Episode 3 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 3

Anita Manning and Raj Bisram take in the delights of Suffolk, Kent and Surrey before heading back to Essex for their third auction. Anita also visits a former silk mill.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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-That's cracking.

-With £200 each...

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-Wonderful.

-..a classic car,

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and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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-That's exactly what I'm talking about.

-I'm all over a shiver.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-No-brainer.

-Going, going, gone.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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-So, will it be the high road to glory...

-Push!

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..or the slow road to disaster?

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How awfully, awfully nice.

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah.

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It's leg three of the road trip,

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and two auctions down for antiques aficionados

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Anita Manning and Raj Bisram.

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So you didn't sleep, darling?

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To be honest, when you get £3.59 down,

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it's hard to sleep.

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So far, Raj has resisted the temptation to play dirty.

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I wonder if I could maybe put Anita in these.

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Ha! And Anita has negotiated hard so far.

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Could you come down even a wee bit more?

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Their faithful friend for the week has been the 1978 Triumph Spitfire.

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Well, Raj, we're in the lovely county of Essex.

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-The sun's trying to get through the cloud.

-It is.

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The rain has stopped...

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..and we're happy again.

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We certainly are.

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Good-oh.

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Our auctioneering duo started their road trip with £200 each,

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and it's been nail-biting stuff ever since.

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Raj now has £428.24 to spend

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but Anita managed to swipe the lead with a tidy £431.48,

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so there is less than £4 in it.

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It's so close now, I'm not sure what to do,

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whether to go all out for it

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-or play...

-Play it cool.

-Play it cool.

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-You, my friend, have to make your own mind up about that.

-I know.

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I'm a risk taker.

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-I know you are.

-THEY LAUGH

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-That's what I'm counting on, Raj.

-RAJ LAUGHS

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Us too.

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After kicking off from Wisbech in Cambridgeshire,

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they took in the sights of Norfolk,

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and they're continuing through Essex and Suffolk,

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from where they'll then head south to Kent, Surrey, and East Sussex,

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before navigating north to Bolton in Lancashire for their final auction.

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Gosh. Today's journey starts in Halstead, Essex,

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and comes full circle back to auction in Rayleigh, also in Essex.

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There's a town in Essex, which is the oldest town in Britain,

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-which is Colchester.

-Oh, I didn't know that.

-Yeah.

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That fella is a mine of information, but it is Halstead,

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not Colchester, where the pair are heading to, first off.

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Certainly looks like a big place.

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Oh, there's going to be a lot of choice here.

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-ANITA LAUGHS

-Well, wish me luck.

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-Have fun, Raj.

-I will.

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And remember - be dangerous.

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I will be.

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Have a good day.

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Burning oil. Huh.

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Halstead Antiques is situated in a former corn mill, hence the size,

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and holds about 25,000 items over two floors.

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Just a few things to choose from in here, then...

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Motor memorabilia is really collectable.

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If you can find original items, they're worth getting your hands on.

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And this is actually an original Wayne petrol pump.

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It's been completely restored.

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I love it.

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It's way out of my price range, but it's great.

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At £650, it's staying right where it is.

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This is a nice, decorative paddle.

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A lot of people put these on their wall.

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I'm always drawn to anything boating as well.

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I quite like this, this is quite nice.

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Got another one here, 18.

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Well, then, what are you thinking?

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They'd make quite a nice lot.

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With ticket prices of £29 and £18,

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Raj wants to see if he can get a deal for the two from owner, James.

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There's not going to be a lot in it for these, but I quite like them.

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-£25? 20, 25?

-Yes.

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20? Can we shake hands?

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-25.

-20?

-25 sounded a lot better to me.

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I'll tell you what, what about splitting it down the middle?

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-£22.50?

-Yeah.

-Yeah?

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You'll take that? Brilliant. We have a deal!

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-Thank you very much, Raj.

-Thank you, James.

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I know there's a saying that goes something like,

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"Up..." What is it?

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"Up the creek without a paddle"?

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Up the creek without a paddle.

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Well, I've got two paddles, I should be OK.

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Here's hoping.

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So that's £22.50 for the early 20th-century paddles.

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Meanwhile, Anita has made her way a couple of miles west

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to the village of Gosfield, home to Gosfield Antiques Village.

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Ten years ago,

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this former working farm was developed into a shopping mecca

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and today, it's run by Glen.

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Welcome, Anita.

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-Hello.

-Welcome to Gosfield.

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It's lovely to be here. I've had a walk through here.

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It's wonderful.

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So you've got this building here

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and you've got the building across the road.

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Across the courtyard. Lots of cabinets.

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-Is that the cabinet?

-SHE GASPS

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I'm a terrible girl for the cabinets.

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Could I go across?

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-Let's go this way.

-Thank you.

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There are 168 cabinets, to be precise.

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Anita's idea of heaven.

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And they are stocked with all things small.

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I'm spoiled for choice.

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I've had a quick look around.

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Now I'm going to be a wee bit more careful,

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ask to look at things, examine them,

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touch them and ask the price.

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And she's got something in mind. Time to bring back Glen.

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Found something?

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I quite like this little ornament here,

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the little antelope.

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It's not a precious metal, it's not silver.

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I think that's quite sweet,

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and I love the malachite base.

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I love those lovely, natural stones.

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It looks as if it's just the malachite,

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they've given it a knock and taken a chunk off of it,

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so it is a wee, sort of, artisan piece.

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It's got a ticket price of £38.

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But something else has also caught Anita's eye.

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This little silver snuff box there, it's £22.

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It doesn't seem a lot of money.

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It looks very pretty with the enamelling showing an exotic bird.

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I'm looking for a hallmark here.

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I can see a rather roughly stippled

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"925."

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It's as if it's been done by an amateur with a screwdriver.

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There is some discolouration there,

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so they've tested it.

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I think it probably is silver.

