Episode 2 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 2

While shopping for antiques in Kent, Charles Hanson finds a pair of rare 18th-century shoe buckles, and Catherine Southon comes across an unusual manicure set.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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-With £200 each...

-I want something shiny.

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..a classic car and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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-I like a rummage.

-I can't resist.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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-But it's no mean feat.

-Sorry!

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-Why do I always do this to myself?

-There'll be worthy winners...

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-Give us a kiss.

-..and valiant losers.

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-Come on, stick 'em up.

-So, will it be the high road to glory?

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-Onwards and upwards.

-..or the slow road to disaster?

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-Take me home.

-This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah.

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MUSIC: I Get Around by The Beach Boys

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On this road trip, we're getting around the English countryside with

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auctioneers Charles Hanson and Catherine Southon.

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Welcome to my garden, welcome to the Garden of England.

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Welcome to Kent.

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Why, thank you, ma'am.

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Catherine is indeed a Kentish lass,

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with over two decades of experience in the antiques business.

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Whilst Derbyshire lad Charles, also known as the Young Pretender,

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brings his experience to the game and a rather unique fashion turn, too.

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-Do you like my jacket today, by the way?

-I do like your jacket.

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My wife calls me the Candyman, because if the Candyman can...

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-# Oh, the Candyman can... #

-Ha-ha, oh, sweet!

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Both our experts started this week of road tripping with £200.

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On the first leg, Catherine built that total to £213.76.

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Well done, that girl.

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But old Carlos zoomed ahead, already having accumulated £478.88.

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And it's only just starting.

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What can Catherine do to catch up?

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Just imagine you're buying me presents through the week and you want to

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see my eyes light up at your buys.

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What are you talking about, Charles?

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Today, these two are driving a beautiful bottle green MGB GT from 1981,

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which they've called Meg, for obvious reasons.

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You've really, really learned how to drive this, haven't you?

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-Come on, car, just push forward.

-Come on, Meg.

-Come on.

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Do it for us. Oh, my goodness.

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-ENGINE REVS

-Ooh!

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Sorry. Sorry, there we go.

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Sorry about that, Catherine.

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Blimey - careful, Charles, you'll have the gearbox out of it.

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Oh, my goodness, my heart just went then.

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I thought we were going to go sliding back down that hill.

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No, I put the car in first by mistake. Don't worry.

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Ha-ha! Honestly... On this epic road trip,

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Catherine and Charles begin in southern England before making their

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way north, meandering around the West Midlands,

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and then darting through the Peak District.

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They'll finally finish up in Congleton in Cheshire, God's County.

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On this leg, they'll start in the Kent village of Chart Sutton,

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and aim for auction in Bourne End in Buckinghamshire.

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Right now, they're just south of Maidstone.

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-Maidstone is the capital of Kent.

-Why?

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-I don't know.

-Ask a silly question...

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They're sharing their first shop. Fortunately, it's a biggie.

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Dealers Jamie and Trevor are on hand to help.

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-Hello, gents.

-Hello.

-Hello.

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-Catherine.

-I'm Trevor. How nice to meet you.

-Hello.

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-Hello, Charles. Trevor.

-Good to see you.

-Nice to meet you.

-Jamie.

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Jamie, hello, Jamie.

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Time to split up and browse.

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Antiques don't buy themselves, you know.

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Supposed to be going that way. This is my way.

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-Can you hear something?

-No, I didn't hear anything.

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-I think I heard a squeak.

-I can hear you.

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You are really hot on my heels, aren't you?

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Jamie, there could be trouble ahead.

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# There may be trouble ahead... #

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I'll say.

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-CLATTERING

-God, he's so noisy, isn't he?

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Charles, keep the noise down, please.

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-I'm trying to...

-I think there's thunder outside.

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It sounds like thunder!

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The storm clouds have parted on this side of the shop.

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Looks like Catherine's spotted something. Goody.

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I quite like this. What's this over here?

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-Oh, the clock and the manicure set.

-That's an unusual combination.

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This charming Edwardian mantle clock contains some tools

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for keeping your nails neat and tidy. How sweet.

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Want to have a look?

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And then you open it up and you've got....

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A set of manicure tools.

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It's priced at £35.

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To make something on this, I need it to be more like 15.

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-Can you do that, because it's a bit...?

-Mm...

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Could we split the difference and come in at 20?

