Episode 2 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 2

Anita Manning starts this leg negotiating hard in an attempt to take the lead over Raj Bisram when they head to an auction in Stansted Mountfitchet, Essex.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts!

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-DONG!

-That's cracking!

-With £200 each...

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-Wonderful!

-..a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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-That's exactly what I'm talking about.

-I'm all over a-shiver!

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-No-brainer.

-Going, going, gone.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory?

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-Push!

-Or the slow road to disaster?

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How awfully, awfully nice.

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This is Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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It's the second leg of the road trip

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for our top auctioneering twosome,

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Raj Bisram and Anita Manning, who are full of the joys of spring.

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This is a very beautiful part of the year, isn't it?

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It's lovely. The daffodils are out

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and it really feels as if spring is now kicking in.

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Raj's tactics so far have been

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to challenge jewellery junkie Anita at her own game...

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I love these two things.

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..whereas Anita is ladling out Philip Serrell's usual fare.

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Heigh-ho, heigh-ho.

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-It's off to auction I go!

-WOMAN LAUGHS

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The 1978 Triumph Spitfire is their trusty, or is it rusty,

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companion for the week.

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And here we are, open top car. I like this car.

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-I know, it's nice!

-It's been really nice to drive, I have to say.

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Off to a good start, then.

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Both experts began their road trip with £200 each.

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One auction down and a great start all round

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means that Anita has £299.78 to play with.

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But Raj steamed ahead,

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taking an early lead with a staggering £370.74.

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Well done, boy!

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Well, Raj, we've got plenty of dosh in our pockets.

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We did so well yesterday.

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Is it the big spend today?

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Well, I think so.

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After setting off from Wisbech in Cambridgeshire,

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they're exploring Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex,

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then gallivanting south to Kent, Surrey and Sussex,

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before ending up in Bolton, Lancashire, for their final auction.

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Gosh!

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Today's leg begins in Sheringham in Norfolk, with their second auction

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taking them south to Stansted Mountfitchet in Essex.

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So, Raj, you're full of beans today,

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but there's a special reason for that.

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-I believe it's your birthday, darling?

-It is indeed, it is indeed.

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# Happy birthday to you Happy birthday to you

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# Happy birthday, Mr Bisram...

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-# Happy birthday to you!

-Happy birthday to you. #

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-Whoa!

-Oh, lovely.

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Who needs Marilyn Monroe, eh?

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Well, the sun is shining today, it's my birthday,

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all the omens are that I am going to find myself a little jewel in a shop

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-somewhere here in Norfolk.

-Jewel, yeah.

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The seaside town of Sheringham is home to the North Norfolk Railway,

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which runs steam train journeys

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through the area's stunning coastal countryside.

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Here we go.

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Oh, this is lovely.

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-Raj, they've put out the bunting for us.

-What more could you want?

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Anita's first shop today is

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Sheringham Collectables, run by Barry. Hello!

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hi, I'm Anita.

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-Hello, Anita.

-This is just looking absolutely wonderful.

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I think I'm going to have to take my bonnet off and my gloves off.

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She definitely means business, this woman.

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From glassware to china, jewellery and militaria,

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the shop sells all things collectable.

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The coin market is really vibrant just now.

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If you can find coins between, I think it's '27 and '36,

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these are the crowns that were made in very limited editions and that

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could be worth a lot of money.

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And if you find a 1934 crown...

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..it will be worth four figures.

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Good tip, but unfortunately, none of those here today.

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This is quite an interesting wee item.

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It's a top-hat brush.

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It is hallmarked silver and it is embossed with the family

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at the table eating, drinking.

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So, it's a nice domestic scene.

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I think I might have a go at that.

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But first, Anita's got her eye on those cabinets again.

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Could I have a look at the enamelled dressing table set

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and also the Masonic locket?

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Well, there's the Masonic locket.

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Thank you.

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I rather like the look of this.

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At the front, we have the dividers,

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which are a Masonic symbol, and this rather attractive cornucopia.

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It belonged to Brother William Jones in 1944.

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It's fully hallmarked at the bottom

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and, though it might have a limited appeal, I like it.

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One to consider. Now, what about that dressing table set?

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So, the important thing about, er...enamelled wear

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-is that it shouldn't have any damage, really, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-A bit of damage on the mirror.

-That's a shame,

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because the mirror's probably one of the most important pieces.

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-Yes.

-And we've got some damage there.

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-Damage there.

-But it's a rather pretty pattern, with the cream,

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-the garlands of flowers...

-Yeah.

-..and the brush has got a kind of

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wee scuff on it as well. So I've got...

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..three pieces with damage.

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Anita's rather keen on this dressing table set, marked up at £45,

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the Masonic pendant at 30

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and the top-hat brush at 38, totalling £113.

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So, can she get a deal for the three?

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Could we be anywhere near £50 on these?

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Um, how about 55?

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-55. I think that's smashing.

-Yeah?

-I'm happy with that.

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So that's £55 for the three.

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A marvellous £58 off for Anita.

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Meanwhile, the birthday boy is navigating the Norfolk countryside.

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Let's hope I can find something really nice today.

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I've got money and I want to spend it.

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Exciting stuff, eh?

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Back in Sheringham, Anita hasn't made it very far.

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Just next door, in fact!

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With three lots in the bag,

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the Queen of hats just can't help herself.

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Oh, I say.

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Coquettish? The size of Spain!

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That's one of MY hats. Look out!

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Was she ever in the home guard? Might well have been!

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LAUGHTER

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She loves it, doesn't she?

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Good Lord!

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Meanwhile, Raj is heading south to the village of Blickling,

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once home to a man who played a crucial role in defeating Hitler

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and bringing an end to the Second World War.

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Wow!

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National Trust guide Malcolm Bird is here to tell Raj more.

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-Hello there.

-Good morning.

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-You must be Malcolm?

-Welcome to Blickling.

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What a fantastic place.

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This breathtaking Jacobean mansion was built in the early 17th century

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and its last owner took over Blickling over 300 years later.

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Philip Kerr became the 11th Marquis of Lothian in 1930

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and he inherited the title from a cousin.

