mill.

0:18:360:18:37

We are very choosy in what we have in the shop.

0:18:370:18:40

She's impressive, old Marilyn there.

0:18:400:18:42

Yep, that came from up north.

0:18:420:18:44

It's 1957, The Seven Year Itch.

0:18:440:18:46

-And what is it?

-It's...it's fibreglass with...

0:18:460:18:51

a concrete bottom.

0:18:510:18:53

Ooh.

0:18:530:18:54

You used to have them in the foyers of the cinemas.

0:18:540:18:57

-£2,000.

-Yes.

0:18:570:18:59

Well, if you could come down to 100, I'll have it.

0:18:590:19:01

Cheeky! MIKE LAUGHS

0:19:010:19:03

I'm worried that I may not have enough money left,

0:19:030:19:05

cos I've already bought a few of things.

0:19:050:19:06

I'm sure Mike has something hidden away that is within your budget.

0:19:060:19:10

-OK, I shall be back.

-No problem.

-Thanks, Mike.

0:19:100:19:13

Ooh!

0:19:130:19:14

(Up her knickers.)

0:19:140:19:15

Looking up her skirt.

0:19:150:19:16

Leave Marilyn alone.

0:19:160:19:18

Saucy.

0:19:180:19:19

Look at this! This is the most...

0:19:190:19:22

..gorgeous, gorgeous thing.

0:19:240:19:27

Look at that. I love it!

0:19:270:19:28

I just remember my mum having exactly the same vacuum cleaner.

0:19:290:19:34

That is just the best.

0:19:340:19:36

It would make no money at auction, but that's just...fantastic.

0:19:370:19:41

Look at that.

0:19:410:19:43

Blimey. It must be some sort of advertising thing.

0:19:430:19:47

I do like to come in somewhere like this,

0:19:470:19:49

where you haven't got run-of-the-mill.

0:19:490:19:51

Like a box of matches, an oversized box of matches

0:19:510:19:53

and a vacuum cleaner for a child.

0:19:530:19:56

-Mike?

-Yes.

0:19:560:19:58

Can I ask you about this tennis racket?

0:19:580:20:00

I love this.

0:20:000:20:02

Harrods themselves used to have so many tickets for Wimbledon,

0:20:020:20:05

which they used to give to their best customers.

0:20:050:20:09

Best clients, right?

0:20:090:20:10

They used to make up a bag

0:20:100:20:12

and give them one of those tennis rackets as well.

0:20:120:20:14

So we're talking what...?

0:20:140:20:16

We're talking the '60s, '70s?

0:20:160:20:18

I would say '70s. '70s. Yeah.

0:20:180:20:20

Yeah, probably looks more '70s, doesn't it?

0:20:200:20:22

And it's in immaculate condition.

0:20:220:20:23

It's in lovely condition, isn't it?

0:20:230:20:25

Does this come with anything else?

0:20:250:20:27

-Does that come with a free Wimbledon ticket for me?

-It...

0:20:270:20:29

-MIKE LAUGHS

-Does it?

-It could do.

0:20:290:20:31

And strawberries and cream!

0:20:310:20:32

Mike, what could this be?

0:20:320:20:34

We've got 58 on it, but...

0:20:340:20:37

I'll do it for 30.

0:20:370:20:38

Can you do 25 on it?

0:20:380:20:40

Go on, I'll let you have it for 25.

0:20:400:20:42

-Can you?

-Yeah.

-I really like that.

0:20:420:20:45

And do you know what will be even better?

0:20:450:20:48

Seeing the look on Phil's face when I turn up with this.

0:20:480:20:52

He is going to be so jealous.

0:20:520:20:55

I think Phillip's probably had enough of tennis for one day.

0:20:550:20:58

Right, I want to spend more. What do I want to buy?

0:20:580:21:01

Well, this golden mother-of-pearl magnifier

0:21:010:21:03

with a bulls-eye lens looks nice..

0:21:030:21:05

It's very strong glass. You can read the hallmarks on it.

0:21:050:21:08

I'll give you a ring, so you can see for yourself.

0:21:080:21:10

Sometimes they are not particularly good, are they?

0:21:100:21:12

No, they're not very powerful.

0:21:120:21:14

So, you should get pretty good magnification.

0:21:140:21:16

Yep, you can read that perfectly.

0:21:160:21:19

You've got 65 on this. What...?

0:21:190:21:21

I can do you for 40.

0:21:210:21:22

Would you? Do you think I've got a chance with that at 40?

0:21:220:21:26

I would say you've definitely got a chance,

0:21:260:21:28

because you've got to ask yourself, where would you buy another one?

