Episode 9 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 9

An unreliable classic car has Charles Hanson and James Braxton complete this leg on foot. After buying antiques in Perthshire and the Lothians, they head to the auction in Cumbria.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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-That's cracking!

-..with £200 each...

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Wonderful!

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..a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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That's exactly what I'm talking about.

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I am all over a shiver.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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-No-brainer.

-Going, going, gone.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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-So, will it be the high road to glory...

-Push!

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..or the slow road to disaster?

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How awfully, awfully nice.

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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# Don't stop me

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# Having a good time Having a good time... #

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It's the penultimate leg of this week's exciting adventure

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for two top auctioneers - James Braxton and Charles Hanson.

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Do they ever stop laughing?

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-This is our fourth leg, James. Time is nearing.

-Fourth leg.

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-Fourth leg.

-The journey...

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You're £100 clear.

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About £130 clear, between friends.

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And what a pair of friends they are.

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James is a very competitive Road Trip veteran.

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You wouldn't think so to look at him.

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To the winner goes the spoils.

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And Charles is an antiques hotshot, willing to do anything to win.

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Don't look at me like that. I'm not a bad man, OK?

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Don't you believe that!

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After starting this trip with £200 in his pocket,

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some canny buys means James now has £315.68 to spend.

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Charles has also bought cleverly,

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more than doubling his original £200 stake.

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He's sitting pretty out in front with £447.34.

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While Charles might be brilliant at buying antiques,

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when it comes to driving one, well...

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that's another matter, so stand by.

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What gear are you in?

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-Are you in first or second?

-Third. Sorry.

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-Sorry!

-JAMES CHUCKLES

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On this trip, our boys are struggling to zip around

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in this ill-sounding 1964 DKW 1000 Coupe.

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Made before seat belts were mandatory

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means our experts aren't wearing any. Got it?

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The car's breaking down! It's stopping. Yeah.

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No, literally. Guys, this is your Captain Hanson speaking.

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Antiques Road Trip, we have a problem.

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You certainly do. Looks like that car's given up the ghost.

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Oh, careful, James.

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Hi-vis jacket on, it's Braxton to the rescue.

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ENGINE TURNS OVER

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What worries me - we're on a hill.

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James has got his yellow jacket on.

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-Now, hold on. While you're speaking to me, could you please wear the helmet?

-Yeah, let me just...

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ENGINE TURNS OVER

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I'll tell you what - only you, Charles,

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-could make a helmet...

-Yes.

-..look like a comedy prop.

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-Get out of here!

-I think if I just get it going, I could get it...

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-It would come right.

-Should I try and push you, James?

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-No, not uphill.

-I'm strong enough.

-I tell you what I could do.

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-I could reverse it, but bump start reverse.

-OK, bump it.

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Forward! Forward!

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Run, Charles. Run, quick!

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-Ow!

-Sorry. Ow!

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So, thanks to Braxton, the boys are back on track.

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After beginning their roving road trip in the Highlands,

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Charles and James have been journeying all over bonny Scotland,

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taking in the north-east and the Central Belt.

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They'll eventually finish up over the border in Berwick-upon-Tweed.

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This leg will kick off in Perth, Scotland,

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and end in England at auction in Crooklands, Cumbria.

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A former capital of Scotland,

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Perth was made a city again by the Queen, as part of

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her diamond jubilee celebrations in 2012.

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It's home to James's first shop, Fair City Antiques.

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-Hello.

-All right, James.

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Hello, good to see you.

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-And your name is?

-My name's Max.

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Max, good to meet you.

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So, it's a big area.

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It is. It's a very vast area. We have eight to ten vendors in here.

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-Can you guide me around? It's a big place, isn't it?

-Yeah, sure.

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-If you want to start up this way...

-Up this way. Good.

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Determined to beat Charles on this leg,

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James is on the hunt for hidden gems.

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So, we've got a pair of, er, sort of fonts.

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It looks as though it might have taken a dish, a liner there.

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-Doesn't it?

-Yeah, well, I would presume so, yeah.

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-Yeah.

-A ceramic dish or something like that.

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Yeah. Could have been, maybe, for washing your hands.

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Maybe, you know, people, if they went to church,

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maybe you'd wash your hands and things like that, you know.

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Very difficult to get the old foot in.

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-You know, bathing, isn't it? You know.

-Yeah.

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You'd need to be a yogic master, Max, to do that, don't you?

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Oh. The ticket says £490 for the pair.

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They're too pricey for your purse, James. So, moving on...

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What have you found now?

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Have these got any age, or are they brand-new?

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I'm not sure. Probably...

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So, this has got some lacquer on it, hasn't it?

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Most of the Chinese stuff was always lacquered.

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-Yeah, yeah. This is more your red cinnabar lacquer.

-Mm-hm.

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It's just got a little bit of tracery

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rushing around here, hasn't it?

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I quite like stools, but these ones are slightly lower.

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That's a sort of seat level.

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Often, you rather hope a stool is slightly higher.

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That's quite a low one.

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They're just a sort of decorative things, really.

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I haven't even asked how much you've got on these.

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140 for the pair.

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140 for the pair.

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I like them.

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It would absolutely make my day at 75 for those.

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-MAX SIGHS

-Er...

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Speak to me, Max.

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-You're worried.

-Do you know what?

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-What? Really?

-Put it there.

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-75.

-That's very kind. Thank you.

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-I've had them a while.

-That's for the two?

-That's for the pair.

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For the pair - lovely. Very pleased with those.

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So that's James's first lot bought.

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And it's not long before another pair catches his eye.

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Two tables this time.

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It is definitely a Sikh-like headdress here.

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So, Indian. This is for export.

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-So, you can...

-For packing.

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-You would have packed...

-Flat-pack.

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Flat-pack. So you could have taken that home with you.