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Before inheriting the estate, Lord Lothian had served

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as private secretary to the then Prime Minister, Lloyd George.

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He was based mainly in London, but when he stayed at Blickling,

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he hosted the great and the good of British society.

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A great room to entertain in.

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Oh, yes. Numerous distinguished people have visited.

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Who was his social circle?

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He entertained the then Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin...

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-OK.

-..and his wife and, er,

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he became friends with Nancy and Waldorf Astor.

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The Astors were American-born millionaires.

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Nancy was the first female MP

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and, along with Lord Lothian and other prominent figures,

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these politically influential people were known as the Cliveden Set.

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At first, they supported the controversial appeasement policy,

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aiming to prevent another war, giving Germany the right

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to take back land confiscated after World War I.

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Was he actually a German sympathiser?

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I don't think he was.

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But there was a cartoon in one of the newspapers at the time that

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illustrated Lord Lothian and the Cliveden Set doing the goose step,

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you know? It sort of implied that they were Nazi sympathisers.

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Controversially, Lothian and the Cliveden Set

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initially admired Germany's new ruler's strong leadership.

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They believed Hitler and Germany

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were being too strongly punished for World War I.

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Did Lord Lothian ever meet Hitler?

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He did meet Hitler on two occasions, yes.

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Once Hitler's true intentions

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of further territorial expansion were clear,

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Lord Lothian repented his earlier views,

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admitting Hitler was a fanatical gangster.

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Having been appointed American ambassador

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just before the war broke out, Lord Lothian used his power and charm

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to try and put a stop to Hitler's

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aggression by highlighting the danger the world was in

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and drumming up American support for Britain's war effort.

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So this is a recording of his speeches that he made in America

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asking the people of America for help?

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Yes, the situation that was arising, we couldn't handle it on our own -

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he knew we couldn't - and we needed their help.

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-RECORDING:

-Nazi Germany is in a better position to win a world empire today

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than she was in the last war. Today, she can concentrate

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almost every particle of force she has in the West.

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Lord Lothian not only swayed American public opinion,

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he also persuaded a reluctant Winston Churchill as Prime Minister

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to write what would become a historic letter

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to President Roosevelt to ask for help.

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This agreement with America, starting with military aid,

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which led eventually to the Americans

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joining the Second World War as Allies.

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Getting the Americans to help must've been a huge achievement?

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Oh, certainly, yes.

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But did he actually get the credit for starting things off?

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I think it was Churchill said he was one of, if not the best,

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ambassador this country had ever had.

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Philip Kerr, the 11th Marquess of Lothian,

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died soon after in Washington, in December 1940, aged 58.

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This intelligent, charismatic man was one

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of the most politically influential people in modern history.

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Thought by many to have been a Nazi sympathiser, he in fact

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played a prominent role in the fall of Nazi Germany once and for all.

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Back with Anita now, who's made her way to Stalham,

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the northern gateway to 125 miles of navigable waterways

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known as the Norfolk broads.

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But Anita's here to navigate her way around more familiar territory

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and local antique delights

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at Stalham Antique Gallery, run by Mike.

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-Hello!

-Oh, hello.

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-Welcome to Stalham.

-Oh, it's lovely, lovely, lovely to be here.

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How lovely! With over 35 years in the trade,

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Mike has a passion for pieces from the 17th to the 19th century.

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This is one of the favourites at the moment, this lovely rosewood table

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with a fabulous cross-banded edge in walnut.

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The patina is really... It's like silk, isn't it?

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-Yeah. Can we get it in the back of your car?

-Ha-ha!

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The only problem is the ticket price of £3,600. Ha!

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Now, THAT I would love to buy.

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-OK.

-But I'm going to have a look around

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-to see if I can see any maybe small pieces of furniture?

-Yeah.

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-If not, we maybe have a trailer to put on the back of your car.

-Aw!

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Good luck with that, then!

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Meanwhile, Raj is just ten miles north-west of Anita

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in the former weaving town of North Walsham to visit...

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Wait a minute, where's he going? The garden centre?

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I've just stopped at a garden centre.

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It's not really the place you look for antiques, but you never know.

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Blimey, what's he up to now?

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A sack of peat? A phone box?

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That's exactly what I'm talking about.

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Something that's a bit unusual

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that you wouldn't find in a place like this - an old telephone box.

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Ring-ring! How's that, eh?

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Ben's the man to call today. Hello, Ben.

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-Hi.

-Hello!

-Are you the owner?

-Yes, I am.

-This is fantastic.

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-This is just the thing I'm looking for.

-OK.

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Give me an idea what kind of money you would be expecting for it?

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Um...1,000-1,500?

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-I've got about 300... Just over £330.

-Right, OK.

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Is there any way we're going to be able to do a deal?

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I don't think I could do it for that.

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But Ben thinks he might have something else

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that might tickle Raj's fancy.

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Right, I managed to dig out an old apple picker.

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Um, we tend to get items like this to put out on display.

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You know, it's a nice piece of...

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old agricultural collector's item, really. How much can you do it for?

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-£10?

-£5 and we've got a deal.

-Yeah, OK, we can do that.

-Yeah?

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-Yeah, sounds good.

-We have a deal.

-A lovely job.

-Thank you, Ben.

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And that is Raj's first buy of the trip.

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An apple picker bag for a fiver.

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Back with Anita now in Stalham

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and she's finally found some smaller items.

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Well, this just looks like the teddy bears' picnic!

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Isn't this absolutely delightful?

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This little chair, I like particularly.

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It's a little child deckchair, or steamer chair.

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It's probably from the late 19th, early 20th century.

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A wee bit of damage there, which is a wee bit worrying.

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But I also like this lovely pokerwork table

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that all the teddy bears are sitting around.

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Now, this is early 20th century,

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and here we have an image of a pretty girl.

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The little table has bobbin turned legs,

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and further pokerwork decoration on the understage.

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People like miniature things.

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Pokerwork is the art of burning a design into wood or leather

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using a heated, pointed tool, also known as pyrography.

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With no price on it, Anita calls Mike over.

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So I like this table.

