Episode 6 Antiques Road Trip


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Episode 6

Charles Hanson and James Braxton start a new road trip, hunting for antiques in the Scottish Highlands. Eventually they reunite to sell their finds at auction in Aberdeen.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Episode 6. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

0:00:020:00:04

That's cracking!

0:00:040:00:05

With £200 each...

0:00:050:00:06

Wonderful.

0:00:060:00:07

..a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

0:00:070:00:11

That's exactly what I'm talking about.

0:00:110:00:13

I'm all over a-shiver.

0:00:130:00:14

The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

0:00:140:00:17

No-brainer.

0:00:170:00:18

Going, going, gone.

0:00:180:00:20

There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

0:00:200:00:22

So, will it be the high road to glory...

0:00:230:00:25

Push!

0:00:250:00:26

..or the slow road to disaster?

0:00:260:00:28

How awfully, awfully nice.

0:00:280:00:30

This is Antiques Road Trip!

0:00:300:00:31

Yeah!

0:00:340:00:35

Today, we begin a brand-new adventure with a couple

0:00:370:00:39

of auctioneer swells.

0:00:390:00:41

Derby dandy Charles Hanson and the ever-jolly James Braxton.

0:00:410:00:45

Nice hat. Is that one of mine?

0:00:460:00:48

Do you prefer Jim or James?

0:00:480:00:50

James.

0:00:500:00:51

-Jimbo?

-James.

0:00:510:00:52

James. Right.

0:00:520:00:53

Are you a Jamie?

0:00:550:00:57

No, I'm not a Jamie.

0:00:570:00:58

-OK, sorry!

-I'm James!

-OK.

0:00:580:01:00

Antiques expert Charles has a keen eye for spotting top lots,

0:01:000:01:03

and unfortunately, a hand for breaking a few, too.

0:01:030:01:07

Look out.

0:01:070:01:08

Look at these beautiful lug handles. Oops!

0:01:080:01:10

That's just become detached!

0:01:100:01:12

Oh, lordy! His rival on this journey is esteemed auctioneer James,

0:01:120:01:16

who's a lover, not a fighter, when it comes to the Road Trip battle.

0:01:160:01:19

I like to leave as friends, Mike!

0:01:190:01:22

I don't want to leave as an enemy.

0:01:220:01:24

I should hope not.

0:01:240:01:27

Starting this trip with £200 each,

0:01:270:01:28

the boys will be taking to the road

0:01:280:01:30

in this 1964 DKW 1000 coupe,

0:01:300:01:32

which was manufactured in West Germany at a time

0:01:340:01:37

before seatbelts were mandatory - got it?

0:01:370:01:39

Don't you truly feel,

0:01:390:01:41

having hunted hard on the Road Trip for many years,

0:01:410:01:43

to come to Scotland, it really is a Holy Grail

0:01:430:01:47

for the Antiques Road Trip?

0:01:470:01:49

It is. It is the road trip.

0:01:490:01:50

-The Scottish leg is what we all lust and hunger for, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:01:500:01:55

Yes, it is indeed.

0:01:550:01:56

Beginning in the Highlands,

0:01:580:01:59

Charles and James will journey all over bonnie Scotland,

0:01:590:02:03

taking in the north-east and central belt, before finally finishing

0:02:030:02:06

across the border in Berwick-upon-Tweed.

0:02:060:02:09

This leg will kick off in Dingwall,

0:02:090:02:11

before ending up in Aberdeen for auction.

0:02:110:02:14

First stop on this epic road trip

0:02:160:02:18

is the bustling market town of Dingwall.

0:02:180:02:21

Sitting at the head of the Cromarty Firth in Ross-shire,

0:02:210:02:24

its name means "parliament field" in old Norse.

0:02:240:02:27

Charles will be kicking off the buying today, so watch out.

0:02:280:02:31

Fantastic, James, isn't it?

0:02:320:02:34

This is where it all begins.

0:02:340:02:35

-Is it?

-This is where...

0:02:350:02:37

Good luck - but not too much luck, mate!

0:02:370:02:39

This is where it begins, but how do you open the doors?

0:02:390:02:42

-Oh, hang on.

-There we go, James.

-Is it?

0:02:420:02:43

I'm out!

0:02:430:02:45

-Right, good luck!

-I'm off, James.

0:02:450:02:46

All the best. Have a good day.

0:02:460:02:48

-See you later.

-Bye!

0:02:480:02:49

He's out - finally -

0:02:500:02:51

and off to the Objet d'Art.

0:02:510:02:53

It's a big shop with five rooms to explore

0:02:530:02:56

and the man in charge is William.

0:02:560:02:57

Looks like he could be Charles's dad.

0:02:570:02:59

-Good morning.

-Charles, good morning. How are you?

0:02:590:03:01

Absolutely splendid. Yourself?

0:03:010:03:03

What a wonderful drive!

0:03:030:03:05

-I'm an Englishman and a Derbyshire man...

-Good man.

0:03:050:03:07

..but the drive through this great region...

0:03:070:03:09

-It's beautiful, isn't it?

-..is absolutely...

-Stunning.

0:03:090:03:11

It almost gives you this injection of peace.

0:03:110:03:13

-Particularly with the white mountains.

-It gives you a desire.

0:03:130:03:16

It does.

0:03:160:03:17

My eyes are going everywhere, because I can see you've got a

0:03:170:03:19

really good, varied mix.

0:03:190:03:21

I can also see this big...

0:03:210:03:23

What beast is that?

0:03:230:03:24

That's a Highland coo.

0:03:240:03:26

-Coo?

-Called Hamish.

0:03:260:03:27

As in C-O-W?

0:03:270:03:28

C-O-O.

0:03:280:03:30

-Which is a cow.

-It is.

0:03:300:03:31

But you call it a coo?

0:03:310:03:32

-It's a Highland coo.

-OK, got it. I'm learning all the time in Scotland!

0:03:320:03:35

You are, indeed. Absolutely.

0:03:350:03:37

-I'll put my hat down, I'll go for a wander...

-Indeed.

0:03:370:03:39

..and I'll give you a shout.

0:03:390:03:41

Stay warm.

0:03:410:03:42

-Thanks, William.

-OK.

-Thanks awfully.

0:03:420:03:44

By the fire, warm those hands,

0:03:440:03:46

ready for the Road Trip action.

0:03:460:03:49

And straight away, something close to Charles's heart

0:03:500:03:53

has turned his head.

0:03:530:03:55

In this cabinet, here,

0:03:550:03:57

are a lovely, lovely pair of vases.

0:03:570:04:00

What you say?

0:04:010:04:03

Yeah, I know.

0:04:030:04:04

You're from Derby!

0:04:040:04:05

These vases were made in Derby

0:04:050:04:07

and the mark on the bottom confirms it.

0:04:070:04:10

I knew from this gorgeous, rich palette, which...

0:04:100:04:13

Look at those flowers! Hand-painted in that rich, Regency spirit

0:04:150:04:18

of circa 1810. Look at these beautiful lug handles...

0:04:180:04:21

Oops! Hell...

0:04:220:04:24

Charles!

0:04:240:04:25

It was stuck,

0:04:270:04:29

and the handle, like on the side of a cliff,

0:04:290:04:32

has just become detached, so...

0:04:320:04:34

Don't break my heart, you're from Derby!

