Episode 8 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 8

James Braxton and Charles Hanson travel south from Glasgow, shopping in Ayrshire and Lanarkshire, before selling at an auction in Hamilton.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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That's cracking.

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-With £200 each...

-Wonderful.

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..a classic car and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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That's exactly what I'm talking about.

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I'm all over a shiver.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-No-brainer.

-Going, going, gone.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory...

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Push.

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..or the slow road to disaster?

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How awfully, awfully nice.

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's the third instalment of this week's epic adventure

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for our auctioneers extraordinaire,

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Charles Hanson and James Braxton.

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-What are you, now? 58?

-I'm not 58!

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I'm warming up for the big 49...

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-Are you serious?

-Hey? Hey?

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Ow! My ribcage!

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Charles is a hotshot antiques expert who likes to be in charge.

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Yeah, I'm very comfortable here. This is more me. Sold.

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Going, going, gone.

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His nemesis on this road trip is antiques guru James,

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who is bursting with antique knowledge...

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Literally.

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Whoopsie. Gesundheit.

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From his starting stake of £200,

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James has £229.60 in his wallet.

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While Charles' profitable purchases

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have turned his original £200 into £294.30,

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so he's out in front and enjoying it.

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-I think I am the antique whisperer.

-Do you?

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Although, one man thought I was a Ken Barlow on antiques.

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-LAUGHING:

-Ken Barlow.

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I guess that makes you Deirdre, then, James.

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On this trip, our boys are travelling in style in

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this 1964 DKW 1000 coupe.

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It was manufactured before seatbelts were mandatory,

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so our experts aren't wearing any, got it?

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-I'm going to buy really old things.

-Good. Please.

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That is what will get my juice...

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That is what will get my sap rising.

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We're not after your sap.

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Quite right.

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After beginning their epic trip in the Highlands,

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Charles and James are journeying all over Bonnie Scotland,

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taking in the north-east and the central belt

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before finishing over the border in Berwick-upon-Tweed.

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This leg will get going in Glasgow and end in Hamilton for auction.

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Shopping kicks off with a visit to Scotland's largest city -

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a wet and windy Glasgow.

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What's new?

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Good egg that he is,

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James is dropping off Charles at the first shop.

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Isn't that lovely? See that the old boy doesn't get wet, eh?

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-This is it, James.

-I'll tell you what?

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This could be the Glasgow kiss of antiques.

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James, if it is a Glasgow kiss,

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it will be the head-butt of all antiques.

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-Keep it new.

-On your head, son. Have a good day. See you later.

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This emporium is bursting with potential buys.

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Dealer John is on hand to help. Hi, John.

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This is now Antiques Road Trip time. Quiet, please.

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I would appreciate no disturbance, OK? No disturbance.

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Well, that's us told, then.

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This is what I do on my day job.

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Yeah, I am very comfortable here. This is more me. Sold.

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Going, going, gone.

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Today is about buying, not selling, chap.

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Now, what have you got there?

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Isn't that nice?

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A little barometer.

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Set to fair, at the moment, is our road trip.

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It could get stormy. It could get stormy.

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The reason I like this

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is it's almost got this militaria association.

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It reads here, "To Sgt Maj Hardy on his marriage

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"from his squadron leader captain, the Honourable RH Lindsay,

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"Royal Scots Greys."

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It's in oak and a good barometer. It's circa 1910.

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Could it be a great price? There's no price on it.

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The barometer isn't John's to sell,

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but luckily the dealer's wife is in the shop today, Julie.

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What is your man willing to accept, then, girl?

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-He says you can have it for 40.

-Oh, don't say that.

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-You've got to fall in love with an object.

-That's true.

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I think this object has a real history,

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so I think with that price, I shall buy it.

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First lot bought - anything else grab you, Charles?

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There's this lovely little dish.

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Elkington-style with an agricultural scene.

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It's been described as being on copper.

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It's silver-plated but just very nice quality.

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With the ticket price of £70,

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is there a deal to be done with John?

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What is the best on that if I bought that?

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60.

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-Interesting. You wouldn't take 50 for it?

-Can't do it.

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I'll take it for £60 and take a gamble with it,

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because it is just a nice object.

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Sometimes when the heart says yes, your heart says yes.

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From one man's heart to a Scottish heart,

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I will take it.

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Thanks a lot, sir.

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Good. A second lot secured for £60. But how about a third?

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Hang on, this piece of porcelain

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looks like it has seen better days, Charles.

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This is a lovely little dish.

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This is hand-enamelled with a very attractive lady.

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What I like about this is the gilding on this rim.

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But we talk about condition, condition is so important,

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and you will see on the back, it has been plastered.

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The wounds have been healed.

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You have got cracks, you've got some quite serious damage,

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and the old wire from where it's been held up.

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It will date to around 1880, made at Dresden in Germany,

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like Staffordshire is to England, a huge epicentre,

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but it is completely smashed, isn't it, John?

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What's the best price on that?

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-For you?

-Yes. £1.

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£1?

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-Yes.

-For 100 pence, I will take her.

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-Going, going, gone.

-No problem.

-Thanks a lot, John.

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That's another programme, isn't it?

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Anyway, three lots bought. Well done.

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James, meanwhile, has motored 23 miles south-west

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to Kilbirnie in Ayrshire, home of The Stirrup Cup,

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a lovely little antique shop that James has visited before.

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Look out.

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-Hello.

-Hello, James.

-Greta, how are you?

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I'm very well. Nice to have you back.

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Yeah, lovely to be back, isn't it?

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What have you got, Greta? Have you got some goodies at the moment?

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Something interesting?

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On my way here, I dropped off Charles, and I said to Charles,

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"What I want to buy is things of age."

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With a selection of antiques and curios,

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you're bound to find something old in here.

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Look at the condition of that bell. It's got a bit of history, though.

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-That's had a direct hit.

-The Blitz in Glasgow.

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-So where did this come from?

-Clydebank.

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That is where we had a lot of our problems.

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-Isn't that great?

-Isn't it great?

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So this comes from Clydebank.

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The poor air raid warden wouldn't wear that, would he?

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-That would have been on his door.

-That would have been on his door.