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The snuff box and the ornament, which I think is a ring holder,

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would total £50, so Anita's hoping to strike a deal.

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If I bought both of them,

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I would be thinking in the region of...

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..£25, £30.

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-I think we could manage £30.

-You could manage 30, go for 30?

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Let's do it, then.

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Thank you very much, Glen.

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That's £30 for the stylised ring holder and silver snuff box.

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Good-oh.

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Back with Raj in Halstead now.

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He's found himself another option.

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I really like this William Russell Flint.

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He was a Scottish artist, an illustrator as well.

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He had a great life.

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He just painted beautiful women, and mostly naked.

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I mean, this is quite unusual, because they've got clothes on.

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Obviously, his originals are really what you want,

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but this is a nice signed print.

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I would be interested around the £50 mark region.

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Like much of Russell Flint's work,

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his watercolour brush technique is superb,

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which is why his originals are coveted by collectors.

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The ticket price is £115 and Raj wants it for 50,

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so he's putting in a call to the off-site dealer.

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Stand by.

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Hello, Andrea, hello there.

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Thank you so much indeed.

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That's really kind.

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Lovely, thank you very much indeed, Andrea.

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Great! Fantastic.

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She's agreed to that.

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That's £50 for the 1950s William Russell Flint print.

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Raj has one more item he'd like to have a go at.

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This is a little bit different - it's turned into a bench,

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this "Danger Electricity" sign.

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I would want to pay £30 for it.

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It would make a great garden seat.

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It's priced at £85, so what's the best James can do?

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50?

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I'm prepared to split the difference and I'll pay 40 for it...

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HE EXHALES

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..which is slightly more than I wanted.

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He might be pushing it.

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-Yes.

-Yes?

-Yes.

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We have a deal. Thank you very much, James.

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Good man. Let's hope it sparks some interest at auction.

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So that's £40 for the "Danger Electricity" bench,

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£50 for the William Russell Flint print

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and £22.50 for the pair of paddles, totalling £112.50.

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Thank you very much indeed, James, it's been a pleasure to meet you,

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and thank you for making me feel so welcome.

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-And you.

-All the best.

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While Raj has been spending, Anita's headed south to Braintree.

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The town is responsible

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for producing some of the finest textiles in British history,

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favoured by the Royal family for over a century.

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To tell Anita more is textile historian and author Mary Schoeser.

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Mary, it's lovely to be here.

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It's lovely to have you here, Anita.

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I love textiles

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and I can see all of these wonderful cloths round about me.

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By the end of the 19th century,

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Essex had become a hub for silk production.

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Benjamin Warner, an entrepreneur with a background in textiles,

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took over this Braintree mill in 1895.

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At the time, it was one of Britain's largest mills for hand-woven silk.

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The contents of these drawers reveal

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over 100 years of ever-changing fashion and style,

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showing the fabric of British history.

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That's a lovely line.

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These early silks are so exquisite

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and they must have been so expensive to make.

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Who were the people who were wearing these things?

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Well, they were the wealthiest of all people

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because silk is the most expensive fibre.

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And so, of course, many of the clients were aristocrats

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and members of the royalty.

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Warners have dressed and furnished royal households for generations.

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Samples of these priceless cloths make up just part of this collection

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of 100,000 items.

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Mary, isn't that the most magnificent piece of fabric?

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That gold is glowing, it's so wonderful.

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Well, it is very special indeed.

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We know that the pattern was used at Queen Victoria's coronation

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and this is cloth of gold,

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woven for the coronation of Edward VII

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and it is gold thread woven into the cloth.

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That is amazing.

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In 1911, Warners were called on again to weave their magic

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for the coronation of King Edward's son and daughter-in-law,

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who were to become King George V and Queen Mary.

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This is one of two hand-woven, hand-brocaded cloths made in 1911

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for Queen Mary's coronation trousseau.

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There was a close relationship between Princess May,

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as she was called, prior to being crowned.

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Her wedding cloth, most famously, was woven by Warners.

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I think of Princess May as the first People's Princess.

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She was the first, as far as I know,

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to actually come inside a factory and stand next to a worker

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with his coat off, you know,

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and witness real work.

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That must have been a huge thing at that time,

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-because royalty just didn't pop down to their local factory!

-No, no.

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Princess Mary was a big supporter of British industry,

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promoting the high-quality designs of English hand-woven silk,

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a tradition that has continued through the Royal family to today.

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This one is very special.

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It's a hand-woven velvet.

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Oh, so beautiful.

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I can almost taste that.

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What would this have been used for?

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Well, this was used for the chairs of estate at the coronation

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of George V and Queen Mary.

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It is based on a 17th-century Genovese velvet design,

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but this was one of the cloths that...

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Warners, really, by this time,

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were the only hand weavers who could produce it.

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Very, very special. Very special.

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-That is not just a piece of fabric, that is a work of art.

-It is.

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It is. It's a piece of history.

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The archive holds 25,000 swatches,

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recording which weavers made them and when.

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Even though the mill shut in 1971,

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some of Warners' classic designs are back in production today.

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And this is taken from the original from the 1930s.

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Oh, that's fab.

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And I thought you would love that.

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-I think I'll try it on.

-I think you should.

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-Shall I?

-I think you should.

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-Oh, there we go.

-What do you think?

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It really is perfect.

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Warners' success not only lives on through this magnificent archive,

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but their designs are still being used by high-end companies

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across the world, showing that this great British business

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will not be forgotten.

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Raj, meanwhile, has got weaving his way north across the border

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into Suffolk, to the magnificent medieval market town of Clare,

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and to Market Hill Antiques, headed up by Robin.

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-Hello, there.

-Good afternoon.

-Robin, isn't it?

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-That's correct.

-I'm Raj.

-OK, Raj.

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You've got some lovely little things I can see already.

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My eyes are starting to sparkle.

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-Have a good look.

-I will do.

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Raj still has over £300 in his wallet.