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-OK, let's put that as a possibility.

-OK.

-Put that to one side,

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because I feel you have a lot more to offer here.

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One item put aside. And what's this?

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That's quite a nice old...

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railway sign. It's very heavy, be careful.

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-It is heavy, isn't it? Cast iron.

-Yes, cast iron.

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What is it? "Any person who omits to shut and fasten this gate

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"is liable to a penalty." That's a big lump, isn't it?

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Yes, it's quite nice.

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-Anyone for cricket?

-HE CHUCKLES

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Hey, careful, Catherine, or you'll be on a sticky wicket, love.

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That hefty railway sign had £48 on the ticket,

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but can Trev help with the heavy lifting?

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-I'm happy to let you have that for 15, if it helps.

-Are you? Right.

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Another item to set aside.

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And there really is no stopping Catherine this morning. Go, girl.

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This is nice.

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-Yeah, that's unusual, isn't it?

-Mm.

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Certainly is. Mid-20th century parasol

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embellished with a carved figure?

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Lovely.

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-The sticks are all good.

-There we are.

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Mm. Priced at £35.

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And once again, Catherine's not going to commit until she's finished browsing.

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Isn't this terribly bad luck to put that over your head?

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Oh, yeah, thanks. God, I don't need any more bad luck!

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I don't need any more.

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Charles, do you want an umbrella?

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I don't think he does, you know.

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He's found a promising pile of...something.

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They're good signs, aren't they?

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Wow.

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It's a collection of six enamel advertising signs from the early

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to the mid-20th century.

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Ticket price on the lot is a whopping £600.

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Dealer Jamie will try to contact the vendor to see if a deal can be struck, while Charles browses on.

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But elsewhere, Catherine has also nabbed Jamie's attention.

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Tell me about the bubble gum machine.

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It's very good. It takes 20p pieces.

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-You can use it as a money box, if you want to.

-Oh, you can use it?

-Yeah, you can use it.

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Oh, yes.

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Would be nicer if it was full of sweeties, though, heh?

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What you think? What you think, boys?

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-Talk to me.

-I think at the right price you could

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-make a profit on that.

-He would say that.

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It dates from the 1980s. Ticket price is £75.

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Can we say 25 and I won't go down any more?

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-OK.

-Can we?

-Yeah.

-I quite like this.

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-I'm going to shake your hand on that.

-OK.

-I'm going to say yes.

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-Yes to £25.

-OK.

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Crikey! Catherine bags the sweetest of discounts.

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And elsewhere Charles has espied something that piques HIS fancy.

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Carved African wooden mask.

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And it might... Actually, Catherine, how are you?

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Oi, Catherine, are you OK? I'm over here.

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When you've QUITE finished, Charles. Stop mucking about.

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The mask probably dates from 1900,

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and, as ever, Jamie's the man to assist.

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Could that be a very good price, Jamie?

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-I'm sure it could be.

-A very good price.

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I could have a look for you and let you know.

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I know it's priced at 95, but, if it has been here a while,

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would you be prepared to just get rid of it?

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I think so, yes.

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Jamie will check his books, to see what the mask could be.

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I've had a look what we paid for it...

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-Go on, Jamie, I'm going to read your mind...

-Go for it.

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-Go on, tell me.

-No, you read my mind. What did I say?

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-I think you might say about £30.

-I had £30 in mind.

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-No!

-There we go.

-Really?

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-It was £30.

-And that still gives you a profit?

-Yes.

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Lovely. That little "face-off" - ha-ha!

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means Charles finally has his first item.

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And now, the owner of all those signs is on the blower.

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What might he do if Charles takes all six?

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30 quid the lot?

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£400?

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-And that's the bottom?

-Better than the top.

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And after a final chat with Jamie...

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Take care, bye-bye, bye!

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So, if we both say together, the best price was...?

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380.

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It wasn't?!

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A terrific offer,

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but Charles still wants to keep his options open.

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I feel duty bound, just to get myself around

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the great landscape of Kent,

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just to make sure I don't unearth anything else...

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would you have an agreement to hold them?

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-Yep.

-And I will, either way, call you.

-Yep.

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Jamie, you are a gent.

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Charles has those on hold, and the mask in the bag.

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And he's heading off.

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Meanwhile, Catherine herself still has a heap of items set aside.

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The mantle clock-cum-manicure set,

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the railway signage and the mid-20th century parasol,

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which Trevor has had some word on.