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Yes. It is all bumped and bashed, isn't it?

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It's quite funny that it's an ARP warden... So Air Raid...

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-Air Raid Personnel.

-Air Raid Personnel.

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..would have had a direct hit.

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How much are those two, Greta?

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Well, I could do the two for 40 for you.

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-40. It's got history, hasn't it?

-Yes.

-That certainly has.

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I quite like that. I think I'm going to put that aside, Greta.

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Touching history, that's what we need to do.

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Looks like James has spotted another bit of history

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in the form of an oak table.

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Oh, yes.

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The table is Arts and Crafts,

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so you're looking at, what, 1890, 1900?

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It has been restored...

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Yeah, it looks very clean, doesn't it?

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-It is in perfect condition.

-Nice piece, that.

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It's good, isn't it?

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With a ticket price of £225, the table is set aside for now

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because something shiny has caught James' eye.

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They are very stylish, aren't they?

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-They are a stylish, aren't they?

-They're early.

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When the Orkney silver first took off,

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which would be probably about the '70s,

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Ola Gorie, she was one of the main designers for Ortak,

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but they are so stylish.

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It's nice to get something packaged.

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Is that the little pamphlet that went originally with it as well?

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Oh, I see.

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It's quite nice to have that, isn't it?

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He seems keen, but will Greta be willing to go lower

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than the £50 ticket price?

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I could do them for 25 for you, James.

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What was the best you could do on that table?

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The table... Well, I could do the table...

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I could do the table for 80.

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-80.

-Yes.

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That is a very generous discount. Right, James, decision time.

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I'm going to definitely take earrings at 25.

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I'm trailing a bit with my terrible partner,

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old History Hanson is sort of moving away.

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I think he will be rather envious of that.

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Could you take a bit of that one, 70,

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and then I will pay you the 40 on that

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and then the 125, so it's 135?

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-Right, OK.

-Would that be all right?

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-Yes, let's agree on that.

-Thank you, that's very kind.

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Very kind. I'm really pleased with that.

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I've got history, I've got style,

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and I've got that Glasgow, that great craftsmanship, really.

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Yeah, it is a nice piece. It is a lovely piece.

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Great. Really pleased. Really pleased.

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So you should be. That's three lots bought £135 in your very first shop!

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Charles has been back on the road and made his way to Prestwick.

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Once thought as the only place in the UK

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that Elvis Presley ever set foot,

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Prestwick is also home to Nae Sae New.

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That's a shop.

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Dealer Gary has plenty of antiques and collectables on offer,

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and it doesn't take Charles long to spot something he likes.

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I like the spoons. They're nice, aren't they?

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How much are those silver spoons, Gary?

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Those ones are 35.

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-And the best price, Gary, on those could be...to an old mate?

-28.

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They're quite sweet.

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Right, the spoons are a possibility, and the search continues.

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-We always like being able to root.

-Get stuck in.

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CHARLES LAUGHS

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That's quite nice, isn't it, Gary?

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A little...

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Probably Regency in period.

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If you are a man of some distinction,

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you would certainly be using this at your desk

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to rubber-stamp your letters with your wax seal.

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I bet, Gary, it is quite good value.

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-Very.

-Tell me.

-Fiver.

-Yeah, I thought so.

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Not bad at all, isn't it? I might put that on the side there, Gary.

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What I also like is that. It's a rule, isn't it?

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-Yes.

-How early is that?

-Late 19th, early 20th.

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What could that be, best price?

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-Eight.

-That's your very best on that?

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-See what else you come up with.

-OK.

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I will put it over there as well, Gary.

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What's Gary got in there, then?

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His stash.

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Oh, I say! That is quite a sweet pendant,

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isn't it, with a footballer?

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Yes, it's got a compass on the other side.

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Oh, how nice, Gary. How much is that?

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I could do that for eight.

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I'm going to take him out and put him on your counter

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with my little rule and stamp.

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I'm actually seeing a lot of objects that I'm quite taken by.

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One second, I'm going down.

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What we've got is a nice drum mustard

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that's hallmarked Birmingham, made by Walker & Hall.

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You've then got matching salt, with spoons.

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They are all silver, which is nice.

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How much, Gary, would all that be, there, out of interest?

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30.

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With a combined ticket price of £58 on the selection of silver

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and £21 for the compass, rule and seal,

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what's the best Gary will do?

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-I would do 50.

-OK.

-I would do...

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..15 for those three pieces.

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I'm going to, for auction, put those three together.

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-Right.

-And pay £15.

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-OK.

-Done. OK.

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I have now confirmed one lot.

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I'm going to buy these spoons for £20.

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Job done. Thank you very much.

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Then, finally, I'm going to buy my group of metalware,

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which is all silver, for £30.

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Gary, thank you.

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£65 has Charles another two lots for auction. Jolly good stuff.

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Thanks for the memories. See you.

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James, meanwhile, is still in Ayrshire,

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and has made his way down to Ardeer,

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which is in the bottom of our garden. Ha!

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It was here in the late 19th century

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that Swedish scientist and inventor Alfred Nobel

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built what was, at the time,

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the biggest explosives factory in the world.

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After centuries of gunpowder ruling the explosives market,

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everything changed when nitroglycerin was invented,

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which Nobel then used to manufacture dynamite.

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James is meeting local author Dr Eric Graham to find out more.

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Boom-boom.

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Eric, tell me about the man himself, Alfred Nobel.

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Well, he was a Swedish chemist, engineer.

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He takes this new product called nitroglycerin,

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which was very unstable, and he makes it safe by mixing it

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with a kind of moss, bog material, quite inert,

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which he'll patent, and he'll call it dynamite.

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This was no mean feat.

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The volatile nature of nitroglycerin had caused many deaths,

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including Nobel's youngest brother, Emil,

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who was killed while experimenting with the dangerous liquid in 1864.

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Crikey. Over the next three years,

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Nobel focused on the safety issues with nitroglycerin.

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In 1867, dynamite was born.

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Although manufacturing was still dangerous,

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the finished product was much safer to handle.

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He was a very astute businessman.

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He was very good at organising the capital.

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He knew governments would be very interested,

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because it's such a powerful explosive device.

