Episode 1 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 1

Charles Hanson and Catherine Southon hunt for antiques around Sussex, visiting Storrington, Petworth, Lewes and Peacehaven, and head to an auction in Paddock Wood, Kent.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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-With £200 each...

-I want something shiny.

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..a classic car and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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-I like a rummage!

-I can't resist it.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Why do I always do this to myself?

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-There'll be worthy winners...

-Give us a kiss.

-..and valiant losers.

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Come on - stick 'em up.

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-So, will it be the high road to glory...

-Onwards and upwards!

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..or the slow road to disaster?

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Take me home!

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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# It's a new dawn, it's a new day

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# It's a new life for me

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# And I'm feeling good. #

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Today we begin a brand-new adventure in the south of England with

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les auctioneers extraordinaires,

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Catherine Southon and Charles Hanson.

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How exciting. They make a nice couple, don't they?

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I'm a northern guy,

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and I've come very far south to take on a southern lass.

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That's it. Southon in southern.

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You know what they say - there can be a big North-South divide

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and I'm feeling it, but not that much.

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There is a big north and south divide here.

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-Get out of here.

-We'll never have a divide.

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-We're going to have a fun challenge.

-We're going to have fun.

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Right. Road Trip regular Charles is a smooth talker

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who knows his stuff when it comes to sniffing out antiques.

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Isn't it beautiful?

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Oh, look at this little lamb.

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-I know.

-Oh, look.

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-Baaa!

-Hello, lambs.

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Hello, sheep. Here is the Derby Ram.

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I am a Derby Ram, you know.

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I do enjoy lamb to eat.

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How can you say that?

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Well, I do. Shall we put one in the back?

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-How can you possibly say that?

-There's one dead over there.

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Oh, Charles.

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I enjoy cooking lamb.

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His rival on this journey, another Road Trip favourite, Catherine,

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is the queen of brokering a good deal.

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How do you play the Road Trip game?

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-What is your game?

-I don't have a game.

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I don't have a strategy.

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If I like it, I buy...

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-What have you done?

-My seat has gone back.

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Sorry. Sorry, Catherine.

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I'm just getting into the Road Trip week, OK?

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Let me just lie back,

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think of England and just think about the dream.

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Oh, Charles. Starting this Road Trip with £200 each,

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our experts will be zipping around in this snazzy 1981 MGB GT.

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We don't have a great reputation

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for driving particularly well, do we?

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Do you think we're going to come out of this alive?

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I do hope so.

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On this epic Road Trip,

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Catherine and Charles will start in the south of England before making

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their way north, meandering around the West Midlands

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and then travelling through the Peak District.

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They will finish up with a final auction in Congleton in Cheshire.

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This leg will kick off in Arundel, West Sussex,

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and end in Paddock Wood, Kent, for an auction. Nice.

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Charles, it is getting really hot in here.

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You think this is right?

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Um, do you mean the car or us?

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-What?

-Sorry.

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Charles Hanson!

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Yeah. This morning, our Charles will shop first.

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Look out, Arundel.

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Isn't that charming?

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-Have a great day.

-Have fun.

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I will have fun. The sun is shining.

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Have fun in the sun.

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-Can you get out?

-Thank you.

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Bye.

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-Good morning.

-Good morning.

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-How are you?

-I'm very well, thank you, Charles.

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-Charles Hanson.

-Nice to meet you.

-What a gorgeous town.

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You are right there.

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David's shop specialises in militaria,

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but there are plenty of other antiques on offer here.

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Right, let's go.

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Let's go, Charles.

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Stop hopping about.

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Have you been married a few years, David?

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Have I been married a few years?

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I have indeed. I thought you said have I been mad for a few years?

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Ha! So did I.

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And standing by, David's good lady wife Amy has something she'd like to

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show Charles, and she's a good egg.

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Hello. Is that ostrich egg? Of course.

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It's a cigarette stand, isn't it?

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Dispenser. I would have thought...

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What is it - 1930s?

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Yes, it's so exotic,

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it's so Jazz Age.

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It's so, I suppose, stylish.

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So really because this obviously is a faux shell.

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It's not a real shell, is it?

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It's just made to imitate some type of ostrich egg.

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So a really stylish object, Amy.

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How much is it?

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-£50.

-How much?

-£50.

-£15?

-50!

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Sorry. Five-zero.

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You're happy. No problem. 20.

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-How much?

-20.

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-20?

-Yeah.

-Oh, that's not bad.

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I like the style.

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One to consider.

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All right, boys, OK?

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Stay with me, OK? Stay with me.

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So, while Charles's browsing continues outside,

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Catherine has made her way to Storrington

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and her first shop of the day.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

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And you might be?

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-Ian.

-Hello, Ian, I'm Catherine.

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Welcome to Stable Antiques.

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With 35 dealers and wares set out over two floors,

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there's plenty to peruse.

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I don't think you'd find my name on there.

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I wasn't the best behaved girl at school.

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Crikey. Really?

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Right, what have you found?

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Fans, I have actually done OK with some fans recently.

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This one in particular, though, this is mother-of-pearl,

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so the guard sticks, the outer sticks,

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are mother-of-pearl. The actual fan itself is usually silk.

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It does say on it, AF, so "as found",

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so that means there is obviously something wrong with it.

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Well, there's only one way to find out, girl.

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I think you will find it's in a little bit of a poorly state.

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-Oh, gosh, it is, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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OK. Right. You don't have any more, by any chance, do you?

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Anywhere else, dotted?

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Well, actually, I have. I've got two more which I haven't priced up yet.

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I haven't put out for sale.

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Lovely. This is getting exciting.

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It is indeed.

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Right, let's see those fans.

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I used to have a few of those.

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That's actually the bad thing.

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It is when the outer guard sticks get broken.

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-Yes.

-We've got one broken one, another broken one.

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I think you'll like this one.

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I'm going to put that one down.

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Well, the problem that we have is that we have

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three fans in very poor condition.

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These two you haven't put prices on.

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-No.

-I mean, he's put £12 on that, your friend, Simon.

-Yes.

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I mean, I would probably offer eight, if that is acceptable to him.

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-Eight for this one alone?

-Yeah.

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I think I can do it for ten.

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Oh, OK. And then I would probably say ten for each of those.

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I think this one is worth a little bit more. 25 for the two.

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-So 35...

-Yes.

-Couldn't come to 30?

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Shall we see what else you might buy?

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Well, I'm quite interested in your little puppy outside.

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-Ah.

-How much is that doggie in the window?

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Well, actually on the path.