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He's prepared to let you have that for £18.

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-18, OK.

-Mm.

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I can do the clock for 15 for you, if that helps.

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Right. So we've got 15 on the clock.

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Yes. And the railway sign...

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-We can do that for 15?

-I'll do it for 15.

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So that's...48.

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-48 for the three items.

-Yeah.

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I think that seems pretty good.

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Deal done, then, at £48 for the parasol, sign and clock,

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and Catherine also has the bubble gum machine she bought earlier as well.

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So, she's got a whopping four items in the bag for a total of £73,

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and she's finished here also.

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HE WHISTLES Nice flowers.

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Meanwhile, Charles is navigating the MGB through the B-roads of Kent

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en route to his next stop of the day.

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His destination is the town of Maidstone, and Kent Life Museum,

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where he's meeting volunteer Frances Madison Roberts.

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As you do.

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-Hello.

-Hello!

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I'm hoping you're Frances.

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-I am.

-Good to see you. Charles Hanson.

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-Hello, Charles.

-Isn't it gorgeous?

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It's absolutely lovely. You've got a nice day.

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Indeed they have.

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Charles is here to learn about a local industry which really put Kent

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on the map. Hop growing.

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From the 1500s right up to the mid-20th century,

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Kent was famous for its hop gardens, where this valuable plant was grown.

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Goodness me. There's a man on a huge pair of stilts.

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Hello, sir, how are you?

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-Hi, Charles.

-Hi.

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Yeah, I'm very well, thank you, how are you?

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You're almost up in the sky there. So what are you doing up there?

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We're stringing the hop garden.

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We're training the hops up these old strings, hop string, coconut string,

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and we're doing it the old, traditional way with the stilts.

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Our friend Tim - great name - is hopping back in time on his stilts,

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continuing a Kent tradition of hundreds of years.

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Frances is keen to show Charles more.

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-We're going into the hop garden. Here are our hops.

-Wow.

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We'll walk down an alley of the hop garden.

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Wow.

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The hop plant is cultivated for use in the brewing of beer,

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a staple of the British diet for many centuries.

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The hops add a lot of ale's most toothsome qualities.

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Well, the hop gives it clarity.

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It also gives it flavour, it gives it colour,

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it gives it aroma and it helps in the keeping life of the beer,

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-so it's very good.

-Why was it grown so well in Kent,

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and how did it all begin?

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Yes, well, they've always grown wild in the hedgerows,

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but it was the Flemish people coming over in the 16th century that

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introduced them to us and showed us how we could cultivate them to improve the beer.

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Because, prior to that, we just had ale,

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which wasn't a very good quality.

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And so they grew very well here.

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The soil is suitable, the climate is suitable.

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And there's a lot of possible labour force, because that's extremely

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important, because hops are very labour-intensive.

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So all that labour force required, where did they come from?

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Well, of course there were local people,

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who were very glad to come along,

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but also there were Londoners,

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people came down in droves.

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Whole streets of Londoners came down in the 20th century.

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Every September, these families would travel down

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from London to Kent for the annual hop harvest.

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And, they'd need somewhere to stay.

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Frances is taking Charles to see an example of a hopper's accommodation,

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dating from around 1900.

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So, hoppers' huts were allocated to each family, and

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if you were a good picker,

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then you would get the same hut year after year.

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So a whole family could stay in a hut?

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We understand that ten people could sleep in one hut.

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Gosh. Facilities were basic.

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But for many of the families who worked here,

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the hop harvest was a welcome break from city life.

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The air was much healthier,

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they were away from the smog and pollution of London, and also,

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people lived in very cramped conditions in London,

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so it wasn't that much of a culture shock.

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Once the hoppers had picked the harvest,

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the hops had to be dried to preserve them,

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a process that took place here in the oast house.

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The fresh hops were spread on the floor, which was heated by a kiln below.

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As they dried, they would need to be turned to make sure they dried

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evenly, so you can very gently turn...turn the hops.

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-May I have a go?

-Yes, please have a go.

-So they carefully...

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-Very carefully, that's right...

-Why so carefully?

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Well, you don't want to damage the hops, you don't want them to break up.

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As the 20th century progressed,

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new technologies replaced these traditional methods.

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But the modern fashion for small batch beer brewing has revived interest.

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What we have done is have a microbrewery make beer from our hops.