0:21:280:21:31

Where have you seen another one?

0:21:310:21:33

I mean, you see magnifiers all the time.

0:21:330:21:35

But not like that.

0:21:350:21:36

-But A, not as miniature, like that.

-No.

0:21:360:21:38

And B, not with such a beautiful handle. And...

0:21:380:21:41

Why am I telling you all this,

0:21:410:21:43

because the price is going to go up again.

0:21:430:21:44

-LAUGHTER

-This would be my fifth item.

0:21:440:21:46

I'm kind of really steaming along today

0:21:460:21:49

and buying lots of items.

0:21:490:21:51

I'm just thinking whether I should...step back a bit.

0:21:510:21:54

That should make a lot more than £40 in auction.

0:21:540:21:58

-Go on, then.

-You're going to go for that?

0:21:580:22:00

-I am, I'm going to shake your hand.

-OK.

0:22:000:22:03

-That's a very soft shake.

-Yes.

-Let's have a real manly shake.

0:22:030:22:06

So, how much is it that I owe you, my friend?

0:22:060:22:08

Only 65.

0:22:080:22:10

"Only 65", he says.

0:22:100:22:12

60, 80.

0:22:120:22:14

There is your change.

0:22:140:22:16

Thank you. Thank you.

0:22:160:22:18

-Wonderful, thank you very much.

-Yes, thank you.

0:22:180:22:20

Well, Catherine's been busy.

0:22:200:22:21

She's bought five items to end the day's shopping.

0:22:210:22:24

For now, it's time to say night-night.

0:22:240:22:27

So, night-night.

0:22:270:22:29

Morning, all.

0:22:310:22:32

Ha! Catherine's in the driving seat today, so watch out.

0:22:320:22:35

There's some sort of petrol-y smell going on around here.

0:22:350:22:38

-It's just fine.

-Are you sure?

0:22:380:22:41

-This feels like I should be going into third now.

-Well, go on, then.

0:22:410:22:44

Up and away from you... Up.

0:22:440:22:46

Phil, put it in third for me!

0:22:460:22:49

-Foot on the clutch.

-Oh, yeah, I forgot about the clutch.

0:22:490:22:52

-That's why it wasn't...

-The armrest has come off in my arm.

0:22:520:22:56

Lordy... Let's have a catch-up on the shopping so far.

0:22:560:23:00

Catherine has been busy.

0:23:000:23:01

She's got five lots - the magnifier, the amber beads, the mini dominoes,

0:23:010:23:07

the pair of compacts and the mini tennis racket,

0:23:070:23:09

leaving her £37 to spend today.

0:23:090:23:12

Does it come with a free Wimbledon ticket for me?

0:23:120:23:15

As for Philip, he bought a stoneware barrel

0:23:150:23:17

and an industrial steel cabinet...

0:23:170:23:19

-That could be really cheap.

-Oh, you naughty boy!

0:23:190:23:23

..leaving him £165 to spend if his nerves can hold out.

0:23:230:23:26

You know when people talk about those near-death experiences...

0:23:260:23:28

-Yes.

-..when can just see the end of their life looming before them?

0:23:280:23:32

I never thought it would take the form a Citroen.

0:23:320:23:36

Today, our two experts are starting off in the village of Wootton Wawen,

0:23:360:23:39

located in the county of Warwickshire.

0:23:390:23:41

The most famous landmark around here is the cast-iron aqueduct that

0:23:430:23:48

carries the Stratford-upon-Avon canal across the village.

0:23:480:23:50

Stopping, stopped.

0:23:500:23:52

-Oh, that's a relief.

-Oh, yes.

0:23:520:23:54

First stop of the day is at the aptly named Antiques Shop.

0:23:540:23:57

And with a moniker like that, I've high hopes for Philip.

0:23:570:24:00

-Good luck.

-Reverse.

-All right!

-Reverse.

0:24:000:24:04

-Hello.

-Hello?

-Hi. How are you? Phil.

0:24:050:24:08

-Hi, there.

-Good to see you.

0:24:080:24:10

And you. This is Phil, my business partner.

0:24:100:24:12

Phil, how are you doing? Good to see you.

0:24:120:24:14

-What can we do for you today?

-Well, you can find me something

0:24:140:24:16

that's got a profit in it, that's what you can do.

0:24:160:24:19

This is interesting. I'll tell you what it's for.

0:24:190:24:21

You put that on a piece of flesh, or skin, and you press that,

0:24:210:24:24

which is now perished, and when it expands,

0:24:240:24:28

it sucks the skin up if you've got some sort of

0:24:280:24:31

nasty carbuncle or something.