0:04:360:04:39

-William?

-Yes?

0:04:390:04:40

Just a quickie.

0:04:400:04:41

Just to let you know, it wasn't me.

0:04:420:04:45

I was just handling the vase...

0:04:450:04:47

Don't worry.

0:04:470:04:48

..and the handle has just became just detached.

0:04:480:04:50

It'd been restored, hadn't it?

0:04:500:04:51

-Fine, yeah. That's fine.

-No problem whatsoever.

0:04:510:04:53

I mean, it just needs a bit of glue... Sorry about that, sir.

0:04:530:04:55

Don't you worry about that in the slightest.

0:04:550:04:57

-But, that, a lovely pair of vases.

-We'll get it restored, no worries.

0:04:570:05:00

Oh, what a start! First object in...

0:05:000:05:02

Anyway.

0:05:020:05:03

I think you got off lightly there, butterfingers.

0:05:030:05:06

Anything less fragile catch your eye, Charles?

0:05:060:05:09

That little dish at the far end.

0:05:090:05:11

Yeah, that's Austrian. Is it?

0:05:110:05:13

-May I have a look at it?

-Yeah, you most certainly can.

0:05:130:05:16

Er, rather unusual...

0:05:160:05:17

Is it old?

0:05:170:05:19

I would think probably early 1900s, 1800s.

0:05:190:05:22

Late 1800s.

0:05:240:05:25

It's what we call a little waiter, isn't it?

0:05:250:05:28

It's a little, almost a small salver which people would have used...

0:05:280:05:31

For their creme de menthe.

0:05:330:05:35

Exactly...

0:05:350:05:36

-Or in Scotland, you'd use it for...

-Your dram.

0:05:360:05:38

-Your dram.

-Your dram.

0:05:380:05:40

A drink.

0:05:400:05:41

-What I quite like about this are the marks here.

-Yes.

0:05:410:05:43

They are quite indistinct

0:05:430:05:44

and they look quite early marks.

0:05:460:05:47

The ticket says £125.

0:05:490:05:52

Charles, time to make a cheeky offer?

0:05:520:05:54

-£60?

-Indeed.

0:05:540:05:55

Happy with that? Indeed.

0:05:550:05:56

-I'll take it.

-Much obliged, thank you.

0:05:560:05:58

Thanks very much. My road trip now is truly off and running.

0:05:580:06:00

-Highland fling?

-Indeed.

-How do you do the Highland fling?

-I don't know!

0:06:000:06:03

-Is it all that?

-Something like that, yes!

0:06:030:06:05

Charles got a great deal there,

0:06:050:06:07

purchasing the plate for less than half price.

0:06:070:06:10

£60 - hopefully, it'll be the toast of Aberdeen.

0:06:100:06:13

I'm sure it will be and thank you very much, indeed.

0:06:140:06:16

Nice to meet you and see your wonderful shop. Thanks a lot.

0:06:160:06:18

Goodbye, see you! Bye-bye.

0:06:180:06:20

Well done, Charles.

0:06:200:06:21

Voila.

0:06:230:06:24

James, meanwhile, has motored 25 miles down the road to Daviot,

0:06:270:06:31

just south of Inverness,

0:06:310:06:33

in the hope of finding his first purchase of this road trip.

0:06:330:06:36

Ah.

0:06:410:06:42

What a lovely caravan!

0:06:460:06:47

He's come to Antiques & Architectural Salvage,

0:06:490:06:53

hoping to uncover some hidden gems.

0:06:530:06:55

This is the sort of place that you could get lost for days in.

0:06:550:06:59

Amazing! Now, who's this?

0:06:590:07:01

-Hello!

-Hi.

-James.

0:07:010:07:03

-I'm Mike.

-Hello, Mike.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:07:030:07:06

-Well, it looks all very good from outside, I must say!

-Yeah.

0:07:060:07:09

Yeah, one of everything and two of everything else.

0:07:090:07:12

Mike's not kidding.

0:07:130:07:14

As well as a couple of barns,

0:07:140:07:15

his yard is packed with unusual and interesting stock.

0:07:150:07:19

What on earth is that?

0:07:190:07:21

It's a lid from a whisky still.

0:07:210:07:23

It would have a big cross clamp and a screw,

0:07:230:07:26

to screw the top down tight.

0:07:260:07:28

So, the screw engages, sort of, there?

0:07:280:07:30

-Yeah, yeah.

-Holds it there.

0:07:300:07:31

What's it made of?

0:07:310:07:33

-It's cast brass.

-Cast brass, goodness.

0:07:330:07:35

-That is hernia stuff, isn't it?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:07:360:07:39

I love that.

0:07:390:07:40

Yeah, that could be £60.

0:07:400:07:42

Could it?

0:07:420:07:43

Could be.

0:07:430:07:44

With a ticket price of £120, that would be an impressive 50% discount.

0:07:450:07:49

It's just the sort of perfect shop, isn't it?

0:07:510:07:54

It's salvage and antiques.

0:07:540:07:55

All that he needs to do is throw in a bespoke tailor

0:07:570:08:01

and a decent restaurant and I think I could live here!

0:08:010:08:03

Not sure how Mike would feel about that.

0:08:040:08:07

That's quite fun, isn't it?

0:08:090:08:11

Have you got the corresponding thing?

0:08:110:08:13

No, I'm afraid I haven't. No.

0:08:130:08:14

Very often with antiques,

0:08:140:08:15

you don't necessarily need them, do you?

0:08:150:08:18

Oh, no! No, no.

0:08:180:08:21

You might not need them, but they cost!

0:08:210:08:22

The reclaimed stanchion and the rope has a ticket price of £40.

0:08:240:08:28

That's another item to think about.

0:08:290:08:30

But, anything else, James?

0:08:300:08:32

I always like matchbox covers.

0:08:330:08:34

-It's a great weight, that one, isn't it?

-Aye.

0:08:360:08:38

-That's beautifully made.

-Yeah.

0:08:390:08:40

Oh, I see!

0:08:420:08:43

-So, you take it out and then strike.

-I think so, yeah.

0:08:430:08:46

Yeah, I think so.

0:08:470:08:48

It's £12.

0:08:500:08:51

Really interesting.

0:08:520:08:54

Browsing over, James has a few things on his wish list.

0:08:540:08:57

Time to talk money.

0:08:580:09:00

There's three objects I really like here.

0:09:000:09:03

Like that.

0:09:030:09:04

I like the whisky still cover.

0:09:050:09:07

I like brass and copper.

0:09:070:09:09

If it's made of brass and copper,

0:09:100:09:11

I think I must have some sort of terrible deficiency

0:09:110:09:15

in those metals, so I'm always drawn to them!

0:09:150:09:18

-I quite like your mechanical matchbox cover.

-Yeah.

0:09:180:09:21

Yeah, I see a wrap-up coming now!

0:09:220:09:24

No, no, no.

0:09:240:09:26

Hardly. I like to be gentle with people.

0:09:260:09:29

I like to leave as friends, Mike.

0:09:290:09:32

I don't want to leave as an enemy!

0:09:320:09:33

I like that. I'll take that one, Mike.

0:09:330:09:35

-Good.

-What did you say on the still cover?

0:09:350:09:38

I said 60 on the cover, and...

0:09:380:09:40

-What did I say on the matchbox?