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With the British Empire expanding, demand for dynamite quickly grew

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as it was ideal for blasting tunnels, cutting canals

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and building railways and roads.

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Of course, you will have 13,000 people working at the site alone.

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-13,000 here?

-Just here in Ardeer.

-Really?

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Nobel chose to build his factory on the Ardeer Peninsula

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due to its remote location and huge sand dunes,

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which provided natural safety features

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for the dangerous manufacture of dynamite.

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All these earthworks you see all round about you,

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excavated out of sand dunes,

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provides the unit production protection.

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So if they were to go up, the hut would explode,

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but the force would go up the way, not sideways.

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I see, so not hitting anything else, just straight up into the air.

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So you minimise damage and casualties

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and you don't lose the factory.

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This is what we're going to prove with the experiment, isn't it?

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-This force going up.

-An experiment, yes, that would be excellent.

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-Get blowing something up.

-Yes!

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This sounds right up James' street!

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So we've got the brown box.

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And in the blue box, we have the same amount of charge,

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but this box will be uncovered, whereas this one will be...

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It's sand-bagged.

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The experiment will show how the contained one here,

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give an example of how these blast walls,

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these will be the sand bags to hold the blast and direct it upwards,

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away from the other munitions workers and huts.

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-You can't wait to press the button, can you?

-I can't.

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Get plunging!

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We don't have plungers any more. Far more sophisticated.

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Boxes prepped and ready to go. James gets to do the honours.

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This is where the button is.

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KLAXON SOUNDS

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All away?

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Press one.

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Here we go.

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So, with both boxes blown, it's time to survey the damage.

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The non-sand-bagged blue box first.

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It's scattered, isn't it? All over.

0:17:040:17:06

Well, there's not a lot left of the blue box, that's a fact.

0:17:060:17:09

-No, no.

-It's everywhere. As far as you can see.

-All over.

0:17:090:17:12

I can see it over there as well.

0:17:120:17:14

How's our brown box fared?

0:17:140:17:16

I think it should have been much more contained.

0:17:160:17:19

-The damage is localised.

-It is localised, isn't it?

0:17:190:17:23

For almost 25 years,

0:17:230:17:25

Nobel's explosives were manufactured at Ardeer.

0:17:250:17:28

Sadly, 21 people lost their lives here,

0:17:280:17:31

but compared to the number of employees,

0:17:310:17:34

it was actually a lower death rate

0:17:340:17:36

than any cotton mill or shipyard at that time.

0:17:360:17:39

Eric has a very close connection with Ardeer

0:17:390:17:42

as one of his relatives once worked here.

0:17:420:17:44

So this is my wonderful Aunt Maisie. Just engaged to be married.

0:17:440:17:49

-She's 22 years old.

-22 years old.

0:17:490:17:52

She would be one of four girls in the cartridging huts.

0:17:520:17:58

Unfortunately, 66 years ago to this day,

0:17:580:18:01

my Aunt Maisie and the other three girls were blown up,

0:18:010:18:05

so they all died.

0:18:050:18:07

We've never found out what caused the accident,

0:18:070:18:10

but the principle that we've been discussing

0:18:100:18:12

meant that only that hut went.

0:18:120:18:14

-Yeah. Yeah.

-So there was no more casualties.

0:18:140:18:17

-It didn't spread.

-It didn't spread.

-Amazing.

0:18:170:18:20

Although dynamite revolutionised the mining and construction industries,

0:18:200:18:24

it wasn't long before the military began using it in warfare.

0:18:240:18:27

In 1888, a French newspaper mistakenly published

0:18:270:18:31

Alfred Nobel's obituary,

0:18:310:18:33

describing him as a man who made millions

0:18:330:18:35

through the death of others.

0:18:350:18:37

Reportedly stunned, Nobel was determined to improve his legacy.

0:18:400:18:44

The year before he died in 1896,

0:18:440:18:46

he signed his last will and testament,

0:18:460:18:49

in which he set aside the majority of his vast estate

0:18:490:18:52

to establish the Nobel prizes,

0:18:520:18:54

including one awarded for the pursuit of peace.

0:18:540:18:58

Thank you, Eric. It's been...

0:18:580:18:59

Well, you've made this former very busy landscape come alive again.

0:18:590:19:04

-I loved doing the blasting.

-Did you?

0:19:040:19:06

Let's get into the warm.

0:19:060:19:09

-North Ayrshire, it's quite cold, isn't it?

-Yes!

0:19:090:19:12

And so ends another explosive day for our experts.

0:19:120:19:16

Time for some shuteye. Night-night, you two.

0:19:160:19:19

No explosions and it's a new day in Bonnie Scotland,

0:19:220:19:25

and our boys are back on the road.

0:19:250:19:27

Did you have a good day yesterday?

0:19:270:19:30

-Yeah.

-Did you buy anything?

0:19:300:19:31

-I went... I bought...

-Sorry.

0:19:310:19:34

-Sorry.

-Lovely... Lovely driving.

0:19:360:19:38

-I didn't know we were going through a

-ford. Sorry about that.

0:19:380:19:41

This is Scotland, James. I'll tell you what?

0:19:410:19:44

We've had some rain the last 24 hours.

0:19:440:19:46

We've had some rain.

0:19:460:19:47

So far, James has bought three lots -

0:19:470:19:50

the Arts and Crafts oak table,

0:19:500:19:52

the World War II ARP hand ball and door plate,

0:19:520:19:56

and the Ola Gorie silver earrings,

0:19:560:19:59

leaving him £94.60 available to spend today.

0:19:590:20:02

Charles, meanwhile, has secured himself five lots.

0:20:040:20:07

The early 20th-century barometer, a 19th-century embossed charger,

0:20:070:20:11

the Dresden porcelain plate,

0:20:110:20:14

the selection of assorted silver

0:20:140:20:16

and the combined lot of the football compass, parallel rule

0:20:160:20:19

and treen seal which means

0:20:190:20:21

he still has £128.30 in his pocket.

0:20:210:20:25

Why is the car currently shaking?

0:20:270:20:29

I can't work...

0:20:290:20:31

What have you done? Go up to second.