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I think it's quite sweet.

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Now, is this something that I could buy for not a lot of money?

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I think it's worth about £100, but, to you, maybe a bit less.

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It's pretty, it's perfect, it's lovely, but these are not unusual.

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Well, I'd like you to beat your competitor.

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-Oh, thank you, darling!

-So I think, today, we'll say £40.

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-Will we say 40?

-SHE GASPS

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That is a wonderful deal.

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-Have we got a deal?

-We've got a deal.

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Scorching. That's £40 for the late-19th-century pokerwork table.

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Meanwhile, Raj has made his way half a mile further down the road to

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a more traditional Road Trip stop in North Walsham,

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at Timeline Antiques Centre, run by Michael.

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Hello. Michael?

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-Hello, Raj.

-Hi, nice to meet you.

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The centre is home to several different dealers,

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stocking both small and large antiques.

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I'm wondering if I could maybe put Anita in these?

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I don't think she'd appreciate it, really.

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No, me neither. Best move on.

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I have to say, I do like furniture,

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and I especially like nice, early oak,

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and this is an 18th-century... It's what they call a mule chest.

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Actually, it's got some nice inlay.

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It's not in bad condition, this one.

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I mean, the hinges have been replaced.

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It's got quite a few splits as well.

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But here, they've had little minor repairs, but you would expect that.

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You know, this is an old piece - 1741.

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It's a bit over my budget, though,

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so I'd better look at something else.

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Yes, at £675, you better had.

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I've seen a really nice pair of scallop-rounded dishes, Crown Derby,

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which I quite like as well, in one of these cabinets here.

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Raj calls on Michael's assistance to take a closer look.

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These are nice, and are they in perfect condition?

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This one feels like it is.

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For their age, they're in really good condition, yeah.

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-Talking about 1806...

-Yeah!

-..that sort of date.

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Yeah, they're nice, I quite like them.

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-Can I have a look at the other one, please?

-Yes.

-They are early ones.

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-All hand-painted.

-Yeah.

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-And the shape of them is slightly different, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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The ticket price is £78.

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What can you do these for, Michael?

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-Because I bought them well...

-Mm-hm?

-..um, I could let those go for £30.

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I would normally say, "Can you do a little bit better?"

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because it's just in my nature, OK?

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But, on this occasion, at £30...

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..I'm going to shake your hand.

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-That's wonderful, thank you.

-Thank you very much indeed, Michael.

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That's a fair, fair price, so...lovely!

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But Raj isn't done just yet. Oh, no.

0:18:180:18:21

Have you got anything that's apple-related?

0:18:210:18:24

Weird question.

0:18:240:18:25

-Er...

-Because I'll tell you why. I've bought a lot already.

0:18:260:18:29

It's just a simple apple picker, and I wanted to know if I could buy

0:18:290:18:33

anything that was apple-connected to put with it to bulk the lot up.

0:18:330:18:36

I've got a preserve pot in the shape of an apple.

0:18:360:18:39

Oh, you could be onto something.

0:18:390:18:41

Yep, a silver-plated EPNS apple sauce pot.

0:18:410:18:45

Yeah, it's not a lot of money. I mean, what could you do that for?

0:18:450:18:48

A fiver?

0:18:480:18:50

A fiver? Yes, I'll have that as well.

0:18:500:18:53

-Well done.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:18:530:18:55

So that's £35 for a pair of early 19th-century scalloped Derby dishes

0:18:550:19:00

and an apple preserve pot.

0:19:000:19:01

On that fruity note, it's time to get some shut-eye, Antiquers.

0:19:010:19:06

Nighty night.

0:19:060:19:07

Wakey-wakey, rise and shine!

0:19:100:19:11

It's another beautiful day for treasure hunting.

0:19:110:19:14

# On the road again, Raj! We're on the road again

0:19:150:19:19

# We're on the road We're on the road

0:19:190:19:22

# We're on the road again! #

0:19:220:19:25

And in high spirits.

0:19:250:19:26

So far, Anita's gathered four items -

0:19:260:19:29

a silver top-hat brush, a Masonic pendant,

0:19:290:19:32

an enamel dressing table set and a pokerwork table, all for £95,

0:19:320:19:36

leaving her just over 200 still to spend.

0:19:360:19:40

Isn't this absolutely delightful?

0:19:400:19:42

Raj has three items -

0:19:420:19:44

an apple picker bag and an apple preserve pot,

0:19:440:19:47

and a pair of scalloped Derby dishes, costing just £40,

0:19:470:19:51

so he still has just over £330 left.

0:19:510:19:54

Yes, I'm going to have that as well.

0:19:540:19:56

I've been learning some Norfolk sayings while I've been here.

0:19:580:20:02

What do you think it is to pingle?

0:20:020:20:05

To pingle? Tell me.

0:20:050:20:07

It's to play with your food.

0:20:070:20:09

Oh, right!

0:20:090:20:10

Not sure that'll come up today, but thanks anyway.

0:20:100:20:13

-Look at that, beautiful.

-Oh, wow!

0:20:130:20:15

-Here we are in beautiful, beautiful Norwich.

-Wow.

0:20:150:20:18

Wow, isn't that gorgeous?

0:20:180:20:20

This morning, the jolly duo are

0:20:200:20:22

taking the Triumph Spitfire to Norwich,

0:20:220:20:24

Norfolk's county town, voted England's first city of literature.

0:20:240:20:29

-I think I'm going shopping.

-Aw, well, have a great time.

-Yeah.

0:20:300:20:34

You might be tempted to spend big.

0:20:340:20:37

-You never know!

-With all your dosh.

-Yep, I've got some money.

0:20:370:20:40

Based just outside Norwich city centre is East Anglia's largest

0:20:400:20:44

dealer-based antiques and collectables centre -

0:20:440:20:47

Looses Emporium.

0:20:470:20:48

Patrick is at the helm today.

0:20:480:20:51

-Hello, Patrick, is it?

-Yes, it is.

0:20:510:20:52

-Hi, Raj, nice to meet you.

-Nice to meet you.

0:20:520:20:55

-What a place!

-It is.