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Yes. Not bad, is it?

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It's very nice hardwood.

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Who can resist an elephant?

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I can never resist an elephant.

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They're beautiful, beautiful animals.

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And it's just quite nice.

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Quite a nice scene there.

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What could these be?

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45 for t'pair.

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-45 for pair?

-Yeah.

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-Yeah, I'll take them, 45.

-All right?

-Thank you. Really kind.

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-Sometimes I buy singularly, sometimes I buy in pairs.

-Mm-hm.

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Today is a pairs day.

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And what a pair of pairs they are.

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Great start!

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-Thanks for coming.

-Thanks a lot.

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Charles, meanwhile, has motored up the road

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to his first shop of the day, Farang Antiques...

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-Good morning.

-Morning.

-Hello, my name's Charles Hanson.

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-John Stewart. Nice to meet you.

-Hi, John.

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Have you any interesting finds of recent date?

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-We've got lots of interesting things.

-Fantastic.

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-If you want to come through, I'll be glad to show you.

-Wonderful - can't wait!

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..housing a large selection of fine arts and crafts

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from Southeast Asia.

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There are plenty of exotic pieces on offer.

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I love that burnished gilt.

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This is a wonderful piece.

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-It is.

-I mean, this is a fabulous Shan 19th-century Buddha

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made from teak wood, been gilded.

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Lots of wear and tear, as it would be of this age.

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I suppose I wouldn't get much change, John, from £2,500.

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You wouldn't get any change on £2,500 pounds at all.

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This one would be £4,500.

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-And between friends?

-4,400.

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4,400. I like your style.

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Well out of your price range, Charles.

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I like, John, the Edwardian cabinet.

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-Is that for sale?

-I'm afraid not.

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I need it for my display here desperately.

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It's the display that's actually caught my eye.

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You've got these figures in almost, I suppose, miniature frames.

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And they are full-length portraits.

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These are what you'd call Chinese pith paintings.

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Pith paintings. Meaning they're on rice paper?

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-They're on rice paper.

-Yes.

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Be about 19th century. Wow! They're really well painted.

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-Beautifully painted.

-They're very well detailed.

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It's a shame... This one, I can see,

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has got the split in the pith, or the rice paper.

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-Are they expensive?

-No, they're not.

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It's a set of three. They're £60 altogether.

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Yeah, yeah.

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They are well done.

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He likes them, but enough to buy, I wonder?

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I'm going to say thanks but no, thanks.

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-OK.

-John, thank you. I've had a really enjoyable visit.

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I might regret not buying these.

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And to you, John, I shall say...

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-Sa-wut dee krup.

-Sa-wut dee krup.

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And that's "goodbye" in...

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-In Thai.

-Goodbye, John.

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Sa-wut dee krup. See you, John. See you.

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Charles leaves his first shop empty-handed,

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and his wallet is still bulging.

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James's buying is going much better

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and he's now made his way six miles east to Glencarse.

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He's come to Michael Young Antiques.

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BELL RINGS

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-Hello. James.

-Hello, James.

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-Hello.

-Good to meet you.

-Good to meet you. What a lovely place.

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With a mixed bag of antiques on offer,

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James is hoping Michael can help him sniff out a potential purchase.

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Why can't he look for himself?

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Do you keep all your junk in the cabinets or do you keep all your precious items in the cabinets?

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I don't profess to have a lot of junk but, in actual fact,

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you've hit upon the right cabinet.

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-Very lucky horseshoe.

-Very early, yeah.

-Very early.

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Find some goodies.

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Have you got so much money to spend? Is that it?

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No, I haven't got a huge amount of money to spend, unfortunately.

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Well, you've still got nearly £200, James.

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A little pot.

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Oh, not as old as I thought.

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-That's a shame. It's a lovely Iznik pattern, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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How much have you got on that?

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-£20.

-£20, yeah.

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It's damaged on the corner.

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Yeah, I saw that. I like to call it fritting.

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Fair enough.

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Call it what you like.

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Fritting, indeed!

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With the pot put back on the shelf,

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James's attention turns to something a bit bulkier.

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Big old mirror there.

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Old brass-framed mirror.

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-Yeah.

-Base metals.

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I love a bit of base metal.

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What could that be, Michael?

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150?

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And the glass - is that deterioration...?

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Pull it off the wall and have a look.

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-Is there deterioration behind it? Probably.

-Yeah, it's behind.

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Steady!

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It's got a sort of zinc back, hasn't it?

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-So you've got a sort of...

-Polish up beautifully.

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..stylised rose there, haven't you?

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It's a big old thing.

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-Very much in the Arts and Crafts manner, isn't it?

-Mm.

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Superb, I think, actually.

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The stylised flowers. Shame about the mirror, but there we are.

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What about 100, Michael?

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-Thank you, sir.

-Very much indeed.

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That's very kind of you, Michael.

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Kind indeed. That generous discount sees James secure another lot

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to take to auction. Jolly good!

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Charles, meanwhile, has made his way to Crieff.

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He's come to learn about an elite band of hardy Scots

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known as the Highland drovers.

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From the mid-17th century,

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tough and courageous herdsmen drove cattle

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from the Highlands and Islands across Scotland's roughest terrain,

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to trade at market.

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Charles is meeting chairman of the Crieff and Strathearn Drovers' Tryst Festival

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John Cummings, to find out more.

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-Welcome to Crieff. Come this way.

-Wonderful!

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I've been a driver, John, and it's been quite difficult

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navigating over these hills and around lochs

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in an old classic car but, of course, for the drovers

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-it was a different story.

-Very much so, yes.

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There were no roads, basically, when they were at their height.

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There were no maps, there were no GPS systems.

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The droving would take on average 12 miles a day,

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they could cover with cattle.