0:20:310:20:33

You've gone to fourth again.

0:20:330:20:35

All you do, all you do is you drive from first to fourth.

0:20:350:20:40

There are two other gears, you know.

0:20:400:20:42

It's called clutch control. It's called clutch control.

0:20:420:20:46

You're in first again, aren't you?

0:20:460:20:48

James, maybe you should drive.

0:20:480:20:50

This morning, our likely lads have made their way to the village of

0:20:520:20:55

Overtown in North Lanarkshire,

0:20:550:20:57

where Charles is dropping James off at his first shop of the day.

0:20:570:21:01

Garrion Bridges Garden And Antique Centre.

0:21:010:21:03

I've been there.

0:21:030:21:05

If I don't find any antiques, it's herbs for me.

0:21:050:21:08

James, I hope you'll bloom. Bloom like a daffodil.

0:21:080:21:12

-Good luck, but not too much, bye.

-Yeah. Flower.

0:21:120:21:15

All the best, James.

0:21:160:21:17

ENGINE ROARS Oh, Lord, get it in gear.

0:21:170:21:20

Ha... With over 100 dealers' delights on display,

0:21:210:21:25

manager Greg is lending a helping hand.

0:21:250:21:27

Nice bit of plain porcelain there. Who's it made by?

0:21:320:21:35

We've got Royal Doulton there.

0:21:350:21:36

We've got a date, 1936.

0:21:360:21:39

Normally with commemorative china,

0:21:390:21:43

you don't get the sort of royal cipher there,

0:21:430:21:46

so the initials - you normally get something to do with an event.

0:21:460:21:50

Say, like a coronation. It's lovely quality.

0:21:500:21:53

-That's history. I like that.

-History, yeah.

-It's damaged.

0:21:530:21:57

What have we got? We've got 15 on that. Can I make a cheeky offer?

0:21:570:22:01

-You can, on you go.

-A fiver.

0:22:010:22:02

A quick call to the dealer and Greg's back.

0:22:020:22:05

-Right, bad news, I'm afraid.

-Bad news, Greg?

0:22:070:22:10

What is the bad news?

0:22:100:22:12

-£12.

-£12? Oh, he's a tough man, isn't he?

0:22:120:22:16

-Very tough.

-Tough man.

0:22:160:22:18

£12?

0:22:180:22:19

I think it's still worth having a go at.

0:22:190:22:21

I think that's rather fun.

0:22:210:22:23

Yeah. I'll go for it. Why not?

0:22:230:22:25

-In for a penny.

-Thank you.

-Thank you, Greg.

0:22:250:22:27

The little Doulton jug secured for £12 - well done, James.

0:22:270:22:31

CAR HORN

0:22:340:22:36

Charles, meanwhile, is starting the day with a trip to Lanark.

0:22:360:22:40

He's come to New Lanark - founded in the late 18th century,

0:22:410:22:45

this pioneering cotton mill village

0:22:450:22:47

was made famous by a man named Robert Owen.

0:22:470:22:50

Charles is meeting learning and outreach manager Aynsley Gough

0:22:500:22:54

to find out more.

0:22:540:22:57

-Hello, Charles. Welcome to New Lanark.

-How are you?

0:22:570:22:59

-What an amazing place.

-It is.

-Isn't it?

-Come on in.

-Can't wait.

0:22:590:23:03

In 1800, social pioneer Robert Owen

0:23:050:23:08

took over New Lanark from his father-in-law.

0:23:080:23:11

This cotton mill village would go on to become known worldwide

0:23:110:23:15

thanks to Owen's workplace, social and educational reforms.

0:23:150:23:19

His ground-breaking ideas would go on

0:23:190:23:22

to change the lives of the working classes the world over.

0:23:220:23:25

Robert Owen had grand plans for this place.

0:23:250:23:28

He wanted to create a model community.

0:23:280:23:31

By that, I mean he wanted to make

0:23:310:23:35

the lives of the working people better.

0:23:350:23:37

Of course they were required to work in his mill to make money.

0:23:370:23:40

But he wanted to make their lives better in terms of the environment

0:23:400:23:43

they lived in, the living standards that they encountered

0:23:430:23:47

and by giving them an education.

0:23:470:23:49

That was very forward-thinking at the time.

0:23:490:23:51

He had the foresight to see how one had good workers,

0:23:510:23:56

meant good business, meant good spirits,

0:23:560:23:59

and meant we all got on together.

0:23:590:24:00

Working conditions in mills at this time were brutal,

0:24:000:24:04

with long hours, poor wages and cruel discipline.

0:24:040:24:07

More than a century ahead of his time,

0:24:070:24:09

Owen believed the environment formed character

0:24:090:24:13

so, he made New Lanark a better place for his workers

0:24:130:24:15

to work and live.

0:24:150:24:17

Owen also stayed in the village and his house still stands today.

0:24:170:24:21

Quite grand.

0:24:210:24:22

He did much here to improve the lives of the workers.

0:24:220:24:26

He built a school here.

0:24:260:24:28

He banned all children under ten working in the mills.

0:24:280:24:31

As well as the school,

0:24:310:24:32

-he built the Institute For The Formation Of Character...

-Yes.

0:24:320:24:35

..in which there were evening classes for the adults.

0:24:350:24:38

There was a library,

0:24:380:24:39

because he believed that all of the working classes

0:24:390:24:42

had a right to education.

0:24:420:24:44

Along with creating the world's first infant school,

0:24:460:24:49

Owen also built a village store

0:24:490:24:51

which is believed to be a forerunner of the Co-operative Movement.

0:24:510:24:55

Established in 1813,

0:24:560:24:58

Owen wanted to provide quality groceries and goods at fair prices.

0:24:580:25:02

All profits from the shop were used

0:25:020:25:04

to help fund the education system Owen had introduced.

0:25:040:25:08

-The idea behind the store was to make people's money go further.

-Yes.

0:25:080:25:12

They didn't earn great wages here at New Lanark,

0:25:120:25:14

because they had benefits such as better housing -

0:25:140:25:16

but Robert Owen wanted to make sure that their money could go further,

0:25:160:25:20

and he instituted an idea of fair trading all those years ago.