-12 on the matchbox cover.

0:09:420:09:45

£80, the wrap-up.

0:09:460:09:48

-Really?

-Cheers.

0:09:480:09:49

You've got yourself a deal. Thank you, Mike, thank you.

0:09:490:09:51

No, it's been a real pleasure, what a lovely place.

0:09:510:09:55

Good. Lovely, yeah.

0:09:550:09:56

It's a real tonic for an antiques man!

0:09:560:09:58

Okey-dokey.

0:10:000:10:01

All I've got to do is find the gin, now.

0:10:010:10:03

That was £60 for the whisky lid

0:10:030:10:05

and £10 each for the stanchion and rope, and the matchbox cover.

0:10:050:10:08

What a mixture.

0:10:090:10:11

Three down, two to go.

0:10:110:10:12

Charles, meanwhile, has made his way to Inverness

0:10:160:10:19

with £140 still in his pocket.

0:10:190:10:22

What can he find there at the merchant?

0:10:220:10:25

-Hello!

-Good day to you.

0:10:260:10:28

-You, too.

-How are you?

0:10:280:10:29

I'm very well, thank you.

0:10:290:10:30

-Your name is?

-Moira.

0:10:300:10:32

Hi, Moira. I love this part of the world. Ever so fresh...

0:10:320:10:35

-It's fabulous.

-It's so clean up here, isn't it?

-It is.

0:10:350:10:38

Great to be here. Love your shop. Wowee!

0:10:380:10:39

Thank you.

0:10:390:10:41

With a mix of antiques and vintage items, there's plenty on offer here.

0:10:410:10:45

That's quite nice.

0:10:460:10:47

What is it, do you know?

0:10:470:10:49

A glass vase!

0:10:490:10:51

Moira, I like your style! I like your style.

0:10:510:10:53

It's a bit rubbed.

0:10:530:10:55

Can you see? It's a really attractive hexagonal...

0:10:550:10:58

..green glass vase.

0:10:590:11:01

Not one of a pair, is it?

0:11:010:11:02

No, unfortunately not.

0:11:020:11:03

What a shame. Yeah...

0:11:030:11:05

The best price on that would be?

0:11:050:11:08

That one...

0:11:080:11:09

Probably £8.

0:11:110:11:13

-£8.

-Yes, on that one.

0:11:130:11:14

It's nice. I think it's really decorative,

0:11:150:11:17

and if it was one of a pair,

0:11:170:11:19

-the pair would be worth £100.

-Yeah.

0:11:190:11:21

But, on its own, £8 is such a good investment...

0:11:210:11:25

-I'll mental-note it and come back to it.

-OK.

0:11:280:11:30

OK, but for £8, it's a really nice object.

0:11:300:11:33

Noted. What's next?

0:11:340:11:36

Gorgeous vase.

0:11:360:11:38

Well, what we call a potpourri.

0:11:380:11:40

That's pretty.

0:11:400:11:41

Isn't that nice, Moira?

0:11:420:11:43

It is lovely.

0:11:430:11:45

Good answer.

0:11:450:11:47

Yes!

0:11:470:11:48

What I love about this is it's fantastic what we call

0:11:480:11:51

-Japanese Satsuma ware.

-Mm.

0:11:510:11:53

And Japanese Satsuma was made quite quickly

0:11:530:11:55

after the treaty of Edo, 1858.

0:11:550:11:59

Just out of interest, Moira, it's priced at £65.

0:11:590:12:02

Yes.

0:12:020:12:03

What's your very, very best?

0:12:040:12:05

-Not a lot of...

-To an old English mate?!

0:12:050:12:08

Not a lot of leeway in that one, actually.

0:12:080:12:10

We've literally just got it in.

0:12:100:12:12

-Mm, look at me...

-So...

0:12:120:12:14

-£60.

-OK.

0:12:140:12:15

-That is it.

-That's fine.

0:12:150:12:16

-I couldn't do anything less than that.

-No, that's fine.

0:12:160:12:18

That's five pounds off. OK.

0:12:180:12:20

OK...

0:12:200:12:21

Thank you.

0:12:210:12:23

-No problem.

-I'll give it some thought. Thanks, Moira.

0:12:230:12:25

Something else to think about.

0:12:250:12:27

Any more for any more?

0:12:270:12:30

Just going to open this cabinet,

0:12:300:12:31

cos there's lots of interesting curios in here.

0:12:310:12:34

I quite like your little mouse.

0:12:340:12:35

Yes. Unfortunately, he's missing his eyes and his ears.

0:12:350:12:39

But he has the original tail.

0:12:400:12:42

Well, that's something.

0:12:420:12:43

He's a really sweet mouse and we always think back to

0:12:430:12:46

-the novel Edwardian times...

-Mm-hm.

0:12:460:12:49

..and our Edwardian ancestors were so

0:12:490:12:53

novel in what they used as a matchbox, and that's what this is.

0:12:530:12:57

-Yes.

-It's basically a small vesta case or matchbox and I would have

0:12:570:13:02

thought, looking at the fact he's lost his eyes,

0:13:020:13:06

he's lost his ears, he probably would date to around 1900.

0:13:060:13:10

What's the best price on this poor, old mouse?

0:13:100:13:13

What do I have on my little mousy?

0:13:130:13:15

25.

0:13:150:13:17

I could do 18 on that one.

0:13:170:13:18

-Really?

-Yes.

0:13:180:13:20

Yeah, he is just tired, but sometimes,

0:13:200:13:22

at the start of a Road Trip,

0:13:220:13:24

you've just got to take things in small doses -

0:13:240:13:26

and this mouse really is that. He is..

0:13:260:13:30

He's cute.

0:13:300:13:32

With three potential lots playing on his mind,

0:13:320:13:35

it's decision time.

0:13:350:13:37

If I was to buy

0:13:370:13:39

the mouse, 18, vase at eight...

0:13:390:13:41

Yes.

0:13:430:13:44

26.

0:13:440:13:45

Plus, the very nice Japanese potpourri at 60...

0:13:450:13:49

-Mm-hm.

-That's £86, isn't it?

0:13:510:13:53

Yeah.

0:13:530:13:54

-Is that right?

-Yes.

0:13:540:13:56

-Fine. I'll take them.

-OK.

0:13:560:13:57

-Thank you. Yes, I will. Thanks, Moira.

-No problem.

0:13:570:14:00

A very successful bit of buying there, with three lots bought.

0:14:000:14:03

Marvellous.

0:14:030:14:04

Oh, another kiss.

0:14:040:14:05

James, meanwhile, has made his way to Culloden Moor, near Inverness.

0:14:080:14:12

It was here that Bonnie Prince Charlie and his Jacobite army

0:14:120:14:16

took on the British Army with devastating results.

0:14:160:14:19

During the 17th and 18th century,

0:14:200:14:23

Britain was suffering from political and religious upheaval.

0:14:230:14:26

In 1688, King James II was forced off the throne.

0:14:260:14:30

Nearly 60 years later, his grandson, Bonnie Prince Charlie,

0:14:300:14:34

made it his mission to reinstate a Stuart monarch

0:14:340:14:37

on the throne of Britain...

0:14:370:14:39

an ambition which resulted in a bloody battle at Culloden

0:14:400:14:44

on 16 April, 1746.