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So you're talking about possibly two weeks en route.

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-Really?

-Yeah, it was a long, long haul.

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What did the Highland cattle have?

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Why travel all that distance?

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Were these special beasts?

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Scottish beef was traditionally very, very much valued.

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And certainly during the 17th century

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and part of the 18th century, there was a tremendous demand -

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80% of beef came from Scotland.

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-Really?

-And what did it serve?

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It served the Navy.

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It served the Armed Forces.

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Salted beef.

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The Drovers' Tryst in Crieff

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was one of the busiest cattle markets in the country.

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Held in the second week in October, trade was so substantial

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that Crieff was the financial centre of Scotland during this period.

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Why Perthshire?

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What did that region have in Scotland which others didn't?

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If you look at the map of Scotland,

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a lot of the droving routes converge on Crieff.

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The traders that were coming up from either the Borders early on or,

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after the Union, increasingly from England,

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they were quite happy to come as far as Crieff, but not beyond Crieff.

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That was wild, untamed country.

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-At its height, 30,000 cattle came through Crieff.

-Really?

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For the Highlander, it was his form of wealth.

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But they had to guard the cattle

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because you had, very often, cattle thieving.

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That went on and that was part and parcel of the whole story

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about droving, because a lot of drovers were previously cattle thieves.

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Rob Roy MacGregor - the famous Rob Roy - he was a cattle thief,

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but he was part of the MacGregor clan and an outlaw.

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The drovers were a key part of Scottish life

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for more than 200 years but due to the Highland Clearances,

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faster steamships and the birth of railways,

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the droving trade in Scotland dried up.

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The hardy Highlanders were forced to find work elsewhere.

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Where did these drovers end up?

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Australia. America. Canada.

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And the skills they took with them, of course,

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were the skills of the droving.

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So the drovers, in many ways, become the cowboys.

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We know all about the cowboys.

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They've been romanticised by John Ford and John Wayne and so on.

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But they went across there, they became the big, big landowners

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and the ranchers of Texas.

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So really, the cowboys almost began, in a way, in Scotland?

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Well, you could say that.

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Many, many Scottish traditions and, as we know,

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many names over in Canada and so on.

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Charles reckons he could be a daring drover.

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So John's brought him to meet local farmer Euan Stewart,

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who's kindly offered to let him loose on his Highland coos.

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Looks angry.

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And there they are. Aren't they beautiful creatures?

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What's the secret? What is the way to drove?

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Just go and say, "Come on, girls.

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-"On your way."

-Do I whistle a bit?

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-HE WHISTLES

-You can, yes. OK.

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Well, I'll try that.

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That's what we do down south.

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Come on. This way.

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You have mighty fine horns. Thank you.

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No need to be personal, Charles.

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Come on. We're going south towards Derbyshire.

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That's it.

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-What do you want?

-Don't ask!

0:16:240:16:25

You've had...

0:16:250:16:27

You've had your water.

0:16:270:16:28

BULL MOOS

0:16:280:16:30

Don't look at me like that. I'm not a bad man, OK? I know.

0:16:300:16:33

Come on, let's go.

0:16:330:16:35

Let's find the way.

0:16:350:16:37

And as Charles heads off with the herd...

0:16:370:16:40

TIM CHUCKLES

0:16:400:16:41

..day one draws to an end, so nighty-night.

0:16:410:16:44

It's a brand-new day, and our boys are back together

0:16:480:16:51

and have made their way to Edinburgh.

0:16:510:16:53

The sun is shining on the Scottish capital -

0:16:530:16:55

surely a good omen.

0:16:550:16:56

If you go at the back and push and I'll steer, OK?

0:16:560:16:59

Is that all right?

0:16:590:17:01

Uh-oh. Maybe not, then. Looks like the car's had it again.

0:17:010:17:04

The run-up's OK.

0:17:040:17:06

It's not too steep.

0:17:060:17:08

-I'll have a go.

-Yeah, OK.

0:17:080:17:10

Let me get those biceps just warmed up, James, first, OK?

0:17:100:17:14

-Hold on. OK, ready?

-In your own time.

0:17:140:17:17

Come on, Charles. Put your back into it.

0:17:170:17:19

Ooh! Hope you don't do yourself a mischief.

0:17:190:17:22

James. James.

0:17:220:17:24

Yeah, sorry. I think I'll come and give you a hand.

0:17:240:17:27

Take it out of gear!

0:17:270:17:29

Oh, crikey. Really?

0:17:290:17:31

-Ready?

-Why would he do it any better?

0:17:310:17:34

Come on, James.

0:17:350:17:36

Push! Push!

0:17:360:17:38

He's so much older than you!

0:17:400:17:41

-James...

-I've run out.

0:17:410:17:43

-I've run out.

-The road trip...

0:17:430:17:45

This isn't right!

0:17:450:17:46

..is all about the two of us, OK?

0:17:460:17:48

-Do you want me to drive instead?

-Oh, no!

0:17:480:17:51

OK, let's try brute force from both boys

0:17:520:17:54

and a helping hand from a mechanic.

0:17:540:17:56

Push for all your might, here in Edinburgh!

0:17:560:17:58

Let's go.

0:17:580:18:00

Let's go, James. Keep going.

0:18:000:18:03

Keep going. Hold it there, James. Hold it there.

0:18:030:18:07

Handbrake on, driver.

0:18:070:18:08

-Well done.

-There we go. The day is alive.

-Come on, let's walk.

0:18:080:18:12

Thanks a lot. All the best to you.

0:18:120:18:14

Oh, yes, of course - there's shopping to do.

0:18:140:18:15

So far, James has bagged himself three lots -

0:18:150:18:18

the Chinese stools, the hardwood tables and the Arts and Crafts mirror -

0:18:180:18:21

which means he's still got £95.68 in his pocket.