0:24:310:24:34

I think that's designed to get it off.

0:24:340:24:36

Not a pretty sight.

0:24:360:24:37

Let's just leave that out - that might be a possibility.

0:24:370:24:40

Let's go and have a look outside.

0:24:400:24:43

See, that's ideal. That's a nice thing.

0:24:430:24:45

-A butter churn, isn't it?

-Yeah, a butter churn.

0:24:450:24:47

A lot of these were made in Chippenham, in Wiltshire.

0:24:470:24:49

-Were they really?

-Yes, very often you'd lose the stand.

0:24:490:24:52

220.

0:24:520:24:55

-I do like this.

-It's really quite ornate, isn't it?

0:24:550:24:57

Put your back into it, Philip.

0:24:570:24:59

Yeah, it's a good-looking thing, but for me to make a profit,

0:24:590:25:02

I'm going to have to bid you really, really low on that.

0:25:020:25:04

-We're not shy.

-Well, I'm looking at 60 quid.

0:25:040:25:08

How shy are you now?

0:25:080:25:09

-We're quite embarrassed.

-I'm not!

0:25:090:25:12

We'll leave Philip negotiating. I wonder what Catherine's up to.

0:25:120:25:17

I have got all the time in the world,

0:25:170:25:20

cos I've got five rather nice objects.

0:25:200:25:22

She's headed into Stratford-upon-Avon,

0:25:220:25:24

Shakespeare's old stomping ground.

0:25:240:25:26

She's tamed the Citroen, look!

0:25:260:25:28

When there's no traffic,

0:25:280:25:30

it's actually quite lovely.

0:25:300:25:32

I want to show Phil how it's done.

0:25:320:25:36

Driving any type of car...

0:25:360:25:39

I shall show him how to drive a Citroen and drive it well.

0:25:390:25:44

Tres bon. Catherine has £37 left to spend here

0:25:440:25:47

in Henley Street Antiques Centre.

0:25:470:25:50

So, let's just get things straight. I don't really need to buy anything.

0:25:500:25:55

Don't speak too soon.

0:25:550:25:57

Oh, no, this is cool.

0:25:570:25:59

Deal of the month.

0:25:590:26:01

This is fantastic! £95. How much have I got left?

0:26:010:26:04

I just said £37.

0:26:040:26:06

Maybe I'd just buy...just one.

0:26:060:26:08

One drum.

0:26:080:26:09

SHE PLAYS DRUM

0:26:090:26:12

That is fantastic.

0:26:120:26:13

Right, I'm going to walk away cos I can't buy it.

0:26:130:26:15

"Philip Serrell was here.

0:26:150:26:18

"With all best wishes."

0:26:180:26:19

Did he seriously write on this wall?

0:26:190:26:21

That's terrible! What a vandal!

0:26:210:26:24

Graffiti from a previous road trip - the scamp.

0:26:240:26:27

It seems like Catherine's all shopped out.

0:26:270:26:29

-You never know though.

-I think I'm probably going

0:26:290:26:31

to quit and call it a day.

0:26:310:26:33

Well, I suppose if you can't beat him...

0:26:330:26:35

Back in Wootton Wawen, Philip's been browsing the cabinets.

0:26:370:26:41

-What's he found?

-I used to love that book as a kid.

0:26:410:26:43

I used to read it for hours and hours and hours.

0:26:430:26:46

"Mr Crabtree Goes Fishing." I like that.

0:26:460:26:50

Look at this. His son was Peter.

0:26:500:26:52

Peter used to go fishing with Mr Crabtree.

0:26:520:26:54

I love that. I absolutely love that.

0:26:540:26:56

I need to have a ruminate here,

0:26:560:26:58

because I really like your butter churn.

0:26:580:27:01

It's what you can do it for.

0:27:010:27:02

And just for old memories for me, I like Mr Crabtree.

0:27:020:27:05

Yes. 80 would do the two for you.

0:27:050:27:07

So you're saying Mr Crabtree and that at 80 squid?

0:27:070:27:11

-Yeah.

-You have been very, very generous to me

0:27:110:27:13

and I'm very appreciative of that.

0:27:130:27:15

Yeah, go on, £80 the two. You have been very, very kind to me

0:27:150:27:18

and this is really sad, but I'm more excited about this.

0:27:180:27:22

Philip pays £75 for the butter churn and £5 for the book.

0:27:220:27:26

-Great discounts.

-Two, four, six, eight.

0:27:260:27:29

You've been really kind. Thank you very, very much.

0:27:290:27:31

-No problem.

-Lovely to see you.

0:27:310:27:33

Catherine, meanwhile, has finished shopping,

0:27:360:27:39

so she's headed to Redditch to hear a little local history.