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-He's lovely.

-He's actually...

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although he is a puppy, he is about the same age

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as the larger full-sized Great Dane.

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Is he not very old?

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He's probably about ten years old.

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What sort of price could he be?

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-He could be about 30-ish?

-I would say 40.

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If we could say 30 on the fans and 38 on him, we've got a deal.

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You don't think we could do 32 on the fans and 38 on him?

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Oh, I'm not going to argue over two pounds.

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-Very good.

-I'm not going to argue over two pounds.

-Thank you.

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It's been lovely. £32. £38. What are we going to call him?

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-Lucky.

-Absolutely.

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Lucky, that's what we'll call him.

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Lucky, you are coming home with me.

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Well, let's hope he lives up to his name.

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So that is the trio of fans and Lucky the dog bought for £70.

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Good stuff. Woof.

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Meanwhile, back in Arundel,

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it looks like a Minton bowl has caught Charles's eye.

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Just look at that gorgeous blue.

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The reason that I like this is this, what we call...

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we call this blue Blue Celeste.

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What I love is this continuous band of sailing vessels

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against this really well-illuminated skyline.

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-Art Deco, 1930.

-Oh, right.

-HE TAPS THE BOWL

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-That ring as well.

-It has a nice ring to it.

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Rings a bell, doesn't it?

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Is that a chip?

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Yeah, it is.

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Yeah. Surely that will knock some money off

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the £120 ticket price, then?

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To me in a saleroom, I'd want to probably pay you about £50.

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-Is that too little?

-I think that's too low, I'm afraid.

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I think 65 would be well below what we'd hope for.

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-Really?

-Yes.

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Would you meet me at £60?

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Let's do it at £60.

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Amy, you are happy at 60?

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-Yeah.

-I think we're all good at 60.

-David, you're happy?

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So I can buy the attractive bowl,

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my Road Trip now is off and running,

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quite literally sailing.

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You slightly lost me there, Charles.

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Anyway, that's your first lot bought -

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what else is here of interest?

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A little rootwood carving of an elder.

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Probably Japanese.

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And this would date to around 1880.

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He has got a split.

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The feet are not particularly good,

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but the detail in there is very, very nice indeed.

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Nice patination. David, how much is he?

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-35.

-Yeah, he's nice.

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And the best on him would be?

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Make an offer.

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-Make an offer?

-Yes.

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-£10.

-All right.

-Is that a sale?

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It's a £10 sale. Well done.

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-I'll take him.

-Thank you very much indeed.

-I'll take him.

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Cor, he is on a roll, isn't he?

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That's another lot bought and he is showing no sign of stopping.

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What is this ink stand here, David?

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-Well, I believe it to be Black Forest.

-OK. So it is German.

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It is all very typical of circa 1900.

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I think it is quite late.

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It is about 1900, 1910.

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-But it is in remarkably good condition.

-Yep.

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Black Forest carvings became a symbol of luxury and wealth

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associated with travel, and very popular today.

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What would be your very best price, Amy?

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You can have...150.

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I like it, but my bid would be £70.

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-£80.

-Oh, don't say that. How much?

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-£80.

-80 and you can have it.

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And we wish you well with it.

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£75, you've got a deal.

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-OK.

-OK, 75 is good.

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-I'll take it. Go on, thank you very much.

-Thank you so much.

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Another deal done and Charles is still considering

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the cigarette dispenser, which could be a risky punt,

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as tobacco-related collectables

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aren't particularly popular these days.

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HE COUGHS

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This is quite novel because it's Art Deco and your best on this is 20?

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-Yes.

-This lovely sort of simulated ostrich egg in the jazz Art Deco style,

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it's got great style, I will buy this for £20.

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Thank you, Amy.

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It seems like a no-brainer to me, and he is done!

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That's a huge £165 spent on four lots in his very first shop.

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Bye-bye, see you.

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Crikey. Slightly concerned -

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I'm just about spent up.

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While Charles has been busy,

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Catherine has made her way down the road to Ford.

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Back in the 19th century,

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cholera was a serious threat to towns and cities across the country.

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Originating in India, the disease swept across the Empire,

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arriving on UK shores in 1831.

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Causing panic,

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there was no practical proposal to stem its spread until an engineer

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in nearby Littlehampton offered a way forward.

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Catherine is meeting managing director at Dando Drilling,

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Martin Fitch-Roy, to find out more.

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Hi there. Catherine. Nice to meet you.

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Hello, Catherine, shall we go inside?

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Please. Show me the way.

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In the summer of 1867,

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an outbreak of cholera across the south coast

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left 18 people dead in Littlehampton.

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Dear, oh, dear.

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So, taking it right back, what was the number one cause of cholera?

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It was proven that a contamination of the water supply by human sewage,

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either leaking pipes...

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They had a theory that they could put the pipes into the river,

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which only makes things worse.

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But in our case in Littlehampton,

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they were drinking water from the ground, ground water,

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but also digging pit latrines in the proximity of the water supply.

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So they were contaminating their water before they even used it.

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In Littlehampton, a leading physician at that time,

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Dr John Candy,

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believed that by cleaning the water supply, cholera could be overcome.

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Dr Candy had an associate, Albion Ockenden,

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who was one of the founders of this company.

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Who had an idea that he could make a machine and use technology to drill

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further down into the geology,

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below the depths of the wells they were using at the moment,

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to get into clean water, thus presenting a clean water supply.

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He would have used a very simple gantry machine

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with just a rope and a winch,

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but the secret was to find steel tubes that could be driven into

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the ground and he used tubes from the boiler of an old steam tug

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called the Newcastle, which happened to be in the harbour being renovated

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at the time, and using those tubes,

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he invented a method of drilling down into the geology

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to acquire clean water.

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Ockenden hit the jackpot with his tube-well invention

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and quickly patented it.

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With his partner, Reginald Duke,

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they soon began to fix water supplies

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in nearby towns and eventually across the British Empire,

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saving millions of lives.

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After the 1860s outbreak,

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cholera never again reached epidemic proportions in this country.

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It is, however, still a significant killer around the globe.

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Ockenden and Duke's company are still making drills.

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This one is destined for use in Africa.

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Oh, wow.

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Bring the lever, the right-hand one, down.

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It will come down.

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Woo-hoo!

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Albion Ockenden's simple technique for drilling just a few feet deeper

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continues to save lives around the world to this day.

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Well, thank you very much indeed, Martin.

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It has been really interesting finding out about the history,

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and thanks for letting me drive the machine.

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It's been a pleasure, Catherine.

