Episode 10 Antiques Road Trip


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Episode 10

It is the last leg of the road trip for James Braxton and Charles Hanson. Starting in Scotland, they head south over the border to take their final auction in Berwick-upon-Tweed.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 10. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

It's the nation's favourite antiques experts. HE STRIKES GONG

0:00:020:00:04

-That's cracking.

-With £200 each...

-Wonderful.

0:00:040:00:07

..a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

0:00:070:00:11

-That's exactly what I'm talking about.

-I'm all over a-shiver.

0:00:110:00:14

The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

0:00:140:00:17

-No-brainer.

-Going, going, gone.

0:00:170:00:20

There'll be worthy winners, and valiant losers.

0:00:200:00:23

-So, will it be the high road to glory?

-Push.

0:00:230:00:26

-Or the slow road to disaster?

-How awfully, awfully nice.

0:00:260:00:29

This is Antiques Road Trip.

0:00:290:00:31

Yeah!

0:00:340:00:35

MUSIC: The Final Countdown by Europe

0:00:350:00:38

Hold on to your hats,

0:00:400:00:41

it's the last leg of this rip-roaring road trip

0:00:410:00:45

for a couple of swirls,

0:00:450:00:46

Charles Hanson and James Braxton.

0:00:460:00:48

James, it's been an amazing trip, but the end is nigh,

0:00:500:00:53

the curtain is about to be drawn for the last time on you and I,

0:00:530:00:57

and I think we've got to go with a bang. The crowd want an encore.

0:00:570:01:01

It's like a boxing match.

0:01:010:01:03

After a while, all the crowd want to see is a bit of blood, don't they?

0:01:030:01:07

Somebody on the canvas.

0:01:070:01:09

BELL RINGS

0:01:090:01:10

MUSIC: Theme from Rocky

0:01:100:01:12

James is an auctioneer who's always on the ball.

0:01:120:01:16

HE PLAYS WHISTLE

0:01:160:01:18

And his sparring partner, Charles,

0:01:180:01:20

is a demon when it comes to doing a deal.

0:01:200:01:22

I've got a bit of money in my sporran.

0:01:220:01:24

Oh, yeah? He's not wrong. Charles is loaded and way out in the lead.

0:01:240:01:29

This dapper chap has turned his original £200 stake

0:01:300:01:34

into a whopping £505.04.

0:01:340:01:37

James also started this trip with 200, and some profitable

0:01:400:01:43

purchases means he's now driving around with £337.02 in his pocket.

0:01:430:01:49

Do you know how much there is difference between you and I?

0:01:490:01:52

-No, how much?

-168.

-Is that all?

-Yeah.

-That's not a lot, is it?

0:01:520:01:56

-Is that all?!

-It's not a lot.

-It's enough.

0:01:560:01:59

After having some catastrophic car trouble on the last leg

0:01:590:02:03

with their blue DKW 1000 coupe,

0:02:030:02:06

our boys and now roaring around in a ravishing red one.

0:02:060:02:10

Ha! Made before seat belts were mandatory,

0:02:100:02:12

it means our experts aren't wearing any. Got it?

0:02:120:02:16

-So, we're on the east coast.

-We are, we are.

0:02:160:02:18

Literally, James, if you were to go that way,

0:02:180:02:21

I think you'd hit Bergen,

0:02:210:02:23

because Bergen is in what country?

0:02:230:02:26

-Germany.

-No, Norway. Bergen's in Norway.

0:02:260:02:29

After beginning their epic adventure in the Highlands,

0:02:310:02:34

Charles and James have been journeying all over bonnie Scotland,

0:02:340:02:37

taking in the north-east and the central belt.

0:02:370:02:40

Today, they'll finish up over the border in Berwick-upon-Tweed.

0:02:400:02:44

This leg will kick off in Dunbar before ending in Berwick-upon-Tweed.

0:02:460:02:50

Watch the lorry, give me a honk. Give me a honk.

0:02:520:02:54

-LORRY HONKS ITS HORN

-Yes!

0:02:540:02:56

-JAMES HONKS CAR HORN

-No! Quick, James.

0:02:560:02:59

The nation's behind us, James, in Scotland.

0:03:000:03:03

-They know we're driving forwards...

-They know.

0:03:030:03:05

..on this great journey.

0:03:050:03:06

Our excitable experts are primed and raring to go.

0:03:070:03:11

James will be dropping Charles off at his first shop of the day.

0:03:110:03:16

-Buttercup, baby, I'm here.

-Well done, Charles, there you are.

0:03:160:03:20

-Let me go.

-Have good luck.

-Thanks, James. Take care. Be lucky.

0:03:200:03:25

-Be lucky.

-In love.

0:03:250:03:26

-Charles will be kicking things off in the Buttercup Studio.

-Oh, yes.

0:03:280:03:32

-Oh, hello.

-Good morning. How are you?

-Lovely.

-Your name is?

-Linda.

0:03:320:03:37

Linda has a wide variety of antiques on offer,

0:03:380:03:40

and Charles gets stuck in straight away.

0:03:400:03:43

-Can I open the cabinet?

-Yes.

-So I'm going to be very, very careful.

0:03:430:03:47

CABINET CLATTERS

0:03:470:03:48

There we go, the handle's just come off the cabinet.

0:03:500:03:52

-Has it?

-It's OK. It's back on now, it's OK.

0:03:520:03:55

Just a bit loose.

0:03:550:03:56

SHE LAUGHS

0:03:560:03:57

Like me today - a bit loose.

0:03:570:03:59

You said it.

0:03:590:04:01

So, you'd literally...

0:04:010:04:02

-If it had a reed in, you'd play it here.

-Yes, you would do.

0:04:020:04:06

-You would whistle...

-Like that.

0:04:060:04:07

SHE LAUGHS

0:04:070:04:09

-Yes.

-HE WOLF-WHISTLES

0:04:090:04:10

Sorry, Linda.

0:04:100:04:11

SHE LAUGHS

0:04:110:04:13

-The finger's out.

-Finger's out.

0:04:150:04:16

When the finger comes out, it means I'm meaning business now.

0:04:160:04:20

That's pretty.

0:04:240:04:26

-CLATTERING

-Oops, sorry, Linda.

0:04:260:04:27

-Don't worry.

-I'm sorry about that.

0:04:270:04:30

Sorry, Linda. Sorry about this. Sorry, Linda.

0:04:300:04:34

I'm getting carried away. I'm getting carried away, Linda, sorry.

0:04:340:04:38

Steady, Charles!

0:04:380:04:40

So, on this nice rack here, Linda, I do quite like this little dog.

0:04:400:04:45

# How much is that doggie on the rack? #

0:04:450:04:48

He's got no wagging tail.

0:04:480:04:50

But where did he come from, a local find?

0:04:500:04:53

He's been on my mantelpiece for quite a number of years.

0:04:530:04:57

-How old is he, do you think?

-No idea. He's just very attractive.

0:04:570:05:01

I think he's missing his paw there, isn't he?

0:05:010:05:03

He's got a bit of damage to him.

0:05:030:05:05

He is Staffordshire porcelain, rather than being ceramic...

0:05:050:05:08

Well, rather than being a pottery, an earthenware or stoneware,

0:05:080:05:11

he is porcelain, so he's highly fired and made of that china clay.

0:05:110:05:16

I'm presuming there's no price ticket.