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That's wonderful. I almost feel like saying it's been thirsty work,

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Frances. I've really enjoyed learning about this handicraft of Kentish people.

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-Thank you so much for your time today, it's been great.

-It's been a pleasure.

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Meanwhile, Catherine's travelled on to the Kent town of Tenterden,

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where she's strolling into her next shop and meeting dealers Pam and Terry.

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-Hi there!

-Hello.

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-Hi. I'm Catherine. Very nice to meet you.

-Pam.

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Hi there.

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Hello.

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-I'm Terry.

-Hi, Terry.

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It's very calming over this part of the shop, with all the clocks ticking.

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It's all very peaceful.

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Doesn't take her long to spot something, though.

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Quite nice. So we've got a leather Georgian fire bucket.

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Copper around the top.

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And I like this sort of studded...

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That's quite nice, isn't it?

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1820s, '30s?

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It's in quite nice condition. People like these.

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As well they might. It's a real antique.

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But, at what price?

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How much is on it?

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138...

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138 on your bucket.

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We could do 110

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for you. It is an old Georgian one,

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-it's at least 200 years old.

-Yeah.

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I do like it. The ones that tend to do very well are the ones with,

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I think, really more the coats of arms on them.

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And ones that have...

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Aren't so worn. Because this is quite worn.

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It feels like it's almost...

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-It still holds water.

-Have you tested it?

-We have.

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But will this deal hold water?

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Would that be your best on that?

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I can do you £100.

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-Right.

-Catherine's tempted.

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I was so decisive this morning and I just went bang, bang, bang, bang.

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Four items. But then they weren't very much money.

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Now I'm spending most of my budget on one item.

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I just think £100...

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It's a lot of money, isn't it?

0:17:120:17:14

Do 90, then, but that would be the very best.

0:17:140:17:16

You think I should? What d'you think?

0:17:160:17:18

I think rustic, sort of shabby chic, I think it would do well.

0:17:180:17:22

-Do you think?

-Yeah.

0:17:220:17:25

Why not? I'm going to go for it.

0:17:250:17:27

-And 90 is your best price?

-Yeah.

-Yeah? OK.

0:17:280:17:31

-We'll shake on it.

-Thank you.

0:17:310:17:33

A gamble it is.

0:17:330:17:35

Catherine parts with the lion's share of her kitty for a venerable bucket,

0:17:350:17:40

leaving her with just over £50 left to spend, and that

0:17:400:17:43

daring buy brings us to the end of a jam-packed first day, so,

0:17:430:17:48

night-night, you two.

0:17:480:17:50

The morning sun finds them back in the MG, and raring to go.

0:17:520:17:57

You know, the sun has got his hat on today.

0:17:570:18:01

It's going to be a hip, hip, hip hooray.

0:18:010:18:03

And I can't wait. Yeah.

0:18:030:18:04

Gosh, Charles, you do have a way with words.

0:18:040:18:07

So far, Catherine has amassed five lots.

0:18:080:18:10

The parasol, the bubble gum machine, the clock-cum-manicure set,

0:18:100:18:14

the fire bucket and the railway sign.

0:18:140:18:16

She still has £50.76 to spend.

0:18:160:18:20

While Charles has been parsimonious by comparison,

0:18:220:18:26

buying only the African mask.

0:18:260:18:29

He still has £448.88.

0:18:290:18:32

So, he'd better get a wiggle on -

0:18:320:18:34

if he can stop that back-seat driving for five minutes.

0:18:340:18:38

Just always watch your brake when we go downhill.

0:18:380:18:41

-Just test your brakes, I would.

-I am!

0:18:410:18:43

-Does your horn work as well? On these tight bends, just...

-HORN TOOTS

0:18:430:18:46

That's it. Just always test your horn.

0:18:460:18:48

-My mum taught me that.

-Are you trying to teach me how to drive?

0:18:480:18:51

Don't aggravate Catherine, Charles, for heaven's sake.

0:18:510:18:55

They're nearly in the village of Headcorn.

0:18:550:18:57

I'm going to a place called...

0:18:570:18:59

-Is it Breakneck?

-What?

-Breakneck.

0:18:590:19:02

Headcorn! God, you are a handful this morning, Charles.

0:19:020:19:06

Catherine's dropping him off at his first shop.

0:19:060:19:09

She'll be pleased to have some peace and quiet.