0:25:200:25:24

He would buy in bulk - local fresh produce.

0:25:240:25:27

The company leased a farm locally,

0:25:270:25:29

so that people were getting access to apples, vegetables -

0:25:290:25:33

they could buy them fresh and at a very good price.

0:25:330:25:37

-We understand 25% less...

-Really?

-..than market value.

0:25:370:25:41

So, it meant that a family could have quite a good diet.

0:25:410:25:45

In addition to the store, and he encouraged people to save.

0:25:450:25:49

He created a savings bank here and, again,

0:25:490:25:52

just convincing people to put back a little bit

0:25:520:25:55

of their hard-earned cash was a huge cultural change.

0:25:550:26:00

Owen was one of the most influential thinkers of his time,

0:26:000:26:03

and he continued to campaign for social reform

0:26:030:26:06

until his death in 1858.

0:26:060:26:08

Robert Owen's vision for fairness and moral order

0:26:080:26:12

remains a source of inspiration to this day.

0:26:120:26:14

With more shopping still to do,

0:26:180:26:20

James has made his way to Newhouse in North Lanarkshire.

0:26:200:26:23

He's arrived at Greenside Antique And Decorative Arts Centre

0:26:240:26:28

with just over £80 still in his pocket...

0:26:280:26:31

and looking very pleased with himself.

0:26:310:26:33

I'm looking for an elusive combination - profit and history.

0:26:350:26:40

I've got one more item to buy.

0:26:420:26:44

HE SNEEZES

0:26:450:26:46

Bless you!

0:26:460:26:47

I want to buy it well. What on earth is that?

0:26:470:26:50

Look at that light!

0:26:500:26:52

That's cutting-edge design, isn't it? That's right up my street.

0:26:560:27:01

Looks like a plastic lamp from around the 1970s, I'd say.

0:27:010:27:05

Can we just suspend the history, the seeking of history, here?!

0:27:050:27:09

Cos this is slightly tempting.

0:27:110:27:12

Alan...

0:27:140:27:15

History well and truly out of the window -

0:27:150:27:18

dealer Alan, what's the damage?

0:27:180:27:20

Looks like the one thing I haven't priced!

0:27:200:27:22

Well done, you haven't priced it - cos it's free, isn't it, Alan?

0:27:220:27:25

-Well done.

-Not quite.

-Do you think it works? Could we just turn it on?

0:27:250:27:29

-Yeah, yeah.

-Can I just see it lit?

0:27:290:27:31

This will be a test of it. If it lights, I might buy it.

0:27:340:27:38

Look at that!

0:27:380:27:39

-Super splendid.

-Haven't even cleaned it!

0:27:390:27:42

Would you incorporate this in your home?

0:27:430:27:45

Until last week, it WAS in my home. It was lying in the kitchen!

0:27:450:27:48

-Alan, a fiver, chief.

-James!

-A fiver.

-How about £10, eh?

0:27:510:27:56

Fiver... £10?

0:27:560:27:58

How about splitting the difference, chief? £8.

0:27:590:28:02

-£8, I'll give you the favour. Well done.

-Great, great.

0:28:020:28:05

Retro lamp bought -

0:28:050:28:07

and just in time, cos here comes Hanson.

0:28:070:28:09

Apparently, he's in here now, James is,

0:28:090:28:11

and I'm determined just to, maybe, join the party.

0:28:110:28:14

-Do you mind, Alan, can we leave that on the desk, lit?

-Course you can.

0:28:140:28:18

And when our history boy, Charles Hanson,

0:28:180:28:21

arrives, let's see if he makes any comment about it.

0:28:210:28:25

Course you can.

0:28:250:28:26

Quick, hide! He's here!

0:28:260:28:29

Like children, these two.

0:28:290:28:31

Now... Look at him go.

0:28:310:28:33

Oh, Charles...

0:28:350:28:36

Ha, Charles, he's behind you!

0:28:380:28:40

This is ridiculous.

0:28:420:28:44

He's got the observational skills of a newt.

0:28:440:28:47

Charles, you great berk.

0:28:470:28:49

LAUGHTER

0:28:490:28:51

-How's it going?!

-Very good.

0:28:510:28:52

-How's it going?

-How are you?

-Yeah, very well.

0:28:520:28:54

-All spent up?

-Well, no.

0:28:540:28:57

I'm never spent up, James,

0:28:570:28:58

because there's always a chance to keep hunting.

0:28:580:29:01

Always a goodie, isn't there?

0:29:010:29:02

-Hunting down those great...

-Always a goodie.

0:29:020:29:04

Very often, it's in front of our noses, isn't it?

0:29:040:29:08

-Is that the clue?

-I don't know how you're going to wrap that light.

0:29:080:29:12

-Have you bought that, have you really?

-Yeah.

-You haven't!

0:29:120:29:14

It's very retro.

0:29:140:29:16

Yeah, baby.

0:29:160:29:17

With James all spent, Charles, it's your turn for a look around.

0:29:170:29:21

If I'm going to find something, it's got to be quite big, I feel.

0:29:210:29:25

So, he's after big, and he's found...

0:29:250:29:28

Well, small.

0:29:280:29:30

In this cabinet here is a label, which reads,

0:29:300:29:34

"A set of three Roman nails

0:29:340:29:37

"excavated from Inchtuthil in Perthshire. 2,000 years old."

0:29:370:29:43

For three old nails - and they're just wonderful to see.

0:29:430:29:47

The ticket says £45. Alan! You're needed.

0:29:470:29:51

Priced at £45, what could these Inchtuthil Perthshire nails be?

0:29:510:29:55

-For you, Charles, 20.

-Not bad at all. Let me give them some thought.

0:29:550:30:00

-I quite like, also, Alan, the very nice Benson pocket watch here.

-Yeah.

0:30:000:30:07

Nice quality.

0:30:070:30:09

Slightly engine turned, that's worn,

0:30:090:30:11

these beautiful blue enamel dials, and that's just a beautiful watch,

0:30:110:30:16

and really was one of the leading pocket watchmakers.

0:30:160:30:19

The Benson family were highly regarded watchmakers

0:30:190:30:22

in the middle of the 19th century.