0:05:160:05:20

He's just a little doggie in the window, here to go.

0:05:200:05:24

-Yes.

-Yeah.

-Um...

0:05:240:05:27

It was £10, but you can have it for five.

0:05:270:05:30

He's quite cute, isn't he?

0:05:320:05:35

He is cute. Go on, Linda, I'll take him for £5.

0:05:350:05:37

-Thanks a lot.

-Thank you.

0:05:370:05:38

Our Charles buys the King Charles to kick-start this leg's shopping.

0:05:380:05:43

Anything else?

0:05:430:05:45

That's quite nice.

0:05:450:05:47

I'm not sure how old it is, Linda.

0:05:470:05:49

No idea, but it's wood, the bit there.

0:05:490:05:51

-And you can see quite well out of it...

-Oh, Charles!

0:05:510:05:55

It's OK, it comes apart anyway.

0:05:550:05:57

Yeah, it does, it's on a thread.

0:05:570:06:00

-Could that be quite reasonable?

-Very best, 25.

0:06:000:06:03

-It's a man toy.

-SHE CHUCKLES

0:06:050:06:07

It's got a few indentations, you'll see it's been dropped,

0:06:070:06:10

on the cover here you'll see it's got a slight fracture

0:06:100:06:14

in the glass there.

0:06:140:06:15

And also, on that thread,

0:06:150:06:17

you've got a few knocks of where it's been dropped.

0:06:170:06:19

But I would say it's got some age to it.

0:06:190:06:22

It's quite a nice, quality object.

0:06:220:06:24

You're saying 25. I would think the auctioneer might put

0:06:240:06:26

a guide price of that figure on as a high estimate.

0:06:260:06:31

-Would you take for it £20?

-Yes, I'll take 20.

0:06:310:06:33

-Are you sure? 20?

-20, yes.

-Are you sure?

0:06:330:06:35

-Yes, positive.

-Sold. Thank you very much. I'll take it, Linda.

0:06:350:06:38

Thank you. Thank you very much. And I can now see you. There we are.

0:06:380:06:41

I've got you.

0:06:410:06:43

And you've got yourself two lots in your first shop.

0:06:430:06:46

Good stuff.

0:06:460:06:47

See you, bye, bye.

0:06:470:06:50

James, meanwhile, has made his way to Haddington.

0:06:530:06:57

He's come to Lennoxlove House

0:06:570:06:59

to hear about one of the most intriguing incidents

0:06:590:07:02

of World War II.

0:07:020:07:03

He's meeting Lord James Selkirk of Douglas to find out more.

0:07:050:07:10

-Good morning.

-Glad to meet you.

0:07:100:07:12

-Looking forward very much to having a chat.

-Thank you.

0:07:120:07:16

In 1941, the War was going badly for Britain.

0:07:160:07:19

Eight months of Luftwaffe bombing had seen over a million

0:07:210:07:24

London homes destroyed and 40,000 people killed.

0:07:240:07:29

On 10th May, a lone Messerschmitt flew deep into enemy territory,

0:07:290:07:34

evading all of Britain's air defences.

0:07:340:07:37

Remarkably, the pilot was Rudolf Hess,

0:07:370:07:39

chairman of the Nazi Party and Hitler's dedicated deputy.

0:07:390:07:44

He was heading for a location less than 20 miles south of Glasgow.

0:07:440:07:48

This is the map and the red arrow points to Dungavel House.

0:07:480:07:53

-Oh, I see.

-But, of course, he couldn't find it in the dark and

0:07:530:07:57

he parachutes over Eaglesham to the north, only a few miles away.

0:07:570:08:02

Hess was quickly captured and taken into military custody.

0:08:020:08:07

He repeatedly insisted he'd only speak to one man,

0:08:070:08:10

Lord Selkirk's father, the Duke of Hamilton,

0:08:100:08:13

a pioneering aviator and the first man to fly over Mount Everest.

0:08:130:08:18

And Hess gives a false name,

0:08:180:08:20

says that he is Hauptmann Alfred Horn,

0:08:200:08:23

-who was in fact his brother, brother-in-law, called Alfred Horn.

-Yeah.

0:08:230:08:28

And my father made arrangements to go through and see him

0:08:280:08:33

with the interrogating officer the next morning.

0:08:330:08:36

When they met, Hess confessed who he really was to the Duke

0:08:360:08:39

and made him an offer.

0:08:390:08:41

Britain could keep its empire

0:08:410:08:42

if Germany had a free hand in Europe and the East.

0:08:420:08:46

The Duke didn't waste any time in heading south

0:08:460:08:50

to inform Winston Churchill of what he'd heard from Hess.

0:08:500:08:53

When he got to Ditchley Park,

0:08:540:08:56

Churchill was in good spirits because 33 German bombers

0:08:560:08:59

had been shot down, and he asked him for his news,

0:08:590:09:03

and my father told him when everyone had left the room,

0:09:030:09:07

apart from the Secretary of State for Air, that this man

0:09:070:09:10

who had given a false name to everybody else

0:09:100:09:13

claimed to him that he was Hitler's deputy.

0:09:130:09:16

And Churchill refused to believe that that was at all likely

0:09:160:09:21

or even possible.

0:09:210:09:22

And then he said to my father, "Well, Hess or no Hess,

0:09:220:09:26

"I'm going to see the Marx Brothers,"

0:09:260:09:29

and they went out to see the film next door.

0:09:290:09:31

JAMES LAUGHS

0:09:310:09:33

Hess was imprisoned in Britain,

0:09:330:09:35

including a short spell in the Tower of London,

0:09:350:09:38

until October 1945 when he was sent to stand trial at Nuremberg.

0:09:380:09:42

Sentenced to life imprisonment as a war criminal, Hess remained

0:09:420:09:47

incarcerated in Berlin's Spandau prison until his death in 1987.

0:09:470:09:53

To this day, many rumours still revolve around Hess's

0:09:530:09:56

fateful flight to Scotland. Had Hitler actually approved it?

0:09:560:10:01

Was Hess a would-be assassin?

0:10:010:10:03

Or was it simply the doomed mission of an unstable man?

0:10:030:10:07

We will never know.

0:10:070:10:09

Reunited, our boys, though,

0:10:110:10:14

have motored the DKW to Old Craighall near Musselburgh.

0:10:140:10:18

They've arrived at a shop called Early Technology.

0:10:210:10:24

-Quite surreal, isn't it?

-It is quite surreal.

0:10:260:10:28

The owner of this rather unique antiques haven is Michael.

0:10:280:10:32

-Oh, look, here's the man.

-Hello, sir.

0:10:320:10:35

-Sorry we're a bit late, we got a bit lost. Charles.

-James.

0:10:350:10:39

-Good to meet you.

-What an amazing home you have here.

0:10:390:10:43

He does indeed.

0:10:430:10:45

Packed full of fun and peculiar pieces,

0:10:450:10:47

our chaps are going to love this place.

0:10:470:10:49

Oh, wow. It's quite something here. James, look at the Penny Farthing.

0:10:520:10:57

-I know, amazing.

-Isn't that wonderful?

-Yeah.

-Is it for sale?

0:10:570:11:00

-Everything's for sale.

-Music to an antique hunter's ears.

0:11:000:11:04

-So, James, what's our plan?

-I think we just go for things that...