0:18:210:18:26

Charles, meanwhile, hasn't bought a single thing. Ha!

0:18:280:18:31

So he's got some big buying to do today, with his £447.34.

0:18:310:18:37

Thankfully, our experts aren't too far from their first shop

0:18:400:18:44

so, with the car out of action, they're walking the rest of the way.

0:18:440:18:48

Look at this view!

0:18:480:18:49

MUSIC: I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles) by The Proclaimers

0:18:490:18:53

-BOTH:

-# And I would walk 500 more

0:18:530:18:56

# Just to be the man who walks a thousand miles

0:18:560:19:01

# To fall down at your door

0:19:010:19:04

# La-la, la-la

0:19:040:19:06

# La-la, la-la... #

0:19:060:19:08

What a lovely tone you've got, Charles!

0:19:080:19:10

That's a matter of opinion.

0:19:100:19:11

Oh, look at that - snake hips!

0:19:130:19:15

-Are you shattered?

-Yeah.

-Are you shattered?

0:19:200:19:21

-I need to get fit.

-You need to get fit.

0:19:210:19:23

-I'm almost losing my sap and energy for this first shop, James.

-Really?

0:19:230:19:28

This is a cunning plan.

0:19:280:19:31

So cunning you could put a tail on it.

0:19:310:19:34

Charles and James will be doing a spot of joint shopping this morning.

0:19:340:19:37

Oh, Lord! Do be careful, Charles.

0:19:390:19:42

They've finally arrived in one piece at Courtyard Antiques.

0:19:420:19:46

After you.

0:19:460:19:47

Oh, James! Get it together, chaps.

0:19:490:19:52

With a wide selection of antiques spread over two floors,

0:19:530:19:56

it's time for some serious shopping, particularly Charles.

0:19:560:19:59

This is an amazing shop, isn't it?

0:19:590:20:01

Well...there's no shortage of content here, is there?

0:20:010:20:04

-Shall I go this way and you go that way?

-OK. You have choice. Good luck, good luck.

0:20:040:20:08

Still to start spending, Charles has decided to seek out dealer Lewis

0:20:090:20:13

to get some insider knowledge.

0:20:130:20:15

-Hello, there.

-Hi, Charles.

-You must be the proprietor here.

0:20:160:20:19

-Yes.

-Would you have anything that is quite market fresh,

0:20:190:20:23

that maybe is something full of Eastern promise?

0:20:230:20:26

-We have some early carvings...

-Oh, really?

0:20:260:20:28

-..up at that end.

-Let's go for a wander.

0:20:280:20:31

James, meanwhile, is going it alone upstairs.

0:20:310:20:34

Always look up, always look down.

0:20:340:20:37

There might be some lovely rugs,

0:20:370:20:38

there might be something interesting hanging up.

0:20:380:20:41

It's mainly chairs at the moment.

0:20:410:20:43

Downstairs, Charles is getting a closer look

0:20:450:20:47

at the group of 17th and 18th-century carvings.

0:20:470:20:50

-Have they just come in, or...?

-Yeah.

0:20:520:20:54

God, they're beautiful. How much are they?

0:20:540:20:56

Erm, I was hoping to get 140 each for them.

0:20:560:20:59

Aren't they gorgeous?

0:20:590:21:01

-Have they been here a while?

-They've been here four days.

0:21:010:21:04

Aren't they nice?

0:21:040:21:06

I suppose they're what we call caryatids, aren't they?

0:21:060:21:09

And a caryatid is almost like a plaster,

0:21:090:21:12

where it's almost a moulding applied to a piece of furniture.

0:21:120:21:18

I haven't really seen so much up here.

0:21:180:21:21

I think I might head down.

0:21:210:21:22

Let's muscle in on young Hanson downstairs, shall we?

0:21:220:21:26

HE HUMS

0:21:260:21:29

What could be the best price on them?

0:21:290:21:31

590?

0:21:330:21:34

Keep it high, Lewis, keep it high!

0:21:360:21:38

Keep it high. He's got plenty of money.

0:21:380:21:41

He's ahead. He's ahead at the moment.

0:21:410:21:43

-They're very nice, those, aren't they?

-Yeah, they are.

0:21:430:21:45

-You've got £590.

-I wish I did, I wish I did.

0:21:450:21:47

-Keep spending, keep spending.

-Thanks a lot!

-I'm just going to come by, do you mind?

0:21:490:21:53

You know, when you're at that moment, caught in time...

0:21:530:21:55

-I know.

-..you get your old mate just come and upset the apple cart.

0:21:550:21:59

Before Friday sings,

0:21:590:22:01

I would like to go for the big one that could dip high or dip low.

0:22:010:22:06

Yeah, I know. It's worth it, isn't it?

0:22:060:22:08

After that walk we've had, I've got to clear my head a bit,

0:22:080:22:10

because I'm still, in my own mind, walking still.

0:22:100:22:13

Talking of walkies, James has found a Studio Pottery corgi moneybox

0:22:130:22:18

right under Charles's nose.

0:22:180:22:19

-That's a nice thing. Can I have a look at that?

-No, you can't!

0:22:190:22:22

No, you can't! Do you know what?

0:22:220:22:24

-Good design...

-Yes.

-Good design always has humour.

0:22:240:22:28

-I do like that.

-It's like Martinware Brothers.

0:22:280:22:30

-I think, Lewis, what I'm going to do...

-I like the crown.

0:22:300:22:33

I think I'm going to make a note of these and just say, "Let's put them to one side."

0:22:330:22:37

-I'm going to put that to one side as well.

-No, no, no, you're not.

0:22:370:22:40

-Let's have a chat. That'll be first come, first served.

-Lewis...

0:22:400:22:44

I'm looking at this,

0:22:440:22:46

I'm looking at this, and I'm getting as feel of about £20.