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So get it dusted off.

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You very rarely go into a shop where you see a rare piece

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of Royal Doulton, and this is a Columbine figurine,

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which is a very rare piece.

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It's hand-signed.

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I can't see a price on it

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but this is from 1931.

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At £700, it's more than twice Raj's remaining budget.

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So, he'd better get on looking.

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The buttons - they're interesting.

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I've got 175 on them.

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That is probably a bit much for auction.

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They've got ridged design on, which dates them to circa 1900.

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They are silver. They've been tested.

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But they're in the original retailers' box,

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which is West & Sons of Dublin.

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Not only are these a nice set of Art Nouveau silver buttons,

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they're Irish, and they're in their original box.

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There's got to be a profit in these.

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I would pay you £50 for those.

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You would pay that for them?

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-They're yours then, Sir.

-Brilliant.

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-We have a deal.

-Thank you.

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A generous discount at £50 for the set of Art Nouveau buttons.

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On that note, it's time to button up and call it a night.

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So, nighty-night.

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Good morning, Antiquers!

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What a beautiful morning it is to take the Triumph Spitfire out

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again for a spin.

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Don't you think, Raj, it's just the joy of joys?

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To be sitting in a wee, flashy convertible...

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..in the sunshine, with a good pal?

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I tell you, I couldn't ask for anything better, Anita.

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Not sure where the sunshine is, though, Anita.

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So far, Anita has found herself two items.

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An enamel snuffbox and a stylised antelope -

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a possible ring stand - leaving her with just over £400 still to spend.

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Let's do it then. Thank you very much, Glen.

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Raj has four lots in the old bag.

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A pair of paddles,

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a William Russell Flint print,

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a "Danger Electricity" concrete bench

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and a set of Art Nouveau buttons.

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And he has just over £265 left to play with.

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We have a deal.

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You know, England is such a beautiful country,

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with all these wonderful little villages and the changing landscape.

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Anita, you can see why Kent is known as the Garden of England.

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True, true.

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This morning, they're heading to western Kent, to the town of Otford,

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home to a former winner of Britain's best roundabout.

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So, Raj, today, we're going to share a shop.

0:17:220:17:26

I don't want you following me around,

0:17:260:17:30

trying to buy a nicer wee brooch than I am!

0:17:300:17:34

Well, I'm afraid, Anita, all's fair in love and war.

0:17:340:17:38

And antiques. The shop in question

0:17:380:17:41

is Otford Antique and Collectors Centre.

0:17:410:17:44

Well, we've both got money,

0:17:440:17:47

-let's go shopping.

-RAJ CHUCKLES

0:17:470:17:50

Helping Anita and Raj today are Barry and Alan.

0:17:500:17:54

Here we are.

0:17:540:17:55

Hello, hello.

0:17:550:17:56

-Hi.

-Morning.

0:17:560:17:58

-How are you?

-How are you, all right?

0:17:580:18:01

I'm Raj, nice meet you.

0:18:010:18:03

Smashing place you've got.

0:18:030:18:04

I believe this is a skyscraper of an antique shop.

0:18:040:18:08

Well, we've got about 30 different dealers,

0:18:080:18:10

just over 30, I think, haven't we?

0:18:100:18:12

-35, I think.

-Upstairs, downstairs.

0:18:120:18:14

I'm going to go.

0:18:140:18:16

But, Anita, can you give me a 20-minute start?

0:18:160:18:18

-No.

-OK. Fair enough.

-See you later, good luck, Raj.

0:18:180:18:21

Raj heads upstairs while Anita tours the ground floor.

0:18:220:18:25

Raj soon finds something that's calling him.

0:18:310:18:35

These, um, old Bakelite telephones, the old black ones,

0:18:350:18:38

and the white ones as well,

0:18:380:18:39

have become very, very collectable now.

0:18:390:18:42

As you can see, this one is from a town just down the road,

0:18:420:18:44

in fact, Orpington.

0:18:440:18:46

This is a 1920s to 1940s one,

0:18:460:18:49

with a price ticket of £120,

0:18:490:18:51

so they have really gone up in value.

0:18:510:18:53

What's really interesting about these old phones, though,

0:18:530:18:55

is they can be converted.

0:18:550:18:56

One to think about, eh?

0:18:560:18:58

How's Anita getting on?

0:18:580:19:00

When you come into a big shop like this,

0:19:000:19:02

with lots and lots of dealers,

0:19:020:19:04

it can be a bit daunting at the beginning.

0:19:040:19:08

What I tend to do is to whizz round,

0:19:080:19:11

have a look at everything first of all,

0:19:110:19:14

and then I try to go round more carefully.

0:19:140:19:18

Meanwhile, Raj has been hitting the cabinets

0:19:200:19:22

and has roped in Alan to help.

0:19:220:19:24

I really like the look of this...

0:19:240:19:27

That's a lovely piece of glass.

0:19:270:19:29

Yeah, it's lovely.

0:19:290:19:31

It's absolutely lovely.

0:19:310:19:33

These kind of items sell really, really well

0:19:330:19:35

and there are a lot of collectors for them.

0:19:350:19:37

This is in really good condition.

0:19:370:19:39

Rene Lalique originally worked in jewellery but is now synonymous

0:19:390:19:43

worldwide with exquisite glass design,

0:19:430:19:45

which he began to do in the late 19th century.

0:19:450:19:48

This shell bowl dates from the 1930s.

0:19:480:19:50

Any idea what you think we could possibly get it for?

0:19:500:19:55

Er...

0:19:550:19:56

I've got 275.

0:19:580:20:00

It's on 10%.

0:20:000:20:01

I'd happily pay 150 for it.

0:20:010:20:04

I don't think he would take that.

0:20:040:20:06

But Alan's going to get the dealer on the phone for Raj

0:20:060:20:09

to see what he can do.

0:20:090:20:10

Hello, Andrew?