0:14:440:14:46

James has met Learning Manager at Culloden, Katie Boal,

0:14:470:14:51

to find out more.

0:14:510:14:53

So, is this is where it all happened, Katie?

0:14:530:14:55

Yeah. You're standing in the centre

0:14:550:14:58

of the Battle of Culloden and this is where the majority of the

0:14:580:15:01

hand-to-hand fighting took place.

0:15:010:15:04

What sort of numbers are we talking?

0:15:040:15:05

You know, is it 1,000 here and 2,000 there or what?

0:15:050:15:08

-We're talking about 5,500 to 6,000 in the Jacobite army.

-Yeah.

0:15:080:15:14

-Erm, these are best guesses.

-Yeah.

0:15:140:15:16

-And about 7,000-8,000 in the government army.

-Right, OK.

0:15:160:15:21

So, they're not, they're not too...

0:15:210:15:23

-They're good. They're matched.

-Yeah.

0:15:230:15:24

And were they matched in arms?

0:15:240:15:26

-Absolutely not, no.

-Really?

0:15:260:15:28

The Jacobites had a mishmash of arms, but the government soldiers,

0:15:280:15:32

not only were they well armed, but they were well drilled.

0:15:320:15:35

The battle itself actually started at about 12:30

0:15:350:15:38

-and we think that it was over in about an hour, so...

-Really?

0:15:380:15:41

Yeah, only an hour.

0:15:410:15:42

So, first the Jacobites fired their cannon at the government soldiers

0:15:420:15:47

and the cannon actually flies over the heads of the government soldiers

0:15:470:15:51

and the government soldiers begin to return fire and they pound

0:15:510:15:54

into the Jacobite forces.

0:15:540:15:56

And what are they firing?

0:15:560:15:57

They're firing cannon at this point.

0:15:570:15:59

OK.

0:15:590:16:00

The Jacobites take the cannon for as long as they can,

0:16:000:16:04

until they began to cry out to their leaders to let them unleash

0:16:040:16:06

-their most fearsome weapon of all, the Highland Charge.

-OK.

0:16:060:16:10

Finally, the order is given,

0:16:100:16:11

-the men run across the field...

-Yeah.

0:16:110:16:13

-..and then the government army begins to fire grapeshot.

-OK.

0:16:130:16:18

Now, grapeshot, it's like a tin can,

0:16:180:16:20

small and lots and lots of little pieces of lead,

0:16:200:16:23

and it just decimates the Army.

0:16:230:16:26

It was a really bloody crush, wasn't it?

0:16:260:16:28

Yes, absolutely.

0:16:280:16:30

About 1,500 Jacobites are dead

0:16:300:16:31

and about 50 government soldiers lose their lives.

0:16:340:16:36

-God, that's amazing odds, isn't it?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:16:360:16:38

-1,500 plays 50.

-Yeah.

0:16:380:16:39

And then what happened afterwards? Were they pursued?

0:16:390:16:42

Or did they all shake hands and say, "You've won."?

0:16:420:16:45

-No, no, no. Not at all.

-OK.

0:16:450:16:46

The Jacobites were rebels, according to the government army,

0:16:460:16:51

and they were pursued and, actually,

0:16:510:16:53

what the Duke of Cumberland did is he actually ordered his men

0:16:530:16:56

to fix bayonets after the battle and to advance across the field

0:16:560:17:00

and to kill anyone they found there.

0:17:000:17:02

Many artefacts have been uncovered at Culloden battlefield

0:17:030:17:06

over the years, but there is one very special item

0:17:060:17:09

at the visitors' centre that stands out from all the rest.

0:17:090:17:12

So, this fantastic object

0:17:140:17:15

is the Brodie Sword.

0:17:160:17:18

The story is that it belonged to Charles Edward Stuart.

0:17:180:17:23

Goodness!

0:17:230:17:24

What happens to Bonnie Prince Charlie after the battle?

0:17:240:17:28

So, after the battle, Charles is taken from the field

0:17:280:17:33

by his men and he goes on the run.

0:17:330:17:35

And he's on the run in the Highlands of Scotland for a month.

0:17:350:17:39

Relentlessly pursued by government soldiers,

0:17:390:17:42

Charles is said to have evaded capture by disguising himself

0:17:420:17:46

as a shipwrecked merchant and later as a lady called Betty Burke.

0:17:460:17:52

Finally, helped by loyal supporters,

0:17:520:17:54

he escaped by ship back to France.

0:17:540:17:57

The battle of Culloden saw the end of the Jacobite uprising and,

0:17:570:18:01

despite his defeat, Bonnie Prince Charlie went on to be romanticised

0:18:010:18:05

through legends and ballads,

0:18:050:18:07

becoming a national hero of Scotland.

0:18:070:18:09

It's been a busy old day for our experts.

0:18:110:18:14

Time for some well-earned rest.

0:18:140:18:16

So, nighty-night.

0:18:160:18:18

It's a new day and the boys are back on the road.

0:18:200:18:23

Do you want to do the windscreen wipers?

0:18:240:18:26

-That one.

-Yeah.

-Lovely.

0:18:260:18:28

There's always good comedic value

0:18:280:18:30

-in strange windscreen wipers, isn't there?

-Yes!

0:18:300:18:34

Why do they never, sort of, hit and get tangled?

0:18:340:18:36

-No. They don't quite hit it off together, do they?

-No, they don't.

0:18:360:18:39

So far, Charles has secured himself an impressive four lots.

0:18:400:18:43

The silver waiter, the green Bohemian vase,

0:18:430:18:47

the Satsuma potpourri vase and the bronze mouse vesta case -

0:18:470:18:51

which means he still has £54 in his pocket.

0:18:510:18:55

James has bagged three lots.

0:18:560:18:58

A copper whisky still lid,

0:18:580:19:00

the reclaimed stanchion and rope

0:19:000:19:02

and the silver matchbox cover -

0:19:020:19:04

leaving him £120 available to spend today.

0:19:040:19:08

James will start his shopping day in the village of Auldearn,

0:19:120:19:16

which was the site of a bloody battle between Loyalists

0:19:160:19:20

and Covenanters back in 1645.

0:19:200:19:23

Thankfully, it's much more peaceful now and is home

0:19:230:19:26

to Auldearn Antiques.

0:19:260:19:28

James has been here before,

0:19:280:19:29

but he doesn't have fond memories.

0:19:290:19:31

This was the scene of the bloody defeat of Mr Braxton

0:19:310:19:35

at the hands of Charlie Ross at Buckie.

0:19:350:19:38

The weapon was a pottery elephant.

0:19:380:19:40

'Bid on the phone at £2,700, then...'

0:19:400:19:43

Oh, remember it well.

0:19:440:19:46

Bought for a mere £8, and sold for a fortune.

0:19:460:19:49

I'm leaving. I think my road trip is over!

0:19:510:19:54

Ha-ha! Let's hope Lady Luck is on your side this time, James.

0:19:550:19:59

Now, what's that?

0:19:590:20:01

Ah, a kilim rug.

0:20:010:20:02

It's quite grubby.

0:20:030:20:05

It's certainly been used.

0:20:050:20:06

But, in spite of being used,

0:20:070:20:10

it's not bad. Not bad condition.

0:20:120:20:14

So, it's just a bit grubby.

0:20:140:20:15

It's lovely and stiff. It's very tight weave.