0:11:040:11:08

I love the loo.

0:11:080:11:10

-I think, James... I think I might go this way.

-Yeah.

0:11:100:11:14

-And I might stay here.

-Yeah, I think so.

0:11:140:11:17

I might go and stand by this love tester, put in my penny.

0:11:170:11:20

-I'll light the love tester for you, you can try it out.

-Oh, wonderful!

0:11:200:11:23

I'm going to try the love tester.

0:11:230:11:25

-Maybe it will give me a good sense of wellbeing here.

-Standby.

0:11:250:11:28

-Dear, oh, dear.

-Push the money in here.

-Put your money in.

0:11:280:11:31

-Hold the grip.

-Hold the knob.

0:11:310:11:33

LOVE TESTER RINGS

0:11:330:11:34

-Oh, Lord.

-Oh, James, feel the love.

0:11:340:11:37

Hold on.

0:11:370:11:38

Oh! I think I'll be "wild".

0:11:390:11:42

"Clammy".

0:11:440:11:45

Ha-ha! "Clammy".

0:11:450:11:47

You know, I gripped...

0:11:490:11:50

-I gripped for the nation.

-Did you?

0:11:500:11:52

I gripped for my love affair with antiques.

0:11:520:11:55

That's what I get. "Clammy". Your turn.

0:11:550:11:58

It's a fix!

0:11:580:11:59

Good luck, James, hold tight.

0:11:590:12:01

I'm just going to go... I'm going to treat it like a lady.

0:12:010:12:04

-Just gen... Nice and gently.

-I think "hot stuff".

0:12:040:12:07

-Hot stuff! "Uncontrollable", I'm hoping for.

-Oh, yeah?

0:12:070:12:10

-Wild!

-Wild! He's wild!

0:12:120:12:14

Right, on that note, James, you get wild, I'll get clammy,

0:12:160:12:20

and I'll start handling some antiques.

0:12:200:12:23

Now, what are they going to get up to next?

0:12:230:12:26

I've been framed.

0:12:270:12:30

-Oh, I like that. The cock and hammer.

-18th century.

0:12:300:12:32

-What's a cock and hammer?

-It's a well-known game.

0:12:320:12:35

-It's still made today, oddly enough.

-Aren't they wonderful?

0:12:350:12:38

They're absolutely period.

0:12:380:12:39

And I suppose, Mike, if you were to offer these to James or I,

0:12:390:12:44

-what would be the best price?

-120 for those.

0:12:440:12:46

-They're not perfect.

-No.

0:12:460:12:48

Look at me. Do you want it?

0:12:480:12:49

No, I like the Teasmade. How much for the Teasmade?

0:12:490:12:52

The Teasmade you can have for £25.

0:12:520:12:56

-Thank you, Mike.

-No, no...

-It's your bargain.

0:12:560:12:59

-I'm going on that. Thank you, Mike.

-That's your bargain.

0:12:590:13:03

-Come on, Charles.

-Just like that.

0:13:030:13:05

-You've just got to keep your eyes open.

-Just like that.

0:13:050:13:07

-You get too easily distracted.

-£25!

0:13:070:13:10

It's not early technology.

0:13:100:13:12

-It's late technology, as far as I'm concerned.

-Mike!

0:13:120:13:14

-Have you bought it?

-Yeah, £25. Teasmade.

-Absolutely.

0:13:140:13:17

Look at that. I've never seen such a fine Teasmade.

0:13:170:13:20

-That is a work of art.

-£25.

0:13:200:13:23

You've got a light there, so that wakes you up in the morning.

0:13:230:13:26

You've got your clock. And then... What a... What a... What a...

0:13:260:13:30

-You like a cup of tea.

-So, you've just sold it to him?

-Yes.

0:13:300:13:33

-Absolutely. We shook on it.

-Thrilled to sell it.

0:13:330:13:35

Anyway, bye.

0:13:350:13:37

Anyway, that's me. I'm home early. Bye.

0:13:370:13:39

-Charles, you keep...

-It's time for tea for you, isn't it?

0:13:390:13:42

-Time for tea.

-Yeah.

-Time for tea.

0:13:420:13:44

I'd invite you along, if you'd purchase something.

0:13:440:13:47

James showing his wild side there,

0:13:480:13:51

doing one of the quickest deals we've ever seen.

0:13:510:13:54

Well done, that man.

0:13:540:13:56

I am so pleased with this.

0:13:570:13:59

I spotted this beyond Charles.

0:13:590:14:01

A fabulous Teasmade.

0:14:010:14:03

Teasmades have come roaring back,

0:14:030:14:05

and I love this rocking motion, this tolerance.

0:14:050:14:08

So when this is really boiling, the light's flashing,

0:14:080:14:12

it's making a lot of noise, it can resist.

0:14:120:14:14

It's not going to fall off the table, is it?

0:14:140:14:17

It's going to keep burning away.

0:14:170:14:18

It's a lovely item. £25. I think I'm ahead.

0:14:180:14:22

James is jolly excited about the lot he's bought.

0:14:230:14:26

Meanwhile, Charles is feeling a little overwhelmed

0:14:290:14:32

by the choice on offer.

0:14:320:14:33

There's so much lurking.

0:14:330:14:35

There's typewriters, there's a basket of fruit down there.

0:14:350:14:39

Down there, is that a concertina in that box?

0:14:410:14:44

Is it a concertina? Oh, it is a concertina.

0:14:440:14:47

-Do you play it?

-No.

0:14:490:14:50

It's all complete, except for the knobs that go through.

0:14:500:14:53

-But the knobs are not that difficult to get.

-Oh, what a shame.

0:14:530:14:56

-I've done everything else, but it's cheap for the price.

-How much?

0:14:560:14:59

-They're worth money.

-How much?

0:14:590:15:01

-65.

-I love the fact it's a Campbells of Glasgow concertina.

-Yeah.

0:15:010:15:07

And...

0:15:070:15:09

Mike, can you give me a little jig?

0:15:090:15:10

CONCERTINA TOOTS

0:15:100:15:12

It obviously has had some TLC over their years.

0:15:130:15:18

The case sells it, Mike, and it's a Glaswegian concertina,

0:15:180:15:21

which also gives me a bit of love.

0:15:210:15:23

-Would you do it for £40?

-No, I'll do it for 50.

-Right.

0:15:230:15:27

-We'll do it. Mike, let's do it.

-OK.

0:15:280:15:30

Thanks a lot, Mike. Thanks a lot. £50.

0:15:300:15:32

A really interesting concertina, full of Scottish charm,

0:15:320:15:35

and, hopefully, it might play at the saleroom if I get lucky.

0:15:350:15:40

£50 buys Charles the Victorian concertina.

0:15:400:15:44

-Thank you so much.

-Thank you, Michael.

-Good luck.

-Great day.

0:15:440:15:47

All the best.

0:15:470:15:48

Bye.

0:15:480:15:50

And that purchase brings today's buying to a close.

0:15:510:15:54

So, nighty-night.

0:15:540:15:56

It's a brand-new day,

0:16:040:16:06

and the boys are back on the road in Scotland.

0:16:060:16:09

It is very beautiful, isn't it? Look at this.

0:16:090:16:11

-And I can't believe now time is nigh.

-It is. Last day of buying.

0:16:110:16:16

Never have thought...