0:20:100:20:12

Uh-huh. I mean, for me, it's going to be about 150, 160.

0:20:130:20:17

Yes, I'm going to take a chance. Yes, I like it.

0:20:190:20:22

I like it, yeah. I will definitely take it for 165, yes.

0:20:220:20:26

Thank you very much indeed, Andrew.

0:20:260:20:28

He's come down to 165.

0:20:280:20:30

-Yeah, bye!

-There might be a small loss there, but I love it.

0:20:300:20:34

I love Rene Lalique's work, I love his glass.

0:20:340:20:37

-Lovely bowl.

-It's a lovely bowl

0:20:370:20:38

and it's actually quite a rare one, this one.

0:20:380:20:40

The shape and the design is slightly different to his normal ones.

0:20:400:20:44

So, that's £165 for the Lalique-signed shell bowl.

0:20:440:20:48

Back with Anita now and, after her initial whizz round,

0:20:510:20:54

she spotted a potential little gem in the window.

0:20:540:20:57

People say that brown furniture is not popular just now.

0:20:570:21:02

But small pieces of furniture are still popular.

0:21:020:21:06

And this is a lovely, wee, functional thing

0:21:060:21:09

that you can keep your favourite books in.

0:21:090:21:13

Victorian, mahogany,

0:21:130:21:17

and it has this rather nice carved detail here.

0:21:170:21:21

I like that, and I'm going to have a go at it.

0:21:210:21:25

Oh! So, Barry's putting it to one side

0:21:250:21:27

while Anita continues her search.

0:21:270:21:30

Hang on a minute. What's she doing now?

0:21:300:21:32

-MUSIC PLAYS

-Raj!

-Yes?

-Oh, no!

-Shall we dance?

0:21:320:21:36

Another one of my talents, I don't think.

0:21:360:21:39

-Why don't I put this on as well?

-You look so handsome.

-Let's go!

0:21:390:21:42

-Fred Astaire.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:21:420:21:44

I'm getting into this.

0:21:530:21:55

I'm not sure he'll get a ten from Len.

0:21:550:21:58

I'm afraid I still have some items to buy,

0:21:580:22:00

so I think I'll have to twirl off and I'll see you later.

0:22:000:22:05

Adios!

0:22:050:22:06

With Raj's shopping finished, but his dancing career starting,

0:22:060:22:11

Anita's searching high and low

0:22:110:22:13

to find something to wow the auction-goers of Essex.

0:22:130:22:15

There's some lovely 20th-century items in here.

0:22:160:22:20

Some lovely Whitefriars here, some Daum glass,

0:22:200:22:25

and a piece of Troika.

0:22:250:22:27

Troika pottery was only made for a short period and this wheel vase,

0:22:270:22:31

so-called as it's round,

0:22:310:22:33

looks to have been made by Louise Jinks,

0:22:330:22:36

who worked at Troika between 1976 and 1981.

0:22:360:22:40

I like it very, very much. I love the modernist design.

0:22:420:22:46

I love the fact that it was made by an artist.

0:22:460:22:50

It's priced at £145, and another option

0:22:500:22:53

to go with her miniature mahogany bookcase, perhaps.

0:22:530:22:56

Let's see what Barry can do.

0:22:560:22:58

I think that's a nice wee thing.

0:22:580:23:00

-It's priced at £38, Barry.

-OK.

-But there's a wee damage here.

0:23:000:23:04

A little bit of the moulding missing.

0:23:040:23:06

-Right.

-I was wondering if there was a possibility

0:23:060:23:09

of getting it nearer £20?

0:23:090:23:12

-Oh, my goodness!

-Is that too big a discount?

0:23:120:23:15

I would've thought it probably is.

0:23:150:23:17

So, Barry's going to let Anita talk to the dealer herself.

0:23:170:23:20

Hello, Jackie, it's Anita here.

0:23:200:23:22

Hi! Now, I've fancied that nice wee, um, kind of miniature bookcase.

0:23:220:23:30

I was wanting to pay round about £20 for it,

0:23:300:23:34

but, um, Barry was saying that was a wee bit too much.

0:23:340:23:38

25 would be absolutely wonderful.

0:23:380:23:41

Thank you, Jackie.

0:23:410:23:43

Right. Bye-bye.

0:23:430:23:45

-25, Barry.

-Lovely!

0:23:450:23:46

If you don't ask, you don't get and Anita's not done yet.

0:23:460:23:49

Barry's back on the phone to dealer Andrew,

0:23:490:23:52

who sold the Lalique bowl to Raj.

0:23:520:23:54

Let's see if he's still feeling generous.

0:23:540:23:56

Hello, Andrew.

0:23:560:23:58

I fancied the little wheel vase.

0:23:580:24:01

Now, you've got 145 on it.

0:24:010:24:04

SHE LAUGHS

0:24:040:24:08

I love you, too.

0:24:080:24:10

What's the very best that you can do, Andrew?

0:24:100:24:13

Aw, thank you so much. That's absolutely fabulous.

0:24:140:24:18

OK, bye-bye.

0:24:180:24:20

So, 90 for that. He's come down for us.

0:24:200:24:23

That's terrific.

0:24:230:24:25

So, that's £115 all in, including the mahogany bookcase.

0:24:250:24:28

Gosh!

0:24:280:24:30

-I love my lovely items.

-Well done!

-OK.

-Good luck with them.

0:24:300:24:33

-See you next time. Bye-bye!

-Thank you, bye-bye.

0:24:330:24:35

Meanwhile, Raj has headed north to Bexleyheath,

0:24:410:24:44

a town belonging to Kent until 1965,

0:24:440:24:46

when it became part of Greater London Boroughs.

0:24:460:24:49

Raj is here to find out about the birthplace of interior design

0:24:490:24:53

at the former home of an iconic British artist.

0:24:530:24:55

National Trust house and gardens manager, Robin Finney,

0:24:550:24:59

is here to tell Raj more.