0:20:150:20:18

Rather nice.

0:20:180:20:19

It could benefit from a good clean, but it's a nice kilim.

0:20:190:20:24

A kilim rug is flat woven,

0:20:240:20:27

a style typical from Turkey, Iran and Pakistan.

0:20:270:20:30

It can be £40 to you.

0:20:300:20:32

£40? Roger, I'll take it. Thank you.

0:20:320:20:35

That's the quickest deal that been done this week, thank you, James!

0:20:350:20:40

No, pleasure. Pleasure.

0:20:400:20:41

I think I'll have to get my carpet beater out

0:20:410:20:43

and beat some of that dust out.

0:20:430:20:45

-No, but it could be a lovely thing.

-Yeah.

0:20:450:20:47

No messing about there, James.

0:20:470:20:49

Fourth lot bought - well done.

0:20:490:20:53

Do you think it's the dirt keeping it nice and stiff?

0:20:530:20:56

-Not entirely.

-Top quality.

-Top-quality item.

0:20:560:20:58

It wants to stand up, doesn't it?

0:20:580:21:00

Look at that!

0:21:000:21:02

What a marvellous thing. There you are.

0:21:020:21:04

-One, two...40.

-Thank you very much, indeed.

0:21:040:21:05

Thank you very much, indeed, Roger.

0:21:050:21:07

While James has been busy buying, Charles has made his way to Moy.

0:21:090:21:12

He'll have a sedate start to his day with a gentle cruise

0:21:130:21:16

on the Caledonian Canal.

0:21:160:21:18

Unbelievable.

0:21:190:21:20

There she awaits,

0:21:200:21:22

from the Antiques Road Trip to the boating trip.

0:21:220:21:25

I can't wait.

0:21:250:21:26

Cutting through the mountainous heart of the Scottish Highlands,

0:21:290:21:32

this ground-breaking, 200-year-old mighty waterway was one of Britain's

0:21:320:21:36

biggest and boldest building projects.

0:21:360:21:39

Built in the 19th century,

0:21:390:21:41

the canal's design and construction was state of the art.

0:21:410:21:45

Linking the North Sea to the Atlantic Ocean,

0:21:450:21:48

it's 60 miles long, with 29 locks.

0:21:480:21:50

Charles is meeting skipper Andy and Heritage Officer Chris O'Connell

0:21:520:21:55

to find out more.

0:21:550:21:57

Chris, it is truly awe-inspiring.

0:21:570:22:00

It is, isn't it?

0:22:000:22:01

But, what I can't quite believe is the water we're on

0:22:010:22:04

was actually man-made. Why?

0:22:040:22:06

Well, it was a government-sponsored project

0:22:060:22:09

for employment for the Highlands.

0:22:090:22:12

At the time - after the Jacobite revolution - mass migration,

0:22:120:22:16

the Clearances, the Highland Clearances,

0:22:160:22:18

30,000 people leaving the country,

0:22:180:22:20

it was a way of keeping people in the country.

0:22:200:22:23

It was a government-sponsored employment scheme.

0:22:230:22:26

The father of modern civil engineering, Thomas Telford,

0:22:270:22:30

was brought on board to create the ambitious Caledonian Canal.

0:22:300:22:34

His vision was to combine clever construction

0:22:340:22:37

with Scotland's spectacular scenery.

0:22:370:22:40

In 1803, he surveyed the route of the canal,

0:22:400:22:44

an act of Parliament was passed,

0:22:440:22:47

and construction began shortly afterwards.

0:22:470:22:49

Expected to take seven years to build,

0:22:490:22:52

the canal actually didn't open until 1822 -

0:22:520:22:56

five years late and way over budget.

0:22:560:22:58

Sounds pretty typical.

0:22:590:23:00

This is the ledger, the money spent.

0:23:020:23:05

We see here, Thomas Telford,

0:23:050:23:07

for general superintendence and management,

0:23:070:23:10

1803 to 1825, he was paid £5,272.

0:23:100:23:15

And that was literally the period of those almost 19 years

0:23:150:23:20

building the canal.

0:23:200:23:21

That, in today's money, is roughly £350,000.

0:23:210:23:25

Look at this - "whisky allowed to men working in the water",

0:23:250:23:29

£127 worth.

0:23:290:23:31

-Amazing.

-I don't know how much whisky you get for £127.

0:23:310:23:34

-Any whisky left over?

-I don't think so!

0:23:340:23:36

It's getting a bit cold up here!

0:23:360:23:37

No time for a snifter, Charles, it's your turn to take the helm.

0:23:370:23:41

Watch out(!)

0:23:410:23:42

Oh, dear - hold tight, gents.

0:23:440:23:45

This is the Antiques Boat Trip!

0:23:450:23:47

I should say, there is a speed limit.

0:23:470:23:50

Sorry? All right, sorry about that!

0:23:500:23:52

Not the smoothest of starts, hey?

0:23:520:23:54

It's just amazing. I can see so much in front of me...

0:23:540:23:58

When there's no traffic,

0:24:000:24:02

driving can be...like buying antiques - piece of cake!

0:24:020:24:07

The most impressive single engineering feat on the canal

0:24:070:24:10

is Neptune's Staircase, a spectacular flight of eight locks.

0:24:100:24:15

It takes roughly 90 minutes to travel up the 64 feet to the top.

0:24:150:24:20

There's a lock gate in front.

0:24:200:24:22

-Yes.

-How do we get through, do I just nudge it?

0:24:220:24:25

The lock keeper's waited, so we will head over towards the right.

0:24:250:24:29

OK. So I'll go slightly right, yes.

0:24:290:24:32

Hello, sir. Here's our lock keeper.

0:24:320:24:35

-Hello, sir.

-How are you doing?

0:24:350:24:37

I almost feel like saluting those Highlanders,

0:24:370:24:40

-what they've achieved.

-Yes.

-And, of course, Mr Telford.

0:24:400:24:43

Sorry, I'll concentrate.

0:24:430:24:45

-There's a little duck. Excuse me!

-HORN BLARES

0:24:470:24:50

Although at the time of opening the canal was considered

0:24:500:24:53

a commercial failure,

0:24:530:24:55

it has proven to be a stunning feat of engineering

0:24:550:24:59

which has survived hundreds of years and has been enjoyed by millions.

0:24:590:25:03

James, thank you ever so much.

0:25:030:25:05

I think in all my time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:25:050:25:09

this has been one of my favourite, most memorable experiences.

0:25:090:25:11

Being on Caledonian...

0:25:110:25:13

-Our pleasure.

-It's been wonderful.

0:25:130:25:16

James, meanwhile, has made his way to the village of Dulnain Bridge

0:25:180:25:22

for his final shop.

0:25:220:25:24

He's come to the Speyside Heather Centre

0:25:240:25:26

and is hoping dealer Betty can help him unearth

0:25:260:25:30

a bargain to take to auction.

0:25:300:25:32

-Hello!

-Hello.

0:25:320:25:34

My goodness, you're much taller than I expected!

0:25:340:25:37

-You're saying all the right things!

-Handsome, as well!

0:25:370:25:40

-I say.

-Well, I'll have a good look around.

0:25:400:25:44

-Please do.

-Have a nose.

0:25:440:25:46

-OK.

-What do you say in Scotland, is it a nose?

0:25:460:25:49

What do you have? Do you have a browse?