0:22:460:22:49

About half of what I was thinking.

0:22:490:22:50

Really? 25 and it's yours.

0:22:500:22:53

I'll buy them at 25.

0:22:530:22:54

Go on. First one done!

0:22:540:22:56

-Wahey!

-I can't believe it!

0:22:560:22:59

I almost feel like giving you a Glasgow head-butt,

0:22:590:23:03

via this delightful...

0:23:030:23:04

-To the winner goes the spoils!

-That's a very good object, James.

0:23:040:23:07

-That's a lovely object.

-And to Queen and country.

0:23:070:23:10

Get out of here! Go on!

0:23:100:23:11

-Thank you, Lewis.

-Go walk those 500 miles that way!

0:23:110:23:14

Go on, get out of here!

0:23:140:23:16

An interruption by James sees him walk off with his fourth lot for auction.

0:23:170:23:22

Charles, meanwhile, is still thinking about the caryatids - as you do.

0:23:220:23:26

I'd be prepared to spend £400 on them.

0:23:270:23:30

Cash.

0:23:300:23:31

Charlie is slightly wearing him down.

0:23:310:23:34

The poor man's going to have to lie down in a darkened room soon, isn't he?

0:23:340:23:38

I would be prepared to go kind of halfway with you, 450.

0:23:380:23:41

That's quite interesting.

0:23:430:23:44

Oh, it's open! It's a sort of weird curio.

0:23:460:23:49

It's very heavy. It's made of lead...

0:23:500:23:52

..and it's got a donkey on it, a mule, a donkey.

0:23:540:23:57

It's rather sweet, isn't it?

0:23:570:24:00

It's got no price on it. A couple of quid...

0:24:000:24:02

So, he's off to interrupt - yet again.

0:24:020:24:05

I found this in a little cabinet, rather... Curio.

0:24:060:24:09

-That's pretty.

-Pretty, isn't it?

0:24:090:24:11

-That's nice.

-It's not TOO nice.

0:24:110:24:14

It's really nice.

0:24:140:24:16

-Wonderful!

-Hold on, hold on...

0:24:160:24:18

It's very good, isn't it?

0:24:200:24:21

-How much is that?

-A couple of pounds?

0:24:210:24:23

Never mind the quality - feel the weight.

0:24:230:24:25

It hasn't got a price tag,

0:24:250:24:28

so, you know, I thought I'd give you a lift from nought.

0:24:280:24:31

15.

0:24:310:24:32

I think we're moving in the right direction, Lewis.

0:24:330:24:36

It's nice to see. Lewis - a tenner.

0:24:360:24:38

Go on, put it there.

0:24:380:24:40

Well done. My work is done here.

0:24:400:24:42

-Do you know...

-My work is done here.

-He's more a decision kind of guy.

0:24:420:24:45

My work is done here. Thank you, good people.

0:24:450:24:47

-Good people of Edinburgh, I leave you.

-I shall wish you good day.

-Good day, good day.

0:24:470:24:51

Do you know, sometimes you worry that a man's on fire.

0:24:510:24:53

This man's come from nowhere and he is on fire.

0:24:530:24:56

He's certainly hot!

0:24:560:24:58

With a total of five lots bought, that's James spent.

0:24:580:25:01

Charles, we're still waiting for you to get started.

0:25:010:25:04

Now, how about those caryatids?

0:25:040:25:08

Would you meet me at £400 and give me a chance?

0:25:080:25:11

420.

0:25:110:25:12

Oh, don't say that! Would you meet me at 410?

0:25:120:25:15

Here he goes.

0:25:200:25:21

-Come on.

-Do you know what, Lewis?

0:25:210:25:23

Life's a journey.

0:25:250:25:27

We hold tight and as I go back into England,

0:25:270:25:31

I'll think of England and hope the nation will rejoice...

0:25:310:25:35

at £410.

0:25:350:25:37

Thank you very much.

0:25:380:25:39

Took a while to get there, but you got there.

0:25:390:25:43

Charles has almost blown his whole budget on the six caryatids,

0:25:430:25:46

which he will split into three lots for auction. Dear, oh, dear.

0:25:460:25:49

-Lewis, thank you again.

-Goodbye to you.

-Bye-bye.

0:25:490:25:53

All shopped-out, James is taking it easy in Edinburgh this afternoon

0:25:560:26:00

and heading to the birthplace of one of the greatest scientists in history,

0:26:000:26:04

James Clerk Maxwell.

0:26:040:26:07

Unknown to many but held in high esteem by fellow scientists,

0:26:070:26:12

Maxwell inspired Einstein,

0:26:120:26:13

and his discoveries helped in the development

0:26:130:26:16

of electricity, radio, television and much more.

0:26:160:26:20

Born in this building in June 1831, Maxwell's theories on astronomy,

0:26:200:26:26

physiology, colour optics, thermodynamics,

0:26:260:26:29

electricity and magnetism were ground-breaking.

0:26:290:26:32

James has come to meet particle physicist Dr Aidan Robson to find out more.

0:26:320:26:37

I guess science is one of James's special subjects.

0:26:370:26:42

Such a bright spark!

0:26:420:26:43

One of the things that James Clerk Maxwell is best known for

0:26:440:26:47

is the theory of electromagnetism and so,

0:26:470:26:50

around the middle of the 19th century,

0:26:500:26:52

a lot of people were investigating these two phenomena,

0:26:520:26:55

electricity and magnetism,

0:26:550:26:57

and realising that they're different sides of the same thing.

0:26:570:27:00

-OK.

-So, if we pass a current through a coil of wire...

-Yep.

0:27:000:27:05

..then it becomes magnetic.

0:27:050:27:07

Or, alternatively, if we move a magnet inside a coil of wire,

0:27:070:27:13

then it generates an

0:27:130:27:16

-electric current.