0:24:590:25:02

Guess whose house it was, then? Go on.

0:25:020:25:04

-Hello, Robin.

-Hi, Raj.

0:25:040:25:06

-Welcome to Red House.

-Thank you much indeed.

0:25:060:25:08

Red House was built for William Morris in 1859

0:25:100:25:14

when he was just 25.

0:25:140:25:16

He went on to become one of the most influential designers

0:25:160:25:19

of the 19th century, inspiring the Arts and Crafts movement.

0:25:190:25:23

So, Robin, at the time, when he built this house,

0:25:230:25:26

it was quite a way from Central London.

0:25:260:25:28

It was about 12 miles, and this was all countryside.

0:25:280:25:31

Yeah, so the house was all surrounded by orchards at the time.

0:25:310:25:34

I mean, in Britain, we had the Industrial Revolution.

0:25:340:25:37

-Yes.

-How did that shape his thoughts?

0:25:370:25:39

He was very much looking for an antidote for that.

0:25:390:25:42

You see this movement out into the country,

0:25:420:25:44

and this medieval way of living is him pushing back on that

0:25:440:25:48

and that industrial way and brutalist way of life.

0:25:480:25:51

As the only property to have been commissioned,

0:25:510:25:54

created and lived in by Morris,

0:25:540:25:57

the Red House gives a unique insight into his world.

0:25:570:26:01

Morris enlisted his friend, architect Philip Webb,

0:26:010:26:04

to design a dream home amongst this rural idyll.

0:26:040:26:08

A palace of art where he and fellow guests could collaborate.

0:26:080:26:12

So, what did this house represent for him?

0:26:120:26:16

So Morris had actually just got married to Janey Burdon,

0:26:160:26:20

and this was really supposed to be their forever home,

0:26:200:26:23

so where they would grow old, their children would be born.

0:26:230:26:26

With that in mind, the garden also tied in with the style of the house,

0:26:270:26:32

both inside and out.

0:26:320:26:34

Many of the flowers planted here feature in Morris's famous designs.

0:26:340:26:38

But it's inside where you can see his work really come to life.

0:26:380:26:44

Having struggled to find furnishings beautiful enough for his new home,

0:26:440:26:48

he and architect Webb decided to make their own.

0:26:480:26:51

This is an incredible piece of furniture -

0:26:510:26:54

very typical of the Arts and Crafts movement.

0:26:540:26:56

-Is this something he would have made himself?

-Yes.

0:26:560:26:59

Everything in the house was either designed by Morris or his friends.

0:26:590:27:03

And this piece here was designed by Philip Webb and painted by Morris.

0:27:030:27:07

Everything had to be beautiful in its own right,

0:27:070:27:09

which everyone knows that famous quote by Morris -

0:27:090:27:12

"Have nothing in your houses you do not know to be beautiful

0:27:120:27:15

"or believe to be beautiful."

0:27:150:27:16

That's very much symbolises that.

0:27:160:27:18

Morris's palace of art dream came true

0:27:190:27:22

as the Red House became a creative hub of collaboration

0:27:220:27:26

and the foundations of interior design were formed.

0:27:260:27:29

His friends and fellow artists,

0:27:290:27:31

including Edward Burne-Jones and his wife,

0:27:310:27:34

added their touch to this rural retreat during their regular visits,

0:27:340:27:38

often staying for weeks at a time.

0:27:380:27:40

It led to, in 1861, to the founding of the firm

0:27:400:27:44

which we now know as Morris & Co.

0:27:440:27:46

So this group of friends decided that, actually, these things

0:27:460:27:49

they were creating were good enough to be sold to other people.

0:27:490:27:52

And a lot of things you'll see in Red House today

0:27:520:27:54

actually went into production for the firm.

0:27:540:27:56

The company produced a range of domestic furnishings,

0:27:560:28:00

aimed at making homes beautiful as well as practical.

0:28:000:28:04

Morris & Co was becoming really successful.

0:28:040:28:07

He was commuting from Bexleyheath every day into London,

0:28:070:28:10

which could be a struggle sometimes now,

0:28:100:28:12

but then was a much bigger journey.

0:28:120:28:14

Plans were drawn up to extend the house

0:28:140:28:16

and for the Burne-Joneses to move in.

0:28:160:28:18

But due to some sad personal circumstances of theirs,

0:28:180:28:22

that didn't happen and the decision was made to move.

0:28:220:28:25

Morris was completely heartbroken

0:28:250:28:26

and said he would never be able to return to the house,

0:28:260:28:29

cos it would just be too heartbreaking.

0:28:290:28:30

-Quite sad really, isn't it?

-A really sad end, yeah.

0:28:300:28:34

William Morris and his family moved out

0:28:340:28:37

just five years after it was built in 1865.

0:28:370:28:41

Morris is still regarded globally

0:28:410:28:42

as one of the greatest designers of all time,

0:28:420:28:45

who revolutionised the way people decorated their homes.

0:28:450:28:48

But this might not have been the case

0:28:480:28:50

without the artistic hotbed of creativity he set up here

0:28:500:28:54

that shaped both his life and work.

0:28:540:28:56

In the meantime, Anita's crossed the border into Surrey,

0:29:000:29:04

to the village of Godstone.

0:29:040:29:06

Its pretty pond was where horses were watered in ye olden days,

0:29:060:29:11

before being stabled in what's now

0:29:110:29:13

a different type of watering hole across the road.

0:29:130:29:16

Anita's here to try her luck at Godstone Emporium, run by Jacqui.

0:29:160:29:21

-Ooh!

-Hi, girls!

-Hi!

0:29:210:29:23

-I'm Anita.

-Lovely to meet you.

0:29:230:29:25

Oh, it's great to be here, it's great to be here.

0:29:250:29:28

-This looks lovely.

-There's lots of treasures here to be found.