0:25:490:25:51

Yeah, a rook around, a rook aroun'...

0:25:510:25:54

A rook around? I'll have a rook around.

0:25:540:25:58

You just do that.

0:25:580:25:59

You haven't got anything lurking behind the plaid curtain?

0:26:080:26:11

I can let you have a peek.

0:26:110:26:13

Oh! Into the inner sanctum! Follow me.

0:26:130:26:17

Ooh, look, this is where the treasures are!

0:26:190:26:21

So you've got a pair of those? I saw one of those outside.

0:26:210:26:24

That looks sort of like an Ercol chair

0:26:240:26:26

with the arm thing.

0:26:260:26:28

I'm going to look at the one outside and see...

0:26:280:26:31

Betty, are you all right with that?

0:26:310:26:32

-You wouldn't mind bringing that through, would you?

-OK.

0:26:320:26:35

So, James, do they match?

0:26:350:26:38

-It is a pair, isn't it?

-Mm-hm.

-Who are they made by?

0:26:380:26:43

There's a mark there. Can you see?

0:26:440:26:46

-Oh, yes - it's got a kitemark.

-It is Ercol.

0:26:470:26:50

It's Ercol, is it?

0:26:500:26:51

Ercol is the manufacturer.

0:26:510:26:53

Regarded for good quality.

0:26:530:26:56

It's got quite a nice, stylish back.

0:26:560:26:58

We've got a sort of stick back chair,

0:26:580:27:01

but it's got these, sort of, out-rigging arms.

0:27:010:27:06

This is more...

0:27:060:27:08

This is more lunch and supper, less microwave Chicken Kiev.

0:27:080:27:14

You could sit in here for two hours rather than 20 minutes.

0:27:140:27:18

Betty, what do you think you could do for the pair?

0:27:180:27:21

Think low!

0:27:220:27:24

Of course, they're not mine, but I could...

0:27:240:27:27

-Will I make the phone call?

-Make a phone call.

0:27:270:27:30

Ticket price is £55 each.

0:27:300:27:33

They're not the brightest of order.

0:27:330:27:35

They've had a life.

0:27:370:27:38

But so have I.

0:27:400:27:42

Look lively, Betty's back, and with good news, we hope.

0:27:420:27:46

You are one lucky man. I said you were charming...

0:27:460:27:49

Oh?

0:27:490:27:50

..and she said 20% at first.

0:27:500:27:53

I said, "I don't think he'll go for it."

0:27:530:27:55

And she said, "OK, 65 for the two."

0:27:550:27:58

You know, I'm slightly out of my comfort zone.

0:27:580:28:01

A pair of Ercol chairs - they could make £20 at auction for all I know.

0:28:010:28:05

Do you think she might go any lower, or not? 50?

0:28:070:28:09

She might stretch and give you the two for 55.

0:28:110:28:14

55, you've gone and got yourself a deal.

0:28:140:28:17

-OK.

-Thank you very much indeed, Betty. They are lovely.

0:28:170:28:21

And in life, you know, are you a man or are you a mouse?

0:28:210:28:25

You've got to take risks.

0:28:250:28:26

Risks equal rewards - or sometimes abject failure.

0:28:260:28:31

Well, we'll soon see, as that's you all bought up.

0:28:310:28:36

-OK, decision made.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:28:360:28:38

That's really kind - here's your money.

0:28:380:28:40

That's what it's all about - one, two, three... 60.

0:28:400:28:44

Right, OK. Here you go.

0:28:440:28:46

There you are. Thank you. Thanks very much indeed.

0:28:460:28:48

-Really kind of you.

-Good deed!

0:28:480:28:50

-Thanks a lot. Bye!

-Bye.

0:28:500:28:52

Charles isn't spent up quite yet

0:28:570:28:59

so he's made his way to his final stop in Kingussie,

0:28:590:29:03

sitting by the River Spey.

0:29:030:29:05

The popular TV series Monarch of the Glen

0:29:050:29:07

was filmed entirely in the upper Spey Valley,

0:29:070:29:10

including many scenes here, in Kingussie.

0:29:100:29:13

Here we are.

0:29:130:29:15

He's arrived at the White Cockade,

0:29:150:29:17

with £55 burning a hole in his pocket.

0:29:170:29:20

Specialising in French and Scottish furniture,

0:29:230:29:25

kitchenalia and collectables, there is plenty on offer.

0:29:250:29:30

It's so exciting when you do come across really good silk hats.

0:29:300:29:34

And look at that silk hat...

0:29:340:29:36

It's too small. Shame.

0:29:410:29:44

If the hat fits, then wear it.

0:29:440:29:47

Back to browsing, eh?

0:29:470:29:49

I thought this was quite old for a second, I thought, wowee,

0:29:500:29:53

this could be folk art, it could be early Scottish,

0:29:530:29:57

it could be English, it could be mid-17th-century...

0:29:570:30:00

It felt so rustic, it feels so good. I turn it upside down and it says,

0:30:000:30:04

"Made in Colombia".

0:30:040:30:05

So we never stop learning in this game!

0:30:050:30:07

It's not "just like that" today. It's not just like that.

0:30:110:30:14

It should be! Normally it is.

0:30:140:30:16

Just as Charles was starting to despair,

0:30:160:30:19

some ladles with a ticket price of £85 have caught his attention.

0:30:190:30:24

Time to call in dealer Laurence.

0:30:240:30:27

Are these old, do you think, Laurence, or reproduction?

0:30:280:30:30

They are old. I believe they are 18th century.

0:30:300:30:34

A set of... Is it four?

0:30:340:30:37

Yes, the big one as well.

0:30:370:30:38

I do think these are probably quite old.

0:30:380:30:41

You can see how they've been hand-finished.

0:30:410:30:43

I do like the patination on them.

0:30:430:30:49

What would be the best on them for the four, please?

0:30:490:30:53

OK, for you...

0:30:550:30:56

I'll do 50, but that's my very, very, very best.

0:30:590:31:03

I'm going to go for the ladles

0:31:030:31:05

because I think they're real antiques,

0:31:050:31:07

it's late in the day...

0:31:070:31:09

I had a really nice soup for lunch today which was Scottish,

0:31:100:31:13

so I feel these really provincial-looking 18th-century copper ladles

0:31:130:31:19

might just serve up a sweet tomato buyer, you never know.

0:31:190:31:25

-I'll take them, for £50.

-OK.

-Thank you so much.

0:31:250:31:28

It's taken me a while, but I've got there.

0:31:280:31:30

Am I happy? Give me a high-five!

0:31:300:31:32

Thanks a lot - done!

0:31:320:31:34

And that final high-five means our boys are all bought up.

0:31:340:31:39

Buying the ladles for £50

0:31:440:31:46

means Charles has almost blown his whole budget,

0:31:460:31:49

purchasing the silver waiter, the green Bohemian vase,

0:31:490:31:54

the Satsuma potpourri vase and the bronze mouse vesta case,

0:31:540:31:57

spending a total of £196.

0:31:570:32:00

James spent a little less, shelling out £175 on five lots.

0:32:020:32:07

He bought the copper whisky still lid,

0:32:070:32:09

the reclaimed stanchion and rope,

0:32:090:32:12

the silver matchbox cover,

0:32:120:32:13

the kilim rug and the pair of mid-century Ercol chairs.