0:27:390:27:42

Incredibly, by the late 1800s,

0:27:420:27:44

90% of the world's needles were being made in the town.

0:27:440:27:47

Catherine is visiting the Forge Mill Needle Museum

0:27:470:27:51

and meeting curator Jo-Ann Gloger.

0:27:510:27:53

-Hello, Jo-Ann, lovely to meet you.

-Thank you.

0:27:530:27:57

Where are we here? What are these buildings all about?

0:27:570:27:59

This is the only remaining water-powered needle scouring mill

0:27:590:28:03

left in the entire world.

0:28:030:28:05

Victorian Redditch was located close to manufacturers that

0:28:050:28:08

needed a constant supply of needles to help them make their products.

0:28:080:28:12

You've got a fantastic leather industry over at Walsall,

0:28:120:28:15

Kidderminster for carpets - very famous -

0:28:150:28:19

and then you have the gloving trade over at Worcester.

0:28:190:28:23

You've got Nottingham for lace.

0:28:230:28:25

So you've got all these industrial markets,

0:28:250:28:27

plus the domestic demand as well.

0:28:270:28:30

In 1859, the Redditch needle makers really hit the jackpot

0:28:300:28:34

when the railway came to town.

0:28:340:28:36

It meant that a lot of people could set up in business

0:28:360:28:40

in the Redditch area and by 1869,

0:28:400:28:45

we've got recorded 117 companies, big and small,

0:28:450:28:48

in the Redditch area, which is amazing.

0:28:480:28:51

At the height of needle making in Redditch,

0:28:510:28:53

the town was producing 100 million needles every week.

0:28:530:28:57

All needles start their life as large coils of wire.

0:28:570:29:01

You can see how thick it is. Just feel that. Yeah?

0:29:010:29:03

Now from here, it has to be drawn down.

0:29:030:29:06

That's making it thinner and longer.

0:29:060:29:08

Look at that. Look at the difference from there to there.

0:29:080:29:11

From here it gets cut and then the pointer will then point the wires.

0:29:110:29:17

The pointers used grindstones to sharpen the ends of the needles,

0:29:170:29:20

but it was not without risks.

0:29:200:29:21

It was a very, very dangerous job.

0:29:210:29:25

I mean, their life expectancy

0:29:250:29:27

wasn't much beyond the age of about 30, 35.

0:29:270:29:31

He's breathing in a lethal mixture of dust from the grindstone

0:29:310:29:36

and metal dust from the wire,

0:29:360:29:37

so it's all going down into his lungs

0:29:370:29:39

and within two or three years, he'll be coughing up blood.

0:29:390:29:43

It was pretty horrible.

0:29:430:29:45

If they knew these kind of conditions,

0:29:450:29:47

why did they do it?

0:29:470:29:48

For the money. They were very, very well paid,

0:29:480:29:52

because they knew it was such a dangerous job,

0:29:520:29:54

they were earning two and three guineas per week,

0:29:540:29:57

which, in Victorian times, was a great deal of money.

0:29:570:30:00

So how many needles could he point a day?

0:30:000:30:02

Something like 10,000 needles per hour.

0:30:020:30:06

-Per hour?!

-Wow.

0:30:060:30:08

-What's next?

-Right. Putting the eyes in.

0:30:080:30:11

Have you ever wondered how they put eyes in needles?

0:30:110:30:13

Well, I must admit, I haven't laid awake at night wondering about that,

0:30:130:30:16

but now you come to mention it...

0:30:160:30:18

You can see we have a punch here and it's got some impressions

0:30:180:30:24

of where the eyes are going to be made.

0:30:240:30:27

So the kick stamper, as his name was,

0:30:270:30:29

he would actually put the wire like that.

0:30:290:30:32

It comes down and...

0:30:320:30:35

..he's going to make the impression of where the eyes are going to go.

0:30:360:30:40

-So he's put his foot in a peddle...?

-He's put his foot in a stirrup

0:30:400:30:43

and he's letting the hammer come down

0:30:430:30:47

and he's making the impression.

0:30:470:30:48

50 kick stamps per minute on a 30lb drop hammer.

0:30:480:30:50

-That's amazing.

-There were over 30 separate stages,

0:30:500:30:53

including being heated in ovens, dipped in oil and left to dry.

0:30:530:30:57

The end of the process was to clean and polish the needles,

0:30:570:30:59

known as scouring.

0:30:590:31:01

As you can see, the needles up to this stage were very, very dirty.

0:31:020:31:05

-Just look at that.

-How did they get cleaned?