0:30:220:30:25

And that is priced only £35. The best on that would be...?

0:30:250:30:29

Well, in the condition it is -

0:30:290:30:30

-I don't think it's working properly, that one.

-Oh, right.

-£15, as it is.

0:30:300:30:34

-I mean, the silver is worth that, I'm sure.

-Yeah, it is.

-It's cheap.

0:30:340:30:38

It's nice - but it's decision time, Charles.

0:30:380:30:41

-If I bought the Benson pocket watch and the nails...

-Uh-huh.

0:30:410:30:46

-What's the best price you could do - the very best?

-30.

0:30:460:30:50

Those nails at £15, I'm going to say yes to. So, I'll buy the nails.

0:30:500:30:55

-Uh-huh.

-Is there any margin on that watch, at all?

0:30:550:30:59

-12? Give you a chance.

-Go on, then. Sold.

-There we are.

-Job done.

0:30:590:31:02

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much, Alan.

0:31:020:31:04

That's two more items bought for £27.

0:31:040:31:07

-Thanks a lot, Alan. Take care. See you.

-Thank you, bye.

0:31:070:31:10

-All the best. Bye-bye.

-Thank you.

0:31:100:31:12

Charles does have a bulging shopping bag.

0:31:120:31:14

Along with the rare Roman nails,

0:31:140:31:16

he has his selection of assorted silver,

0:31:160:31:18

which he's adding the Benson fob watch to.

0:31:180:31:21

There is the early 20th-century barometer,

0:31:210:31:24

the 19th-century embossed charger, the Dresden porcelain plate,

0:31:240:31:27

and his combined lot of the football compass, parallel rule,

0:31:270:31:30

and treen seal, giving him a six-lot haul.

0:31:300:31:34

Gosh.

0:31:340:31:35

Meanwhile, James has bought five lots -

0:31:360:31:39

the Arts and Crafts note table,

0:31:390:31:41

the World War II ARP handbell and doorplate,

0:31:410:31:44

the Ola Gorie silver earrings

0:31:440:31:46

and the Royal Dalton jug - and, of course, his retro lamp.

0:31:460:31:50

So, what will they make of each other's lots?

0:31:500:31:53

Typical Charles - unexpectedly, he always reaches back into history.

0:31:530:31:58

His Roman nails are a class act.

0:31:580:32:01

I do like his bell - the great Air Warden bell.

0:32:010:32:05

It's in a condition which makes one think, "What's its story?"

0:32:050:32:08

He's got a bunch of silver that's going to do very well,

0:32:080:32:12

he's going to get strong profit there.

0:32:120:32:14

Forget the lamp.

0:32:140:32:15

I think, for £8, it's dreadful, James, but, of course,

0:32:150:32:18

it's retro and you never know, it might take off in Hamilton.

0:32:180:32:22

After beginning in Glasgow,

0:32:220:32:23

our experts are now hurtling on towards the auction in Hamilton.

0:32:230:32:28

-James, I just love this light. On a morning...

-It is lovely, isn't it?

0:32:280:32:33

..doesn't it give you a breath of incentive?

0:32:330:32:35

You know, it gives you an energy,

0:32:350:32:36

it gives you an energy and bounce -

0:32:360:32:38

and you know when you think of a wink or a twitch or a...

0:32:380:32:41

-a part of the nose...

-Yeah.

-To me, James...

0:32:410:32:44

Where are you going with this, Charles?

0:32:440:32:46

-I just foresee a bidding frenzy approaching.

-Do you?

-Yes, I do.

0:32:460:32:50

The boys have arrived at LS Smellie & Sons, Auctioneers.

0:32:500:32:54

-Man and machine...

-James, don't you feel...

0:32:540:32:57

..in perfect harmony.

0:32:570:32:58

-..this place has a pedigree...

-Do you think so?

0:32:580:33:00

..to give us a real life?

0:33:000:33:02

-Are you feeling lucky?

-Very.

0:33:020:33:03

The gentleman holding the gavel today is James Henderson -

0:33:030:33:06

so, what does he think of our lads' lots?

0:33:060:33:10

I think the Arts and Crafts table will do OK, it's quite nice -

0:33:100:33:14

and, well, I know the silver will probably do the better of the lots,

0:33:140:33:17

but it depends who's here.

0:33:170:33:21

The boys have battled their way through the crowd

0:33:210:33:23

to take their places, and are raring to go.

0:33:230:33:27

It's like you're almost like a jockey, you know?

0:33:270:33:30

Well, they're at starters orders, and they're off!

0:33:300:33:33

First up, ding-ding, is James' ARP handbell and doorplate.

0:33:330:33:37

Give it a ring, go on!

0:33:370:33:38

10, I'm bid.

0:33:380:33:39

10. 12, now.

0:33:390:33:41

At 12, at 14. 16...and 18.

0:33:410:33:44

And 20, and 22.

0:33:440:33:46

At 25, and 28.

0:33:460:33:49

At 28, 30.

0:33:490:33:50

At 30, bid 30. With the lady...

0:33:500:33:52

It's moving.

0:33:520:33:54

At 30, I'm bid.

0:33:540:33:55

At 30, and 32 - at £32.

0:33:550:33:58

-Well done.

-At 32, at 32, at 32...

0:33:580:34:00

Come on, it's worth this.

0:34:000:34:02

At 32 - all done at £32.

0:34:020:34:06

A disappointing start could be a dead ringer.

0:34:060:34:08

But still, time to make it all up.

0:34:080:34:09

-It's warming up. This is your first item...

-Yeah.

-Don't worry about it.

0:34:090:34:13

So sweet. Let's see if Charles can fare better with his barometer.

0:34:130:34:17

Can we start the bidding here at £50?

0:34:170:34:20

Great! I'm moving.

0:34:200:34:22

50 I'm bid. At 50. 55. 60...

0:34:220:34:25

65.

0:34:250:34:26

65, and 70. At £70 for the barometer.

0:34:260:34:29

At 70.

0:34:290:34:30

-It's a lovely object.

-80 now.

0:34:300:34:32

£80! It's moving.

0:34:320:34:33

At 80 I'm bid.