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-Thank you.

-Let's hope it works again later.

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THEY LAUGH

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Back with Charles and he has made his way 12 miles north

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to the small town of Petworth - I live near there.

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With a reputation of being a leading antiques town,

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there are sure to be a plethora of goodies available

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at Petworth Antiques Market, but with just £35 left in his pocket,

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Charles will need to buy very canni-li-li-lily.

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Sometimes I can just see the dealer over there.

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If you look a bit sad or look a bit lost,

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they almost just feel a bit sorry for you and then sometimes that can work

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in your favour and there might be a bit more discount.

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Look a bit lost and it just helps sometimes.

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Isn't that sweet?

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We see lots of blue and white in antique centres

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and often it's willow pattern,

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it can be quite mundane and quite boring.

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This is a fisherman pattern,

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and this coffee cup would date to around 1785.

0:16:060:16:10

And what I like about this coffee pot is you will see, OK,

0:16:100:16:13

there is a crack here, but what really sets it off

0:16:130:16:17

is this almost fritting in the glaze,

0:16:170:16:19

which might suggest it is experimental.

0:16:190:16:22

It could be quite an early coffee cup.

0:16:220:16:26

With a ticket price of £10, it is time to talk to dealer Jeff.

0:16:260:16:30

Priced at £10,

0:16:310:16:32

that says 1,000 pence to me.

0:16:320:16:35

1,000 pence and the best price would be, in pence?

0:16:370:16:41

I should think £8.

0:16:410:16:43

800 pence. That's not bad. 800 pence.

0:16:430:16:47

-A good buy, I think.

-It just sounds a bit more grand saying pence.

0:16:470:16:50

If you say so, Charles.

0:16:500:16:52

And it looks like that is a deal done on the Caughley coffee cup.

0:16:520:16:56

They say in antiques small is beautiful.

0:16:580:17:01

So I'll take it. Jeff, there is £10.

0:17:010:17:04

Thank you very much. I'm very grateful.

0:17:040:17:06

If I may have some change.

0:17:060:17:07

Yes, I'll just get you some change.

0:17:070:17:09

Very good of you.

0:17:090:17:11

And with that, a day's shopping draws to a close.

0:17:110:17:14

Nighty-night, guys.

0:17:140:17:16

It's the next day and Catherine and Charles are back on the road.

0:17:210:17:25

This is, Charles,

0:17:250:17:27

the first time I have ever been in a car with you driving

0:17:270:17:30

-and I am petrified.

-You're not, are you?

0:17:300:17:33

Why? Are you being serious?

0:17:330:17:35

Yes!

0:17:350:17:37

Listen, this is all part of getting jiggy.

0:17:370:17:39

This is you.

0:17:400:17:41

So far, Charles has secured himself an impressive five lots.

0:17:430:17:47

Buying a Minton bowl, the 1930s ostrich egg cigarettes dispenser,

0:17:470:17:52

the Japanese carved figure, the Black Forest desk stand,

0:17:520:17:57

and the rare Caughley coffee cup,

0:17:570:17:59

which means he has just £27 left to spend today.

0:17:590:18:03

Catherine, meanwhile, has bagged two lots.

0:18:030:18:06

The trio of fans and Lucky the Great Dane,

0:18:060:18:10

leaving her with £130 to play with.

0:18:100:18:12

This morning, Catherine and Charles

0:18:150:18:17

have moseyed along to Lewes in East Sussex.

0:18:170:18:21

Nestled amongst the beautiful South Downs,

0:18:210:18:23

historic Lewes is home to our experts' first shop of the day.

0:18:230:18:28

Here we are, Catherine.

0:18:280:18:30

Top of the day. Good luck to you.

0:18:300:18:31

-Here we are.

-Perfectly placed.

0:18:310:18:34

-Do you know this shop?

-No.

0:18:340:18:36

First time. I'm a northern man lost in the south with you.

0:18:360:18:40

Well, this is well-known territory for me - I will show you around.

0:18:400:18:43

Come on. Ladies first.

0:18:430:18:45

Hello. Charles Hanson, good to see you.

0:18:470:18:49

-Michelle, hi.

-Fantastic.

0:18:490:18:50

-What an amazing shop, isn't it?

-It's really good.

0:18:500:18:52

I don't know whether we can maybe have a personal shopper each,

0:18:520:18:55

is that feasible? We can go our own ways

0:18:550:18:57

-and I might take the lady with me.

-OK.

-Is that OK with you?

0:18:570:19:00

Thank you very much.

0:19:000:19:02

Come on, let's go for a quick wander.

0:19:020:19:03

Here we go.

0:19:030:19:05

You old charmer, Charles.

0:19:050:19:08

Established for 18 years, this shop holds a wide variety of antiques.

0:19:080:19:12

This cabinet, I feel, is a very good place to start.

0:19:130:19:18

-Hello.

-Hello, I am back with the keys.

0:19:180:19:20

Thank you, Michelle.

0:19:200:19:21

-Another thing...

-Can I call you Michelle My Belle?

0:19:210:19:24

It might give us a discount as well. Thank you, Michelle.

0:19:240:19:26

ALARM SOUNDS Oh, my Lord! Charles!

0:19:260:19:28

-Sorry about that.

-How alarming.

0:19:280:19:31

Meanwhile, Catherine has spied a small charm that she likes.

0:19:310:19:35

Is it silver gilt, or...

0:19:350:19:36

It's gilt metal.

0:19:360:19:38

Oh, OK. Can I have a little look at that?

0:19:380:19:40

Carrying on with my fan theme of yesterday.

0:19:400:19:43

Isn't that sweet?

0:19:470:19:49

You've got this nice sort of embossed design.

0:19:490:19:54

Quite sweet. What date do you think that is?

0:19:540:19:56

I would have thought it is about 1920.

0:19:560:19:58

-Somewhere around there.

-Can I hold on to that?

0:19:580:20:01

Would you mind? Can I give that to you?

0:20:010:20:02

Thank you. I just like that because it is a little bit...

0:20:020:20:05

A little bit different. And we all love a fan, don't we?

0:20:050:20:08

We do indeed.

0:20:080:20:09

Well, you certainly seem to this Road Trip.

0:20:100:20:13

What has caught your eye, then, old girl?

0:20:130:20:16

I saw this ballerina.

0:20:160:20:19

I'm not a big fan of brooches, but she is quite sweet.

0:20:190:20:22

-Yes.

-The subject is fantastic,

0:20:220:20:24

I mean, so often you find these big clusters with the big stone stuck in

0:20:240:20:28

the middle, but something like that..