0:31:050:31:08

You would then put them into a long trough

0:31:080:31:12

with some sacking in it, with some powdered stone and some soft soap.

0:31:120:31:17

You would then put the set of needles

0:31:170:31:19

into the scouring beds and then the scouring beds press on top of it

0:31:190:31:25

and it's rubbed and rolled and the emery takes the grime away.

0:31:250:31:29

How long does that process take?

0:31:290:31:31

-Round about eight hours.

-Eight hours?

-Yeah.

0:31:310:31:35

Then, all that was left to do was to sift the needles out.

0:31:350:31:38

Ready?

0:31:380:31:40

No, hopeless.

0:31:430:31:46

By the middle of the 20th century, the industry was in steep decline

0:31:460:31:49

due to cheap imports and falling demand,

0:31:490:31:51

but Redditch will always be synonymous with needle making.

0:31:510:31:55

Meanwhile, Philip has made his way

0:32:010:32:03

to Fladbury in Worcestershire.

0:32:030:32:04

He's visiting his final shop,

0:32:040:32:07

which is run by an old business chum.

0:32:070:32:09

-Mr Humphries, how are you?

-Mr Serrell, I'm very well.

0:32:090:32:12

All I would say to you is, I know you come to my sales regularly,

0:32:120:32:15

I do not want to buy anything that I've sold you,

0:32:150:32:17

cos that would be really embarrassing.

0:32:170:32:19

You've got a lot of stock, haven't you?

0:32:190:32:21

I tell you what, Phil, I like to keep it well stocked,

0:32:210:32:24

but I turn it over well, as well.

0:32:240:32:26

-Is that dear?

-It depends what you call dear.

0:32:260:32:29

-Well, I can tell you how much money I've got.

-Go on, then.

0:32:290:32:33

-I've got 80 quid left.

-That's dear, then.

0:32:330:32:36

-Is it? That out of my range?

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:32:360:32:38

Oh, I like those, as well.

0:32:380:32:40

They're weathering nicely, aren't they?

0:32:400:32:42

-I know how they feel.

-You and me both, Philip.

0:32:420:32:44

Ticketed at £275, they're still out of Philip's budget.

0:32:440:32:48

Is Ian feeling kind?

0:32:480:32:50

-You might be able to buy those, actually.

-Really?

0:32:500:32:53

They're basically a pair of concrete dogs, aren't they?

0:32:530:32:55

-Greyhounds, aren't they?

-They're not going to win many races.

0:32:550:32:58

-But they're so heavy.

-Are they hollow?

-No, they're solid.

0:32:580:33:01

-And they're concrete, aren't they?

-Yes.

-Oh, Lord above!

0:33:010:33:05

-These might be 30, 40 years old.

-I think so.

0:33:070:33:10

And those might be a possibility?

0:33:100:33:12

-Might be.

-Might be.

0:33:120:33:13

-I just really like them.

-They are quite nice.

0:33:130:33:16

-The other reason why I like them is cos I had a lurcher.

-Oh, really?

0:33:160:33:19

Who was the absolute love of my life.

0:33:190:33:21

-Myrtle the lurcher.

-Oh, bless.

-I loved her to bits.

0:33:210:33:24

Can we get one outside?

0:33:240:33:26

Do you mind? Look at that, there's a quick rupture.

0:33:260:33:29

It's a poor job that won't stand a good foreman.

0:33:310:33:34

(I'm the foreman.)

0:33:340:33:35

Try telling Catherine that.

0:33:350:33:37

-He's nice, isn't he?

-You've got to buy it now.

0:33:370:33:39

Down, boy. They come as a pair.

0:33:390:33:42

They're just weathering down nicely.

0:33:420:33:45

They're going to go one way now, aren't they?

0:33:450:33:47

Yeah, they're going to go south, that's where they're going to go.

0:33:470:33:49

They're going to go down to Salisbury. You're a star.

0:33:490:33:52

-Fantastic. Good man.

-I'd better pay you, my friend.

0:33:520:33:54

That last buy has Philip all spent up.

0:33:540:33:57

Sit down, Rover!

0:33:570:33:59

I'm just trying to train them. Just trying to train them. Sit!

0:33:590:34:02

Good dog, good dog.

0:34:020:34:04

And the dogs are added to Philip's other buys -

0:34:040:34:06

the stoneware barrel, a steel cabinet,

0:34:060:34:08

a butter churner and a book on fishing.

0:34:080:34:10

He spent £200 on the nail.

0:34:100:34:14

Catherine spent £163 on some amber beads,

0:34:140:34:18

a miniature tennis racket,

0:34:180:34:20

a gold magnifier,

0:34:200:34:21

a miniature set of dominoes and a pair of compacts.