-Can I feel that?

0:27:160:27:18

And so these were the sort of experiments that Michael Faraday

0:27:180:27:21

was doing, for example,

0:27:210:27:22

and what James Clerk Maxwell was trying to do was develop a combined

0:27:220:27:28

mathematical theory that explained everything, and he did that.

0:27:280:27:32

It's what we know now as Maxwell's equations.

0:27:320:27:35

And the extraordinary thing that came out of that was a prediction

0:27:350:27:39

that energy was propagating what we know as an electromagnetic field

0:27:390:27:44

at the speed of light.

0:27:440:27:46

James Clerk Maxwell made the jump to realise that light itself

0:27:460:27:50

is electromagnetic radiation, and this was extraordinary.

0:27:500:27:54

This was one of the triumphs of 19th-century science.

0:27:540:27:58

Maxwell's pioneering research into electromagnetic radiation

0:28:010:28:06

led to inventions like the television, radio and mobile phones.

0:28:060:28:11

Even more than that, he founded the whole field

0:28:110:28:15

of mathematical physics

0:28:150:28:18

and this is really what led to Einstein's success

0:28:180:28:21

and led to Peter Higgs's work, as well.

0:28:210:28:24

So Maxwell was really the foundation of a lot of the breakthroughs

0:28:240:28:28

in physics since then.

0:28:280:28:30

Maxwell was a hero of Albert Einstein, who famously said,

0:28:300:28:34

"I stand on the shoulders of James Clerk Maxwell."

0:28:340:28:39

Despite this recognition from possibly the most famous scientist in history,

0:28:390:28:43

Maxwell has remained largely in the shadows since his death in 1879.

0:28:430:28:49

But to those in the know,

0:28:490:28:51

Maxwell's theories have shaped our modern world,

0:28:510:28:53

paving the way for much of the world's technological innovations.

0:28:530:28:58

Aidan, absolutely fascinating.

0:28:580:29:00

It's lovely to know where the source material of the radio,

0:29:000:29:04

the television, of mobile telephones...

0:29:040:29:07

I must say, I do wish I concentrated slightly more at physics.

0:29:070:29:10

Anyway, it's been absolutely fascinating. Thank you very much indeed.

0:29:100:29:13

Charles has made his way to North Berwick, where he's arrived

0:29:180:29:22

at the final shop of the day.

0:29:220:29:24

-Hello, there!

-Oh, hello.

0:29:250:29:27

How are you? Your name, sir, is?

0:29:270:29:29

-Charles.

-You're Charles as well?

-Yes, exactly the same.

0:29:290:29:32

-Occasionally Charlie.

-Are you a Charlie?

0:29:320:29:35

I'm normally a Charles.

0:29:350:29:36

OUR Charles spent the bulk of his budget in the last shop,

0:29:370:29:41

so has just over £37 available to spend.

0:29:410:29:44

Almost takes me back to my droving days.

0:29:440:29:47

Beautiful, beautiful shop, Charles. I'm trying to butter you up as well.

0:29:530:29:56

Flattery will only get you so far, Charles.

0:29:580:30:00

Now, what have you spotted in here?

0:30:000:30:02

It's quite a cute little, erm...

0:30:050:30:08

cup, little tea bowl. Maybe a bowl.

0:30:080:30:10

And often we see images of 18th-century ladies

0:30:100:30:14

taking their tea like this.

0:30:140:30:16

But it's a beautiful little blue-and-white example.

0:30:170:30:20

-Charles?

-Yes?

0:30:200:30:22

They say small is beautiful.

0:30:220:30:24

The little bowl here's quite sweet.

0:30:240:30:26

Nice, isn't it? Just cute.

0:30:260:30:27

-Yes, yes.

-What could it be?

0:30:270:30:29

-A couple of pounds?

-Yeah.

-Fine.

0:30:290:30:31

-Quite cute, isn't it, for a couple of pounds?

-Mm.

0:30:310:30:33

Yeah, I like your style.

0:30:330:30:35

Thanks, Charles. That's one purchase.

0:30:350:30:37

I'll keep wandering. Thanks a lot. OK.

0:30:370:30:40

That's the tea bowl bought for £2,

0:30:400:30:42

and it looks like there may be one more buy on the cards.

0:30:420:30:47

That's a nice little dish.

0:30:470:30:49

It's quite a nice pewter...

0:30:490:30:51

I suppose what you might call a dinner plate,

0:30:510:30:54

in this lovely almost pie-crust reeded-moulded cast frame.

0:30:540:30:58

What you look for on any pewter or early metalware

0:30:580:31:02

is where it's languished on tables,

0:31:020:31:04

and you can see on the base of this dish,

0:31:040:31:08

there are some nice knife marks.

0:31:080:31:10

It's not overly early, but it's quite tactile.

0:31:100:31:14

He likes it, but how much will it set him back?

0:31:140:31:17

Er, Charlie?

0:31:170:31:18

-Is it expensive or...?

-It's 15.

0:31:190:31:21

-15?

-Yeah.

0:31:210:31:23

It's quite nice, isn't it?

0:31:240:31:26

Yeah, because...

0:31:260:31:27

something that doesn't sell an awful lot is pewter.

0:31:270:31:31

-It's kind of out of...

-Would you take £10 for it?

0:31:310:31:34

Mmm, yes.

0:31:340:31:36

Thanks ever so much. Pick up my blue-and-white...

0:31:360:31:39

..tea bowl down here and the waiter that I am,

0:31:400:31:44

walk this, or drove it, down to Cumbria.

0:31:440:31:47

I'll pay for it first.

0:31:470:31:49

Charles pays for the tea bowl and pewter plate...