0:19:090:19:12

Put your nose right in and then come out, come out.

0:19:130:19:16

-Charles, you and I...

-Come out, come out!

0:19:160:19:18

You're on the kerb. Keep going, don't stall.

0:19:180:19:21

-Charles!

-You've stalled the car!

-Charles!

-OK, I'm going to go.

0:19:210:19:24

I'm going to go now. I'll see you later.

0:19:240:19:26

-You are really getting on my nerves today!

-Sorry! I'm sorry.

0:19:260:19:28

Well, it's a bit heady in Headcorn, isn't it?

0:19:280:19:31

Drive carefully. See you later. Good luck.

0:19:310:19:33

Be careful. Bye.

0:19:340:19:37

-I'm so glad to be getting rid of you.

-Blow me a kiss.

0:19:370:19:39

-I'm so glad to be getting rid of you.

-Bye.

0:19:390:19:41

You do have a way with the girls, Charles.

0:19:410:19:44

Let's hope he can strike up an easier rapport with dealer Shirley.

0:19:440:19:48

-Shirley, good to see you.

-And you.

-It's nice to be here.

0:19:480:19:50

-Good.

-I like your antique shop. I'll go for a wander.

0:19:500:19:53

-OK.

-Thank you, Mrs...

0:19:530:19:56

-Just Shirley?

-Just Shirley.

-Just Shirley here in Kent.

-Not Mrs.

0:19:560:19:59

I like your style. We're friends in Kent. That's great.

0:19:590:20:02

-What's this?

-I'm always after a waistcoat,

0:20:060:20:10

because I enjoy wearing waistcoats. That's quite nice.

0:20:100:20:14

I mean, I quite like colour and it's got almost a bit of a Picasso, Cubism look.

0:20:140:20:19

But is a Cubist waistcoat really the thing for the sale room, Charles?

0:20:190:20:24

I've got to just...

0:20:240:20:26

I'm quite a broad guy, for the right reasons.

0:20:260:20:28

Modest, too.

0:20:280:20:30

Well, it fits OK...

0:20:300:20:31

I quite like this.

0:20:320:20:34

Fits perfectly. Goodness me. Can't really buy it for auction,

0:20:340:20:37

-I can't buy it myself.

-Suits you, sir!

0:20:370:20:40

When you've finished with the gents' outfitters routine, an item,

0:20:400:20:43

perhaps, that might sell at auction...

0:20:430:20:46

That's quite nice.

0:20:460:20:48

Isn't that pretty? Isn't that a beautiful shape?

0:20:480:20:50

It's so... So Art Deco.

0:20:500:20:53

So you. This part dinner service was made by Gray's,

0:20:530:20:57

a Staffordshire pottery maker founded in 1907.

0:20:570:20:59

But this set dates from the early 20th century.

0:21:010:21:04

Look at that, the design. That's got the lid...

0:21:040:21:06

Open it up,

0:21:080:21:10

and this sort of set just makes you feel happy.

0:21:100:21:12

That ladle. Because the colours are so vibrant,

0:21:130:21:17

the sun is shining in Kent, and importantly, I like this.

0:21:170:21:22

Ticket price is £45. Oh. Shirley...!

0:21:230:21:27

Shirley! You're a lady who's full of joy.

0:21:270:21:31

-Oh, thank you.

-On this sunny Kentish morning and...

0:21:310:21:33

to hopefully a man who's smiling today,

0:21:330:21:37

Shirley, and to keep my smile, what could be the best price on that?

0:21:370:21:41

I'll have to phone the dealer for you.

0:21:410:21:42

-Yeah.

-Just to make sure. But I'm sure we can do something.

-What are you thinking?

0:21:420:21:46

-What are you thinking?

-What am I thinking?

0:21:460:21:48

He's got 45... I don't know if he'd go as low as 30.

0:21:480:21:52

-That sounds good to me.

-Does that all right?

-Yeah.

0:21:520:21:55

Within a flash, Shirl the Pearl has the answer.

0:21:550:21:59

-I've spoken to the dealer.

-Full of Art Deco promise. Hit me.

0:21:590:22:01

-Yes, you can have it for 30.

-I'll take it. Thank you.

-Great.

0:22:010:22:04

I'll take it. That's one down. Fantastic. I'm delighted, Shirley.

0:22:040:22:07

And that's another tidy little buy for Charles.

