Episode 4 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 4

Anita Manning and Raj Bisram hit the road for the penultimate time, with Anita finding an eastern deity figure she hopes will attract big bids.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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That's cracking!

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-With £200 each...

-Wonderful.

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..a classic car, and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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That's exactly what I'm talking about.

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I'm all over a-shiver.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-No-brainer.

-Going, going, gone.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory?

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-Push!

-Or the slow road to disaster?

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How awfully, awfully nice.

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This is Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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We're back on the road for the fourth round

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of Anita Manning versus Raj Bisram,

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with these two veteran auctioneers competing to be champion.

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Are you going to be living dangerously today?

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I'm not telling you about any of my tactics today, Raj Bisram.

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BOTH LAUGH

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She will be playing her cards close with Raj,

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but Anita's laying them on the table with the dealers.

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I love you, too!

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And it seems the heady world of antiques is getting to Raj.

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Cos I can see already, my eyes are starting to sparkle.

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Accompanying them on this trip is a 1978 Triumph Spitfire, in red.

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We're very lucky again, Anita - look, the sun is coming out.

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Blue skies.

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# Blue skies Plenty of blue skies. #

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-SHE LAUGHS

-I made that up myself.

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I was going to say, it's not one that I know.

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Me neither, huh!

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Since starting their road trip with £200 each,

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our ace auctioneers have had a roller-coaster journey.

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Anita now has £414.12 to play with.

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But Raj has snatched the lead once more with a big fat £536.98.

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So, what's the plan today?

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So, Raj, is it going to be dangerous?

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Do you want to spend big?

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Have you got that urge?

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Certainly, if I see the right thing, and I've got the money,

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I'm going to be spending it, yeah.

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Yeah, fingers crossed.

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After first hitting the road in Wisbech, in Cambridgeshire,

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they've travelled through Norfolk, Essex, Suffolk, and Surrey

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and they'll be continuing through Kent and East Sussex

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before turning north to Bolton in Lancashire for their final auction.

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Ha-ha, look at that!

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Today's ball starts rolling from Deal in Kent - Raj's home county -

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and lands them at auction in Battle, in East Sussex.

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The auction is very near the coast,

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so anything connected to the sea...

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..would be a good idea.

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And Battle, of course, is the site of the Battle of Hastings.

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-Is it really?

-So, anything that's historical...

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So, forget about the wee brooches?

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Forget the wee brooches, forget the Troika vases...

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-SHE LAUGHS

-Let's get a suit of armour...

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-Yes!

-..and go to battle.

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Yes!

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But before battle commences, Raj's first stop

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is the picture-perfect seaside town of Deal in Kent,

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home to a spectacular seafront and some great shopping.

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Well, Raj, isn't that bonny?

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Oh, that... That is beautiful.

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Beautiful, I love the sea.

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And remember, spend a couple of bob.

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I will.

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-Bye!

-Bye.

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Holding the fort at family-run Full House Emporium today

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is owner Mick Davies.

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-Hello, there.

-Hello, there.

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-I'm Raj.

-I'm Mick.

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-Nice to meet you, Mick.

-Nice to meet you, too.

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A lovely, sunny day. Lots of bargains for me?

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-We hope so.

-I hope so, too.

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With an eclectic mix of antiques, vintage and curios,

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Raj shouldn't have too much trouble.

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This is really nice - late Victorian.

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But they've gone down in price so much recently.

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Here, you would have kept all your envelopes, your pens,

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probably not the original inkwells,

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but they're still there, and then you open this up.

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Keep all your letters and paperwork in there.

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I mean, at £225, you know, it needs a bit of work doing to it,

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but I used to sell these for £400 to £600.

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But Mick has something he thinks may be of interest to Raj.

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Shotgun cleaning kit.

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I mean, we know it's not in its original box,

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but it's quite nice with all these cleaning rods, isn't it?

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Various sizes, as well.

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I presume some are for 14, some are for 12 bores...

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We've got various paraphernalia...

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Pull throughs, brushes,

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powder.

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You've got ten rods there.

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And how much could the...

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-Well, I got it, I think, for 45.

-Yeah.

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I could do that, really, for 20.

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15 and we have a deal.

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-Yeah. Fine.

-Brilliant. Thank you very much indeed.

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My first purchase.

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And Raj has spotted a potential second.

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The Anglepoise lamp. They're quite collectable now.

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People convert them. Obviously, this one's working,

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but it's got the original... The old light fitting, as well.

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I quite like those.

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There's no ticket price, so what's it going to be?

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50.

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Well, then?

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30.

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40.

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-35.

-38.

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-37.

-Ruthless!

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We have a deal. £37.

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-There we go.

-LAUGHING:

-Thank you!

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He's driven a hard bargain

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whilst Anita's been cruising the Kent countryside in the Triumph.

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My lovely Kentish man is feeling very confident.

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He's done very well and he's making big profits.

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BUT that can be a dangerous position to be in.

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Indeed.

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Back on the coast in Deal, Raj has a third possible buy.

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Nice silver-plated punchbowl.

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Relatively new one.

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-It's got the look, though.

-It certainly has got the look.

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I mean, that's actually got some weight to it, that one.

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The ladle has.

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It sports a ticket price of £65.

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What would be the best, Mick?

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I could do it for 30.

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I should think this is a 20th-century one.

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It's in good condition, what would be the very, very best on it?

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-25.

-25?

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That's what I paid for it, so...

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-I break even.

-We've got a deal.

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-It's been there for a while.

-We've got a deal.

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-OK.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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Along with the punchbowl,

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he's shelling out £15 for the shotgun cleaning kit

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and 37 for the Anglepoise lamp.

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£77 all in.

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Careful, now.

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Meanwhile, Anita has made her way north to Sandwich.

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Still in Kent.

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The town's name means "sandy place",

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as opposed to a delicious lunch option, huh!

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Anita's here to check out Vintage Curiosities, run by Mandy.

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Hello, Mandy.

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-Hello!

-Hello!

-Hi! I'm Anita.

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-I'm Mandy.

-It's lovely to meet you.

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Anita's armed with local boy Raj's shopping tips for auction.