0:16:160:16:17

It's gone like a dream in terms of you and I, don't you think so?

0:16:170:16:20

It has.

0:16:200:16:21

So far, Charles has bought three lots.

0:16:210:16:24

The porcelain King Charles spaniel ornament.

0:16:240:16:27

The early 19th-century brass telescope.

0:16:270:16:30

And the Victorian rosewood concertina.

0:16:300:16:32

Leaving him £430.04 to spend.

0:16:320:16:36

I'll shake your hand and say thank you, sir.

0:16:360:16:39

Meanwhile, James has only bought one lot,

0:16:390:16:41

the 1950s tea-maker,

0:16:410:16:43

so he's still got £312.02 to play with today.

0:16:430:16:47

For their final fling around bonnie Scotland,

0:16:490:16:52

Charles is wearing a kilt, of course.

0:16:520:16:54

I've also got my hat, James, as well.

0:16:540:16:56

-Sorry. Look.

-See the hat.

0:16:560:16:59

Look, James.

0:16:590:17:01

It should be worn slightly off centre,

0:17:010:17:03

and all of your tartan should be all the way

0:17:030:17:06

straight as your stockings and...

0:17:060:17:09

There we go, look.

0:17:090:17:11

Oh! Ohh!

0:17:110:17:13

You look very fine.

0:17:130:17:14

I second that.

0:17:140:17:16

This morning, the boys have made their way to Melrose.

0:17:160:17:19

James is dropping Charles off at Abbotsford.

0:17:220:17:24

This was the home of the famous Scottish novelist and poet

0:17:240:17:28

Sir Walter Scott,

0:17:280:17:29

without whom tartan, as we know it today, would not exist.

0:17:290:17:34

Isn't this beautiful, James?

0:17:340:17:35

I just cannot believe how wonderful it looks.

0:17:350:17:37

And I want to deliver my tartan Dr Doolittle of antiques.

0:17:370:17:41

Watch my skirt... Sorry, my kilt.

0:17:410:17:43

There we go, James. I feel a very proud man.

0:17:430:17:46

-Goodbye.

-This facade. Take care, bye.

0:17:460:17:49

That boy's got moves.

0:17:530:17:56

Charles is here to meet collections manager Kirsty Archer-Thompson

0:17:560:18:00

to find out more

0:18:000:18:02

about the great Sir Walter Scott's connection with tartan.

0:18:020:18:05

-You must be Kirsty.

-Hello, Charles. Lovely to meet you.

0:18:050:18:08

-Charles Hanson, good to see.

-You look fantastic.

-Think so?

0:18:080:18:11

-Yeah.

-Kirsty, tell me, how far back can we trace tartan?

0:18:110:18:14

Tartan actually has a surprisingly long history.

0:18:140:18:17

We have references in Roman documents

0:18:170:18:20

to the Celtic peoples on the Continent and also here

0:18:200:18:23

wearing what we might recognise as tartan.

0:18:230:18:26

Certainly chequered patterns with natural dyes.

0:18:260:18:29

The vibrant and quite often gaudy tartans we know today

0:18:290:18:33

didn't come about until much later,

0:18:330:18:36

mainly thanks to one man's romantic vision of Scotland.

0:18:360:18:39

It's something that starts with his novels.

0:18:390:18:42

I mean, when he publishes Waverley in 1814

0:18:420:18:44

and then goes on to novels like Rob Roy,

0:18:440:18:46

the great Scottish historical novels,

0:18:460:18:48

he is giving tartan a platform again,

0:18:480:18:51

he's giving the Highlander a platform

0:18:510:18:53

after the terrible defeat at Culloden and the ban of tartan.

0:18:530:18:57

-Ban of tartan?

-Yes, absolutely.

-What happened?

0:18:570:18:59

Tartan was banned. The Act came into force in 1747,

0:18:590:19:03

and that was a response to the Battle of Culloden.

0:19:030:19:06

Open the door for you, madam. There we are.

0:19:060:19:08

The wearing of tartan was outlawed for 35 years

0:19:080:19:12

until the Act was repealed in 1782.

0:19:120:19:14

Tartan made a slow comeback,

0:19:160:19:18

but it's real resurgence came when plans were made

0:19:180:19:21

for the first British monarch to visit Scotland in over 170 years.

0:19:210:19:26

Much pomp and pageantry was planned,

0:19:280:19:30

and tartan was to play a central role.

0:19:300:19:33

The state visit of King George IV in 1822

0:19:330:19:36

was orchestrated by the most famous Scotsman of the day,

0:19:360:19:39

Sir Walter Scott.

0:19:390:19:41

Scotland in sort of 1820 is not a particularly happy place,

0:19:410:19:45

and, you know, unionists, conservatives like Scott,

0:19:450:19:49

were looking very closely at events and thinking,

0:19:490:19:53

"I hope there isn't an uprising like the French Revolution,"

0:19:530:19:56

and to a point that looked like it might be on the cards.

0:19:560:19:59

So, what Scott decides to do

0:19:590:20:01

is try and imagine the King's visit as a unifying force

0:20:010:20:05

to unite the country behind something

0:20:050:20:08

and to heal wounds in contemporary society.

0:20:080:20:12

So, come 1822, there was a big party to welcome King George IV,

0:20:120:20:17

and is that how tartan then became almost this mass of colour?

0:20:170:20:21

Effectively. I mean, it's three weeks of celebrations.

0:20:210:20:24

It's quite a spectacle,

0:20:240:20:25

and a bit of a masterstroke by Scott to include tartan.

0:20:250:20:28

In the run-up to the King's visit,

0:20:280:20:30

Scott is deliberately telling people that they need to go out

0:20:300:20:33

and dress appropriately.

0:20:330:20:35

This is a sanitising of tartan.

0:20:350:20:37

-He's effectively putting it through the wash.

-Yes.

0:20:370:20:40

You know, washing out the bloodstains,

0:20:400:20:42

the links with rebellion, and making them safe again.

0:20:420:20:46

-Tell me, did King George IV wear tartan?

-He did.

-He didn't?!

0:20:460:20:49

At the Highland Ball,

0:20:490:20:51

which was probably the most memorable event of the King's visit.

0:20:510:20:56

And his outfit cost, in modern terms, £100,000.

0:20:560:20:59

-It didn't?!

-He did.

0:20:590:21:00

He was known for wearing his kilt slightly too short,

0:21:000:21:03

but he also had flesh-coloured tights

0:21:030:21:06

which do appear in lots of caricatures of the period.

0:21:060:21:08

People were not impressed.

0:21:080:21:10

-It was almost a masterstroke by Scott.

-It absolutely was.

0:21:100:21:13

Everyone was talking about it, whether they liked it or loathed it.

0:21:130:21:16

So what we do know for sure

0:21:160:21:18

is that Sir Walter Scott helped to put tartan back on the map,

0:21:180:21:21

and it's been here to stay ever since.

0:21:210:21:23

James, meanwhile, has made his way

0:21:280:21:30

to Jedburgh in the Scottish Borders.

0:21:300:21:32

Having lost every leg so far, James has decided to do his research

0:21:360:21:40

and make a quick call to the auction house

0:21:400:21:42

to find out what sells well.

0:21:420:21:44

He said, internet-strong up there, so buy small,

0:21:460:21:49

something that can be posted, packaged and posted, quite easily.