0:32:130:32:18

So, what do they make of each other's lots?

0:32:180:32:20

Not a lot, I suspect.

0:32:200:32:22

Charles has bought a good regional auction house section.

0:32:220:32:26

We got the glass department covered with the Bohemian vase.

0:32:260:32:29

We got the rather nice copper spoons -

0:32:290:32:31

me being a metal man, I love the spoons.

0:32:310:32:34

Bit of red copper and I'm all over it.

0:32:340:32:37

I really rate the copper distillery cover,

0:32:370:32:40

for what it represents in whisky and its link to Scotland.

0:32:400:32:44

Well done, James. I like that.

0:32:440:32:45

The silver, I'm not so sure about that -

0:32:450:32:48

pressed metal with some dodgy feet.

0:32:480:32:50

The kilim rug was a real find.

0:32:500:32:53

It's a great object which currently has great scope to do very well,

0:32:530:32:58

so he's bought very strongly.

0:32:580:32:59

After starting in Dingwall in the Highlands,

0:33:010:33:04

our experts are now en route to auction in Aberdeen.

0:33:040:33:08

Is it Aberdeenians you call local people here?

0:33:080:33:10

Aberdonians.

0:33:100:33:12

-Oh, Aberdonians, sorry.

-I don't know.

0:33:120:33:14

Are these Aberdeenians?

0:33:140:33:15

-I think Aberdonians.

-Aberdonians.

-For the Don.

-For the Don. Exactly.

0:33:150:33:19

-Or for the Dee.

-No, for the Dee.

0:33:190:33:21

It's Aberdeenians... I'm a Dee, you're a Don!

0:33:210:33:24

Today's auction is taking place at John Milne Auctioneers -

0:33:240:33:27

the firm has been trading in the region for 150 years.

0:33:270:33:30

-Ah!

-It's very grand here, isn't it?

-It is lovely, isn't it?

0:33:300:33:34

-In we go. Into the auction. Good luck, James.

-Good luck.

0:33:340:33:37

Presiding over today's proceedings is auctioneer Colin Edward,

0:33:370:33:42

but what does he make of our experts' lots?

0:33:420:33:44

The copper hatch lid, we have had a little bit of interest,

0:33:460:33:49

a couple of phone calls have come in to ask about it.

0:33:490:33:54

So...fingers crossed.

0:33:540:33:56

The mouse vesta holder,

0:33:560:33:58

although it's not perfect and it is only in bronze or brass,

0:33:580:34:02

it is my favourite piece and I think it should...

0:34:020:34:05

It should get them a nice little profit, I think.

0:34:050:34:07

Aye... Lovely room, isn't it? And the sunshine.

0:34:070:34:11

Our experts are seated and ready to go.

0:34:120:34:14

First up, it's Charles's Bohemian green vase.

0:34:140:34:17

Hold tight, James.

0:34:170:34:19

Really?

0:34:190:34:21

£10. 10. Surely, 10.

0:34:210:34:24

Oh, I can't believe it. Profit, profit!

0:34:240:34:26

-12.

-15. £15, on my left...

0:34:260:34:29

-Slow start. It's OK. That's great.

-Is it?

0:34:290:34:32

A green and gilt vase, at 15.

0:34:320:34:35

Selling at £15, all done at 15.

0:34:350:34:39

A lovely little profit to kick things off.

0:34:390:34:42

A little small step for auction mankind.

0:34:420:34:44

-That's OK.

-Is it?

-Auction mankind is walking.

0:34:440:34:47

Will it be more of a giant leap for James's matchbox cover?

0:34:470:34:51

£40?

0:34:520:34:53

30.

0:34:550:34:56

It is striking. It's not lighting.

0:34:560:34:58

20?

0:34:580:34:59

-£10.

-£10. 10. 12.

0:34:590:35:02

-It's a good thing.

-15.

0:35:020:35:04

18. 20.

0:35:040:35:06

22... 25.

0:35:060:35:08

28. At 30.

0:35:080:35:10

£30.

0:35:100:35:12

At 30, all done now at £30, the matchbox cover...

0:35:120:35:17

So, that's a profit apiece. Great stuff.

0:35:170:35:20

Well done, mate. See, that's a nice little start, isn't it?

0:35:200:35:23

How do you feel, pretty good?

0:35:230:35:24

It was nice, you got the right price.

0:35:240:35:26

A long way to go. But you're ahead.

0:35:260:35:29

Next up are Charles' set of copper ladles, bought for £50.

0:35:290:35:34

£60 for the ladles.

0:35:340:35:35

-They're good things.

-I think they look vulnerable.

0:35:350:35:38

-40?

-They are.

0:35:380:35:39

-£30.

-Oh, dear.

-Hello, hello.

0:35:390:35:42

35. 40. 45.

0:35:420:35:44

50. 55. 60.

0:35:440:35:47

-65...

-We are in business.

-70.

0:35:470:35:50

-75...

-Very speccy.

0:35:500:35:52

-They're speccy, they're speccy.

-80. 85.

-Hello!

0:35:520:35:56

£85, the lady's bid.

0:35:560:35:58

85. At 90...

0:35:580:36:01

-Go on, Madam! Go on...!

-At £90, at 90 on my right, at 90.

0:36:010:36:05

If we're done, at 90...

0:36:050:36:06

-95.

-One more!

-100.

0:36:060:36:09

Madam!

0:36:090:36:11

105.

0:36:110:36:12

All done now at £105.

0:36:120:36:16

Now, that's what I call a result.

0:36:160:36:20

-Well done.

-You put the A in antique

0:36:200:36:22

and you blew a wee Scottish lady a kiss.

0:36:220:36:25

Thank you! Thank you, madam!

0:36:250:36:28

Thank you!

0:36:280:36:29

Enough of the kisses.

0:36:290:36:31

Now, it's the turn of James' reclaimed stanchion and rope.

0:36:310:36:35

£10. Get in there!

0:36:350:36:37

-10, I'm bid. 12.

-Profit.

0:36:370:36:39

-15, 18.

-Well done, James.

-20.

0:36:390:36:43

-22.

-Go on!

0:36:430:36:44

£22, on my left at 22.

0:36:440:36:47

-The VIP rope...

-That's clearly a very important person buying it.

0:36:470:36:51

At 22...

0:36:510:36:52

Another good return there for James.

0:36:520:36:55

It's all in that northerly direction.

0:36:550:36:58

The wind is blowing the right way.

0:36:580:37:00

-Isn't it?

-What, easterly? Westerly? Northerly?

0:37:000:37:04

We're going up. We're both going up in the world.

0:37:040:37:06

Indeed. Next up is the auctioneer's favourite,

0:37:060:37:10

Charles's bronze mouse vesta case.

0:37:100:37:13

20. Someone at £20?

0:37:130:37:16

20, I'm bid.

0:37:160:37:17

-22. 25.

-Go on!

0:37:170:37:19

28. 30.

0:37:190:37:22

32. 35.

0:37:220:37:23

38. At 40.

0:37:230:37:27

Come on, keep going!

0:37:270:37:28

42. 45.

0:37:280:37:31

48. £48 on my right, at 48.

0:37:310:37:34

Selling now at £48...

0:37:340:37:36

And 50.

0:37:360:37:37

52. 55.

0:37:370:37:41

-On the phone at 55.