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Raj said that items which have to do with the sea

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might be good in our next auction

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and we have here a pair of port and starboard lamps -

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they are older ones.

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The ones which will get the best money will be copper ones.

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But they are probably 18th century, early 19th century.

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There is quite a bit of damage on them.

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And the price is...over £100.

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Better see what Mandy can do.

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I like these. They're good, honest, period items.

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They're not copper ones...

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-No.

-They are, uh, just like a tin.

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But they're the right age.

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The other thing they have going against them is the damage.

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Yes. I can see that, yeah.

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Is there a possibility of a good deal on these?

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Could you come anywhere near £80?

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Yes, I'll think about that, Anita.

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While Mandy thinks, Anita has something else in mind.

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There was another thing that I looked at

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and it was this... Oriental piece here.

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-They have been making these deities since the beginning of time.

-Yes.

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And the older ones are really good.

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It's the beginning of the 20th century,

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not the beginning of the... 7th century.

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-ANITA LAUGHS

-Yes.

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It's priced at £85.

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Could that be bought for around 40?

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I'm thinking more 55.

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-55?

-Yes.

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-Could you come to 45?

-50.

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-50?

-Yeah. That's the lowest I can go on that.

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-50.

-I'll have a wee think about that.

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-OK, then.

-I'm tempted.

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-Yeah.

-I'm tempted.

-MANDY LAUGHS

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It's a gamble, as Anita's not an Asian specialist,

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but the market for Eastern antiques is buoyant

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and depending on the size and age, deities can attract large sums.

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It all depends on whether it catches the right eyes at the auction.

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Now, that's more like Anita - jewellery.

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I rather like garnets.

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People call them the poor man's rubies,

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but I think they're nice.

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I mean, they are a gemstone. Any idea how old these are, Mandy?

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-'80s, maybe.

-'80s, uh-huh.

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-'70s, '80s.

-Yeah.

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-Because the clasp is quite nice, it's not just a hook.

-No.

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Yeah, it's a very nice clasp.

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That's a five-strand garnet necklace and priced at £18.

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-Could they be bought for ten?

-The lowest I'd go is 12.

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If I... If I paid 12 for these,

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could you come in another wee bit on the Buddha?

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No, not on the Buddha, no.

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62?

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Yes. 62.

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Can you make it a round 60?

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-ANITA LAUGHS

-OK, then.

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-Is that all right?

-£60, yes.

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-I don't want you to be unhappy about it.

-No, that's fine.

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OK, Mandy. That's absolutely terrific.

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-You're welcome.

-Thank you very, very much.

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Good luck at auction.

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That's £60 for the bronze deity and the five-strand garnet necklace.

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Anita's decided against the ship's lights,

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but she's happy with her lots.

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My tactic this morning was to probably spend minimally,

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unless I saw something which I was absolutely sure of a profit on.

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Now, I've just bought a Buddha for £50 there,

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and I've taken a wee bit of a chance with that.

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I'm just going to put my faith in it at £50.

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That's all you can do for now, girl.

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While Anita's been busy, back in Deal, Raj has... Hang on a minute...

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As you can see, I'm working really hard.

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The sun's shining, here I am in...

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By the sea in beautiful Deal,

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having some lovely fresh crab.

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Does life get any better?

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Maybe not, my friend, but there's no rest for the wicked,

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as restaurant owner Ian

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reckons he's got something inside that might be of interest to Raj.

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It's a doll's eye switchboard.

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I love it. Straight away, I absolutely love it.

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It came from Harrogate originally...

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and it had been retrieved from Germany, I assume,

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from the forces.

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This must be, sort of, '50s, '60s?

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I think, maybe, a little earlier than that, but, yeah.

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Earlier than that. This is such an unusual item.

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-This is really...

-Would you consider selling it?

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I have got £459 left.

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And I'm prepared to throw it all at this. I love it.

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I tell all my customers that I'm NOT going to sell it for 400...

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If you DO change your mind,

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-I'll give you my mobile number, give me a ring.

-OK.

-OK?

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Nice try, though.

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Right, Raj.

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Anita's taking a break from shopping

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and heading north-west to Whitstable.

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A unique Parliamentary act in the late 18th century

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changed the fortune of this charming seaside town for ever,

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making it eternally synonymous with one of the world's most luxurious

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gastronomic delights...

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Oysters.

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To find out more,

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Anita's meeting trustee of Whitstable Museum Peter Banbury.

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-Hi, Peter.

-Hello, Anita!

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Oh, what a charming facade.

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-Do come in.

-Thank you.

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It's believed that oysters have been harvested in Whitstable

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for almost 2,000 years,

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with the Romans exporting them back to Rome by the thousand.

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What made this an area where oysters flourished?

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Whitstable is on the Thames Estuary,

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so we have a mixture of freshwater and saltwater.

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And we've also got

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a particularly flavoursome form of mud off the shore,

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on which the plankton can grow and on which the oysters feed.

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So, were they farmed or were they just fished out of the sea?

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Originally, they were just fished out of the sea

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for local consumption.

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But, back in 1793,

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Whitstable working men clubbed together to form a co-operative

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through an act of Parliament to farm the oysters in an intensive way.

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This act meant that the co-operative controlled the protected area

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of around six square miles,

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allowing THEM to invest time and money into establishing oyster beds,

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as Whitstable native oysters

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take five years to grow big enough to eat.

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By 1850,

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the Whitstable co-operative was sending 80 million oysters a year

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to London's fish market.

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Wow!

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So oyster production really was a big part of the growth, the wealth,

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and the welfare of this little town?

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Indeed. Whitstable certainly punched above its weight

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because the oyster cultivation

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brought in external money into the village

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and enabled developments to happen.

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It must have involved the whole town.

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Well, indeed. You look at an oyster yawl and, of course,

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you need sales, you need the masts,

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you need the blocks, the pulleys, the rope.

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Then the fisherman needs sea boots to wear to keep him warm.

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And that's BEFORE the oysters were brought to shore.

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Then there's the process of preparing them,

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transporting and selling them,

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as well as the building of the boats - named yawls -

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another huge business for Whitstable.

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At the peak of the area's oyster production,

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around 100 of these boats

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would be seen off the coast of Whitstable every day.