0:20:560:20:57

It looks enormous!

0:20:570:20:59

It is. With two floors of antiques, vintage,

0:20:590:21:01

retro and modern items to peruse, Raj has a lot of ground to cover,

0:21:010:21:06

so Patrick's helping.

0:21:060:21:07

Oh, I've just noticed this.

0:21:090:21:11

-Oh, yeah, that...

-Oh, I tell you, can I try that on?

0:21:110:21:14

-Anita would love it.

-OK, then.

0:21:140:21:16

-Let's try that.

-When she sees this...

0:21:160:21:19

-Let's try this on.

-RAJ LAUGHS

0:21:190:21:20

-How does it go on?

-I don't know. I'll try.

0:21:200:21:23

OK.

0:21:230:21:24

Chief Long-in-the-Tooth Bisram is in the building.

0:21:240:21:28

Maybe I'd have the mickey taken out too much if I bought that,

0:21:280:21:30

but it is different.

0:21:300:21:32

It certainly is that. But what else have you seen?

0:21:320:21:35

These fairground, these... Old 1940s, I guess?

0:21:350:21:38

Yeah, probably a little bit earlier, some of them.

0:21:380:21:40

I'd do you one for £200. That's what they cost me each.

0:21:400:21:44

I don't know a lot about them. I know they're collectable.

0:21:450:21:49

They are collectable at the moment, yeah.

0:21:490:21:51

-RAJ SIGHS

-They don't often come on the market.

0:21:510:21:54

I mean, I have to say,

0:21:540:21:55

I am tempted by them, they are slightly different.

0:21:550:21:58

I mean, actually, I just noticed that...

0:21:580:22:01

-That motorbike one.

-Yeah, that's the one I'd want.

0:22:010:22:03

You see, then, if I bought something like that,

0:22:030:22:06

then I'd be looking for two different markets,

0:22:060:22:09

not only the fairground market, the decorative market...

0:22:090:22:11

-Mmm, motorbike people.

-..but also the motorbike people, as well.

0:22:110:22:14

It's a little bit risky for me, but will you take £150 cash for them?

0:22:140:22:19

I can do 180.

0:22:200:22:21

What about split the difference - 160?

0:22:240:22:26

-I can't risk too much.

-Go on, then.

-160?

-Go on, then.

0:22:270:22:30

-We've got a deal.

-Got a deal.

0:22:300:22:32

Very kind, Patrick. Anita was right.

0:22:320:22:34

It seems Raj is spending big today and he's not finished yet.

0:22:340:22:38

It's dealer Roy's turn now.

0:22:380:22:41

Is it possible I could have a look at this, I guess, paper knife,

0:22:410:22:45

-I think you'd call it?

-Are you over 18?

-I'm over 18!

0:22:450:22:47

Only just, though, only just.

0:22:470:22:49

In your dreams!

0:22:490:22:51

Yeah, what I noticed, and it is as well,

0:22:510:22:54

-is the engraving here of the tennis player.

-Mm-hm.

0:22:540:22:57

-Unusual.

-It IS unusual.

0:22:570:22:59

-I would guess, from the blade, probably '60s or '70s.

-OK.

0:22:590:23:03

-Not a particularly old piece, but unusual.

-No.

0:23:030:23:06

-It is unusual. I mean, it's a great maker.

-Mm-hm.

-Wilkinson.

0:23:060:23:10

-That is definitely quite a quality item.

-Yeah.

0:23:100:23:13

What could you do this for?

0:23:130:23:15

Erm...the very best would be 40. And that's half-price.

0:23:170:23:23

Could I possibly offer you 35 for it?

0:23:240:23:28

It would be cash.

0:23:280:23:29

-Yes.

-Yes?

0:23:320:23:34

-At £35...

-Leaving me a little bit of meat on the bone, as they say.

0:23:340:23:37

I'm going to shake your hand.

0:23:370:23:39

-Thank you very much indeed.

-No problem.

-Thank you very much.

0:23:390:23:42

So that's £35 for the engraved paper knife

0:23:420:23:44

and 160 for the early 20th-century fairground motorcycle ride.

0:23:440:23:48

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you.

0:23:500:23:52

-Thank you for showing me around.

-That's all right. I hope you do ever so well with it.

0:23:520:23:56

Still in Norwich, Anita's here to find out

0:23:560:23:58

about a little-known local lad

0:23:580:24:00

who was once an entertainer and film star, famous the world over.

0:24:000:24:04

To tell Anita more about this forgotten pioneer

0:24:040:24:07

of stage and screen is local historian and author Philip Yaxley.

0:24:070:24:11

-Hi, Philip.

-Lovely to see you, Anita.

0:24:110:24:15

It's lovely to be here in this wonderful square,

0:24:150:24:19

with Norwich Cathedral here and the marvellous Norwich School.

0:24:190:24:23

William Vernon Blyth was born in 1887.

0:24:240:24:27

After attending Norwich School,

0:24:270:24:29

he sought fame and fortune as a magician and comedian in London.

0:24:290:24:34

His sister, Coralie, was already big in the West End theatre scene,

0:24:340:24:38

but in 1906, she went to America and took 19-year-old Vernon along.

0:24:380:24:43

He got a small part in one of her plays, leading to other roles,

0:24:430:24:47

which not only impressed his peers,

0:24:470:24:49

but also wannabe actress, Irene Foote,

0:24:490:24:51

who went on to become his wife.

0:24:510:24:53

Was he successful at that time before he met Irene?

0:24:550:24:58

He was becoming more and more well-known on the Broadway stage.

0:24:580:25:02

They got married in May 1911,

0:25:020:25:04

and they became more and more successful.

0:25:040:25:07

Vernon Castle, as he was now known, and wife, Irene,

0:25:070:25:10

went on to act in Paris.

0:25:100:25:11

Whilst there, they made the move

0:25:110:25:13

from acting to dancing, after getting a slot

0:25:130:25:16

at elegant Parisian dining and dancing revue Cafe de Paris.

0:25:160:25:21

At the time, intimate animal-named dances, like the turkey trot,

0:25:210:25:26

were all the rage, but the Castles tamed these dances,

0:25:260:25:30

refining and popularising them.