0:22:070:22:11

Thank you, Shirl.

0:22:110:22:13

Thanks a lot, I'm very grateful.

0:22:130:22:14

-You're very welcome.

-See you, Shirley. Take care. Bye.

0:22:140:22:18

Now, Catherine already has five items in her old bag,

0:22:210:22:25

so she's galloped straight back to the town of Maidstone.

0:22:250:22:28

Cantered, actually. Where she seems to be horsing around.

0:22:290:22:32

Ha! Where did you get that wonderful conveyance, ma'am?

0:22:320:22:35

MUSIC: Galloping Home by Denis King

0:22:350:22:38

So, from classic car

0:22:380:22:41

to my carriage. This is even more classic.

0:22:410:22:44

Eat your heart out, Charles Hanson.

0:22:450:22:47

Crikey. In quite the correct style, she is heading

0:22:470:22:51

-for the Tyrwhitt-Drake Museum of Carriages.

-Thank you very much!

0:22:510:22:56

That was an amazing experience.

0:22:560:22:58

Thank you, thank you.

0:22:580:22:59

-You're welcome.

-Thank you, Wilbur and Buster.

0:22:590:23:01

Well done, boys.

0:23:010:23:03

Here she's meeting Maidstone Museum's director Victoria Barlow.

0:23:030:23:08

-Hi there.

-Hi.

-Victoria, very nice to meet you.

0:23:080:23:11

This place holds a collection of over 60 carriages.

0:23:120:23:15

It's a time capsule of the world when horsepower was really the thing.

0:23:160:23:21

We owe its existence today to its founder and namesake.

0:23:210:23:24

Who's our friend here then?

0:23:260:23:28

OK, so this is the reason that we're here, this is Garrard Tyrwhitt-Drake.

0:23:280:23:32

He was born in the 1880s, so very much a late Victorian,

0:23:320:23:37

but he came from a local brewing family, so very wealthy.

0:23:370:23:40

The reason he's important for this museum was that

0:23:400:23:43

after the end of the Second World War

0:23:430:23:45

he began to see that carriages had had their day.

0:23:450:23:48

Motorised vehicles were coming in, and he was quite aware of the fact that

0:23:480:23:52

a lot of the carriages that had been so popular and that he remembered so

0:23:520:23:56

fondly from his youth, were sitting in barns, rotting away,

0:23:560:24:00

and were never going to be used again and he wanted to save examples,

0:24:000:24:04

so that we would know what it was like.

0:24:040:24:07

The horse-drawn carriages he saved form the basis for the museum's

0:24:070:24:12

collection. They tell the story of coach and carriage evolution

0:24:120:24:16

down the ages - from the days

0:24:160:24:17

when carriage travel was only for the wealthy,

0:24:170:24:20

to the 19th century, when it opened up to ordinary people.

0:24:200:24:24

Well, this is quite an important carriage in the development of them.

0:24:240:24:27

This is a Clarence, also known as a growler,

0:24:270:24:31

because of the noise its wheels made on the floor.

0:24:310:24:33

This was one of the first carriages in the Victorian era,

0:24:330:24:36

when a normal middle-class family could buy a carriage

0:24:360:24:39

and take their family out in it.

0:24:390:24:41

This made carriage travel an option for the middle-class masses.

0:24:430:24:47

And they soon learned that they made perfect cabs for hire,

0:24:470:24:52

because you could get four people and some

0:24:520:24:54

luggage into the carriage,

0:24:540:24:57

so people started then renting them by the hour, and these became the first

0:24:570:25:01

-hackney carriages.

-Oh, really?

0:25:010:25:03

So where we get the name hackney carriages from today, for the London cabs?

0:25:030:25:06

The streets of Britain's cities teemed with carriages in their Victorian heyday,

0:25:060:25:11

but it didn't take long until carriage design

0:25:110:25:14

evolved along some more daring lines.

0:25:140:25:18

Victoria, this particular coach

0:25:180:25:20

looks structurally very different from what we've seen downstairs.

0:25:200:25:25

What's happened here is we've had a shift from having your driver upfront

0:25:250:25:30

driving you while you sit in comfort at the back.

0:25:300:25:32

This is actually an owner-driver vehicle, so you drive yourself.

0:25:320:25:37

It meant that it became very popular with young men who liked speed.

0:25:370:25:41

So this was, you know, the sort of sports car of its day.