0:20:280:20:29

I mean, and she's quite elegant.

0:20:290:20:31

Her pose is quite elegant, isn't it?

0:20:310:20:33

She's actually quite lovely.

0:20:330:20:35

I quite like that.

0:20:350:20:36

It has got 50 on it.

0:20:360:20:38

I was thinking in my mind sort of 28, 30...

0:20:380:20:40

We'll leave Craig to consider Catherine's offer,

0:20:400:20:43

because Charles has found a Swansea porcelain ink stand.

0:20:430:20:47

He only has £27 left so fingers crossed, eh?

0:20:470:20:50

I think that's lovely.

0:20:500:20:53

It is this beautiful boat shape and I would call this a piece

0:20:530:20:55

of Georgian porcelain and then it would date to around 1820.

0:20:550:20:59

How much could that be, Michelle?

0:20:590:21:01

I would have to phone him - there is no ticket on it.

0:21:010:21:04

Could it be £25?

0:21:040:21:06

-I really don't know.

-Could you give him a call?

0:21:060:21:08

All right, I'll ask him, yeah.

0:21:080:21:09

Ink well. Thanks, Michelle.

0:21:090:21:11

-Find out for me.

-OK.

0:21:110:21:14

Hi, Ian, it is Michelle.

0:21:140:21:15

Hello, lovey, how are you?

0:21:160:21:18

Right, Michelle My Belle, what news?

0:21:180:21:20

-Michelle?

-Your luck is in.

0:21:200:21:22

-No, really?

-Well, he said 30, but...

0:21:220:21:25

Really? I just wonder if you could do £28?

0:21:250:21:29

I think that would be OK.

0:21:290:21:31

Really? I think I will say at £28, for the first time,

0:21:310:21:36

for the second time, and I will buy it.

0:21:360:21:39

-I will buy that for £28.

-OK.

0:21:390:21:41

Oh, no, you won't. You're short, Charles.

0:21:410:21:43

Lovely. My last bit of money.

0:21:430:21:45

There's 20.

0:21:450:21:47

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.

0:21:470:21:49

Seven? 27? It was meant to be 28.

0:21:520:21:54

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6...

0:21:540:21:57

-Miscalculation?

-I've only got £27 left.

0:21:570:22:00

-Oh, dear.

-Would you like...

-Never mind.

0:22:000:22:02

That is not on purpose.

0:22:020:22:04

-I believe you.

-I am one pound short.

0:22:040:22:06

Would you take £27?

0:22:060:22:09

And you really have completely cleared me out.

0:22:090:22:11

I apologise.

0:22:110:22:12

Yes. It's fine, it's fine, never mind.

0:22:120:22:14

Are you sure? Michelle My Belle, give us a kiss.

0:22:140:22:18

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

0:22:180:22:19

It doesn't matter.

0:22:190:22:20

It's only money. Thanks, Michelle.

0:22:200:22:23

-It is.

-Take care, see you.

0:22:230:22:24

You naughty boy.

0:22:240:22:26

That forgiving deal means Charles has spent every single penny,

0:22:260:22:29

-so top marks.

-Bye!

0:22:290:22:31

I do apologise.

0:22:310:22:32

Ha-ha!

0:22:350:22:36

Catherine is still shopping and Craig has something he thinks

0:22:360:22:40

will pique her interest.

0:22:400:22:41

Asprey hair brushes.

0:22:430:22:45

-Now you're talking.

-These have only just come in to stock

0:22:450:22:47

-so they haven't even been cleaned yet.

-They are lovely.

0:22:470:22:50

Absolutely perfect.

0:22:510:22:53

So this would've been in a set once upon a time.

0:22:530:22:55

Perhaps with some other little jars or something like that.

0:22:550:22:58

And maybe a hand mirror, probably.

0:22:580:23:00

But it's nice that we've got Asprey on the side there -

0:23:000:23:03

a nice clear mark, which is lovely, and you haven't polished them,

0:23:030:23:06

which I think is fantastic.

0:23:060:23:08

A great side as well is the lovely green enamel, the engine-turned enamel.

0:23:090:23:14

Did you have a price in mind for these?

0:23:140:23:16

Yes. They come in at a massive £10 each.

0:23:160:23:19

So £40.

0:23:190:23:21

Can they be 30 - is that cheeky?

0:23:210:23:23

-Can they be 30?

-They can be 35.

0:23:230:23:25

So that's just come in, that's fresh stock.

0:23:250:23:27

I love fresh stock.

0:23:270:23:29

It gets me all excited.

0:23:290:23:31

Ohh-hoo-hoo!

0:23:310:23:32

So do I.

0:23:320:23:34

Now, decision time.

0:23:340:23:35

Catherine has three lots.

0:23:350:23:37

Did you find out anything else on that?

0:23:370:23:39

I had a word with Michelle, we've made a decision

0:23:390:23:41

and we're going to take 30 on it.

0:23:410:23:42

You can do 30, that's wonderful.

0:23:420:23:43

I'll take that at 30.

0:23:430:23:45

This had a little ticket on it, which is no longer on it...

0:23:450:23:48

What...?

0:23:480:23:50

It was £12, so it's £10.

0:23:500:23:52

£10, OK.

0:23:520:23:54

Can you do that for eight?

0:23:540:23:56

Just to make my lot... The reason being, the rest of my fans are 32 and if

0:23:560:24:00

I can make that eight, that gives it a nice comfortable...

0:24:000:24:02

-A nice round figure.

-A nice round figure.

0:24:020:24:04

So, if I can do eight for that, that's lovely.

0:24:040:24:06

And £35 for the Asprey hairbrushes makes a combined total of £73.

0:24:060:24:11

S'marvellous.

0:24:110:24:13

Having spent every penny,

0:24:190:24:21

Charles has decided to take a trip to the seaside,

0:24:210:24:23

and has made his way to Brighton.

0:24:230:24:25

MUSIC: I Do Like To Be Beside The Seaside

0:24:250:24:28

But he is not here to stroll along the prom, prom, prom - oh, no.

0:24:280:24:33

Instead, he is here to learn all about how the town

0:24:330:24:37

used to pong, pong, pong,

0:24:370:24:39

as he has come to meet Stuart Slark,

0:24:390:24:42

who knows a thing or two about Brighton's sewers.

0:24:420:24:44

Rather Charles than me.

0:24:440:24:46

-Is it Stuart?

-Yes, it is.

0:24:470:24:49

-Good to see you.

-Hello, Charles, nice to meet you.