0:25:300:25:32

When they returned to America, their careers continued to skyrocket.

0:25:320:25:36

1914 was a very, very big year - the pinnacle of their success.

0:25:360:25:41

They issued the bestselling book, Modern Dancing.

0:25:410:25:45

And they did a whirlwind tour of American cities, 35 -

0:25:450:25:50

some people call it 32 - cities in 28 days!

0:25:500:25:53

And, everywhere they went, there were big banners,

0:25:530:25:55

"The Castles are coming, hooray, hooray!" and big crowds!

0:25:550:25:59

Equate it to the Beatles in 1964.

0:25:590:26:01

They were young, they were talented, they were beautiful,

0:26:010:26:05

and everyone wanted to copy what they were doing.

0:26:050:26:09

Yes, with all their endorsements and fashion,

0:26:090:26:11

they weren't just the Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire of that time,

0:26:110:26:15

but heavens they were, but they were also the Posh and Becks.

0:26:150:26:18

Vernon wrote a film, called The Whirl of Life.

0:26:180:26:22

A huge hit, both at home and abroad,

0:26:220:26:24

even Fred Astaire admitted Vernon was his dancing inspiration.

0:26:240:26:29

To tell and show Anita more is

0:26:290:26:31

professional ballroom dancer Sasha Zagovsky.

0:26:310:26:35

Tell me what the popular dances of that time were.

0:26:350:26:39

Well, really, as a reaction to the stiff formality

0:26:390:26:41

of the Victorian age, the animal dances had become very popular,

0:26:410:26:45

and we had everything from the bunny hug

0:26:450:26:48

to the chicken scratch to the kangaroo hop.

0:26:480:26:51

The one that survives to today, of course, is the foxtrot.

0:26:510:26:54

The Castles refined all of these dances

0:26:540:26:56

and made them much more acceptable.

0:26:560:26:58

Give it a go, then, Anita. If I can do it, anyone can.

0:26:580:27:01

Eight steps.

0:27:010:27:03

And then, from there, achieve a rotation.

0:27:040:27:07

Not one I ever did on Strictly.

0:27:070:27:09

-We breeze along happily, as Vernon Castle says in his book.

-Great fun!

0:27:090:27:14

You back away from each other. You run around me, Anita.

0:27:140:27:19

We wind up, I turn to meet you, we do a lovely little dance pose.

0:27:190:27:23

-Aw!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:27:230:27:25

Seven!

0:27:250:27:26

So what influence did they have from that time up to today?

0:27:270:27:33

Really it's the idea of style, polish, poise,

0:27:330:27:37

elegance and technique.

0:27:370:27:40

All of those things! Really, without the Castles,

0:27:400:27:43

we wouldn't have ballroom dancing today, and probably no Strictly.

0:27:430:27:47

And that would be a shame.

0:27:470:27:49

Vernon died in 1918, serving his country in World War I.

0:27:490:27:54

Irene retired from public life a few years later, but lived until 1969.

0:27:540:27:59

Just over 20 years after Vernon's death,

0:27:590:28:01

their story was memorialised when Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers

0:28:010:28:05

starred in The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle.

0:28:050:28:09

This local Norwich boy may no longer be well-known,

0:28:090:28:13

but without him pioneering a clean-cut but fun dancing style,

0:28:130:28:17

ballroom dancing wouldn't be what it is today.

0:28:170:28:20

In the meanwhile, Raj has whizzed southwest of Norwich to Wymondham.

0:28:240:28:28

He's here to check out a local gem, Market Cross Antiques, run by David.

0:28:280:28:34

-Hello there.

-Hello, how are you?

-David, is it?

-It certainly is.

0:28:340:28:37

-I'm Raj.

-How'd you do?

0:28:370:28:38

There's three showrooms' worth of stock to choose from.

0:28:380:28:41

What have you got there?

0:28:440:28:46

This is a piece of West German pottery.

0:28:460:28:49

At the time, it wasn't very, very popular,

0:28:490:28:52

but it seems to have become more and more popular now.

0:28:520:28:55

So that's a possibility.

0:28:550:28:57

It's got a ticket price of £35 for it.

0:28:570:29:01

If I could get that for...

0:29:010:29:03

£15, £20...

0:29:030:29:05

there's a few bob in it.

0:29:050:29:08

One to think about. Maybe try another room.

0:29:080:29:10

These are a little bit different, a pair of saddles.

0:29:130:29:15

One for me, one for Anita. We could go riding off into the sunshine.

0:29:150:29:19

Time to find David.

0:29:200:29:21

-I've seen the pair of saddles.

-Oh, yeah?

0:29:210:29:23

You've got £20 on each. What's the best?

0:29:230:29:27

I'd do the pair for 20.

0:29:290:29:31

-The pair for 20?

-That's gotta be cheap.

0:29:310:29:33

Could I squeeze you to 15 for the two?

0:29:330:29:36

-Yeah, go on.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

-I want you to be happy as well.

0:29:360:29:39

-Yeah.

-Yeah? Are you sure?

-Yeah.

0:29:390:29:40

Yee-ha! That's £15 for the two old leather saddles.

0:29:400:29:45

-Thank you very much indeed.

-I hope you have some luck with them.

0:29:450:29:48

Back with Anita now, who's making her way to the village of Panxworth,

0:29:480:29:53

home of a group of 17th-century

0:29:530:29:56

thatched barns and Norfolk Antique & Reclamation Centre.

0:29:560:29:59

In charge today there is Frank.

0:29:590:30:01

Hello, I'm Anita.

0:30:010:30:02

-Hi, Frank, nice to meet you.

-Oh, it's lovely to meet you too.

0:30:020:30:05

This is an astonishing place.

0:30:050:30:09

The centre combines architectural salvage with antiquities and curiosities.

0:30:090:30:12

Plenty to pique Anita's interest and, yes,

0:30:120:30:17

she's already found something.

0:30:170:30:19

There are so many things in here which are huge and heavy.

0:30:190:30:26

But this is a nice, wee chest.