0:34:330:34:35

And 85. 90.

0:34:350:34:36

For Queen and country, make him happy. Come on!

0:34:360:34:39

-100.

-Come on!

-100 for the barometer. At 100.

-Come on!

0:34:390:34:43

-At 100, I'm bid.

-Come on!

-At 100, 100, 100, 100.

0:34:430:34:46

-That's enough, James.

-All done a £100.

0:34:460:34:49

-Don't be greedy.

-Sold! Fantastic.

0:34:490:34:51

Fantastic indeed.

0:34:510:34:53

The pressure is rising - and a whopping great profit for Charles.

0:34:530:34:55

-I'm delighted.

-I bet you're delighted!

0:34:550:34:58

James, can redeem yourself with your retro lamp?

0:34:580:35:02

20 I'm bid, sir. At 20.

0:35:020:35:04

-2, and 5, and

-8. We're flying.

0:35:040:35:06

And 30 and 5. And 40 and 5.

0:35:060:35:10

At £45.

0:35:100:35:11

-Don't tell him.

-At 45, at 50 now.

-I don't believe it.

0:35:110:35:16

50 I'm bid. Fresh bidder at £50.

0:35:160:35:18

-At 50, bid 50, bid 50...

-A person of taste.

0:35:180:35:21

Bid 50. All done at £50.

0:35:210:35:24

Charles wasn't taken by the retro lamp but the bidders

0:35:260:35:28

of Hamilton are.

0:35:280:35:30

-Cor blimey.

-Get in.

-Get in there, mate.

0:35:300:35:34

Hey, Charles. Leave his pate alone.

0:35:340:35:36

What about the table?

0:35:360:35:38

Do you feel another profit coming on?

0:35:380:35:40

20 I'm bid, sir.

0:35:400:35:41

At £20 the table.

0:35:410:35:43

At 20, bid 2.

0:35:430:35:44

At 22, bid 4, bid 2, bid 28.

0:35:440:35:47

Bid 30, bid 5.

0:35:470:35:49

-40, bid

-5. Moving.

0:35:490:35:51

Bid 50. 5 now on the telephone.

0:35:510:35:53

-At 55, at 60 with the lady.

-Go on.

0:35:530:35:56

At 60. 5 now on the telephone.

0:35:560:35:58

-70, at 70 bid.

-Good man.

-Go on.

0:35:580:36:00

75, at 75.

0:36:000:36:02

80 now. At 85 on the telephone.

0:36:020:36:04

95.

0:36:040:36:06

95, 95 I'm bid.

0:36:060:36:08

-At 100 on the telephone.

-Keep going.

-At 105.

0:36:080:36:10

-At 105, at 110.

-Go on.

0:36:100:36:12

At 115. At 120 now.

0:36:120:36:15

-130.

-God.

-At 130 with the lady.

0:36:150:36:17

-140, 150.

-At 150, I'm bid at 150.

-Go on.

-Amazing.

0:36:170:36:22

-150, 150, 150, 150...

-That's amazing.

-All done at 150!

0:36:220:36:28

-What a marvellous profit. Looks like you're on a roll, James.

-Well done.

0:36:290:36:33

Right, it's Andrew Smellie's turn to take the gavel

0:36:350:36:39

and Charles's rare Roman nails are coming up next.

0:36:390:36:42

10 for a start, £10.

0:36:420:36:43

-Roman nails.

-Tenner in it, £10, 12.

0:36:430:36:45

-12, 14, 16...

-They're worth a lot more.

0:36:450:36:48

-16, 16.

-They are so important.

0:36:480:36:51

In the history of Scotland they have bound you together.

0:36:510:36:54

-Over there.

-16, 16, 18.

0:36:540:36:57

-18.

-18, come on.

0:36:570:37:00

-Go on, sir. Real history.

-20.

0:37:000:37:02

20, I'm bid. £20. All finished?

0:37:020:37:06

£20.

0:37:060:37:08

Not the result Charles was hoping for, but a profit none the less.

0:37:080:37:12

-It just shows what people can buy for £20.

-It does, it does.

0:37:140:37:17

-I'd love, you know, I'd love a Roman nail.

-Wouldn't we all?

0:37:170:37:20

James' silver Ola Gorie earrings are next to go under the gavel.

0:37:220:37:26

10 I'm bid. £10, I'm bid 10.

0:37:260:37:28

-12, 14...

-What are they worth?

0:37:280:37:29

-I don't know.

-16, 18.

0:37:290:37:31

It's out of my comfort zone, this.

0:37:310:37:34

They sit so well and they have style.

0:37:340:37:37

22 I'm at, 24.

0:37:370:37:40

He's back in. That man's got style.

0:37:400:37:42

30, 2, 34 on the rail.

0:37:420:37:45

36, 36, 36 I'm out.

0:37:450:37:49

All finished for the earrings.

0:37:490:37:51

£36.

0:37:510:37:53

James bags himself another pretty profit. Well done.

0:37:530:37:56

When I knew you ten years ago, you had a little stud. I thought you did.

0:37:560:38:01

-I had one in the nose, remember.

-That was it.

0:38:010:38:04

Now that would be a sight to see.

0:38:040:38:07

Charles' turn now is the combined lot of the football compass,

0:38:070:38:10

parallel rule and treen seal.

0:38:100:38:13

20 I'm bid, 20, left, 2.

0:38:150:38:16

24, 26, 28.

0:38:160:38:19

30, 2, 34.

0:38:190:38:24

36, 38, 38 left.

0:38:240:38:28

38 I'm bid. All finished.

0:38:280:38:29

I'd leave it.

0:38:290:38:31

£38.

0:38:310:38:32

Well done, Charles. Great profit there.

0:38:320:38:35

-Put it there.

-No.

0:38:350:38:37

-Give us a kiss.

-No.

0:38:370:38:39

-Give us a kiss.

-No!

0:38:390:38:41

Oh, do behave, you two.

0:38:420:38:44

Next, it's Charles' Dresden plate that he bought for £1.

0:38:440:38:48

10 for the plate.

0:38:480:38:50

I like the Sellotape.

0:38:500:38:51

-Oh!

-£5, 6.