0:34:210:34:25

So, what do they make of each other's buys?

0:34:250:34:26

I think Catherine's done a really, really good job.

0:34:260:34:29

I just love that little tennis racket she's bought.

0:34:290:34:33

I knew it, I knew it, I knew it.

0:34:330:34:35

I knew Phil Serrell would buy a butter churn.

0:34:350:34:38

But for me, the real jewel in the crown are those beads.

0:34:380:34:41

Amber. I think they could be a three-figure lot

0:34:410:34:43

and she's paid next to nothing for them.

0:34:430:34:45

The rusty shelves, £20.

0:34:450:34:48

I would walk straight past them a million times.

0:34:480:34:51

£200, all in.

0:34:510:34:53

Oh, dear.

0:34:530:34:55

After setting off from Coleshill,

0:34:550:34:57

our experts are now headed for auction in the city of Salisbury.

0:34:570:35:01

Do you know what I think my cheapest buy was?

0:35:010:35:03

-Oh, that shelf...

-I bought a rusting tin thing.

0:35:030:35:06

Why did you buy that?

0:35:060:35:08

I think that's bang-on trend. You are looking at me now.

0:35:080:35:11

-Bang-on trend?!

-I am bang-on trend.

0:35:110:35:13

I am up there with the kids. You've got no vision, Catherine.

0:35:130:35:17

No vision at all. It worries me about you sometimes.

0:35:170:35:19

Welcome to the Netherhampton Salerooms.

0:35:190:35:22

It's looking busy.

0:35:220:35:24

What does auctioneer Ian Souter make of our lot?

0:35:240:35:26

My favourite is definitely the butter churn.

0:35:260:35:28

Love it, always loved them.

0:35:280:35:30

If I had a house big enough to put one in, I'd have one.

0:35:300:35:32

Don't know what I'd do with it.

0:35:320:35:33

The mini dominoes - very cute, very good size.

0:35:330:35:37

I think one or two people spotted them earlier,

0:35:370:35:39

so hopefully they'll do well.

0:35:390:35:41

They say like attracts like,

0:35:410:35:42

so the little pretty things are Catherine's

0:35:420:35:44

and the larger more ugly things are Phil's.

0:35:440:35:46

-Probably enough said.

-I think so, Ian.

0:35:460:35:48

We've got a full house, so quiet, please.

0:35:480:35:51

Are you excited? Our very first auction, isn't it?

0:35:510:35:53

I know, but look how many people are here.

0:35:530:35:55

-It's rammed, isn't it?

-Absolutely heaving.

0:35:550:35:58

First up is Philip's fishing book.

0:35:580:36:01

-Why did you buy that?

-It's part of my childhood.

0:36:010:36:03

Is it? Oh, so it's really old.

0:36:030:36:05

Right, who's got 50 or 60?

0:36:060:36:07

30 or 40 or 20? Who wants it?

0:36:070:36:10

Fiver, thank you. £5.

0:36:100:36:11

£6. £8. £10. £12.

0:36:110:36:13

-They all want it!

-15. 18.

0:36:130:36:15

They all remember it from their childhood.

0:36:150:36:17

Happy days, isn't it? Happy days.

0:36:170:36:19

-They went fishing with me.

-At £20.

0:36:190:36:22

-They all took the bait, didn't they?

-They did.

0:36:220:36:24

A bittersweet result, as Philip says goodbye to Mr Crabtree for a profit.

0:36:240:36:28

And, actually, do you know what, that wasn't bang-on trend, was it?

0:36:280:36:32

Next up, Catherine's amber beads.

0:36:330:36:37

OK, so we've got 30, 40.

0:36:370:36:38

Who got 20? £10?

0:36:380:36:40

Some lovely beads. A tenner. £10?

0:36:400:36:42

Someone say something. Fiver. Five I have. £5.

0:36:420:36:45

£6. £8.

0:36:450:36:46

£10. £12.

0:36:460:36:47

-£15.

-A long way to go.

0:36:470:36:49

15 on my left, 15 I have.

0:36:490:36:51

No. These need to be about 60.

0:36:510:36:52

18, £20. 22. 25.

0:36:520:36:57

25. Over here at 25.

0:36:570:36:59

-No, more.

-Don't go shy. 25.

0:36:590:37:01

-Amber. Real amber.

-£25.

0:37:010:37:04

Bad luck, first loss of the day.

0:37:040:37:06

But there's plenty of time to make it up.

0:37:060:37:09

-I don't know that much about amber, do I?

-No.

0:37:090:37:11

Next up, Philip's stoneware barrel.