0:21:490:21:54

Small's the name of the game,

0:21:570:21:59

so let's hope dealer Kate has lots of tiny treasures on offer.

0:21:590:22:03

I'm looking for small, interesting bits.

0:22:030:22:06

What is this little fellow here?

0:22:060:22:09

-Do you want me to get it out for you?

-That would be lovely.

0:22:090:22:12

The auctioneer said look for small things. It's a small thing.

0:22:140:22:17

He's in sort of period costume.

0:22:170:22:20

He's walking with a walking stick.

0:22:200:22:22

Which is a bit of a shame,

0:22:230:22:25

because you'd really want him to be with a sword, wouldn't you?

0:22:250:22:28

He looks a bit old man-y, but he looks very young.

0:22:280:22:32

He's in a sort of Shakespearean outfit.

0:22:320:22:34

These sort of doubloons.

0:22:340:22:36

It's like a character, almost like a theatrical character.

0:22:360:22:40

I'm just going to put that over there. Let's just leave that.

0:22:400:22:44

I'm going to keep hunting.

0:22:440:22:45

With a ticket price of 45, the figure's set aside,

0:22:450:22:50

and something else shiny has caught James' eye.

0:22:500:22:52

I'm drawn to that immediately,

0:22:540:22:56

because you pick it up, and the quality of it...

0:22:560:22:59

It's very heavy.

0:23:000:23:01

What I was drawn to about this, this is very nice engraving.

0:23:010:23:06

It's got a sort of pencil line round the letters, by a maker,

0:23:060:23:09

and it's got Chester marks.

0:23:090:23:11

Chester's nice. But it's a bit bashed.

0:23:110:23:14

It sports a £35 ticket,

0:23:140:23:17

and maker's mark for Sampson Mordan. Very collectable silverware.

0:23:170:23:22

Anything else?

0:23:220:23:23

-Oh, that's a punch ladle, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-With the whale.

0:23:230:23:25

-Can I look at that?

-I can't remember how old is that one is.

0:23:250:23:28

-It's got quite a nice coin in it, hasn't it?

-Yeah.

0:23:280:23:31

-We've got a special window.

-There you go.

0:23:310:23:34

-It's got a gilded...

-Mm-hm.

-..arms there, so it's silver.

0:23:340:23:39

It's done quite a lot of work, hasn't it?

0:23:400:23:43

That's quite nice, isn't it? And this is whalebone.

0:23:430:23:47

The trade in certain types of whale species is banned,

0:23:470:23:50

but as this ladle predates the 1947 CITES agreement,

0:23:500:23:54

it's legal to sell.

0:23:540:23:56

It's got age, so it's 1700s.

0:23:560:23:58

A punch label normally associated with George III, Regency period.

0:23:580:24:05

Men gathering round the punchbowl. It's rather nice, that. I like that.

0:24:050:24:10

With a £35 price tag, the ladle's added to the silver haul.

0:24:100:24:14

And it seems James hasn't satisfied his silver thirst just yet.

0:24:140:24:20

And then we've got this incredible bag here.

0:24:200:24:23

It feels...

0:24:230:24:25

It feels slightly dirty. Light silver. Let's have a look at it.

0:24:250:24:29

And then we've got two blue stones here on the top.

0:24:290:24:33

Couple of chips in them.

0:24:330:24:35

We've got a mark here. Alpaca.

0:24:350:24:37

Now, when you think of alpacas,

0:24:370:24:39

you think of South America, don't you?

0:24:390:24:41

And South America, of course,

0:24:410:24:43

was very famous for, you know, Mexico silver.

0:24:430:24:47

It feels like...

0:24:470:24:48

HE SNIFFS

0:24:480:24:50

Feels like silver. It's dirty. It's quite nice, this.

0:24:500:24:53

You know, is it silver, is it not? You know, it's worth a punt.

0:24:530:24:57

Whew!

0:24:590:25:00

Four items. All silver, all interesting.

0:25:000:25:04

That's got age, that's got style,

0:25:040:25:07

that's a story, and that is a period of time, isn't it?

0:25:070:25:10

The roaring 1920s. Great fun.

0:25:100:25:13

With a combined ticket price of £160,

0:25:130:25:17

is there a deal to be done with Kate?

0:25:170:25:20

I'd like to do the whole lot at 100 quid.

0:25:200:25:22

-120?

-I'll tell you what, Kate.

0:25:220:25:24

I'll do 110.

0:25:240:25:26

-And then we both save our faces.

-Yeah.

0:25:260:25:28

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you.

0:25:280:25:30

That's really kind. Thank you.

0:25:300:25:33

A brilliant bit of buying

0:25:330:25:34

sees James leave with a little silver fellow with a stick,

0:25:340:25:39

the 1920s silver flapper's bag,

0:25:390:25:41

the engraved silver vesta case,

0:25:410:25:44

and the George III silver punch ladle.

0:25:440:25:47

A load of silver, eh?

0:25:470:25:48

Charles, meanwhile, has made his way over the border into England,

0:25:510:25:54

where he's come to Ford in Northumberland.

0:25:540:25:57

It's home to the Old Dairy,

0:26:000:26:02

and Charles' final chance to shop before auction,

0:26:020:26:04

with the £430 he's still got in his old sporran.

0:26:040:26:09

-Hello there.

-Hello, Charles.

-How are you?

-Very well.

0:26:090:26:12

-Your name is?

-Keith. Keith Allan.

-Good to see you.

0:26:120:26:14

I love the emporium. Is it like an old stable yard or a cow shed?

0:26:140:26:18

-Well, this is a modern cow shed, actually

-Wow!

0:26:180:26:22

Without the cows.

0:26:220:26:24

Instead, it's packed with more than a dozen dealer's delights.

0:26:240:26:28

I'm going to bend down now, so please keep your head down, OK?

0:26:290:26:32

Right, there we are, Keith. Sorry about that.

0:26:320:26:35

This kilt does cause me a bit of...

0:26:350:26:37

-Well, you're not used to wearing it.

-..a sensation now and again.

0:26:370:26:40

-Little tap dance, Keith.

-You've got the perfect shoes.

-I have, yeah.

0:26:420:26:45

Oh, and a humdinger.

0:26:470:26:49

To go out with the biggest bang on the road trip ever.

0:26:490:26:52

-I've got a bit of money in my sporran.

-Yeah.

0:26:520:26:54

-I'll try and do my shoelace up.

-Yeah.

0:26:560:26:58

And it's a difficult one, because being a true Scot,

0:26:580:27:02

you do it the right way.

0:27:020:27:03

Steady!

0:27:030:27:05

Sorry, madam. Sorry.

0:27:070:27:09

-I like your jacket, by the way.

-Oh, do you?

-Is it for sale?

0:27:150:27:18

After a good old root round,

0:27:190:27:21

it looks like Charles has found something.

0:27:210:27:24

-I quite like, Keith, the enamel sign over here.

-Yes.

0:27:260:27:31

I'm actually a man who has a business in Derbyshire,

0:27:310:27:35

and we're very near the Nestle factory.

0:27:350:27:37

-Oh, really?

-And I quite like this old tin sign here.

0:27:370:27:44

It's quite early, isn't it?

0:27:440:27:46

-What would it be? Early '50s?

-I suppose it's '50s.

0:27:460:27:50

-There's also a cocoa sign on the wall over there.