0:24:490:24:51

That smell. It is great taking in this lovely air.

0:24:510:24:54

-Oh, it's beautiful.

-It's clean and we always say enjoy the sea air,

0:24:540:24:58

-don't we?

-We do.

0:24:580:24:59

If we roll back the years to maybe when Brighton Pavilion

0:24:590:25:02

and Prince Regent George IV, it was the place to come,

0:25:020:25:05

it was highly fashionable, but back then there was a stench, wasn't there?

0:25:050:25:10

There was a very bad stench, yes.

0:25:100:25:12

Because Brighton didn't have any sewerage system at all.

0:25:120:25:16

All the properties were on cesspits,

0:25:160:25:18

which meant there was nowhere for it to go,

0:25:180:25:20

which meant when they were full up they used to tip them in the streets.

0:25:200:25:23

And it used to come all the way down on to the beach, and go into the sea.

0:25:230:25:26

You're going to show me what the sewers did to make this what it is today.

0:25:260:25:30

-Yes.

-Great! I can't wait, Stuart.

0:25:300:25:32

By the 19th century,

0:25:340:25:35

Brighton was one of the fastest-growing towns in Britain

0:25:350:25:39

and thousands of families would visit for their annual seaside holiday.

0:25:390:25:43

As a result, parts of Brighton struggled to cope.

0:25:430:25:46

One huge problem was the stench from overflowing cesspits,

0:25:460:25:50

and it would take one engineering genius to fix it,

0:25:500:25:53

by creating a sewerage system.

0:25:530:25:55

-Mind your step, Charles.

-I can smell it.

0:25:580:26:00

Oh, my goodness me.

0:26:000:26:02

-Is that sewage?

-That is raw sewage going through there at the moment.

0:26:020:26:06

Oh, my goodness me. So are we now...? This is the old Victorian sewer.

0:26:060:26:11

Everything you see today with me is the old Victorian sewer, yes.

0:26:110:26:16

There is a surface run-off.

0:26:160:26:18

-Is that sewage?

-No, that is just condensation in here at the moment.

0:26:180:26:21

I am pleased to hear it.

0:26:210:26:23

If you look here...

0:26:230:26:24

-Oh, yes.

-This is where the rats normally sit.

0:26:240:26:27

Oh, you are joking.

0:26:270:26:28

-There's none here, so you're all right.

-Oh, God!

0:26:280:26:32

This is awful,

0:26:320:26:33

in the nicest sense of learning about history, it's awful.

0:26:330:26:38

Gosh, we're quite deep now, aren't we, underground?

0:26:380:26:40

Yes, we are about 40 foot underground at the moment

0:26:400:26:44

in the sewers itself.

0:26:440:26:45

My immediate reaction, I think, Stuart,

0:26:450:26:47

to what I can see is what a tremendous feat of engineering.

0:26:470:26:51

It's an incredible feat of engineering

0:26:510:26:54

when you think this was all open-cast done,

0:26:540:26:56

in other words it was a great big hole and then they just built

0:26:560:27:00

the brickwork around a wooden frame.

0:27:000:27:03

The man in charge of designing this impressive system was Sir John Hawkshaw,

0:27:050:27:09

a talented civil engineer noted for work on Charing Cross

0:27:090:27:13

and Cannon Street railway stations in London.

0:27:130:27:15

What did Sir John Hawkshaw do?

0:27:160:27:18

All I can see is a tunnel.

0:27:180:27:20

What was different with his work?

0:27:210:27:23

The difference came because Brighton has got no pumping stations on it

0:27:230:27:28

at all, and everything was done by gravity.

0:27:280:27:30

So what they invented, they invented an egg-shaped barrel,

0:27:310:27:35

as you can see.

0:27:350:27:36

As you can see, the egg-shaped barrel there.

0:27:360:27:40

So what that does, because it is a small amount of gravity going through,

0:27:400:27:45

what it does, it speeds up and throws all the water into the bottom of the barrel

0:27:450:27:50

and makes it go faster as you can hear it going down

0:27:500:27:53

into the pipe bit.

0:27:530:27:54

What a man Sir John was.

0:27:540:27:57

He almost, I suppose, rescued Brighton from what had been.

0:27:570:28:00

I think he helped make it as popular as it was.

0:28:000:28:02

This is still in very good working condition now.

0:28:020:28:05

Which way are we going now?

0:28:050:28:07

Let's go down here. Again.

0:28:070:28:09

As you go round the second bend, just mind the step down.

0:28:090:28:12

I feel like I'm in a loo, literally.

0:28:120:28:14

There are an impressive 29 miles of Victorian sewers

0:28:140:28:18

running under Brighton.

0:28:180:28:20

Wow!

0:28:200:28:22

# Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside

0:28:220:28:25

# Oh, I do like to be beside the sea... #

0:28:250:28:28

I wish he would stop jumping up and down.

0:28:280:28:31

Stuart, I can see light.

0:28:310:28:34

Yes, this is one of the most impressive chambers

0:28:340:28:37

that has ever been built

0:28:370:28:38

by Sir John Hawkshaw.

0:28:380:28:40

Wow, that is amazing, isn't it?

0:28:400:28:42

If you would believe it,

0:28:420:28:44

we have been told there is over seven million bricks in here.

0:28:440:28:47

Who were the workers?

0:28:470:28:49

They employed Irish navvies, actually.

0:28:490:28:52

So the Irish came over in their droves to support this build.

0:28:520:28:56

Yes, correct, yes.

0:28:560:28:57

And it cost quite a bit of money in those days.

0:28:570:29:01

They estimated the cost to build this at £80,000.

0:29:010:29:05

Back in 1860 something?

0:29:050:29:06

Correct.

0:29:060:29:08

That would work out to be about £9 million today.

0:29:080:29:12

You would never get brickwork laid like this now in this day and age.

0:29:120:29:15

How long did it take to build?

0:29:150:29:17

It took from 1869 to 1874.

0:29:170:29:20

It was five years, which was incredible.

0:29:200:29:24

A tribute to Victorian engineering and construction,

0:29:240:29:28

Hawkshaw's sewers remain in use today, keeping Brighton clean,

0:29:280:29:32

fragrant and safe from disease.

0:29:320:29:34

Daylight. Thank goodness.

0:29:360:29:38

Talking of fragrant...

0:29:380:29:40

The sweet smell of Brighton is here once again.

0:29:410:29:45

That was an experience.

0:29:450:29:48

So romantic, Charles.

0:29:480:29:50

Back with Catherine and she's travelled half an hour south

0:29:560:29:59

to Peacehaven for a final spot of shopping.