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Essentially, it's a fairly shallow draft boat,

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and it's got a long counter and a wide deck.

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So you've got plenty of space for the men to lift up

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these rather heavy dredges,

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tip them out on deck and sort out the oysters from the culch.

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Whitstable now has just one of these yawls left, named Favourite.

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Built in 1890,

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she operated until the Second World War when she was gunned down.

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But locals rescued her

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and she now proudly sits just inside the sea wall.

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The mast would be 69 feet.

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-Uh-huh.

-Really huge. The deck is quite low.

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-The water level would only be about here.

-Right.

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So, you're really quite low to the water.

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And the curve, I think, is something really very impressive.

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Beautiful.

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Over 200 years since the original co-operative was formed,

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oysters are still an intrinsic feature of the town and its harbour.

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The business has had its ups and downs,

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but oysters are once again being cultivated in large quantities.

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One man who's seen it all through his 70 years in the industry

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is third-generation oyster fisherman Derek West.

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Derek, it's lovely to meet you.

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-And I believe you are the king of this domain.

-Yes.

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Whitstable native oysters can only be eaten

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in months with the "R" in the name as they reproduce over the summer.

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Weekends are Derek's busiest time

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as they can sell up to 1,500 oysters.

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There's a muscle up there - you have to cut that through, see?

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-Uh-huh.

-You put your knife around there, like that,

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and you turn it over.

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Uh-huh. Why's that?

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They look much nicer when they're turned over

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and all the liquor in it, see?

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Oh, isn't that beautiful?

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You've had royalty down at your stall, haven't you?

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-Yes, we had Prince Charles...

-Prince Charles.

0:16:130:16:15

Yeah, he come down here and had some oysters.

0:16:150:16:17

He said they enjoyed 'em.

0:16:170:16:20

80,000 visitors flock to the town each year from across the globe

0:16:200:16:24

to feast on this tasty treat at its annual oyster festival.

0:16:240:16:28

And we'll leave these three to do just the same.

0:16:280:16:32

Raj, meanwhile,

0:16:360:16:38

has headed into the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

0:16:380:16:42

and to the village of Barham.

0:16:420:16:44

Isn't it pretty? Next stop, Stablegate Antiques.

0:16:440:16:48

-Hi, there.

-Hi, there.

0:16:480:16:49

-I'm Raj.

-I'm Christian.

0:16:490:16:50

-Nice to meet you, Christian.

-Nice to meet you.

0:16:500:16:52

Based in a 17th-century farmhouse,

0:16:520:16:55

these showrooms specialise in Georgian and Victorian furniture

0:16:550:16:58

and quality antiques.

0:16:580:17:00

It's fairly obvious from just mooching around in here

0:17:000:17:03

that Christian is definitely into furniture.

0:17:030:17:06

This is a classic whatnot.

0:17:060:17:08

This is made of beautiful walnut, it's typically mid-Victorian.

0:17:080:17:14

It's got a mirror on the back.

0:17:140:17:15

It's one of the best whatnots I think I've ever seen.

0:17:150:17:18

A whatnot is a stand with shelves for small objects.

0:17:180:17:22

But at £900, it's just under twice what Raj has left. Huh!

0:17:220:17:26

Christian, can you point me in the direction

0:17:260:17:28

of something that you think isn't too expensive,

0:17:280:17:31

that there's going to be a profit in it?

0:17:310:17:33

Erm, swords are always good.

0:17:330:17:36

Swords are...

0:17:360:17:38

-This isn't really a sword, this is a fencing sabre.

-Yes.

0:17:380:17:42

Well, it comes with the hat.

0:17:430:17:44

-It's a nice old one, isn't it?

-It is.

0:17:440:17:46

-1930s, is it?

-Yep.

0:17:460:17:49

Made by Wilkinson.

0:17:490:17:51

-So it's a good maker.

-Mm-hm.

0:17:510:17:53

-It is a bit different.

-It is.

0:17:530:17:55

The ticket price is £175,

0:17:550:17:58

but what's the best Christian can offer?

0:17:580:18:00

Uh, about...80.

0:18:000:18:03

I think that's too strong for me.

0:18:050:18:07

I'd be happy to pay £50.

0:18:070:18:08

55 and we can shake hands.

0:18:080:18:11

For a fiver, I'm definitely going to shake your hands.

0:18:110:18:14

-Good man.

-£55...

0:18:140:18:15

-Good man.

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you.

0:18:150:18:17

A very generous discount,

0:18:170:18:19

at £55 for the fencing mask and foil,

0:18:190:18:21

and it's time to call it a day.

0:18:210:18:24

So, nighty-night.

0:18:240:18:27

Good morning, road trippers!

0:18:330:18:34

Raj is in the driving seat today,

0:18:340:18:36

chauffeuring Anita through the Kent countryside in a Triumph Spitfire.

0:18:360:18:40

What a gent, eh?

0:18:400:18:42

Well, Anita, another glorious, glorious morning.

0:18:420:18:46

Another wonderful day in paradise.

0:18:460:18:48

Absolutely.

0:18:480:18:50

Up to now,

0:18:500:18:51

Anita's purchased a garnet necklace and an Eastern deity figure,

0:18:510:18:55

leaving her just over £350 still to spend.

0:18:550:18:59

OK, Mandy. That's absolutely terrific.

0:18:590:19:01

Raj has found four items - a shotgun cleaning kit,

0:19:010:19:04

an original Anglepoise lamp,

0:19:040:19:07

a silver-plated punchbowl and ladle

0:19:070:19:09

and a 1930s fencing foil and mask,

0:19:090:19:12

still giving him over £400 left to play with.

0:19:120:19:15

We've got a deal.

0:19:150:19:16

Look at that view.

0:19:180:19:19

-Yeah.

-Beautiful.

0:19:190:19:21

Rural England.

0:19:210:19:23

Kent is a beautiful county.

0:19:230:19:24

And lying in the heart of rural Kent is Anita's first stop today.

0:19:240:19:28

The charming market town of Faversham.

0:19:280:19:32

I'm not sure whether these fields are apple orchards or hop fields.