-Yeah.

0:27:500:27:52

I'm not much of a handyman,

0:27:520:27:54

and I can see they're both fairly well hammered into the brickwork.

0:27:540:27:58

-Could they be for sale?

-They could be.

0:27:580:28:01

And that one's, what, 1950s?

0:28:010:28:02

I think that could be '40s, even '30s, yeah. Yeah.

0:28:020:28:06

-And it's in not bad nick, considering.

-Yes.

0:28:060:28:09

-Remember, these things were usually outside, you know, on a wall.

-Yes.

0:28:090:28:12

-And kids used to fire airguns at them.

-Little pellets.

0:28:120:28:15

If I said to you

0:28:150:28:16

what would a fairly bashed and beaten Nestle milk sign cost me

0:28:160:28:21

and the Van Houten's Cocoa sign over there...?

0:28:210:28:25

If I bought the two together, Keith,

0:28:250:28:27

what would be your best price on the two?

0:28:270:28:30

-Well...

-To a humble man.

-Let's start...

-From England.

0:28:300:28:33

..and tell you that that would be about £60.

0:28:330:28:37

That, I'd be looking twice as much. £120.

0:28:370:28:40

-But...

-Keith!

-But, but, but, if you take the two...

0:28:400:28:43

-Keith, look at me!

-..and bearing in mind

0:28:430:28:46

I know you're looking for a good price...

0:28:460:28:49

Well, Keith, you must make a margin.

0:28:490:28:50

-You've got a big business here, and I respect that.

-Yeah.

0:28:500:28:53

-But they owe you what they owe you.

-Yeah.

0:28:530:28:56

-I'm going to say...

-To a humble man.

0:28:560:28:58

I'm going to say £80 for the pair.

0:28:580:29:00

That's not bad, is it?

0:29:000:29:02

I'll say.

0:29:020:29:04

That's a discount of £100.

0:29:040:29:06

So, Charles, what are you thinking?

0:29:080:29:10

Could you possibly do a bit more?

0:29:100:29:12

I've had them a long time, I'll grant you, but that...

0:29:120:29:15

I know it's battered a little bit, that sign,

0:29:150:29:18

but the Van Houten's Cocoa is a good one.

0:29:180:29:21

-And I think you're into a bit of profit in that.

-You think so?

0:29:210:29:25

-That one, I agree, is a bit off.

-Yes.

-It's seen better days.

0:29:250:29:28

But that is a great... It's a great sign.

0:29:280:29:31

I've got to have 80 for the pair.

0:29:310:29:33

Yeah.

0:29:330:29:34

And I respect that, Keith.

0:29:340:29:36

I think, based on the fact I want to go with a bang,

0:29:360:29:40

literally like that sign has,

0:29:400:29:42

you know, being pelted with a few hits over the years,

0:29:420:29:45

I'd better take a direct hit.

0:29:450:29:46

-I'll take them, Keith.

-OK.

-£80.

-Fine.

0:29:460:29:48

I think they're wonderful.

0:29:480:29:50

-I'm a great chocolate lover as well.

-Yes.

-And I enjoy cocoa.

0:29:500:29:53

So, that canny bit of buying means Charles is all shopped up.

0:29:530:29:56

There we are, Keith.

0:29:560:29:58

James, meanwhile, has also made it over the border,

0:30:030:30:06

to Berwick-upon-Tweed,

0:30:060:30:07

for his final spot of shopping on this trip.

0:30:070:30:10

Hello.

0:30:130:30:15

-Hello.

-Hello. James.

-Pleased to meet you.

-Good to meet you.

-Heather.

0:30:150:30:19

Heather. Good to meet you, Heather.

0:30:190:30:21

Dealing in all things antique, vintage and retro,

0:30:210:30:25

there's lots here for James to peruse.

0:30:250:30:28

WHISTLE BLOWS WEAKLY

0:30:310:30:33

We don't know what this is.

0:30:340:30:36

Or how old.

0:30:380:30:40

Yeah, nice uniform, that, isn't it?

0:30:400:30:42

We've just come by it.

0:30:420:30:44

-Well, it looks good. It's got some nice buttons.

-Mm. Mm.

0:30:440:30:48

All works. I can't...

0:30:480:30:50

Let's just see what the buttons...

0:30:500:30:52

whether there's any clues in the buttons, shall we?

0:30:520:30:55

Yeah.

0:30:580:31:00

Very interesting, isn't it?

0:31:010:31:03

It is.

0:31:030:31:04

Looks like a pre-World War I Scottish military jacket,

0:31:040:31:08

also known as a full dress doublet.

0:31:080:31:11

How much does that owe you, Heather?

0:31:110:31:14

-Does it only you big money?

-No, not at all.

0:31:140:31:16

How about I gave you 35 for it?

0:31:160:31:18

-Make it 40.

-Make it 40, you've got yourself a deal.

-Deal.

0:31:200:31:23

Well, if it makes thousands, just remember us, won't you?

0:31:230:31:27

-Of course I will.

-Here at Berwick.

-Course I will.

0:31:270:31:29

THEY CHUCKLE

0:31:290:31:31

That final spend brings shopping to an end on this road trip.

0:31:310:31:36

James will add the dress doublet to his other five lots.

0:31:360:31:41

The 1950s tea-maker.

0:31:410:31:43

The silver man with the stick.

0:31:430:31:45

The 1920s silver flapper's bag.

0:31:450:31:48

The engraved silver vesta case.

0:31:480:31:50

And the George III silver punch ladle.

0:31:500:31:52

Charles, meanwhile, has a total of five items to take to auction.

0:31:540:31:58

The porcelain spaniel ornament.

0:31:580:32:01

The early 19th-century brass telescope.

0:32:010:32:04

The Victorian rosewood concertina.

0:32:040:32:06

And his two enamel signs,

0:32:060:32:08

one from the 1950s and the other from the 1930s.

0:32:080:32:12

So, what do they reckon to each other's lots?

0:32:120:32:15

Charles' concertina, it came in a rather nice box,

0:32:160:32:19

but the concertina was a bit disappointing.

0:32:190:32:21

Not great condition. He paid £50 for it.

0:32:210:32:25

I would have run away from it.

0:32:250:32:27

The vesta case, by a great name, Sampson Mordan.

0:32:270:32:30

How much? £25? That's cheap. Could make 50.

0:32:300:32:33

Charles has bought a brass three-draw telescope. All right...

0:32:330:32:37

You know, I don't think it's a champion buy, really.

0:32:390:32:43

It sounds pretty ordinary to me.

0:32:430:32:45

I think the sleeper that might march on,

0:32:450:32:49

that might just be a battle I don't come out of fairly,

0:32:490:32:53

is that uniform,

0:32:530:32:55

and that uniform could just take James over the hill

0:32:550:32:59

and he'll march me down.

0:32:590:33:00

Well, battle will soon be under way.

0:33:020:33:04

After beginning in Dunbar, our experts are back together,

0:33:040:33:07

making their way to auction in Berwick-upon-Tweed.

0:33:070:33:10

-It's been great, James, I really enjoyed it.

-I've enjoyed it.

0:33:130:33:15

-And I've got a little memento for you, Charles.

-Oh.

0:33:150:33:18

-A little... A little bit of tartan for you.

-Oh, James!

0:33:180:33:21

Now, you just stay there.