0:31:510:31:54

..which he'll add to his three pairs of wooden caryatids,

0:31:550:31:59

giving him five lots to take to auction.

0:31:590:32:01

James also has five lots - his pair of Chinese stools,

0:32:030:32:07

a pair of Indian hardwood tables,

0:32:070:32:09

the Arts and Crafts mirror,

0:32:090:32:11

a Studio Pottery corgi moneybox

0:32:110:32:14

and the lead donkey.

0:32:140:32:16

The big question is, what do they think of each other's lots?

0:32:160:32:20

He's bought a pewter plate. Nobody buys pewter.

0:32:210:32:25

Charles was very excited about the caryatids.

0:32:250:32:28

I had a look at them and some I liked and some I didn't really like.

0:32:280:32:33

He paid £10

0:32:330:32:35

for that little beautifully tactile donkey so, hopefully...

0:32:350:32:38

..he'll be the ass at the end of this auction.

0:32:400:32:43

I say, Carlos!

0:32:430:32:44

The boys are back on the road in a car that works -

0:32:440:32:47

well, at the moment.

0:32:470:32:48

It's another DKW 1000 Coupe.

0:32:480:32:51

After beginning in Perth,

0:32:510:32:53

our experts have now made their way over the border en route to auction

0:32:530:32:56

in Crooklands, Cumbria.

0:32:560:32:58

I must say, behind the wheel, this is a very different car.

0:33:000:33:03

It actually feels like a decent car.

0:33:030:33:05

-But it's not the same car.

-No, it's red.

0:33:050:33:08

This car's red. Our last car was blue, wasn't it?

0:33:080:33:10

So it's had no spray job - it's just a completely different car?

0:33:100:33:13

It feels like a different car.

0:33:130:33:15

I think the other one died.

0:33:150:33:17

Fingers crossed on this one, anyway.

0:33:170:33:19

The boys have arrived at Eighteen Eighteen Auctioneers.

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This is my moment to shine in the prize Cumbrian weather.

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James, on a day like today...

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..may your luck be an antique horse.

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On a day like today, let's get inside.

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With a history stretching back nearly 200 years -

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but not in this building - it's a well-established saleroom.

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The gentleman holding the gavel today is David Brooks.

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What does he make of our experts' lots?

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The lead token donkey is quite sweet.

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Is it going to sell well? I really don't know.

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Jury's out on that one.

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The tea bowl - supposedly 16th-century.

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It's got damage to it, so I don't think it will do terribly well,

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despite its age. But, again, we do get real surprises, sometimes,

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with the Chinese market.

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Oh, yes, it's a busy room and there's online and phone bidding here, too,

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so take your seat, chaps.

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Hold tight! Oh... OK!

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Oh, blimey!

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Sorry about that. Sorry about that.

0:34:150:34:16

First up, James's pair of Chinese stools.

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I have to start the bidding with me at £60.

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You watch. The net's going up, up.

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65 on the internet.

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70 with me.

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-Profit.

-80 with me. £80 here.

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-We have 85...

-I'd like to start bidding now.

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Just in time, sir, 90 in the room.

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It's against you on the net. In the room at £90, have we finished?

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-Chin up.

-With the scarf in the room at £90...

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-Profit.

-Cheap lot.

-£15.

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James hoped for more, but a profit nevertheless.

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How do you feel?

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-Look at me.

-Gutted.

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Now, now! Less of the negative, James.

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Right, the first pair of Charles's caryatids are the next to go.

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Where am I going to start?

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-£50?

-Come on, internet.

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Apparently, we have a telephone bid. 50 now on the internet.

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-Come on, let's go!

-55 on the phone.

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60 now. 65 on the phone.

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I've got a net bid and a phone bid.

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I'm more confident now.

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75 on the phone.

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80 on the internet.

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85, phone.

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90, net.

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95 on the phone.

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-We'll get there slowly.

-Hold tight, everybody, hold tight!

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We've got a long way to go. It's those two over there.

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110 on the phone.

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-120 on the internet.

-Go on, phone line!

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130 on the phone.

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-We've got a long way to go.

-140 on the net.

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150 on the phone.

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-Have we finished?

-Come on!

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No, 160. 160 on the internet.

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And we will sell if no further interest at £160...

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I make that a profit apiece. Well done, boys.

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It just shows - the room is out...

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-The room is out.

-We're very...

-I don't think the room was ever in.

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No.

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Well, let's see how the room feels

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about your pair of Indian tables, shall we, James?

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20. £20, madam? Thank you.

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£20 bid in the room.

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You watch this now - it's going to move.

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-25.

-25.

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28, fresh bid. 30.

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-32. 32 in the room.

-Come on.

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It's against you on the net.

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They're here to be sold at the 32...

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Oh, dear, that's a shame. Bad luck, James.

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You know what, James? It's a funny old game.

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It IS a funny old game, isn't it?

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It IS a funny old game.

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Charles, time for your second pair of caryatids.

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£70 on the internet.

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Bidding on the phone? 75? 75 on the phone.

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-80 on the net.

-Phone's in, is it?

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85, phone. 90, net.

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-These are good.

-95, phone.

-I thought the first ones were lovely.

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Caryatids are carrying on. Come on, phone bid.

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-110 on the phone.

-Come on, internet.

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120 on the internet. 130 on the phone.

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140 now.

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-Go on, phone bid!

-140 on the internet, 150 on the phone.

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-160 on the internet.

-Come on, phone bid.

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160 on the internet.

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-Phone bid, look at me.

-That should be enough.

-Look at me!

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160 on the internet - have we finished?

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-Out on the phone.

-Go on, phone bid!

-Anything from the room, no?

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160 on the internet here and going...

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Another profit there for Charles - marvellous!

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What a gamble! What a gamble!

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I'd love to know, how far would that net bid go?

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We'll never know, Charles.