0:19:320:19:36

Hop. Now, you use hops to make beer, am I right?

0:19:360:19:39

You do, and in fact,

0:19:390:19:41

this area is where the oldest brewery in Britain is.

0:19:410:19:45

It's true, but rather than supping beer, Anita must hit the shops,

0:19:450:19:49

starting today with Squires Antiques.

0:19:490:19:52

-Lovely wee town, Raj.

-It is, isn't it?

0:19:520:19:55

And this is my big shopping day!

0:19:550:19:58

-Thank you.

-Spend all your money!

-I'll do my very best, Raj.

0:19:580:20:01

-Good.

-Bye.

-I'll see you later.

0:20:010:20:03

On hand to help is owner Ann.

0:20:060:20:08

-Hello, I'm Anita.

-Hello, Anita.

0:20:080:20:11

-So nice to meet you.

-It's lovely to meet you, too.

0:20:110:20:14

It's straight upstairs for Anita to see what takes her fancy.

0:20:150:20:18

And, at the drop of a hat, she's found something.

0:20:220:20:25

I find terrestrial globes irresistible.

0:20:260:20:30

They are a little snapshot of how the world was

0:20:310:20:36

at the time that they were made.

0:20:360:20:38

This is a political globe made in 1978.

0:20:380:20:44

Now, in 1978, the Berlin Wall was still there.

0:20:440:20:51

And if we turn round to Africa,

0:20:510:20:53

we can see down here Southern Rhodesia has not become Zimbabwe.

0:20:530:20:59

It's in good condition.

0:20:590:21:01

There are no tears...

0:21:010:21:04

It's priced...

0:21:040:21:05

..at £55.

0:21:060:21:08

One to keep in mind, but there's plenty more to choose from.

0:21:080:21:12

This is a little Victorian crib.

0:21:160:21:18

It's made of some sort of cast iron here

0:21:180:21:22

and the baby lies in a string basket.

0:21:220:21:26

We have some very nice little detail and we have porcelain wheels.

0:21:260:21:32

So, this is a little period piece.

0:21:320:21:35

It's the perfect thing for displaying dogs, or teddies

0:21:350:21:40

if you are a collector,

0:21:400:21:42

and there are plenty of those about the salerooms.

0:21:420:21:46

The cradle has a ticket price of £85.

0:21:480:21:51

Ann, it's this crib...

0:21:510:21:54

I quite like that.

0:21:540:21:56

Have you had it for a wee while?

0:21:560:21:57

Yes, I have had it a while.

0:21:570:21:59

It has been borrowed occasionally.

0:21:590:22:02

One Christmas, it spent all Christmas in Canterbury Cathedral as their nativity.

0:22:020:22:07

Since you've had it for a long time, could that be bought for...

0:22:070:22:13

in the region... 40, £45?

0:22:130:22:17

-Would 45...

-45.

-..be any good?

0:22:170:22:20

£45. That's lovely. Thank you so much, Ann.

0:22:200:22:23

-You're welcome.

-And while she's feeling on top of the world,

0:22:230:22:26

how about that globe?

0:22:260:22:28

Ann, I quite fancy the terrestrial globe here.

0:22:280:22:32

Now, it's not an old one.

0:22:320:22:35

The most valuable maps and globes are those very, very early ones.

0:22:350:22:40

I would like to be buying it probably around about...

0:22:400:22:44

20...

0:22:440:22:46

£25 - is that at all possible?

0:22:460:22:50

Well, I will do 25.

0:22:500:22:52

-25.

-If you would like it.

-Oh, that's great.

0:22:520:22:55

Thank you. Thank you so much for that.

0:22:550:22:58

That's £70 for both the 1978 political globe

0:22:580:23:02

and the Victorian cradle.

0:23:020:23:04

Now, there's just a slight issue of getting it to auction.

0:23:040:23:07

RATTLING

0:23:070:23:09

Back with Raj now, who's making the most of the nice weather.

0:23:110:23:15

A wonderful sunny day, the shades are on, Anita won't see me coming.

0:23:150:23:20

Yeah, however will she recognise you?

0:23:200:23:23

Raj is heading north-west to the historical dockyard, Chatham.

0:23:230:23:26

It's now home to a 19th-century naval ship that not only protected

0:23:270:23:30

the oceans and interests of the British Empire,

0:23:300:23:32

but also played a vital role in turning thousands of young men

0:23:320:23:36

into British naval officers.

0:23:360:23:39

To find out more, Raj is meeting Preservation and Education Director

0:23:390:23:42

of Chatham Historic Dockyard Trust Richard Holdsworth.

0:23:420:23:46

Hi, there.

0:23:460:23:47

-Hi. Nice to meet you.

-I'm Raj.

0:23:470:23:49

I'm Richard. Welcome to the Historical Dockyard at Chatham.

0:23:490:23:52

What a beautiful day and what an amazing ship.

0:23:520:23:55

Built in 1878 and powered by both steam and sail,

0:23:560:23:59

HMS Gannet was a small but mighty ship.

0:23:590:24:03

She's seen many incarnations but has now been restored to her original

0:24:030:24:08

19th-century glory.

0:24:080:24:10

She had a crew of about 145.

0:24:100:24:12

145 people?

0:24:120:24:14

They had to be able to man the masts and set the sails, and warships

0:24:140:24:18

are always crew-heavy because of the need to man the guns.

0:24:180:24:21

And, although she is a small ship, she packed a mighty punch.

0:24:210:24:25

By the time she was decommissioned from war service in 1895,

0:24:260:24:30

HMS Gannet had spent 17 years patrolling the Pacific,

0:24:300:24:34

Mediterranean and Red seas.

0:24:340:24:37

In 1913, the ship was brought back into service,

0:24:370:24:40

this time as a dormitory for a naval training school,

0:24:400:24:44

and renamed TS Mercury.

0:24:440:24:47

In the early 20th century,

0:24:470:24:49

the Royal and Merchant navies were crying out for thousands of boys

0:24:490:24:52

to complete basic sea training,

0:24:520:24:55

encouraging them to enlist - which most of them did -

0:24:550:24:58

despite the conditions they endured.