0:33:210:33:23

It's something near to your heart,

0:33:230:33:24

-because you're well-known for your waistcoats.

-I am.

0:33:240:33:27

-Look at that.

-I love that, James.

0:33:270:33:29

-And that, you know...

-Look at that.

-That is royal tartan.

0:33:290:33:32

I almost feel King of the Road Trip.

0:33:320:33:35

-My only concern is, it's just a bit small.

-No, no.

0:33:350:33:37

-I think it's going to fit you, I hope.

-Yeah.

0:33:370:33:40

Well, we'll soon see,

0:33:400:33:42

as the boys have arrived at Berwick auction centre.

0:33:420:33:45

Here we are, chief.

0:33:450:33:47

-Here we are.

-The last day, and the sun is shining.

-Last day.

0:33:470:33:50

-Isn't it lovely?

-Leap out.

-Come on, Charles. Come on.

0:33:500:33:53

-Handbrake on.

-Handbrake on, well done.

0:33:530:33:56

Do you think it will fit?

0:33:560:33:58

-Get out of here.

-Have you put on...? Have you put on too many...?

0:33:580:34:01

-No, no, no.

-Too many pies?

-No, no, no, no.

-Go on, try it on.

0:34:010:34:04

I just think over the years, you grow a bit,

0:34:040:34:06

and I've got to sort of just stand upright and hold my chin up a bit.

0:34:060:34:10

-Are you spreading?

-No.

0:34:100:34:11

-Well, I might.

-It's those clootie dumplings.

0:34:110:34:14

-It's too small.

-Oh, dear. Well, it's the thought that counts.

0:34:140:34:18

Right, boys, better get in there.

0:34:180:34:21

The gentleman with the gavel in hand today is Stephen Lonsdale.

0:34:210:34:24

So, what does he think about our experts' lots?

0:34:260:34:29

The punch ladle's a nice piece. Silver can be very surprising.

0:34:290:34:32

I said about £40 to £60. Could be more.

0:34:320:34:35

The spaniel, there's a lot of damage to it,

0:34:350:34:38

but I believe it's quite rare.

0:34:380:34:40

I've not seen many of them.

0:34:400:34:42

£40 to £60. But, again, with these things,

0:34:420:34:45

with collectors on the internet,

0:34:450:34:47

you know, if it's wanted it could go for anything.

0:34:470:34:49

Time will soon tell, as the room's filling up,

0:34:490:34:52

and our experts are about to face their final auction.

0:34:520:34:55

-Settle in.

-Today's the day. Our last sale, James.

-Last sale.

0:34:560:34:59

-What a journey we've had.

-Ahhh!

-And it ends here.

0:34:590:35:02

Kicking things off is James's 1950s tea-maker.

0:35:050:35:08

£10 we have, thank you. £10.

0:35:080:35:11

£12 anywhere?

0:35:110:35:12

£10, all done at 10?

0:35:120:35:15

12. 14?

0:35:150:35:16

-16.

-Oh, well done.

0:35:160:35:18

-18.

-Well done, chief.

0:35:180:35:19

20. 22.

0:35:190:35:22

-I wasn't expecting this.

-£20 we have at the front.

0:35:220:35:24

-Well done, chief, profit.

-Are we all done at £20?

0:35:240:35:26

-Well done, chief.

-We're not quite there.

0:35:260:35:28

-GAVEL BANGS

-Well done!

0:35:280:35:30

-Well done.

-Well done, very kind.

0:35:300:35:32

Not the best of starts for James.

0:35:320:35:34

But it's only the beginning.

0:35:340:35:36

-It's a good sign.

-Yes. Good sign for you.

0:35:360:35:38

Well, we'll soon find out,

0:35:380:35:40

as it's Charles' Victorian squeeze-box coming up next.

0:35:400:35:43

We have £30 in the back of the room.

0:35:430:35:46

-Come on.

-35 anywhere?

-It's a really nice object.

-Too much.

0:35:460:35:49

-40?

-Far too much.

-40 at the back.

-Come on.

0:35:490:35:51

45. 50?

0:35:510:35:53

-50 at the back of the room.

-Come on. One more.

0:35:530:35:55

£50 in the back of the room. Are we all done, internet?

0:35:550:35:57

Are you finished? £50.

0:35:570:35:59

-Everybody done?

-GAVEL BANGS

0:35:590:36:01

That is a squeeze. Not quite the result that Charles was hoping for.

0:36:010:36:04

That's OK. I've broken even.

0:36:040:36:07

Time now for the first of James' silver lots,

0:36:080:36:10

his George III punch ladle.

0:36:100:36:13

30.

0:36:130:36:14

£30 we have. 35 anywhere?

0:36:140:36:16

-Profit.

-35. 40?

0:36:160:36:18

£40 we have. 45?

0:36:180:36:20

-50?

-Oh!

-55?

0:36:200:36:22

-£50 we have. 55 anywhere?

-Oh!

0:36:230:36:25

-We'll sell at 50. All done at 50?

-GAVEL BANGS

0:36:250:36:27

That's great. That's a £20 profit.

0:36:270:36:30

It is indeed. Great stuff.

0:36:300:36:32

That's a sign...of things to come. Lashings of profit.

0:36:320:36:36

We can but hope.

0:36:360:36:38

It's the turn of Charles' brass telescope now.

0:36:380:36:42

35.

0:36:420:36:44

-Hello!

-30?

-Help!

-£30 we have.

0:36:440:36:48

£30 at the back was first. 35 anywhere?

0:36:480:36:50

35. 40?

0:36:500:36:52

45.

0:36:520:36:54

50.

0:36:540:36:55

55. 60?

0:36:550:36:56

-Yes, here. Here.

-£60 we have.

0:36:560:36:59

All done at 60?

0:36:590:37:01

Thank you.

0:37:010:37:03

Thank you!

0:37:040:37:06

Give us a... Oh, sorry! Sorry. "Get out of here," she says.

0:37:060:37:09

Oh, Charles! Fantastic profit there, with kisses thrown in for free.

0:37:090:37:14

-Put it there.

-I bet you can't even see out of the thing.

0:37:140:37:17

No point in being bitter, James.

0:37:190:37:21

Next up, it's your Sampson Mordan vesta case.

0:37:210:37:23

15 we have. 16.

0:37:230:37:25

-18.

-Come on, James.

-20.

0:37:250:37:27

22. 24.

0:37:270:37:29

-Come on.

-Keep moving.

-26.

-I shouldn't say, "Come on."

-28.

0:37:290:37:32

30. 32. 34.

0:37:320:37:34

£32, we're done.

0:37:340:37:36

We'll sell at £32.

0:37:360:37:38

And you've got yourself a profit. Well done.

0:37:380:37:42

Is the internet working?

0:37:420:37:43

Right, time for Charles' 1950s enamel sign.

0:37:460:37:49

£40. Any bids at 40?

0:37:490:37:50

£40 we have. 45 anywhere?

0:37:500:37:53

-45. 50.

-Come on.

0:37:530:37:54

55. 60?

0:37:540:37:56

60 at the side of the room.

0:37:560:37:58

-Are we all done at 60?

-No more.

-I like chocolate.

0:37:580:38:00

-No.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:38:000:38:02

Charles' first sign has earned him a profit.

0:38:020:38:04

-Give me a high five.