0:38:510:38:53

-6, 8 I'm bid.

-Stunning.

0:38:530:38:57

10. It's stunning. Come on.

0:38:570:38:59

12, I'm bid, 14.

0:38:590:39:01

14 on the right. Spot of the Super Glue.

0:39:010:39:05

-14, 16.

-Over there.

0:39:050:39:06

-18, 20.

-Over there.

0:39:060:39:08

-20 I'm bid.

-Go on, sir.

-22.

0:39:080:39:10

22, you're in, 4. 24.

0:39:100:39:12

24, are you sure now?

0:39:120:39:15

-24 on the left.

-Make a memory.

0:39:150:39:18

£24.

0:39:180:39:20

Oh, look at that. An incredible profit from a £1 purchase.

0:39:200:39:24

You know, in the scheme of things, that's 100, up 2,300 pence.

0:39:240:39:29

Time for James' final lot. His Royal Doulton jug.

0:39:290:39:33

10, 10 I'm bid.

0:39:330:39:34

10 on the left. 12.

0:39:340:39:36

-14, 14...

-Profit.

-16.

0:39:360:39:37

18, 20. New bidder.

0:39:370:39:40

20 I'm at. £20 I'm bid, 20 I'm bid, 20 I'm bid.

0:39:400:39:43

Wallis Simpson.

0:39:430:39:45

22. 22, 24.

0:39:450:39:49

26, I'm bid. 26 I'm bid, 26 I'm bid.

0:39:490:39:53

All finished? £26.

0:39:530:39:55

So James finishes with another profit.

0:39:550:39:59

Look at that. Shake hands. It's doubled up. Well done.

0:40:010:40:04

What will the room make of Charles' 19th-century embossed charger?

0:40:060:40:09

Interest here. Started at £48.

0:40:090:40:12

-I'm happy with that.

-Brilliant.

0:40:120:40:14

48, 50.

0:40:140:40:16

52, 54, 56.

0:40:160:40:19

Go on.

0:40:190:40:20

-58, 60, 60 I'm bid.

-Come on.

0:40:200:40:22

5, 65, on the rail.

0:40:220:40:24

65 I'm bid, 5 I'm bid, 65...

0:40:240:40:28

70. New bidder.

0:40:280:40:30

5, 75.

0:40:300:40:32

80, 80 bid 5.

0:40:320:40:34

85, 85, I'm bid. 85 on the rail.

0:40:340:40:38

-I do not...

-Come on, keep going. Sorry.

0:40:380:40:41

£85.

0:40:410:40:43

-That's amazing.

-That is good.

0:40:430:40:45

Charles is pleased and rightly so. Well done.

0:40:450:40:49

-Another small profit.

-Another small profit.

0:40:490:40:51

Oh, goodness' sake.

0:40:510:40:53

Here comes the final lot of the day.

0:40:530:40:55

And it's Charles' selection of silver.

0:40:550:40:58

50 for a start. Nice set there. 50 I'm bid.

0:40:580:41:01

The whole lot comes with it.

0:41:010:41:03

55, 60, 5.

0:41:030:41:04

70, 5.

0:41:040:41:06

75 on my left.

0:41:060:41:08

75 I'm bid, I'm bid 5, I'm bid 80.

0:41:080:41:10

-80,

-5... Hey, it hasn't stopped yet.

0:41:100:41:13

85, 90.

0:41:130:41:14

5, 95.

0:41:140:41:16

-95, left, have we?

-Watch over there.

0:41:160:41:18

-He's got some good lots.

-95 and 5.

0:41:180:41:21

100 and 5.

0:41:210:41:22

-110.

-Oh, no.

0:41:220:41:24

110, 115.

0:41:240:41:26

115, 120.

0:41:260:41:28

5, 130.

0:41:280:41:30

-5, 140.

-It's a good lot.

0:41:300:41:33

5, 150.

0:41:330:41:35

Still going. 5.

0:41:350:41:37

155 on my left.

0:41:370:41:39

155, I'll need 5.

0:41:390:41:42

-155, all going...

-Put it down.

0:41:420:41:44

-155.

-Come on.

0:41:440:41:46

Wow, look at that! Brilliant profit for Charles.

0:41:460:41:49

-Well done.

-You rise and fall.

0:41:490:41:51

You rise and fall.

0:41:510:41:52

Like a barometer.

0:41:520:41:54

So as our experts make a dash for the exit...

0:41:540:41:57

Keep going.

0:41:570:41:58

-Oh!

-Oh, Charles is down.

0:41:580:42:00

Dearie me. Let's find out who's come out on top.

0:42:000:42:04

James started this leg with £229.60

0:42:040:42:08

and made an impressive profit of £86.08 after auction costs,

0:42:080:42:13

leaving him with £315.68 for next time.

0:42:130:42:16

Charles began with £294.30

0:42:200:42:23

and he too pulled in a profit

0:42:230:42:25

gaining a whopping £153.04 less costs,

0:42:250:42:31

so he's still in the lead and goes into the next leg

0:42:310:42:35

with a huge £447.34.

0:42:350:42:37

James, it's all in the passion for antiques.

0:42:370:42:41

It's all in the passion from driving to just buying.

0:42:410:42:45

Anyway, the only thing I can take a small amount of comfort from

0:42:450:42:49

-is Roman nails.

-Yes, but they still made £5.

0:42:490:42:53

Roman nails, that's all I'm going to say to you.

0:42:530:42:56

Bon voyage, road trippers.

0:42:560:42:58

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:020:43:04

-there are thrills...

-Don't look at me like that. I'm not a bad man.

0:43:040:43:08

..spills,

0:43:080:43:09

and one big bang.

0:43:090:43:12

GONG REVERBERATES

0:43:120:43:14

James Braxton and Charles Hanson travel south from Glasgow, shopping in Ayrshire and Lanarkshire, before selling at an auction in Hamilton. James is bowled over when he sees an arts and crafts oak table, while Charles is knocked for six after finding some rare 2,000-year-old Roman nails which were excavated in Scotland.

James stops in Ardeer to hear why the local beach is connected to the Nobel Peace Prize, and Charles stops off to hear about a local man who became a pioneering social reformer.