0:29:590:30:01

Good afternoon, sir.

0:30:050:30:07

Hiding behind the cabinets!

0:30:070:30:08

Good afternoon. A pleasure to meet you.

0:30:080:30:11

-I'm Catherine and you're...?

-Hello, Catherine, I'm Steve.

0:30:110:30:14

Hello, Steve. Catherine has £57 still to spend.

0:30:140:30:17

Thank goodness there's lots of stock.

0:30:170:30:20

A bit of silvery bits and bobs, nothing really in there.

0:30:210:30:25

This is all kind of militaria.

0:30:250:30:27

That's quite pretty.

0:30:290:30:30

Whenever I see anything shagreen, I have to pick it up.

0:30:330:30:36

Shagreen is the most wonderful, wonderful material.

0:30:360:30:40

So this is dyed, dyed green shark skin or ray skin.

0:30:400:30:45

You find it in 18th century and also very popular,

0:30:450:30:49

it's kind of revived really in Art Deco.

0:30:490:30:51

You find a lot of things made from this and the Art Deco period.

0:30:510:30:54

This is probably '20s, '30s.

0:30:540:30:57

It's a lighter.

0:30:570:30:59

Had that been an etui or something like that,

0:30:590:31:01

that would have been absolutely gorgeous.

0:31:010:31:03

Can you do this for 20?

0:31:030:31:04

HE SIGHS

0:31:040:31:07

No.

0:31:070:31:08

Oh!

0:31:080:31:09

22 really would be the lowest.

0:31:090:31:12

22.

0:31:120:31:13

Shake my hand, Steve.

0:31:140:31:16

I'm going to buy this at £22.

0:31:160:31:18

-Okey-doke.

-Thank you very much.

0:31:180:31:21

I suppose you need to be paid, don't you?

0:31:210:31:23

Yes.

0:31:230:31:25

-It would be good.

-Damn, I thought I was going to get away with that.

0:31:250:31:28

Nice try, Catherine.

0:31:280:31:30

That purchase brings the shopping to a close for this Road Trip.

0:31:300:31:33

Catherine will add the Art Deco gent's lighter

0:31:350:31:38

to her other purchases -

0:31:380:31:40

the collection of fans, including the novelty gilt metal charm,

0:31:400:31:44

the Great Dane woofer,

0:31:440:31:45

the green enamel brush set,

0:31:460:31:48

and the 1950s silver ballerina brooch.

0:31:490:31:52

She spent a total of £165.

0:31:520:31:55

Well done, that girl.

0:31:550:31:57

Charles, meanwhile, spent every single penny of his £200 pot,

0:31:570:32:01

buying a Minton bowl, the 1930s ostrich egg cigarette dispenser,

0:32:010:32:07

the Japanese carved figure,

0:32:070:32:10

the Black Forest desk stand,

0:32:100:32:12

the rare Caughley coffee cup

0:32:120:32:15

and the Swansea porcelain ink stand, which,

0:32:150:32:18

if it's right, is worth a fortune.

0:32:180:32:19

So, what do they make of each other's lots?

0:32:190:32:21

I adore, adore, his Minton bowl.

0:32:210:32:25

How he got that for £60, I shall never know.

0:32:250:32:28

I love Catherine's puppy. The Great Dane in the window,

0:32:280:32:31

made in Cotswold stone, was an inspired buy.

0:32:310:32:34

The public love small dogs in stone and at £32, to me,

0:32:340:32:38

it's worth between 50 and 70.

0:32:380:32:41

That little blue and white cup looks pretty rare to me,

0:32:410:32:44

but have you spotted that massive crack down it?

0:32:440:32:47

But then he only paid £8 so who knows what will happen?

0:32:470:32:51

After starting in Arundel in Sussex,

0:32:530:32:55

our experts are now en route to

0:32:550:32:57

auction in Paddock Wood, Kent.

0:32:570:33:00

Where are we?

0:33:030:33:04

All you need to know is we are in the Garden of England.

0:33:040:33:07

My home county!

0:33:070:33:10

-Really?

-Welcome.

0:33:100:33:11

It is beautiful. The North-South divide, particularly for you and I,

0:33:110:33:14

it could result, I think,

0:33:140:33:15

in a shock result today in that it could be Catherine 1, Hanson 0.

0:33:150:33:21

-As in football.

-I don't think so.

0:33:210:33:23

Our expert duo have finally arrived at Hop Farm Auctions

0:33:230:33:27

and they are raring to go.

0:33:270:33:29

We are literally at the back of the saleroom.

0:33:290:33:32

And the sun is shining.

0:33:340:33:37

And the sun is shining.

0:33:370:33:38

-What could go wrong?

-Everything is in our favour today.

0:33:380:33:40

Presiding over today's proceedings is auctioneer Alex Jenkins.

0:33:400:33:45

What does he make of our experts' lots?

0:33:450:33:49

I think my favourite for the auction has got to be the Black Forest.

0:33:490:33:53

I think that one has just got it all going on.

0:33:530:33:55

I think it is going to do very well and I'm just jealous

0:33:550:33:58

that I can't buy it myself, I have to say.

0:33:580:33:59

The Cotswold stone,

0:33:590:34:00

this could be a little fun surprise hit of the auction, I think.

0:34:000:34:04

Time to find out.

0:34:040:34:06

With buyers online and in the room,

0:34:060:34:08

it's time for this pair to take their seats.

0:34:080:34:12

First up, Charles's Minton bowl - this could be good.

0:34:120:34:16

100, it starts at 100.

0:34:160:34:18

Oh, come on.

0:34:180:34:19

-I do hate to disappoint.

-It's a great object, I had £100.

0:34:190:34:23

110, 120, 130, 140, 150 now.

0:34:230:34:25

160 on there, 170 now.

0:34:250:34:29

-Go on.

-I'm over the moon with that.

0:34:290:34:31

Selling at 160.

0:34:310:34:32

Yeah! I just liked it.

0:34:320:34:36

-Thank you very much.

-I wonder if they know about the chip.

0:34:360:34:39

Charles is off to a flying start, though.

0:34:390:34:41

That was your best thing.

0:34:410:34:43

Yeah, it was, and my blockbuster paid off, and I'm delighted.

0:34:430:34:46

Can Catherine make as big a splash with her first lot?

0:34:460:34:50

Her set of enamel brushes are next.

0:34:500:34:53

-£50 - I'm in.

-Well done.

0:34:530:34:54

-Put it there?

-£55 anywhere now?