0:30:260:30:28

It needs a bit of TLC

0:30:280:30:30

but it's a good, honest, wee 19th-century piece here.

0:30:300:30:36

Miniature chest.

0:30:370:30:38

It's had a lock.

0:30:380:30:41

This might have carried precious stuff in it.

0:30:410:30:45

It might have been a fine lady's jewels.

0:30:450:30:47

It's made of pine and it has these

0:30:480:30:52

iron strapping affairs here.

0:30:520:30:56

And look! Two wee carrying handles.

0:30:560:31:00

Isn't that sweet?

0:31:000:31:02

With no ticket price, it's time to call Frank.

0:31:020:31:05

Frank!

0:31:050:31:06

I've spotted this wee miniature chest here.

0:31:070:31:10

Oh, yeah, a lovely little pine box.

0:31:100:31:11

Uh-huh. There is no price on it just now.

0:31:110:31:14

What I'd like to pay for it is £20.

0:31:140:31:18

Is that coming anywhere near

0:31:180:31:21

what you're...?

0:31:210:31:22

We have it listed online for 65.

0:31:220:31:25

-Erm...

-65. Oh, but it's still online at 65.

0:31:250:31:28

-It hasn't sold.

-You're quite right.

0:31:280:31:30

I can meet you at £30.

0:31:300:31:33

Could you come down even a wee bit more?

0:31:330:31:35

Just a wee bit more to 25?

0:31:350:31:39

How about we split the difference?

0:31:390:31:40

-27.50.

-27.50.

0:31:400:31:43

-Put it there.

-It's a hard bargain.

0:31:430:31:46

Thank you, thank you.

0:31:460:31:48

Deal done. £27.50 for the miniature pine chest.

0:31:480:31:52

-Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

0:31:520:31:53

-Thanks. It's been great.

-Good luck at the auction.

0:31:530:31:56

And, with that, shopping is complete.

0:31:560:31:57

Let's take a peek at our experts' treasures.

0:31:570:31:59

Along with the pine box, Anita bought a Masonic pendant,

0:31:590:32:02

a top-hat brush, an enamelled dressing-table set,

0:32:020:32:06

and a Victorian pokerwork table for £122.50.

0:32:060:32:11

Raj spent £250 on an apple picker bag and preserve pot,

0:32:110:32:16

a pair of 19th-century Derby china dishes,

0:32:160:32:19

an early 20th-century fairground ride, an engraved paperknife,

0:32:190:32:23

and two old leather saddles.

0:32:230:32:25

So, what do they think?

0:32:250:32:26

I think Raj has bought really well this time.

0:32:260:32:30

I love those Derby dishes.

0:32:300:32:33

A pair. They're the right period.

0:32:330:32:36

He's got to double his money.

0:32:360:32:38

The silver and enamelled dressing-table set is definitely good quality

0:32:380:32:42

but I think I've spotted a little bit of damage.

0:32:420:32:44

So we'll see how that goes.

0:32:440:32:46

I think my favourite item is the fairground motorcycle.

0:32:460:32:51

But that was a bit dangerous at £160.

0:32:510:32:56

This is a nice occasional table.

0:32:560:32:57

Lots of people are looking for things like this.

0:32:570:33:00

I shall be very confident for her.

0:33:010:33:03

We shall soon see.

0:33:030:33:04

After starting in Sheringham, Norfolk,

0:33:040:33:07

Anita and Raj are now nearing their second auction in Stansted Mountfitchet, Essex.

0:33:070:33:12

So, how do they think they'll do?

0:33:120:33:14

There's £70 between us.

0:33:140:33:17

20 or 30 quid is easy to make up.

0:33:170:33:20

70 quid is not as easy.

0:33:200:33:23

You may not be... You may not make it up in one hit

0:33:230:33:27

but I may well lose it in one hit.

0:33:270:33:29

THEY LAUGH

0:33:290:33:31

That's the exciting thing about auctions.

0:33:310:33:33

You never quite know what will happen.

0:33:330:33:35

I'm worried about the motorcycle because I've laid out so much.

0:33:350:33:40

But you were dangerous and you were courageous

0:33:400:33:42

and you love taking a gamble, Raj.

0:33:420:33:44

I think I'm the Evel Knievel of the antiques world.

0:33:440:33:49

If you say so, Raj.

0:33:500:33:52

-Essex...

-Uh-huh?

0:33:520:33:53

..is the wealthiest county in Britain.

0:33:530:33:55

-Oh, right, well, I hope they are all at the auction.

-So do I. So do I.

0:33:550:33:59

I'm not sure that's true but the county does have more islands than

0:33:590:34:03

any other in England, with 35 of them.

0:34:030:34:06

But our experts' last stop is on mainland Essex

0:34:060:34:09

at Sworders auctioneers.

0:34:090:34:10

This looks spectacular, doesn't it?

0:34:100:34:12

-Lots of cars as well.

-Yes, it does. Oh, it's going to be busy, Raj.

0:34:120:34:15

Oh, it is going to be busy for sure.

0:34:150:34:17

OK, here we go. Well, good luck today.

0:34:170:34:19

Let's go and make some money.

0:34:190:34:21

Today's gal with a gavel is Prudence Hopkins.

0:34:210:34:24

I think the Masonic pendant is rather nice.

0:34:240:34:27

Generally, I would probably say this one might struggle on the day, but you never know.

0:34:270:34:31

The apple pickers and the little apple preserve dish

0:34:310:34:34

is a really fun lot.

0:34:340:34:36

I'm not sure how many people have orchards in Essex

0:34:360:34:39

but hopefully someone will pick it up for its quirkiness.

0:34:390:34:42

The pokerwork table is a very nice lot.

0:34:420:34:44

It's very interesting and hopefully, again, it will do well on the day.

0:34:440:34:48

The fairground motorcycle is my favourite lot.

0:34:480:34:52

I think it's an interior piece, so I think that's our winner.

0:34:520:34:57

Take your seats. It's time to see what both the local clientele and

0:34:570:35:00

internet bidders think.

0:35:000:35:02

First up is Anita's Masonic pendant.

0:35:020:35:05

I'm straight in at £20.