0:29:280:29:32

That's what we like to hear. So, what will Anita hunt out first?

0:29:320:29:35

What a lovely wee gem I've found here!

0:29:390:29:42

It's a little Art Nouveau shelving unit.

0:29:420:29:45

Dates 1880-1910.

0:29:450:29:49

It's combining the curvilinear with the geometric,

0:29:490:29:54

and that can be quite typical of Art Nouveau style,

0:29:540:29:58

particularly Glasgow Art Nouveau style.

0:29:580:30:02

At £48.50, it's one to keep in mind.

0:30:020:30:05

-Scotch Corner!

-BAGPIPES ON SOUNDTRACK

0:30:070:30:10

I wonder if they knew I was coming.

0:30:100:30:13

There is a selection here.

0:30:150:30:17

And I think, today, I would like to buy some agate jewellery.

0:30:170:30:21

We have the wonderful autumn colours here.

0:30:210:30:24

But I like this one as well.

0:30:240:30:28

This is mounted in silver.

0:30:280:30:33

Let's have a look at the hallmark.

0:30:330:30:35

That's a Glasgow hallmark. I've got to buy that.

0:30:380:30:41

This central stone is called a Cairngorm.

0:30:420:30:46

And it has the colour and hues

0:30:460:30:49

of the peaty streams, or burns, of Scotland.

0:30:490:30:54

Around the outside, we have these citrines.

0:30:540:31:01

And the silver mount is engraved with leaves and flowers.

0:31:010:31:07

And it's quite a beautiful thing.

0:31:070:31:10

So, if I pick out another two of them...

0:31:100:31:14

..I might be able to get a deal with the dealer.

0:31:170:31:20

So, it's back to Jacqui, to see what she can do.

0:31:200:31:23

Jacqui...

0:31:230:31:24

-Hello.

-I've found three little brooches in that Scotch Corner

0:31:240:31:29

you've got round here.

0:31:290:31:31

-Right.

-They're absolutely lovely.

0:31:310:31:33

-What I thought I might do is, if I could buy three...

-Mm-hm.

0:31:330:31:37

..I could do a deal on the three.

0:31:370:31:41

Well, let's have a look at the prices.

0:31:410:31:44

58. 38.

0:31:440:31:46

And 55.

0:31:460:31:48

151.

0:31:480:31:50

The brooches belong to dealer Maria, who happens to be here today.

0:31:500:31:55

Could you come anywhere near £100 for the three of them?

0:31:550:32:00

-Not that low, no.

-Not that low? What's the best you can do, Maria?

0:32:000:32:05

-120.

-Is that the very, very, very best you can do on it?

-Yeah.

0:32:050:32:12

OK, let's go for that.

0:32:120:32:15

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks very much.

0:32:150:32:17

She may be over 400 miles from home,

0:32:170:32:19

but Anita's bought three Scottish brooches for £120.

0:32:190:32:24

-OK, that's lovely. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-Bye.

0:32:240:32:27

And with that, shopping's done.

0:32:270:32:30

Let's have a gander at their purchases.

0:32:300:32:34

Along with the three brooches, Anita found an enamel snuffbox,

0:32:340:32:37

a stylised antelope ring stand,

0:32:370:32:40

a miniature mahogany bookcase, and a Troika wheel vase,

0:32:400:32:45

all for £265.

0:32:450:32:48

Raj splashed £327.50 on two wooden paddles,

0:32:480:32:53

a William Russell Flint print, a "Danger Electricity" bench,

0:32:530:32:57

a set of Art Nouveau buttons, and a Lalique shell bowl.

0:32:570:33:00

Thoughts, anyone?

0:33:000:33:03

The Troika wheel vase. This is a really lovely item.

0:33:030:33:06

There are a lot of collectors of Troika.

0:33:060:33:08

It's going up in value all the time.

0:33:080:33:10

I love that Coquilles Lalique bowl. That was an item of quality.

0:33:100:33:17

Should make a profit.

0:33:170:33:19

The little metal antelope figurine, I'm not sure about this one.

0:33:190:33:24

I think I'd better say nothing.

0:33:240:33:26

But his electric chair.

0:33:260:33:29

Is that going to burn him out and stop him making huge profits?

0:33:290:33:35

Who knows?

0:33:350:33:36

Who knows, indeed!

0:33:360:33:38

After hitting the road from Halstead, Essex,

0:33:380:33:40

and two successful shopping days,

0:33:400:33:42

Anita and Raj are now on the approach to their third auction

0:33:420:33:45

back in Essex again - in Rayleigh.

0:33:450:33:48

Raj, I hate to say this,

0:33:480:33:50

but are we going round in circles, here?

0:33:500:33:54

To be honest, Anita, I'm the driver, you're the navigator.

0:33:540:33:57

OK? So, if we are, it's your fault.

0:33:570:34:01

Good point!

0:34:010:34:03

We've both won one auction each.

0:34:030:34:06

We've both had a reasonable amount of money to spend.

0:34:060:34:11

I wonder what's going to happen today.

0:34:110:34:14

We'll soon find out, as our experts' last stop of this leg

0:34:140:34:17

is at family-run Stacey's Auctioneers.

0:34:170:34:20

Here we are, Raj.

0:34:200:34:22

Well, here we go. I'm looking forward to this one.

0:34:220:34:26

You never know.

0:34:260:34:27

-Right, third auction.

-Here we are.

0:34:270:34:29

-OK.

-Are you confident, Raj?

-Absolutely!

0:34:290:34:33

Paul Stacey is in charge of the rostrum today.

0:34:330:34:36

The little silver snuffbox, very decorative,

0:34:380:34:41

but it hasn't got a hallmark, so a bit of a risk there.

0:34:410:34:44

The large concrete sign, "Danger Electric" -

0:34:440:34:47

limited market, I think.

0:34:470:34:49

Not particularly pretty, so I think that might struggle a little bit.