0:24:580:25:01

This is the 1920s, '30s.

0:25:010:25:03

Being forced to get up early in the early hours of the morning,

0:25:030:25:06

abandoned ship, swim to the shore, and things,

0:25:060:25:08

were all part of life on board Mercury.

0:25:080:25:12

5,000 boys were stationed here

0:25:120:25:15

over its 54-year service as a dormitory.

0:25:150:25:18

Training was paid for by the boys' parents, who wanted their sons

0:25:180:25:22

to have a Navy career.

0:25:220:25:24

There were up to 160 boys

0:25:240:25:27

aged between 12 and 15 on board at any one time.

0:25:270:25:31

Retired Merchant Navy captain David Parsons spent three years aboard

0:25:310:25:36

in the 1960s.

0:25:360:25:37

So, having cleaned the ship in the morning, we went ashore,

0:25:370:25:41

had a shower and everything,

0:25:410:25:42

breakfast, then we had normal daily lessons -

0:25:420:25:46

as in any school - but the lessons were punctuated with navigation

0:25:460:25:50

and seamanship. The afternoons were usually dedicated to sports,

0:25:500:25:54

homework ashore in the evenings,

0:25:540:25:56

and then back on board to spend yet another night on the hull.

0:25:560:26:00

That, of course, is corrugated iron.

0:26:000:26:02

That was all there was between us and the outside elements

0:26:020:26:06

and the heating never really worked.

0:26:060:26:09

So it was bitterly cold.

0:26:090:26:11

It was character-building.

0:26:110:26:14

The majority of the boys would sleep on the top deck and the rest below,

0:26:140:26:17

with only 18 inches of room each.

0:26:170:26:19

Wow!

0:26:190:26:21

-Luxury.

-We had hammocks in lines like this.

0:26:210:26:25

Looks like it was... pretty tough going.

0:26:250:26:27

They were, actually, incredibly comfortable.

0:26:270:26:30

And you could get a really good night's sleep in one of these.

0:26:300:26:33

And Raj is about to find out how comfortable it really was.

0:26:330:26:37

I'm going to have to take my jacket off for this. Oh, boy. OK.

0:26:370:26:41

So, here we go.

0:26:410:26:42

I'm going to go for it. So, you reckon, hang on to a hook and...

0:26:420:26:47

And then throw yourself on?

0:26:470:26:49

That's it. You got it. You got it.

0:26:490:26:51

Wa-hey!

0:26:510:26:53

-Well done.

-How about that?

0:26:530:26:55

-I'm impressed.

-Oh! If only Anita could see me now.

0:26:550:26:59

TS Mercury closed as a training ship in 1968.

0:26:590:27:03

She may have travelled the world,

0:27:030:27:05

taking part in many important naval assignments,

0:27:050:27:08

but her longest and most crucial role was as the training base

0:27:080:27:13

for thousands of young men who went on to serve Great Britain

0:27:130:27:16

in the Royal and Merchant navies.

0:27:160:27:18

Meanwhile, Anita has made her way to the Isle of Sheppey,

0:27:200:27:23

a nine-mile-long island off the North Kent coast.

0:27:230:27:27

The town of Sheerness lies on its northern side and Anita's next shop,

0:27:270:27:32

Grandad's Attic. The man in charge is a very young-looking grandad!

0:27:320:27:36

Hello. I'm Anita.

0:27:360:27:37

-I'm Barry.

-Great to meet you.

-And you.

0:27:370:27:40

Barry's shop stocks vintage collectables, antiques,

0:27:400:27:43

and all things weird and wonderful.

0:27:430:27:45

Many of our antiques and collectables shops are now

0:27:450:27:49

stocking items from the 1950s.

0:27:490:27:53

And this little magazine rack is one such item.

0:27:530:27:58

What we have here is a wonderful simplicity.

0:27:580:28:01

And the 1950s was a time of advancement in science.

0:28:010:28:07

These little spheres, which form the feet of the magazine rack,

0:28:070:28:14

take us to molecular biology.

0:28:140:28:17

Atomic science.

0:28:170:28:19

And that's exciting.

0:28:190:28:21

This is priced up at £26.

0:28:210:28:24

Not a lot of money for all that style.

0:28:240:28:28

But Anita's got her eye on something else from the same period.

0:28:280:28:32

But what about kids in the 1950s

0:28:320:28:34

and the early '60s?

0:28:340:28:36

There were no video games, there was no social media, what did they do?

0:28:360:28:42

They played with this sort of toy.

0:28:420:28:44

Barry, tell me about this.

0:28:440:28:46

It's a magnetic football game, Anita,

0:28:460:28:48

from the 1950s, 1960s.

0:28:480:28:51

You'd have two magnets with corresponding colours to the teams.

0:28:510:28:55

-These go underneath the table onto the players.

-Wow!

0:28:550:28:59

And you move your corresponding players.

0:28:590:29:02

Wow! Can we have a game?

0:29:020:29:04

Yeah. Let's have a quick game.

0:29:040:29:06

But first, Anita has to get match ready.

0:29:060:29:08

So, it's Manchester United against Chelsea.

0:29:080:29:11

Let's go!

0:29:110:29:12

THEY LAUGH

0:29:120:29:14

I think that's a corner.

0:29:140:29:16

I think that's your corner. Yeah, good.

0:29:160:29:19

ANITA LAUGHS

0:29:190:29:21

They're stuck together!

0:29:220:29:24

Is that a penalty for Manchester United?

0:29:240:29:27

-I think it is.

-Oh!

0:29:270:29:29

Oh!

0:29:300:29:32

Barry, I've got to buy this.

0:29:320:29:35

I've got to buy it. How many pence can it be bought for?

0:29:350:29:40

Pence? Well, it's got...

0:29:400:29:45

£15 on the ticket.

0:29:450:29:47

Ten?

0:29:470:29:49

Could you make it...

0:29:490:29:50

-..£8?

-Seeing as you beat me, Anita, yeah, OK.

0:29:520:29:56

A goal for Anita at £8 for the 1960s magnetic football game.

0:29:560:30:02

Come on, boys, you're my winning team.