-Oh, no.

-Give me high five.

-No. No.

0:38:050:38:09

-No.

-Give me a Glasgow kiss.

-No.

0:38:090:38:11

Suitably buttoned up, James is up again.

0:38:110:38:14

It's his dress doublet.

0:38:140:38:16

25.

0:38:160:38:17

-25 we have at the back of the room.

-Oh, well done.

0:38:170:38:19

30. 35.

0:38:190:38:21

40. 45.

0:38:210:38:23

50.

0:38:230:38:25

55?

0:38:250:38:26

55 at the back. 60.

0:38:260:38:28

65.

0:38:280:38:30

-£60 we have at the side.

-Sell it.

-Come on, the internet.

0:38:300:38:33

-£60.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:38:330:38:36

Another nice little profit for James.

0:38:360:38:38

-It's made you £20.

-£20.

-That's good.

0:38:380:38:41

Another of James' silver lots now.

0:38:420:38:44

Can this little man make him a profit?

0:38:440:38:47

20? £20 we have. 25.

0:38:470:38:49

-30.

-There are hands there.

-Profit.

0:38:490:38:51

25. 30.

0:38:510:38:52

35. 40?

0:38:520:38:55

45.

0:38:550:38:56

-50?

-Go on.

-Slow down.

-Go on.

-Slow down.

-£45.

0:38:560:38:59

£45. Are we all done at £45?

0:38:590:39:03

A pretty profit there for James.

0:39:030:39:06

Well done. Well done, chief. That's good.

0:39:060:39:09

James is up again, and it's his final lot.

0:39:090:39:13

The 1920s ladies evening bag.

0:39:130:39:15

25 we have on the stairs.

0:39:150:39:17

30. 35.

0:39:170:39:19

-Keep going.

-40?

0:39:190:39:21

-40. 45?

-Go on.

0:39:210:39:23

40 on the internet. Looking for 45.

0:39:230:39:25

50. £50 we have on the internet.

0:39:250:39:27

-We'll sell at £50.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:39:270:39:29

James ends on a high, with a profit.

0:39:290:39:32

-Why aren't you wearing your waistcoat?

-It's a bit small on me.

0:39:320:39:35

-Go on, I'll put it on, then.

-Go on, put it on.

-Our last...

0:39:350:39:39

I'll put my Scottish... my royal tartan on.

0:39:390:39:42

Let's hope it brings you luck.

0:39:420:39:45

Your second enamel sign is next to go.

0:39:450:39:48

-50.

-Come on.

0:39:480:39:49

-£50 we have. 55 anywhere?

-Come on, let's move it.

0:39:490:39:52

55. 60?

0:39:520:39:54

-You going 60? £60.

-I wouldn't do it.

-Come on, it's a lovely sign.

0:39:550:39:59

70. 75.

0:39:590:40:01

-How much did it cost you?

-Hold tight, hold tight.

0:40:010:40:03

80 there. Are we all done at £80?

0:40:030:40:06

-We'll sell at 80.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:40:060:40:07

Charles is quids in again.

0:40:070:40:09

-It cost me 50.

-Well done.

-Made me 80.

0:40:110:40:13

And I can keep this on, James, because I'm proud.

0:40:130:40:16

-You're a winner. You're a winner

-Get out of here.

0:40:160:40:18

Time for the final lot of the day, and of this road trip.

0:40:180:40:22

It's Charles' porcelain pooch.

0:40:220:40:25

12 we have. 14.

0:40:250:40:27

-Such an early object.

-16. 18.

0:40:270:40:29

-20. 22.

-It's so early.

0:40:290:40:31

24.

0:40:310:40:32

26. 28.

0:40:320:40:34

30.

0:40:340:40:36

32. 34.

0:40:360:40:38

36.

0:40:380:40:39

Any more bids? 34.

0:40:390:40:41

-Ruff, ruff!

-34.

-Are we all done at £34?

0:40:410:40:43

-Yeah, I think we're done.

-Thank you.

-Put it down!

0:40:430:40:46

GAVEL BANGS

0:40:460:40:47

So, Charles finishes with a fantastic profit, too.

0:40:470:40:51

Hurrah!

0:40:510:40:53

Right, let's see who's come out on top.

0:40:530:40:56

James started this leg with £337.02.

0:40:570:41:01

Putting in a profit of £35.74 after auction costs

0:41:010:41:07

means he finishes this trip with a marvellous £372.76.

0:41:070:41:13

Charles began with a huge £505.04.

0:41:150:41:19

He, too, made a profit, of £77.88 after auction costs,

0:41:190:41:25

which means he's crowned King of the Road Trip

0:41:250:41:28

as he romps home with a fantastic £582.92.

0:41:280:41:34

All profits go to Children In Need.

0:41:340:41:36

-Well done.

-I think it's well done for a great week.

0:41:360:41:40

Isn't it? It's well done to a wonderful week.

0:41:400:41:43

-Our chariot has borne us.

-Exactly.

-Goodbye, Berwick-upon-Tweed.

0:41:430:41:46

And don't forget, James,

0:41:460:41:48

the sunshine will always shine on the chosen two.

0:41:480:41:50

-I know.

-And that you and I.

-That's us.

0:41:500:41:53

Thanks for the memories, mate.

0:41:530:41:54

I shall drive us now into the sunset, bon voyage, a la Scotland.

0:41:540:41:59

-Handbrake. Handbrake.

-Sorry.

0:41:590:42:01

Get it in first.

0:42:010:42:03

-That's it.

-Oh, Charles!

0:42:030:42:04

Our likely lads have had a jolly old jaunt around Scotland.

0:42:060:42:10

Look at these handles. Oops.

0:42:100:42:12

It's just become detached.

0:42:120:42:14

Showing their expertise along the way.

0:42:140:42:16

I think I might wear this for the big haggle.

0:42:160:42:19

Thanks a lot.

0:42:190:42:20

HE SNEEZES

0:42:200:42:21

Things didn't always go smoothly.

0:42:240:42:27

-Push!

-HE STRAINS

0:42:270:42:30

But one thing's for sure,

0:42:300:42:31

it's been a fine old bromance for our classy pair.

0:42:310:42:35

Thank you.

0:42:350:42:36

It's too small.

0:42:360:42:38

-Eh?

-Ow! That was my ribcage!

0:42:430:42:46

-Give us a kiss.

-No.

-Give us a kiss.

-No.

0:42:460:42:49

Well done!

0:42:510:42:52

Thank you, Scotland. I'll come again.

0:42:550:42:58

Fare thee well, road trippers.

0:42:580:43:00

Next week sees road trip veterans Catherine Southon and Philip Serrell

0:43:040:43:09

get reacquainted on a new adventure.

0:43:090:43:11

-I mean, you are looking at me now.

-Bang on trend!

0:43:110:43:14

I am bang on trend. I'm up there with the kids.

0:43:140:43:17

It is the last leg of the road trip for James Braxton and Charles Hanson. Starting in Scotland, they head south over the border to take their final purchases to auction in Berwick-upon-Tweed. Charles dresses in full Highland regalia to hear how Sir Walter Scott reinvented tartan.

Meanwhile, James discovers the story behind one of the most intriguing incidents of World War II. James believes silver antiques will give him victory, but Charles plumps for a little porcelain King Charles Spaniel. Who will be crowned king of this road trip?