0:34:540:34:55

-That's good, well done.

-Sh! Keep going.

0:34:550:34:58

55 is online, 60.

0:34:580:34:59

At £60, £60, 65, 70, we're there.

0:34:590:35:02

-£70, sir?

-I told you.

0:35:020:35:04

-I told you.

-£70 here, 75 we want.

0:35:040:35:06

At £70 it is.

0:35:060:35:08

Yay! He's a friend of mine.

0:35:080:35:10

Hey!

0:35:100:35:12

That's a profit apiece - great stuff.

0:35:120:35:14

I think you did very well.

0:35:140:35:16

Charles is up again, this time with his Swansea porcelain ink stand.

0:35:160:35:20

Now, stand by.

0:35:200:35:21

£30 online.

0:35:210:35:22

Thank you, net, I'm happy.

0:35:220:35:24

32. 32 is at the back, 32.

0:35:240:35:26

34 there, 36? 36 there.

0:35:260:35:29

-Come on!

-36 is there, 40.

0:35:290:35:31

-Keep going.

-40 is there, 42.

0:35:310:35:33

-42 is there - 44, anywhere?

-It doesn't need any more!

0:35:330:35:35

46 there, 48, 50 now.

0:35:350:35:37

£50 online.

0:35:370:35:39

At £50, we're selling at 50.

0:35:390:35:42

Gosh, well done. Another profit there for Charles,

0:35:430:35:46

but it could have been more.

0:35:460:35:47

You are flying.

0:35:470:35:48

-It's good.

-£23...

0:35:480:35:50

Shall I go? You want to do this road trip by yourself?

0:35:500:35:54

Thank you, Wales, and thank you, Kent.

0:35:540:35:56

Time to find out if there are any dog lovers in the room.

0:35:560:36:00

It's Catherine's Great Dane.

0:36:000:36:02

Will he prove to be lucky?

0:36:020:36:04

-£20 is bid.

-That's profit there. What's wrong?

0:36:050:36:09

Oh, is it bid? £22 now,

0:36:090:36:10

come along now.

0:36:100:36:11

-£22, 22 is online, 24.

-Oh, come on!

0:36:110:36:17

-22 it is.

-No.

-The sympathy bids are coming in.

0:36:170:36:20

Ah! Get out!

0:36:200:36:22

£28, 30. Yay! 32, 34. 34 is online.

0:36:220:36:26

36. 38 there, 40 now.

0:36:260:36:28

-42.

-Very, very, very good.

0:36:280:36:30

44, back in. 46 there, 48 to you.

0:36:300:36:34

48's there, 50 now.

0:36:340:36:35

48 it is.

0:36:350:36:36

It got there in the end.

0:36:380:36:39

And it's another profit for Catherine.

0:36:390:36:41

-Here we go, at £5...

-Lucky, you made £10.

0:36:410:36:44

-Lucky.

-Now, Charles, this time with his Oriental old boy.

0:36:440:36:50

-22, 24, 26, 28.

-Quite right, yes.

0:36:500:36:54

30. Go on!

0:36:540:36:56

Go on! Go on!

0:36:560:36:58

32's online. 32 it is.

0:36:580:36:59

At £32. Sells at 32.

0:36:590:37:02

Charles is certainly on a roll today.

0:37:040:37:06

Quality sells.

0:37:060:37:08

Quality sells well.

0:37:080:37:10

Quality sells well.

0:37:100:37:11

That's his mantra.

0:37:120:37:14

Catherine's fan selection is up next.

0:37:140:37:16

£20, thank you, sir.

0:37:160:37:18

22 now, straight in at 20.

0:37:180:37:19

Net's in. Watch the net go. Watch the net.

0:37:190:37:21

Still cheap for this lot.

0:37:210:37:23

-It's really cheap.

-22 is there, 24, 26, 28, 26 there, £28 we need now.

0:37:230:37:27

£26, 28, 30. 32, 34. No?

0:37:270:37:33

32 it is. In the middle at £32.

0:37:330:37:35

Anywhere else? Still pretty things, still cheap.

0:37:350:37:37

Watch the net. There's nothing on the net.

0:37:370:37:41

At £32 bid, it sells at 32.

0:37:410:37:43

-What?

-Paris. Look at me.

0:37:430:37:45

-Oh, shush! 32.

-How much?

0:37:450:37:48

I'm not telling you!

0:37:480:37:49

You know what they made, and they didn't make a profit.

0:37:490:37:51

It was a risky punt, given their condition,

0:37:510:37:54

and one which didn't pay off, unfortunately,

0:37:540:37:57

so bad luck, Catherine.

0:37:570:37:58

I'm really gutted. I really, really thought they would do brilliantly.

0:37:580:38:02

That was my hope.

0:38:020:38:04

Don't laugh. Don't laugh!

0:38:040:38:07

Time to see if Charles's ostrich egg cigarette dispenser

0:38:070:38:11

will go up in smoke or not.

0:38:110:38:13

-£60 I'm bid. £65 we want.

-We are in.

0:38:130:38:16

-You've got 60?

-Look! We're live in the States.

0:38:160:38:19

£60 I've got, £65 we need.

0:38:190:38:21

At £60. It's still cheap, isn't it?

0:38:210:38:25

£60 here,

0:38:250:38:26

-at 60 it is.

-Come on!

0:38:260:38:27

-I'm a humble man.

-How...

-It's trebled up.

-..did that make £60?

0:38:290:38:33

-I'm a happy man.

-How did that make £60?

-The world came to Kent

0:38:330:38:37

and the world saluted my egg and it hatched. I'm delighted.

0:38:370:38:41

I bet you are. That profit means Charles is romping

0:38:410:38:44

-further into the lead.

-Funny old game, you know,

0:38:440:38:47

we've got a long way to go.

0:38:470:38:49

Oh, if looks could kill.

0:38:490:38:52

But can Catherine make a comeback

0:38:520:38:54

with her pretty little silver ballerina brooch?

0:38:540:38:57

Start straight in at £36.

0:38:570:39:00

-£38 anywhere?

-Good.

-Good. Keep going.

-Good.

-£38 now.

0:39:000:39:03

£38 there, 40 is here, 42, 44, 46.

0:39:030:39:08

-She's skipping away.

-£48 now.

0:39:080:39:11

-Oh, that's quite good.

-46 there, 48 we need.

0:39:110:39:13

Any more?

0:39:130:39:15

At 46.

0:39:150:39:16

Nice profit.

0:39:160:39:18

You've got to be pleased with that, Catherine.