0:30:020:30:05

Back with Raj now, who's made his way to the village of Teynham -

0:30:120:30:17

home to Wildwinds Antiques,

0:30:170:30:19

headed up today by Gwyneth and Richard.

0:30:190:30:21

-Hello, there.

-Hello.

0:30:210:30:24

-And you are?

-Richard.

0:30:240:30:25

-And this lovely lady?

-Is Gwyneth.

0:30:250:30:27

-Hi!

-Hello. Nice to meet you.

0:30:270:30:28

-Pleased to meet you.

-I'm looking for something that's a little bit

0:30:280:30:30

different, a little bit special.

0:30:300:30:32

Can you point me in the right direction?

0:30:320:30:34

-You better start in this direction.

-Thank you.

0:30:340:30:37

Raj has got over £400 in his pocket and a 3,000 square foot showroom

0:30:370:30:41

in which to spend it. Wow.

0:30:410:30:45

Over here, we've got some gold albums and some record covers.

0:30:450:30:50

They're actually becoming really collectable.

0:30:500:30:52

One of the things I think is worth investing in definitely

0:30:520:30:55

is if you can get some nice old albums.

0:30:550:30:57

Condition is really, really important, so always go

0:30:570:31:01

through them and make sure there's no big scratches on them.

0:31:010:31:04

Not something to take to auction this time -

0:31:040:31:06

though there is something Raj likes,

0:31:060:31:08

and he's called Richard over to help.

0:31:080:31:11

Well, this is really heavy, Raj.

0:31:110:31:14

And it is original.

0:31:140:31:15

It's something that's different, and that's what I like about it.

0:31:150:31:18

-Here you go.

-Now, it's got 142 on it.

0:31:180:31:22

Right. I presume it's a railway sign.

0:31:220:31:25

Yeah. It's the distance from Derby.

0:31:250:31:27

But how do you know it's from Derby?

0:31:270:31:29

Because the owner, who was a serious railway enthusiast,

0:31:290:31:34

gave me that information.

0:31:340:31:36

It could be 142 miles from anywhere.

0:31:360:31:38

Couldn't it? Really?

0:31:380:31:41

There's a £260 ticket price.

0:31:410:31:44

This is a gamble, and I like gambles.

0:31:440:31:46

I'm going to get my tissue out now.

0:31:460:31:48

You get your tissue out. OK.

0:31:480:31:50

I will give you £80 for it.

0:31:500:31:52

Because it's you, Raj.

0:31:520:31:54

-A deal?

-A deal.

-Fantastic.

0:31:550:31:57

I hope you make a good profit on it.

0:31:570:31:59

That's a whopping £180 off the railway mileage sign.

0:31:590:32:03

Now, he's just got to get it out of the shop.

0:32:030:32:06

Could be trolleyed, this. Huh!

0:32:060:32:08

And that's shopping finished. Now, time to check out their wares.

0:32:100:32:14

Along with the railway sign,

0:32:140:32:16

Raj paid out £212 on a shotgun cleaning kit...

0:32:160:32:21

An Anglepoise lamp...

0:32:210:32:23

A silver-plated punchbowl and ladle...

0:32:230:32:25

And a 1930s fencing mask and foil.

0:32:250:32:28

Anita spent £138 on a garnet necklace...

0:32:290:32:33

A Victorian cradle...

0:32:330:32:35

A 1978 political globe...

0:32:350:32:37

A 1960s magnetic football game...

0:32:370:32:41

And an Eastern bronze deity.

0:32:410:32:43

Gosh. Opinions, please!

0:32:430:32:46

The Anglepoise lamp at 37 was a good buy.

0:32:460:32:51

The cool cats will absolutely love that lot.

0:32:510:32:55

The Eastern bronze deity.

0:32:550:32:56

I've got the feeling this is more 20th century than 19th century,

0:32:560:33:00

but at £50, she shouldn't go wrong.

0:33:000:33:03

His biggest spend was on the railway memorabilia, but that sign at £80

0:33:030:33:11

needs a bit more to make big profit.

0:33:110:33:14

The Victorian cot.

0:33:140:33:15

These once were very saleable but they seem to have gone off the boil.

0:33:150:33:18

Interesting thoughts. Anita and Raj began this trip

0:33:180:33:23

from Deal in Kent and, after two days searching for gems,

0:33:230:33:26

they've now crossed the border into East Sussex

0:33:260:33:28

for their forth auction in Battle.

0:33:280:33:31

One of the most important battles in the history of Great Britain

0:33:310:33:37

took place there - in 1066.

0:33:370:33:40

And another great battle will take place there today

0:33:400:33:44

at auction between Raj and Anita!

0:33:440:33:47

Exciting stuff, eh?

0:33:470:33:49

So, Anita, which one of your items today do you think will do the best?

0:33:490:33:54

I'd like to think that the Indian deity would make the most money.

0:33:540:33:59

But it may not.

0:33:590:34:01

It could make £15.

0:34:010:34:03

It could make £200.

0:34:030:34:05

Well, we'll not have to wait long,

0:34:050:34:07

as their final calling point of this leg is at Burstow & Hewett

0:34:070:34:12

auctioneers, who've been in business since 1790.

0:34:120:34:15

-Here we are.

-A-ha! Well done. Well done.

0:34:150:34:17

-Well, Anita...

-Are you ready for Battle?

0:34:200:34:23

-Very good.

-And is Battle ready for us?

0:34:230:34:25

Let's go!

0:34:250:34:26

Mark Ellin is the auctioneer today.

0:34:260:34:29

Thoughts, please, sir...

0:34:290:34:31

The fencing epee and mask - it's interesting,

0:34:310:34:35

but I don't think it has much value.

0:34:350:34:37

The cradle is, I'm sure, a Victorian piece.

0:34:370:34:40

Slightly limited appeal, these, really, these days.

0:34:400:34:43

The Anglepoise lamp is quite a stylish thing.

0:34:430:34:46

Needs rewiring, but it's a vintage piece of lighting and I think anyone

0:34:460:34:50

would like that on the desk.

0:34:500:34:51

The bronze deity - this was illustrated on the website

0:34:510:34:54

and seemed to have had a lot of enquiries from all over for this

0:34:540:34:57

and I think it'll be a moment of excitement. It'll stand out today.