0:35:070:35:09

£20 is bid.

0:35:090:35:11

-Already, fantastic.

-Do I see 25 anywhere?

0:35:110:35:13

£20 is bid.

0:35:130:35:14

25 is yours, sir.

0:35:140:35:16

£25 now in the room.

0:35:160:35:17

-Another one.

-We'll sell it, then, at £25.

0:35:170:35:20

Make no mistake.

0:35:200:35:22

It's a solid profit, straight off the bat, for Anita.

0:35:220:35:26

That's not a bad profit.

0:35:260:35:27

What a good start.

0:35:270:35:28

-Good start.

-It's what I predicted.

0:35:280:35:30

A little profit on it.

0:35:300:35:32

We knew it wasn't going to fly but at least it's paid for its lunch.

0:35:320:35:38

Sticking with Anita, it's her silver top-hat brush.

0:35:380:35:41

Pretty thing, this one.

0:35:410:35:43

£20 for this one.

0:35:430:35:45

20.

0:35:450:35:46

-Oh, no, they don't like it.

-Ten, then. Take it away today.

0:35:460:35:49

£10 for this one.

0:35:490:35:50

£10 is bid. Thank you. 15 now on the internet.

0:35:500:35:54

20. 25 to bid, internet.

0:35:540:35:56

-Yeah.

-I have £20.

0:35:560:35:58

£20 in the room, then.

0:35:580:36:00

25 now on the internet.

0:36:000:36:02

30?

0:36:020:36:03

£25, then.

0:36:030:36:04

On the internet, they'll take it at 25.

0:36:040:36:07

It's another profit for Anita.

0:36:090:36:12

I thought it might go a little further.

0:36:120:36:14

Listen, you've sold two things and you made a profit on each one.

0:36:140:36:18

If I get to that position, I'll be happy as well, OK?

0:36:180:36:20

Well, let's see, eh, as Raj's Derby dishes are next.

0:36:220:36:26

£20 for these.

0:36:270:36:29

20...£20 is bid.

0:36:290:36:32

Thank you. Do I see five anywhere?

0:36:320:36:34

£20 is now bid.

0:36:340:36:36

The room goes silent.

0:36:360:36:37

We will sell them, maiden bid at 20.

0:36:370:36:40

Oh, dear. That's got to hurt.

0:36:410:36:42

Does my face looked disappointed?

0:36:440:36:46

-Yup.

-£20?

0:36:460:36:47

I know.

0:36:470:36:49

£20? Did I hear right?

0:36:490:36:51

Afraid so, fella!

0:36:510:36:52

But maybe his apple picker bag and preserve holder will do better.

0:36:520:36:57

OK, let's hope they love it.

0:36:570:36:59

Just what you need for the summer.

0:36:590:37:02

Make your own cider.

0:37:020:37:03

-This one, £20...

-Come on!

0:37:030:37:06

20 for this.

0:37:060:37:07

-Come on!

-Ten, then, take it away today.

0:37:070:37:10

£10.

0:37:100:37:11

£10 today.

0:37:110:37:13

Five, then.

0:37:130:37:14

£5. Any interest?

0:37:140:37:16

-£5. Thanks, sir.

-Do they grow apples in Essex?

0:37:160:37:19

Come and take her at £5.

0:37:190:37:20

Do I see ten anywhere?

0:37:200:37:22

We'll sell it, then, at £5, maiden bid.

0:37:220:37:25

Second loss for Raj. Ouch!

0:37:270:37:30

Oh, darling...

0:37:300:37:31

I'm not sure what's going on today.

0:37:310:37:33

But...

0:37:330:37:35

I must be still asleep.

0:37:350:37:37

OK? I'm going to wake up in a minute, aren't I?

0:37:370:37:40

Let's go back to Anita and see if she's still on her lucky streak

0:37:400:37:44

with her pokerwork table.

0:37:440:37:46

£40 for this one.

0:37:460:37:48

£40 is bid.

0:37:480:37:49

Thank you. Do I see five? 45.

0:37:490:37:51

-Straight in at 40.

-Straight in at 40.

-Straight in at 40.

0:37:510:37:53

50...

0:37:530:37:55

55. 60.

0:37:550:37:58

£60 now with the lady. 65, new bidder.

0:37:580:38:00

Well done again.

0:38:000:38:01

-70.

-70?

-75.

0:38:010:38:03

80.

0:38:030:38:05

85.

0:38:060:38:07

90.

0:38:070:38:09

-Yes!

-£90, then, with the lady...

0:38:090:38:11

Well done. Well done.

0:38:110:38:12

I'm coming shopping with you.

0:38:120:38:14

Take it away today at £90.

0:38:140:38:16

Great stuff. Anita's more than doubled her money.

0:38:160:38:19

You certainly are brilliant.

0:38:190:38:21

Maybe Raj's luck will turn with his engraved paperknife.

0:38:210:38:25

And I can start the bidding straight in at £25.

0:38:260:38:31

£25 is bid.

0:38:310:38:32

-Paid 35 for it.

-Do I see 30 anywhere for the little paperknife?

0:38:320:38:36

£25. 30.

0:38:360:38:38

35 with me.

0:38:380:38:40

-Come on.

-40, sir.

-Yes.

0:38:400:38:41

40 is yours.

0:38:410:38:43

£40, then, in the room.

0:38:430:38:44

It's quiet, everyone else.

0:38:440:38:46

We'll sell it at 40.

0:38:460:38:48

There is still time to claw back some profits, Raj.

0:38:490:38:51

Back with Anita, now, for her miniature pine chest.

0:38:530:38:56

Start me off. £30.

0:38:580:39:00

£30 on the internet.

0:39:000:39:02

-£30 straight in.

-Done it!

-Do I see five anywhere?

-Straight in.

0:39:020:39:05

£30 straight in.

0:39:050:39:07

We'll sell it to the internet, make no mistake, at £30...

0:39:070:39:11

That should have done better. Bad luck, Anita.

0:39:130:39:15

Now, can Raj ride off with some profits with his two saddles?

0:39:160:39:20

Start me off. £20 for the two saddles.