0:39:180:39:21

-Good, that's good. That's sweet 16 profit.

-It's good for you.

0:39:210:39:25

Next up, Charles's rare Caughley coffee cup.

0:39:250:39:28

-£30 for it.

-30.

0:39:280:39:29

Come on, rare object.

0:39:290:39:31

Is that a bid?

0:39:310:39:32

No. £30 I'm bid, £32.

0:39:320:39:33

-Yeah, straight in at 30.

-32 we need. Still cheap. £30 there, 32 we want.

0:39:330:39:38

At £30 it is.

0:39:380:39:41

32's in, £34 now.

0:39:410:39:43

£32, at £32, it is 34 we want.

0:39:430:39:46

-Going on the net.

-At £32, £32 it is, that's 32.

0:39:460:39:49

-Stop dancing.

-Sorry.

-Another cracking profit there for Charles.

0:39:490:39:54

Look at me. Thanks a lot. That's good.

0:39:540:39:56

Catherine is back in the hot seat now with her last lot,

0:39:560:40:00

the Art Deco gents' lighter.

0:40:000:40:02

£10 I'm bid.

0:40:020:40:04

12, 14, 16, 18.

0:40:040:40:07

-Come on!

-It's moving now, look.

-16's there, 18 now.

0:40:070:40:09

£18 we need.

0:40:090:40:11

16, 18's there, 20.

0:40:110:40:12

22, 24.

0:40:120:40:14

-Come on, it's gorgeous.

-22 it is.

0:40:140:40:16

24, worth a lot more.

0:40:160:40:17

-Too little ducks. Quack quack.

-22, and 24 we need.

0:40:170:40:21

At 22.

0:40:210:40:22

Well, at least it wasn't a loss.

0:40:240:40:26

It had a good skin on it, it was a thick-skinned object,

0:40:260:40:29

you're thick-skinned as well, come on, it doesn't matter.

0:40:290:40:33

I think I'm going to cry.

0:40:330:40:35

Here comes Charles's final lot, the Black Forest desk stand.

0:40:350:40:40

-100 I'll take, 100, thank you.

-Hello!

0:40:400:40:42

-You should take that and run.

-No. Come on.

0:40:420:40:43

£100 it is. 110 now, should be more.

0:40:430:40:46

-110, 120, 130.

-What?

-Hold tight, baby. Sorry.

0:40:460:40:49

130, 140.

0:40:490:40:50

-Are you paying these guys?

-140, 150.

0:40:500:40:51

-Hold tight.

-160 online.

0:40:510:40:53

-170.

-America is calling.

0:40:530:40:55

It's the American dream. Come on, America.

0:40:550:40:57

-Come on, America.

-170, 180, 190?

0:40:570:40:59

-Yes, please.

-Yes, please.

-190 there, 200.

0:40:590:41:01

-200 is there, 210?

-How do you...

-Come on, America.

-Charlie!

0:41:010:41:04

220, 230. 230 is there, 240 now.

0:41:040:41:06

-230 it is.

-I'm amazed!

0:41:060:41:09

Baby, hold tight, it's a funny old game.

0:41:090:41:11

Sorry, Catherine. Keep going.

0:41:110:41:13

230 in the room, 240 we want.

0:41:130:41:14

-Come on, America!

-240 is there, 250 is yours.

0:41:140:41:17

-250 it is, 260 now.

-Come on!

-At 250 in the room.

0:41:170:41:21

At 250 selling.

0:41:210:41:23

Come on, Internet. Sold.

0:41:230:41:25

-Thank you very much.

-Well done.

0:41:250:41:26

-Wow!

-Well done.

-I can't believe it.

0:41:260:41:29

I think I need a kiss for that.

0:41:290:41:31

Oh!

0:41:310:41:33

And so Charles completes his full house of profits

0:41:330:41:37

with an amazing result.

0:41:370:41:38

I think you should do a little dance.

0:41:380:41:41

-I might have a little jig for joy.

-I might do a little jig for joy as well.

0:41:410:41:44

-GAVEL BANGS

-Sorry. We're being told off now.

0:41:440:41:47

Catherine started this leg with £200 and made a pretty profit

0:41:470:41:49

of £13.76 after auction costs, leaving her with £213.76.

0:41:490:41:56

Well done.

0:41:560:41:59

Charles also started with £200 and he made an amazing profit of

0:41:590:42:04

£278.88, after selling fees,

0:42:040:42:09

so he goes into the next leg way out in the lead,

0:42:090:42:13

with a fabulous £478.88.

0:42:130:42:16

You know, the sun is shining.

0:42:180:42:19

The sun is shining on you, Mr Hanson!

0:42:190:42:22

It's been great, come on.

0:42:220:42:23

You promised me a bit of a ballerina stance

0:42:230:42:25

and a little walk around on your tiptoes.

0:42:250:42:28

And you as well. Join in with me.

0:42:280:42:29

I can't do it, I'm on cloud nine now.

0:42:290:42:32

I'm really enjoying today.

0:42:320:42:33

-You've doubled.

-On your tiptoes.

0:42:330:42:35

-You have doubled.

-On your tiptoes.

0:42:350:42:37

Let's go. Come on. Funny old game.

0:42:390:42:41

In your manor as well.

0:42:410:42:42

In my manor? Yeah, rub it in a bit more, Charles.

0:42:420:42:44

On the lawns of Kent.

0:42:440:42:46

Yes. Let's rub it all in.

0:42:460:42:48

You did so well.

0:42:490:42:50

Take me home. Take me home!

0:42:500:42:52

-Sorry, wrong way. Sorry.

-No, wrong way, that way.

0:42:520:42:55

Sorry, sorry, sorry.

0:42:550:42:56

-Goodbye!

-See you soon, Road Trippers.

0:42:560:42:58

On the next Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:010:43:03

-there are plenty of surprises still to come...

-Goodness me!

0:43:030:43:06

There's a man on a huge pair of stilts.

0:43:060:43:10

..as they hit the road again.

0:43:100:43:11

Eat your heart out, Charles Hanson.

0:43:130:43:15

Charles Hanson and Catherine Southon hunt for antiques around Sussex. Charles also learns the stinky story behind Brighton's sewers, while Catherine hears how a big drill stopped a cholera epidemic.

Cruising around in a 1950 MG Midget, the expert duo visit shops in Storrington, Petworth, Lewes and Peacehaven before heading to an auction in Paddock Wood, Kent. Catherine plumps for English silver, while Charles goes continental and gambles a significant proportion of his £200 budget on a German Black Forest ink stand.


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