0:34:570:35:01

It sounds as if there are commission bids on the book.

0:35:010:35:03

With no internet bidding here,

0:35:030:35:05

it's between these and the auction-goers of East Sussex.

0:35:050:35:08

First up is Raj's fencing foil and mask.

0:35:110:35:14

20? Anyone like it for 20? In the doorway.

0:35:140:35:17

£20, I'm bid. At 20.

0:35:170:35:18

25 at the front.

0:35:180:35:20

30 in the doorway.

0:35:200:35:21

-35.

-Come on.

-40?

0:35:210:35:23

45, again?

0:35:230:35:24

50. At 50.

0:35:240:35:26

Yours in the doorway still.

0:35:260:35:27

It's going, then. All done at £50, then?

0:35:270:35:29

Selling at 50.

0:35:290:35:31

Ooh!

0:35:310:35:32

Still time to make it up, Raj.

0:35:320:35:34

All its qualities were MASKED.

0:35:340:35:36

I know. Absolutely.

0:35:360:35:37

Oh, where does she get those lines?

0:35:370:35:39

And now, Anita's turn with the cradle.

0:35:390:35:41

30 bid. Here in the centre.

0:35:410:35:43

£30, I'm bid. At 30.

0:35:430:35:44

Any advance on 30?

0:35:440:35:45

Bidding's in the centre of the room. No more bids, then, it's going.

0:35:450:35:48

On the first bid, here at £30. All done?

0:35:480:35:50

Gosh. What bad luck, Anita.

0:35:520:35:53

-That's worth more than 30 quid.

-Yeah.

0:35:550:35:56

But you can get a bargain at auction.

0:35:560:36:00

Let's hope Raj's shotgun cleaning kit isn't a bargain, too!

0:36:000:36:04

30 anywhere for this?

0:36:040:36:05

25? 25.

0:36:050:36:07

-Thank you.

-25! Straight in there.

0:36:070:36:09

It's a profit. I've got to be pleased.

0:36:090:36:11

30 in the doorway. 35 at the top of the room?

0:36:110:36:13

No. Thank you. Yours at 35.

0:36:130:36:14

The bidding's over here. It's going. All done at £35, then...

0:36:140:36:18

-Well done.

-Small profit.

0:36:180:36:20

He's doubled his money.

0:36:200:36:23

A profit is a profit is a profit.

0:36:230:36:25

Absolutely.

0:36:250:36:26

Can Anita do the same with her garnet necklace?

0:36:260:36:30

30 bid, here in the front. £30 only. 35 in the doorway.

0:36:300:36:34

35, 40. Down here.

0:36:340:36:35

45 here? 50. 55.

0:36:350:36:39

£60 here. 65 again. 65 here now.

0:36:390:36:42

-65!

-At £70.

0:36:420:36:44

75.

0:36:440:36:46

No. Thank you. Yours at 75.

0:36:460:36:47

In the centre of the room. It's going here now, for the last time.

0:36:470:36:50

Selling at £75, then.

0:36:500:36:51

Incredible! A magnificent profit for Anita.

0:36:520:36:56

That was a good profit.

0:36:560:36:57

-That was a brilliant profit.

-I'm happy with that.

0:36:570:36:59

-£65!

-In fact, I'm delirious.

-I would be, too.

0:36:590:37:03

Next, Raj's railway mileage sign.

0:37:030:37:06

It's his biggest spend and riskiest item.

0:37:060:37:10

I mean, somebody who lives at number 142 and lives on the corner.

0:37:100:37:15

£50?

0:37:170:37:18

Thank you. 55 in the doorway.

0:37:180:37:20

55 bid. 60 again.

0:37:200:37:22

At 60. Again in the doorway?

0:37:220:37:24

65. 70 again.

0:37:240:37:26

We've got a couple of railway enthusiasts.

0:37:260:37:28

75. At 80.

0:37:280:37:29

At 85. 90. At 95.

0:37:290:37:33

£100 bid.

0:37:330:37:34

Thank you. He's out. 100 in the centre.

0:37:340:37:36

All done at £100, then?

0:37:360:37:37

It's a profit and every penny counts.

0:37:390:37:42

-You took a chance and it paid off.

-Well, it made a small profit.

0:37:420:37:45

I suppose I've got to be grateful for small profits. OK.

0:37:450:37:49

Indeed. Next up is Anita's 1960s magnetic football game.

0:37:490:37:52

Say, 30 for that game?

0:37:540:37:55

20? Anyone like it for 20?

0:37:550:37:57

Come on. Anyone like it for 20?

0:37:570:37:59

£15, then. You don't know what you're missing.

0:37:590:38:02

It's great fun!

0:38:020:38:03

Come on! £10, then.

0:38:030:38:05

It's got to go. Ten in the front.

0:38:050:38:07

-£10...

-You're in profit.

-No?

0:38:070:38:09

Two bidders at £10. Here at ten, then.

0:38:090:38:12

Any more bids? It's going here in the front row at £10.

0:38:120:38:14

Ten. Thank you very much.

0:38:140:38:16

It's great fun.

0:38:160:38:18

It is great fun.

0:38:180:38:20

And Anita's made another - albeit small - profit.

0:38:200:38:24

I think I'll make a few pence profit,

0:38:240:38:26

even though I am paying commission.

0:38:260:38:29

It gave me all that fun, so it was a great buy.

0:38:290:38:32

Back to Raj now with the silver-plated punchbowl and ladle.

0:38:320:38:35

Start me off. 40, will you say?

0:38:360:38:38

30? £30, I'm bid.

0:38:380:38:40

-Straight in, well done.

-35?

0:38:400:38:42

At £35, then.

0:38:420:38:44

It's going at £35. 40 in the front now.

0:38:440:38:45

At 40. Selling at £40 on the front, then...

0:38:450:38:48

A good solid profit for Raj.

0:38:490:38:52

-Well done, darling.

-Small profits.

0:38:520:38:54

Next, can Anita's globe rock anyone's world?

0:38:540:38:58

I'm starting this. A couple of absentee bids.