0:39:210:39:25

20. Ten, then, take them away today.

0:39:250:39:28

-Struggling a bit, darling.

-£10 is bid.

0:39:280:39:29

-Thank you. Do I see 15 anywhere?

-Got ten.

-£10 is now bid.

0:39:290:39:32

No, they're not going to sell for a fiver each.

0:39:320:39:34

15 to take them away. Selling, then, maiden bid at £10.

0:39:340:39:39

Blimey! That's the third loss for Raj.

0:39:390:39:42

Look at them, they are very happy. Look, they're going,

0:39:420:39:45

"Can't believe we've got those two saddles for £10."

0:39:450:39:47

Yeah, well, that's the auction.

0:39:470:39:49

-Well...

-A day out at the auctions.

0:39:490:39:51

Next, it's Anita's final item.

0:39:520:39:53

The enamelled dressing-table set.

0:39:530:39:55

Here we are. Here we are.

0:39:560:39:57

Pay attention. Pay attention.

0:39:570:39:59

-OK, here we go.

-Very pretty,

0:39:590:40:02

a slight little bit of damage but that won't alter it.

0:40:020:40:04

Start me off - £20 for this.

0:40:040:40:07

-20 straight in.

-20 is bid.

0:40:070:40:09

-Yes.

-Thank you, sir.

-Yes.

-25 now on the internet.

0:40:090:40:11

30, sir. 30.

0:40:110:40:14

35. 40.

0:40:140:40:16

-Good.

-45. 50.

-Yeah.

0:40:160:40:19

-55, 60...

-Oh.

0:40:190:40:21

65. 70.

0:40:210:40:24

£70. 75, now, on the internet.

0:40:240:40:26

80 to bid, sir?

0:40:260:40:27

-£80 for the gentleman in the room.

-Yes.

-Wow!

-Yes.

0:40:270:40:30

85 on the internet.

0:40:300:40:31

-90.

-Yes.

-It's still going.

0:40:310:40:34

-95.

-Yes.

0:40:340:40:35

100.

0:40:350:40:37

110.

0:40:370:40:39

-Yes.

-Ooh. Wow.

-120 to bid.

0:40:390:40:41

120. 130 to bid, internet.

0:40:410:40:44

130.

0:40:440:40:45

-I don't believe it. I don't... Oh, yes.

-140.

0:40:450:40:48

In the room, if you're all done and out, at £140...

0:40:480:40:52

Incredible. That's seven times what Anita paid for it.

0:40:530:40:57

-Yes.

-What a...

0:40:570:40:58

-What a result.

-Vroom, vroom...

0:40:580:41:00

You've caught up already.

0:41:000:41:02

Oh, my goodness.

0:41:020:41:03

Well done indeed.

0:41:030:41:05

It all comes down now to Raj's last item -

0:41:050:41:07

his biggest spend and riskiest buy.

0:41:070:41:09

-Here we go.

-I have a run of bids on this.

0:41:110:41:14

I have to be in at £140.

0:41:140:41:17

-Yes!

-All right, it's not a profit.

-£140 is now bid.

-Not a profit yet.

0:41:170:41:20

Do I see 150 anywhere?

0:41:200:41:22

-100 and... 150, 160...

-Yes.

0:41:220:41:25

170 to bid, internet.

0:41:250:41:27

170. 180.

0:41:270:41:29

190 to bid. 190 now on the internet.

0:41:290:41:32

-200 in the room.

-Yes.

-£200 in the room.

0:41:320:41:35

220. 240.

0:41:350:41:38

260 to bid.

0:41:380:41:40

260. 280.

0:41:400:41:43

300.

0:41:430:41:44

£300, then, on the internet.

0:41:440:41:47

-If you are quiet in the room...

-Well...

-..we'll sell it at £300.

0:41:470:41:50

Yeah, that's OK.

0:41:500:41:51

Amazing. Certainly a clever buy from Raj, almost double his money.

0:41:530:41:58

-Are you happy, darling?

-Yes, I'm happy with that.

0:41:580:42:00

-Oh...

-Yes, I'm happy with that.

-Oh, that's wonderful.

0:42:000:42:03

Yes, that's good. I'm happy with that.

0:42:030:42:05

Definitely happy.

0:42:050:42:06

And so he should be, but is it enough?

0:42:060:42:09

Raj set off this leg with £370.74.

0:42:090:42:13

Post-auction costs, he's up £57.50,

0:42:130:42:18

giving him £428.24.

0:42:180:42:22

Anita began with £299.78,

0:42:220:42:26

and after auction costs, she made £131.70,

0:42:260:42:30

making her today's winner with £431.48.

0:42:300:42:35

Good going, girl.

0:42:350:42:36

Well, well done, Anita.

0:42:360:42:38

Well, that was so, so...

0:42:380:42:39

-Exciting wasn't it?

-..exciting.

0:42:390:42:41

Well done, you're in front now.

0:42:410:42:43

Oh, not just snapping at your heels.

0:42:430:42:45

A wee, wee bit in front.

0:42:450:42:47

-You certainly are.

-Well, Raj,

0:42:470:42:49

what's going to happen next?

0:42:490:42:51

Let's go off to the next one!

0:42:510:42:54

Can't wait. See you soon, chaps.

0:42:550:42:58

Next time, our auctioneers continue their south-east adventure.

0:42:580:43:01

Are we going round in circles, here?

0:43:010:43:04

Raj goes gaga for all things antique.

0:43:040:43:07

My eyes are starting to sparkle.

0:43:070:43:08

And Anita Manning goes all out for a deal.

0:43:080:43:11

I love you too.

0:43:110:43:12

Antiques experts travel across the country, competing to make a profit at auction. Anita Manning starts this leg negotiating hard in an attempt to take the lead. Behind the wheel of a Triumph Spitfire, they shop in Norfolk, heading for an auction in Stansted Mountfitchet, Essex.

Anita learns about much-forgotten Norwich lad Vernon Castle, who was once a global dancing phenomenon. Taking a break from antiques, Raj heads to the stunning Blicking Hall to find out about its controversial former owner, Lord Lothian.