0:37:110:37:14

-Here to be sold, 30 or 40.

-He's picking it up.

0:37:140:37:17

-What a man.

-Nobody want it?

0:37:170:37:19

Five bid. £5. £6.

0:37:190:37:21

£8. £10. £12.

0:37:210:37:23

15, 18, £20.

0:37:230:37:26

-Don't mind been nice to you.

-£20, £20.

0:37:260:37:29

Anybody else? 20. Being sold this, then, at £20.

0:37:290:37:33

Phil's going to be drowning his sorrows.

0:37:330:37:35

That's a loss after auction fees are deducted.

0:37:350:37:38

You said you knew this auction.

0:37:380:37:39

Yeah, I didn't say I was any good at it, though, did I?

0:37:390:37:42

It's Catherine's miniature dominoes set next.

0:37:420:37:45

50 or 60? 40 or 30?

0:37:450:37:48

Who wants them? 20. I've got 20.

0:37:480:37:50

Thank you, you like them. £20. £20 I have. £20, £20, £20.

0:37:500:37:54

He looks like a man who plays dominant dominoes, doesn't he?

0:37:540:37:57

22, 22, 22...

0:37:570:38:01

-Anybody else?

-Come on!

-At £22.

0:38:010:38:04

Another loss. Bad luck, Catherine.

0:38:040:38:07

-They were lovely. They were lovely.

-It's not my night tonight.

0:38:070:38:11

And your compacts are up next.

0:38:110:38:13

Ten I have, 12, 15, 18, 20, 22, 25...

0:38:130:38:18

-Come on.

-With me, 28.

0:38:180:38:20

£30. £30 in the hat.

0:38:200:38:22

-Don't stop at 30. Come on.

-32.

0:38:220:38:24

What a shame. At 32.

0:38:240:38:26

32 I have. 35. That's the spirit. 35.

0:38:260:38:29

38. 38.

0:38:290:38:32

Last chance to stop. 38. 38. Being sold this time, then, at £38.

0:38:320:38:37

Ooh!

0:38:370:38:38

So near yet so far!

0:38:380:38:42

A run of bad luck, Catherine. They were nice, too.

0:38:420:38:45

What's next, though? Oh! Bang-on trend.

0:38:450:38:48

-Oh, is it your rust?

-What do you mean, rust?

0:38:480:38:51

Philip's little cabinet is next.

0:38:510:38:54

Various interest. Going to start the bidding at £10.

0:38:540:38:56

£10 I have. £10, £10, £10 with me.

0:38:560:38:58

£10. £12. 15. 18. £20 with me.

0:38:580:39:01

He's got a commission on that.

0:39:010:39:04

22. 25. 25 with me.

0:39:040:39:05

At 25. 28. 30.

0:39:050:39:07

-What?!

-32. 35. 38. £40.

-Bang-on trend, you see.

0:39:070:39:11

-How did you do that?

-At £42.

0:39:110:39:15

Look at that, get in. Dip your bread.

0:39:150:39:18

Blimey, he's just doubled his money.

0:39:180:39:20

Next, can Catherine's miniature magnifier be as successful?

0:39:200:39:24

-50 or 40.

-Come on.

0:39:240:39:26

Who's got 30?

0:39:260:39:27

Who's got 20? Tenner if we have to.

0:39:270:39:29

-Can I put my hand up?

-No.

-Can I bid?

0:39:290:39:31

-Come on, it's nine-carat gold.

-Can I big?

0:39:310:39:34

22. 25. 28. £30.

0:39:340:39:38

-£30 I have.

-It's cheap!

-I know it's cheap.

0:39:380:39:40

-Come on.

-32, 35, 38.

0:39:400:39:43

£40. At £40.

0:39:430:39:45

42. 45.

0:39:450:39:47

-Yes!

-48. £50.

0:39:470:39:50

55. 60. 60 in the back, £60.

0:39:500:39:52

Keep going, it's nine-carat.

0:39:520:39:55

Anyone else? Being sold this time at £60.

0:39:550:39:58

-Yours, sir. Thank you.

-Yes!

0:39:580:40:00

-I love you!

-Hey, steady!

0:40:000:40:03

Hoo-hoo-hoo! Well done, Catherine. A nice profit.

0:40:030:40:07

Philip's butter churn is next to go under the gavel.

0:40:070:40:09

What would people do with that now, though?

0:40:090:40:12

Shove it in the garden. Shove it in the big farmhouse kitchen.

0:40:120:40:16

Churn butter with it. I don't know.

0:40:160:40:18

OK, I've got various interest. I'm going to go straight in at £50.