0:34:490:34:52

Um, star items for me -

0:34:520:34:54

the Lalique bowl, I think, will do very well,

0:34:540:34:56

because it's an early piece of Lalique.

0:34:560:34:57

Made during the '40s, so I think that'll do well.

0:34:570:35:00

The silver brooches, they're hallmarked, Scottish.

0:35:000:35:03

I think they're going to do quite well, they're in good condition.

0:35:030:35:05

Hang on to your hats, it's time to see what the Essex auction-goers

0:35:050:35:09

and phone and internet bidders think.

0:35:090:35:11

-RAJ LAUGHS

-Well, here we are.

-Yeah!

0:35:130:35:16

First up is Anita's enamel snuffbox.

0:35:170:35:21

Shall we say about £10 to start? Got to be worth that, surely?

0:35:210:35:24

10 is bid. 12 now, 14. Advance on 14, if you want it.

0:35:240:35:28

-And 16 I've got.

-In profit, in profit.

0:35:280:35:31

At £16 now. Any advances? 18. Thank you. 20.

0:35:310:35:34

22. 25 on the internet now.

0:35:340:35:37

-SHE GASPS, DROWNS HIM OUT

-Yes!

-You're out in the room.

0:35:370:35:40

An internet bid at £25, then,

0:35:400:35:43

-£25.

-Yes!

-Brilliant.

0:35:430:35:44

Brilliant. She starts as she'd like to go on, doubling her money.

0:35:440:35:48

-That's a very, very good start. Well done.

-Thank you, darling.

0:35:480:35:51

THEY LAUGH

0:35:510:35:52

Over to Raj now, with his two paddles.

0:35:530:35:56

Shall we say £10 to start?

0:35:560:35:58

-10 I've got, thank you, sir. 12 now is bid.

-Oh, no!

0:35:580:36:01

-Against you. 14. 16.

-These will probably go for about 100 quid!

0:36:010:36:04

£18, 20 now with you. 22. 25. 28 now we have.

0:36:040:36:09

Gentleman standing at 28 and we have now internet action.

0:36:090:36:13

-Oh, no!

-30.

0:36:130:36:14

There we go. 32 now. Back in the room.

0:36:140:36:17

35? No! At 35, £40 now, all on the internet. There we are.

0:36:170:36:23

Are we all done? I'm about to sell at £40, then.

0:36:230:36:26

GAVEL BANGS

0:36:260:36:27

And a decent profit to start for Raj.

0:36:270:36:30

-Just a small profit.

-Well done, darling.

0:36:300:36:33

I should start to get worried now.

0:36:330:36:37

We're back with Anita now, for the antelope ring stand thingamajig.

0:36:370:36:40

£20 to start, surely. £20 we've got, straight in. Thank you, sir.

0:36:400:36:44

20 is bid. 22. 25. 28.

0:36:440:36:47

-30.

-Yes!

-32, 35. 38.

0:36:470:36:51

At 38 now, 42 is bid online.

0:36:510:36:53

-You're out in the room.

-I'm in trouble.

-At 42, then.

0:36:530:36:56

An online bid at £42, then.

0:36:560:36:59

-GAVEL BANGS

-Yes!

-Brilliant. Well done.

0:36:590:37:01

Anita's made another healthy profit.

0:37:010:37:04

-Are you panicking?

-I am!

-Are you worried? Are you worried?

0:37:040:37:06

-Nah. Not me, not me, no.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:37:060:37:09

Well, we'll see if you should be

0:37:090:37:11

as it's Raj's turn now with the Art Nouveau buttons.

0:37:110:37:14

Shall we say about £30 to start, surely?

0:37:140:37:16

-30 I've got. 32. 35. 38. 40.

-Come on!

-Come on, come on!

0:37:160:37:22

45. 48. 50, 5. 60, 5.

0:37:220:37:28

-70,

-5. Oh, profit!

-80.

-Profit!

0:37:280:37:32

-85. 90...

-Yes!

-In a fresh place at the far back of the room now.

-Yeah.

0:37:320:37:36

Are you still with me? 95. Thank you.

0:37:360:37:38

-Yes!

-Come on!

-100, round it up.

0:37:380:37:39

110, if you like?

0:37:390:37:41

-110.

-Yes!

-No more.

-Yes!

0:37:410:37:43

£110 is now bid.

0:37:430:37:45

For the last time, the hammer's up, I'm selling at £110, then.

0:37:450:37:50

-GAVEL BANGS

-Yes.

-Yes!

-Aw, gimme a kiss!

0:37:500:37:54

Well played, sir. Raj has more than doubled his money.

0:37:540:37:58

My heart was beating, boom-boom, boom-boom! I should be worried!

0:37:580:38:03

He is catching up, but it's Anita's Troika vase next.

0:38:030:38:07

Commission bid at 55, advance on that if you want it.

0:38:070:38:11

-Oh, no!

-At 55. £60. 65. 70 in the room now with you, sir.

0:38:110:38:16

Commissions are out. Are we all done?

0:38:160:38:18

-For the last time, the hammer's up.

-Oh, no!

-I'm selling at £70.

0:38:180:38:23

GAVEL BANGS That's a blow for Anita. What a job.

0:38:230:38:26

-Aw!

-A little loss.

-Just a wee loss.

0:38:260:38:29

We're back with Raj now for the William Russell Flint print.

0:38:290:38:33

£60 anywhere?

0:38:330:38:34

-£60 I've got, on the telephone.

-Oh, no!

-65 online against you.

0:38:340:38:39

-ANITA LAUGHS

-£70.

0:38:390:38:42

75. 80. 85.

0:38:420:38:46

-90 now. On the telephone at £90. Any advance now?

-Bit more. Bit more.

0:38:460:38:52

-I'm about to sell at £90, then.

-GAVEL BANGS

0:38:520:38:55

Another great profit for Raj.