-There's a phone bid!

0:37:410:37:43

-At 58.

-Hello, the UK!

0:37:430:37:45

60?

0:37:450:37:46

No, 58. 60? 60.

0:37:460:37:49

-65.

-Go on!

0:37:490:37:50

-£65, the bid is on my right at 65, all done?

-65!

0:37:500:37:54

At £65...

0:37:540:37:56

Aberdeen is proving very profitable for our boys -

0:37:560:37:59

fantastic result there for Charles.

0:37:590:38:02

-What a good man!

-What a good man.

0:38:020:38:05

He's no mouse!

0:38:050:38:06

James' kilim rug proved as popular.

0:38:060:38:10

£60. 60, I'm bid 60.

0:38:100:38:12

At £60.

0:38:120:38:14

One bid of 60...

0:38:140:38:16

Don't scare everybody off, at £60...

0:38:160:38:20

Are we done? At 60? All finished, one bid, £60?

0:38:200:38:23

All done... At 60.

0:38:230:38:26

Bad luck, James, but a profit is a profit.

0:38:260:38:29

As you know, on the day,

0:38:290:38:31

without the net, with a call-hardened room,

0:38:310:38:34

they go or they don't.

0:38:340:38:36

In this instance, they didn't, that's a shame.

0:38:360:38:38

Charles, you're up again. It's your Satsuma potpourri vase.

0:38:380:38:42

£40. 40 I'm bid.

0:38:420:38:44

-Come on!

-At £40.

0:38:440:38:47

-Come on.

-At 40, one bid of 40, going to be sold.

0:38:470:38:52

At £40, just the one bid, all done.

0:38:520:38:54

42. 45.

0:38:540:38:57

-That's a really good object.

-48.

0:38:570:39:00

At 50.

0:39:000:39:02

52.

0:39:020:39:04

55.

0:39:040:39:06

£55, at 55.

0:39:060:39:09

All done at 55, nice little potpourri pot...

0:39:090:39:13

Ah, what a shame. First loss of the day.

0:39:130:39:17

-That was my favourite object.

-It is funny, I...

0:39:170:39:21

Me too, with the kilim rug.

0:39:210:39:22

It had the most legs to run

0:39:220:39:25

and I think if this market was worldwide,

0:39:250:39:28

it could have made more.

0:39:280:39:30

Will James' pair of Ercol chairs fare a bit better, I wonder?

0:39:300:39:34

30. 20.

0:39:350:39:37

-Here we go.

-20 I'm bid...

-Come on, move!

0:39:370:39:41

..for the Windsor-style chairs.

0:39:410:39:42

22, 25.

0:39:420:39:44

28, at 30...?

0:39:440:39:46

32, 35.

0:39:460:39:49

38. At 40.

0:39:490:39:52

-42, 45...

-Is the buyer Norwegian?

0:39:520:39:54

£45, the lady has bid in the room at 45.

0:39:540:39:58

If we're done at 45, I'll sell at £45...

0:39:580:40:03

Hard luck. That is a small loss for James, too.

0:40:030:40:07

Thank the Lord I only lost £10.

0:40:070:40:10

Now, can Charles pull a profit with his final lot?

0:40:100:40:14

It's the silver waiter.

0:40:140:40:17

-20 I'm bid, 22, 25.

-It's away.

0:40:170:40:20

28. At 30.

0:40:200:40:22

£30, far back, 32.

0:40:220:40:24

35. 38. 40.

0:40:240:40:28

42. 45, 48.

0:40:280:40:30

At 50.

0:40:300:40:32

55, 60.

0:40:320:40:34

65, 70...

0:40:340:40:36

75...

0:40:370:40:39

At 80.

0:40:390:40:40

-That's OK.

-£80.

-Go on!

0:40:400:40:42

All done now, at 80,

0:40:420:40:44

all finished at £80, bidder's far back, at 80.

0:40:440:40:47

Another profit. He had to be pleased with that, well done, Charles.

0:40:470:40:52

I'm happy, that was my Achilles heel,

0:40:520:40:55

-I'm still running.

-It's over.

-I'm still running, baby.

0:40:550:40:57

Time for James's final lot - the copper whisky still lid.

0:40:570:41:03

40.

0:41:030:41:04

-30.

-Oh, God...

0:41:040:41:07

35.

0:41:070:41:08

40. £40 in front.

0:41:080:41:11

45.

0:41:110:41:13

45 on my right.

0:41:130:41:15

-£45.

-What did it cost you, again?

0:41:150:41:17

-Look at me.

-50.

0:41:170:41:19

55. 60. 65.

0:41:190:41:22

70. 75.

0:41:220:41:25

80. 85.

0:41:250:41:28

90. 95.

0:41:280:41:31

-100.

-Cometh the hour.

-I know.

-105.

0:41:310:41:33

-110.

-Wow!

0:41:330:41:35

115, 120.

0:41:350:41:38

125, 130.

0:41:380:41:40

£130, the bid is on my left at 130.

0:41:400:41:43

Selling now at £130.

0:41:430:41:47

James ends on a high with that marvellous profit.

0:41:470:41:50

-Back in the game.

-You are back in the game. Back in the game.

0:41:520:41:56

-Hanson-Braxton.

-Let's go. Let's go.

0:41:560:42:00

It's a close call. Who's going to come out on top?

0:42:000:42:03

Let's do the maths.

0:42:030:42:05

James started this leg with £200.

0:42:050:42:07

He made a tidy profit of £60.34 after auction costs,

0:42:070:42:12

leaving him with a wonderful £260.34.

0:42:120:42:16

Charles also began with 200

0:42:180:42:20

and he too made a profit of £66.40 after auction costs,

0:42:200:42:25

which means he's today's winner

0:42:250:42:28

and leads going into the next leg with a healthy £266.40.

0:42:280:42:33

What fun!

0:42:330:42:35

-Well done.

-Well done, Charlie.

0:42:350:42:37

It's a good start for both of us, James.

0:42:370:42:38

-I think I should drive, don't you?

-Yes.

0:42:380:42:41

The journey is well and truly on the road.

0:42:410:42:43

Do you think the winner should sit in luxury as the passenger?

0:42:430:42:47

Yes!

0:42:470:42:48

HE LAUGHS

0:42:480:42:49

-Thank you, Aberdeen.

-Thank you, Aberdeen.

0:42:510:42:55

Bring on...Dunfermline.

0:42:550:42:57

Cheerio, chaps.

0:42:570:43:00

Next time, the boys are back on the road in bonnie Scotland.

0:43:000:43:04

Charles is smooth-talking...

0:43:040:43:05

-Bob, you have character.

-Oh, thank you!

0:43:050:43:08

..while James has his haggling hat on.

0:43:080:43:11

As all the best hagglers do, you do need the fez.

0:43:110:43:15

Charles Hanson and James Braxton set off behind the wheel of a 1964 German DKW 1000 Coupe as their hunt for antiques starts in the Scottish Highlands.

James is drawn to a filthy yet well-made kilim rug, and Charles uncovers some Jacobite-period copper ladles. James rests from shopping to hear about Bonnie Prince Charlie's defeat at Culloden. Meanwhile, Charles goes on a boat trip to learn about the Caledonian Canal and the engineering marvel who built it.

The old chums reunite to sell at auction in Aberdeen.