0:38:580:39:00

I've 30 to start. £30 bid for this. 35 in the doorway.

0:39:000:39:03

-I'm in profit, darling.

-40. 45. 50?

0:39:030:39:06

£50 bid. 55?

0:39:060:39:07

60? Any advance on 60?

0:39:070:39:09

65 here now.

0:39:090:39:10

70. At 70.

0:39:100:39:12

Commission bid, then. It's going. For the last time at £70, then.

0:39:120:39:15

-70.

-Yes!

0:39:150:39:17

Great profit for Anita - more than doubling her money.

0:39:170:39:20

You must be pleased with that. That is a great result.

0:39:200:39:23

It deserved that.

0:39:230:39:25

Now, to Raj's final item - the original Anglepoise lamp.

0:39:250:39:29

Anita and the auctioneer liked it, but how about the people of Battle?

0:39:290:39:33

I'm starting this. I've 60 bid to start.

0:39:330:39:36

-Yes!

-65 in the door.

0:39:360:39:37

-Yes!

-70. 75? 80?

0:39:370:39:39

85? 90?

0:39:390:39:41

100, with me.

0:39:410:39:43

-100!

-110 with you. 110 in the doorway.

0:39:430:39:45

I'm out. Bidding's over there at 110.

0:39:450:39:46

Any more bids now? 120 behind you.

0:39:460:39:49

130. 140. 150.

0:39:490:39:51

At 150. No. Yours at 150. Selling now for £150, then...

0:39:510:39:57

-BOTH: Yes!

-Brilliant.

0:39:570:39:59

Wow! Look at that!

0:39:590:40:01

Raj has quadrupled his money.

0:40:010:40:03

Well done, Raj.

0:40:030:40:04

That was not bad at all. I'm pleased with that. I'm pleased with that.

0:40:040:40:07

Thank goodness for that!

0:40:070:40:09

Now, Anita's final lot - the Eastern bronze deity.

0:40:100:40:14

Auctioneer Mark said there'd been some excitement over it.

0:40:140:40:17

-I'm on the edge of my seat.

-Here we go.

0:40:170:40:19

-Hold my hand.

-Here it is, showing here.

0:40:190:40:22

Now, lots of interest in this.

0:40:220:40:24

And I have a number of absentee bids on this.

0:40:240:40:27

And I'm starting this at £1,000.

0:40:270:40:30

Oh, my gosh!

0:40:300:40:32

1,000, I have.

0:40:320:40:34

1,000 bid. 1,100 in front.

0:40:340:40:36

1,200 there. 1,300 bid.

0:40:360:40:39

-1,400 here.

-Wow!

0:40:390:40:41

The old instinct kicked in.

0:40:410:40:43

-Fantastic!

-1,800.

0:40:430:40:46

1,900. 2,000.

0:40:460:40:49

2,100. 2,200.

0:40:490:40:52

This is flying!

0:40:520:40:54

2,700.

0:40:540:40:55

2,800.

0:40:550:40:56

And that's a Road Trip record-breaker!

0:40:560:40:59

-Ooh, la-la!

-3,100.

0:40:590:41:02

3,200.

0:41:020:41:03

Thank you. Here at 3,200.

0:41:030:41:06

At 3,200. 3,300 in the doorway.

0:41:060:41:08

Where is it going to stop?

0:41:080:41:10

3,400. 3,400 here.

0:41:100:41:13

-I think you're right out of the game now.

-I'm out...

0:41:130:41:16

I'm on a different planet.

0:41:160:41:18

3,500 again in the doorway.

0:41:180:41:20

-3,600 bid.

-It just shows you, if you get a real feeling about something.

0:41:200:41:25

3,800.

0:41:250:41:26

It's going, then. For the last time at 3,800.

0:41:260:41:30

Wow.

0:41:300:41:31

Yes!

0:41:310:41:33

-Ha-ha, ha-ha!

-And I think that deserves a round of applause.

0:41:330:41:38

-Brilliant.

-You can say that again!

0:41:380:41:41

That is an incredible result.

0:41:410:41:43

The biggest Road Trip profit ever!

0:41:430:41:45

-Fantastic.

-3,800 squidgeroonies!

0:41:450:41:50

The day belongs to you.

0:41:520:41:56

And what an extraordinary day it's been.

0:41:560:41:58

Things like that CAN happen.

0:41:580:42:01

So get out into your antiques shops and keep searching.

0:42:010:42:05

Well said, Anita.

0:42:050:42:07

Raj set off with £536.98,

0:42:070:42:10

and after a mixed auction, post-costs, he's made £95.50,

0:42:100:42:16

leaving him with £632.48 -

0:42:160:42:19

which normally is brilliant.

0:42:190:42:22

But Anita began this leg with £414.12.

0:42:220:42:26

After an unbelievable day and auction fees,

0:42:260:42:29

she's made an incredible £3,129.70 profit - ha! -

0:42:290:42:36

giving her £3,543.82 to spend next time.

0:42:360:42:41

I'm gobsmacked.

0:42:410:42:42

I think I'm a wee bit ahead of you now.

0:42:420:42:44

I think you might just be a little bit ahead of me.

0:42:440:42:47

A wee bit.

0:42:470:42:48

Let me please open the door for you.

0:42:480:42:50

-Ah, thank you. You're wonderful.

-Champagne tonight, I believe.

0:42:500:42:53

Champagne!

0:42:530:42:54

-Onwards and upwards.

-How much further up can you go?!

0:42:570:43:00

Cheerio!

0:43:000:43:01

Next time on Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:010:43:04

How will Anita spend all that lolly?

0:43:040:43:06

This is a James Bond car.

0:43:060:43:09

I wonder if I could afford it.

0:43:090:43:11

And how does Raj plan to catch up?

0:43:110:43:14

Ha!

0:43:140:43:15

Can you believe it?

0:43:150:43:17

Anita Manning and Raj Bisram hit the road for the penultimate time, with Anita finding an eastern deity figure she hopes will attract big bids. The gorgeous Kent towns of Deal, Sandwich and Faversham host the twosome for shopping.

Meanwhile, Anita learns about Whitstable oysters, and Raj detours to hear how thousands of boys became naval officers in the area.