0:38:550:38:58

Next, it's Anita's priciest purchase,

0:38:580:39:00

the three Scottish brooches.

0:39:000:39:02

40 anywhere, nice brooches at 40, surely?

0:39:020:39:05

-40 I've got, thank you.

-Oh, yes!

0:39:050:39:07

40 is bid on the telephone. 42 online, against you.

0:39:070:39:12

45. 48.

0:39:120:39:14

50 on the telephone now.

0:39:140:39:17

-55, back online.

-Yes, come on!

0:39:170:39:20

60 on the telephone, thank you.

0:39:200:39:22

65.

0:39:220:39:23

70.

0:39:230:39:25

Back on the telephone.

0:39:250:39:26

75 online.

0:39:260:39:28

£80 now, still on the telephone, 85.

0:39:280:39:31

90 now, still on the telephone.

0:39:310:39:34

95.

0:39:340:39:36

-No.

-Aww.

-At 95 is bid.

0:39:360:39:39

At £95, then.

0:39:390:39:42

Ouch! That's a second loss for Anita.

0:39:420:39:44

Sell them in Scotland, girl.

0:39:440:39:46

That could have been a lot worse, darling.

0:39:460:39:48

Yeah!

0:39:480:39:50

Don't hold back.

0:39:500:39:52

Raj's "Danger Electricity" bench is up next.

0:39:520:39:55

Auctioneer Paul wasn't sure. Do the bidders agree?

0:39:550:39:58

£30 anywhere?

0:39:580:40:00

£20?

0:40:000:40:02

Ah, there we are, some internet activity!

0:40:020:40:04

-£20 is offered.

-Thank God for that!

-At £22.

0:40:040:40:08

25 now.

0:40:080:40:10

It's all online. 28. Here we go.

0:40:100:40:12

At 30, 32.

0:40:120:40:14

Last opportunity. We don't give free delivery for this, sorry.

0:40:140:40:17

£32. 32.

0:40:170:40:19

Last opportunity at 32, then.

0:40:190:40:21

Unfortunately, no-one was on Raj's wavelength with that one.

0:40:230:40:27

My heart BLEEDS for you.

0:40:270:40:31

Said with feeling, as well!

0:40:310:40:33

It's now Anita's final lot, the miniature mahogany bookcase.

0:40:340:40:38

Commission bids.

0:40:380:40:39

-Commission bids!

-Cleared at £50.

0:40:390:40:41

-Straight in, there you go!

-Come on!

0:40:410:40:44

55 is the bid.

0:40:440:40:46

Any advances now?

0:40:460:40:47

£60. 65.

0:40:470:40:50

-70.

-Yes, yes!

0:40:500:40:52

At 70, on the telephone, this bid.

0:40:520:40:54

A telephone bid at £70, then.

0:40:540:40:57

-Yes!

-£70.

-There you go.

0:40:570:40:59

Almost tripled her money. Go, girl!

0:40:590:41:02

Is that 300% profit?

0:41:020:41:05

Not quite, but not far off. It all comes down to Raj's final lot.

0:41:070:41:11

It's his gamble buy, will it pay off?

0:41:110:41:13

Quite a bit of interest in this, ladies and gentlemen.

0:41:150:41:17

-Good luck, darling.

-I must start the bidding here with me at £100, then.

0:41:170:41:21

Let's advance on 100.

0:41:210:41:23

-That's not right.

-At £100, 120.

0:41:230:41:25

All on the internet at the moment.

0:41:250:41:27

160 now.

0:41:270:41:29

170 is a commission bid.

0:41:290:41:30

Against you, 180.

0:41:300:41:33

-190 now, still with me.

-Come on, more!

0:41:330:41:34

200. 220 is bid.

0:41:340:41:37

230 now.

0:41:370:41:39

240, 250.

0:41:390:41:40

260 now is bid.

0:41:400:41:42

260!

0:41:420:41:44

At £260 is the bid, then,

0:41:440:41:47

last opportunity now.

0:41:470:41:48

I'm about to sell at £260, then.

0:41:480:41:51

-That was wonderful!

-260!

-Congratulations.

0:41:530:41:56

An amazing profit for Raj.

0:41:560:41:59

-Well, that's it all over.

-What an auction! WHAT an auction!

0:41:590:42:03

-I need a cup of tea.

-Come on, let's go.

0:42:030:42:05

Let's do the maths. Anita began this leg with £431.48.

0:42:080:42:13

After auction costs, she is down £17.36,

0:42:130:42:18

leaving her with £414.12.

0:42:180:42:20

Raj set off with £428.24

0:42:220:42:25

and, post costs,

0:42:250:42:28

he is up by a decent £108.74,

0:42:280:42:31

making him the midweek winner with £536.98.

0:42:310:42:37

So, congratulations, old bean.

0:42:370:42:39

Oh, Raj, that was so exciting!

0:42:390:42:41

-That was an exciting one, wasn't it?

-Well, listen,

0:42:410:42:43

living dangerously and spending big money obviously works for you.

0:42:430:42:48

-There you go! Please.

-Thank you, darling.

0:42:480:42:52

-Here we go!

-Hey!

0:42:530:42:55

See you again, folks.

0:42:570:42:59

Next time, our auctioneers head into battle for their fourth round.

0:42:590:43:03

-Let's get a suit of armour and go to battle!

-Yes!

0:43:030:43:06

Raj Bisram changes his approach.

0:43:060:43:08

As you can see, I'm working really hard.

0:43:080:43:10

And Anita Manning gets a shock at the auction.

0:43:100:43:13

-BOTH:

-Yes!

0:43:130:43:15

Anita Manning and Raj Bisram take in the delights of Suffolk, Kent and Surrey before heading back to Essex for their third auction.

Anita rests from shopping to visit a former silk mill with an incredible royal connection. Meanwhile, Raj hears about the birth of interior design and the pioneering artist behind it, William Morris.