0:40:180:40:21

-He's got interest.

-60.

0:40:210:40:23

65. 70. 75. 80.

0:40:230:40:26

Oh, Phil. You've walked it.

0:40:260:40:29

85. 90. 95. 100.

0:40:290:40:33

-Philip!

-100 with me. 100.

0:40:330:40:35

105. 110.

0:40:350:40:37

Bid last if you want it, sir. 110. 115.

0:40:370:40:40

120.

0:40:400:40:41

-That's amazing.

-I'm quite pleased with that, I must admit.

0:40:410:40:44

125. 130. 135.

0:40:440:40:47

He's still bidding, that man by the door.

0:40:470:40:51

At 135, last chance.

0:40:510:40:52

He had a big commission bid on that.

0:40:520:40:55

At £135.

0:40:550:40:57

£135.

0:40:570:40:59

That's all right, isn't it?

0:40:590:41:01

Philip's on a roll.

0:41:010:41:03

Can Catherine serve up a profit with her last lot?

0:41:030:41:06

£50, somebody. 50 or 40.

0:41:060:41:08

-30, 20.

-Come on.

0:41:080:41:10

-25.

-Who wants it? We've got ten. Thank you, ten I have.

0:41:100:41:12

£10, £10, £10. £12.

0:41:120:41:13

15. 18. 18 final time. £18. £18 I have. 18.

0:41:130:41:18

-18. Who else wants it? 18?

-No!

-Don't let it miss you at 18.

0:41:180:41:21

Last chance. Being sold at £20, thank you.

0:41:210:41:24

At £20. £20.

0:41:240:41:26

On my right, 20. Being sold this time, then, at £20.

0:41:260:41:29

£20?!

0:41:290:41:30

-Not a lot of money.

-How did that happen?

0:41:300:41:33

Is that game, set and match to Philip, then?

0:41:330:41:36

Or will his dogs let him down?

0:41:360:41:39

Two vintage life-size stone greyhounds.

0:41:390:41:42

Could Rocket hold them up, please? Hold them up, Rocket!

0:41:420:41:45

He'll be sold whether Rocket holds them up or not.

0:41:450:41:47

Right, who's got £100? 70 or 80?

0:41:470:41:49

50 or 40. £30. 35, 40. 45, 50.

0:41:490:41:54

55, 60. 65. 65 on my left.

0:41:540:41:58

-70. 75.

-You'll be fine.

-80.

0:41:580:42:01

85. 90. 95. 100.

0:42:010:42:06

100 at the back. At £100. I have 100.

0:42:060:42:08

-That's amazing.

-Last chance, 100.

0:42:080:42:09

Anybody else want to join in?

0:42:090:42:11

Being sold this time, then, at £100.

0:42:110:42:13

After commission, it's breaking even.

0:42:130:42:15

Should have held them higher, Rocket.

0:42:150:42:17

LAUGHTER

0:42:170:42:19

Well, that last lot made a profit, but where does that leave us?

0:42:190:42:22

Right, so we need to do some sums, don't we?

0:42:220:42:24

You've got loads of cash. That's all I know.

0:42:240:42:27

Come on, then.

0:42:270:42:28

Catherine started with £200.

0:42:290:42:31

After paying auction costs,

0:42:310:42:33

she made a loss of £27.70,

0:42:330:42:37

leaving her £172.30 to carry forward.

0:42:370:42:40

Phil started with £200.

0:42:400:42:42

After paying all fees, he made a profit of £59.94.

0:42:420:42:48

Well done! Leaving him £259.94 to spend next time.

0:42:480:42:53

You are a bit of a star, Phil,

0:42:530:42:55

and I have to take my hat off to you.

0:42:550:42:57

Where's the next auction? Salisbury?

0:42:570:42:59

No, we're in Salisbury.

0:42:590:43:01

Cheerio, chaps.

0:43:010:43:03

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:030:43:06

-Are we in Hampshire?

-Yeah.

-..Philip plays rough...

0:43:060:43:10

Look at that.

0:43:100:43:11

-Instant discount with that.

-..and Catherine's in heaven.

0:43:110:43:15

I am the queen of rust.

0:43:150:43:17

Philip Serrell and Catherine Southon set off from the midlands in a 1970 Citroen DS20 on a brand new road trip. They hunt for antiques in Birmingham and Stratford-upon-Avon before heading to an auction in Salisbury.

Phil spends a lot of his cash on a 19th-century butter churn, whereas Catherine finds two attractive 1940s compacts.

When they are not shopping, Phil discovers the roots of lawn tennis, and Catherine uncovers the story of how a third of the world's needles once came from Redditch.