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Next up, it's James and his Arts and Crafts mirror.

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I'm going to have to start the bidding with me at £55.

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-Ah, well done, chief.

-So you should. I paid £100 for it.

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55. It's against you on the net.

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60. 65 with me. 70. Now we're jumping up.

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-The net really wants this.

-Commissions are out

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-and the internet has jumped up to £90.

-Oh, my goodness!

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-Wow!

-£90.

-Well done, chief.

-Interest on the phone?

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95. I've come back to you. 100 now on the internet.

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-At 100 on the internet.

-This net really wants it.

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-That net will go up and up.

-We have £130 on the phone now,

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and selling...

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That profit puts you back in the game, James.

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-That's a whopping £30 profit.

-It's a £30 profit.

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-Yeah, happy?

-I am happy.

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Will it be third time's the charm for Charles,

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as his final pair of caryatids go on offer?

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Let's ask £50, got to be.

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£50 on the phone, thank you.

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-Net's in, net's in.

-That's before the internet.

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-100.

-We've jumped to £100.

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-I like your style!

-£100 on the phone.

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Straight in. He's jumped.

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110, there you go.

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-120 on the phone.

-Come on, net.

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-These could move.

-130 on the net.

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140 on the phone. How are we doing? 150?

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-Yes, we are.

-Come on, internet and phone bid!

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160 on the phone, is it?

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Yes, 160 on the phone.

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-170 on the internet.

-Go on, phone bid!

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-No!

-On the internet now, going...

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This pair fared a little better than the other two

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and Charles bags another good profit.

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Overall, James, I'm delighted with that,

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because it was a gamble worth taking, just to enjoy that voyage.

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James is up again. This time, it's his lead donkey.

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£20, please. Start me somewhere.

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-Thank you, madam.

-Here we go.

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£20 I have bid.

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22 right by you.

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25. 28.

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30. 32.

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35. 38.

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40. 42, fresh bid.

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This is kicking on.

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48. 50.

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Have we finished here at £50 now, and selling?

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Wow!

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Wow indeed!

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A fantastic profit there for James.

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That donkey made five times its purchase price.

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-Fantastic!

-It did, it did.

-Fantastic!

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He's good at maths, but will Charles manage to do as well

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with his pewter plate, I wonder?

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£20 start me, please, cheap and cheerful.

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It's a nice plate.

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-Thank you, madam, £20 we have bid.

-Hello there. Thanks a lot.

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Come on! Nice plate!

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22 on the internet.

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25. 28.

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No? 28 on the internet.

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One over there, one over there.

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£30 in the room.

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32. 35.

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-I must say...

-It's 18th-century.

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38. 40.

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-He knows something. It's a very early plate.

-Finished?

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No, 42. 45.

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In the room...

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Oh!

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Oh! Another great profit. Well done, Charles.

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-That's a good return.

-That's a good return.

-That could,

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after today's journey, just get me into the positive.

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James's last lot now - his Studio Pottery corgi moneybox.

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£20 on the internet.

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-Wow!

-22 bid.

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I'll come back to the room. 22 bid.

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Are we bidding in the room? I have 25 on the internet.

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28 in the room, thank you.

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Concentrate on the room.

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At £28 in the room, and we will sell if no further...

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-£30.

-Well done, chief, you're in.

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No? Sure?

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£30 in the room here with this lady.

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-They've been ignored.

-32, she's come back.

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-Well done, mate.

-35.

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-Net's back in again.

-35 with the lady here. At £35...

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James finishes with a final profit.

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Well done, that man! And his dog.

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From one corgi to another...

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THEY SNORT

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Oh, you two!

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Right, time for one last lot.

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It's Charles's porcelain tea bowl.

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-22 on the net.

-Come on!

-25 in the room.

-It's a good thing.

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28. 30. 32 on the internet.

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-32, 35, a bidder in the room now.

-Come on! Do you like it?

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Thank you very much. Come on, internet!

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-40.

-That's enough.

0:41:450:41:47

42. 45 in the room.

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£2! It cost me £2!

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-48.

-48!

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48.

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Have I got to listen to any more of this?

0:41:550:41:58

-Have I really got to...

-Call me Emperor Ming!

0:41:580:42:00

Make no mistake, if no further interest, at the 50 in the room...

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-Put it there.

-Oh, do I have to?

-Yeah.

-Really?

0:42:050:42:08

-Give us a kiss.

-No.

0:42:080:42:09

Don't blame you! Anyway, amazing ending there for Charles.

0:42:090:42:13

-Come on.

-Well done.

0:42:130:42:14

Right, let's see who's coming out on top.

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James started this leg with £315.68.

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Pulling in a profit of £21.34 after auction costs,

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means he now has £337.02.

0:42:270:42:32

Charles began with £447.34.

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Plenty of profits means he gained £57.70 after auction costs.

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He goes into the final leg way out in the lead

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with £505.04. Well done, boy.

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Thank you very much, James! The Escape To Victory.

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You got away with it. You did get away with it, Charles, again.

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Fare thee well, Road Trippers.

0:42:580:43:00

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

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it's the final leg of the boys' Scottish adventure.

0:43:070:43:10

Oh, sorry, madam. Sorry.

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And there's everything to play for.

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You've just got to keep your eyes open.

0:43:160:43:17

-Just like that!

-You get too easily distracted, mate.

0:43:170:43:20

An unreliable classic car has Charles Hanson and James Braxton complete this leg on foot. After buying antiques in Perthshire and the Lothians, Charles hears how drovers would move cattle from the Scottish Highlands to market in Stirling and has a jolly good go at it himself.

Meanwhile, James learns about Einstein's inspiration and one of the greatest scientists in history, James Clerk Maxwell. He hopes a charming little lead donkey means big profits at the auction in Cumbria.