0:25:410:25:45

You would get up, set off, possibly with a friend,

0:25:450:25:49

but essentially it was for the young, the daring, the need for speed.

0:25:490:25:54

MUSIC: William Tell Overture by Rossini

0:25:540:25:56

Boy racers might have been a hazard even in the 19th century,

0:25:560:25:59

but Victoria also wants to show Catherine another carriage that really typified the age.

0:25:590:26:05

Giddy up.

0:26:050:26:07

This is lovely and open, this one, isn't it?

0:26:070:26:09

It is. This is a Victoria.

0:26:090:26:11

This was named after the Queen, Queen Victoria,

0:26:110:26:14

who very much popularised carriages as a way of being seen by a crowd.

0:26:140:26:19

So a lot of the carriages we looked at downstairs

0:26:190:26:22

had doors and window blinds that you could pull, so you could ride in privacy.

0:26:220:26:25

This carriage is all designed to show off.

0:26:250:26:28

-"Look at me."

-Indeed.

0:26:280:26:30

So when you are going out to an event,

0:26:300:26:32

perhaps to the races or to a picnic,

0:26:320:26:34

and you've paid a fortune for your beautiful dress,

0:26:340:26:37

you want people to see it.

0:26:370:26:39

So you could fold the roof back down and the sides are cut away very low.

0:26:390:26:43

And obviously for the Queen, that was important so her subjects could see her.

0:26:430:26:46

As the 20th century dawned,

0:26:480:26:50

motorised transport started to usurp the carriage,

0:26:500:26:54

but these still have an elegance and romance all of their own.

0:26:540:26:57

Well, I have to say it's been wonderful.

0:26:580:27:01

Now my carriage awaits. And I have to head off.

0:27:010:27:04

-Thank you so much, Victoria, thank you.

-Take care.

-Bye-bye.

0:27:040:27:08

You could get too used to this, Catherine.

0:27:090:27:11

Right, we're off again.

0:27:110:27:13

Walk on, as they say.

0:27:130:27:15

Meanwhile, Charles has motored on to the town of Faversham...

0:27:220:27:25

where he's sauntering off into his next shop.

0:27:250:27:28

Andy's in charge here today.

0:27:300:27:32

-Hello there.

-Hello!

0:27:350:27:36

-How are you?

-I'm fine.

0:27:360:27:39

True to form, Charles doesn't take long to spot a possible.

0:27:390:27:43

I just came past, and in the window, I've seen something already.

0:27:430:27:47

-May I show you?

-Yeah, please do.

-Follow me. Just in the window.

0:27:470:27:50

It's this revolving cabinet here.

0:27:500:27:53

Here they are.

0:27:530:27:54

-Aren't they wonderful?

-They're lovely.

0:27:540:27:56

-Are they yours?

-They are, sir.

0:27:560:27:59

-They could be yours.

-Aren't they gorgeous?

0:27:590:28:02

They are a pair of decorative cut steel shoe buckles,

0:28:020:28:06

which Charles thinks may date from as early as the 18th century,

0:28:060:28:10

and I think he's right.

0:28:100:28:11

So, you'd put them on like that, wouldn't you, in the day?

0:28:110:28:15

That's it, yes.

0:28:150:28:17

So... Maybe a Georgian gent, and don't my shoes look better now?

0:28:170:28:21

-They do, they look beautiful.

-They're just stunning.

0:28:210:28:25

Oh - stand lively.

0:28:250:28:26

I quite like them.

0:28:260:28:28

-Right.

-They're decorative and quite refined...

0:28:280:28:31

Ticket price on these handsome accoutrements is £150.

0:28:320:28:36

But what might be Andy's bottom line?

0:28:360:28:39

Well, I would like...

0:28:410:28:43

To be honest, I'd like about 80.

0:28:430:28:44

It's almost half price.

0:28:440:28:47

So you're hopefully telling me that they didn't cost you too much.

0:28:470:28:50

-They didn't, no.

-Oh, good. OK.

0:28:500:28:53

Andy IS good to you, Charles.

0:28:550:28:58

Could you go a bit less, do you think?

0:28:580:28:59

A little bit less, yeah.

0:28:590:29:01

-Which would be?

-70.

0:29:010:29:04

I almost feel like saying you're an odd and I'm an even.

0:29:040:29:08

-Right.

-Odd and even.

0:29:080:29:10

And I wonder if you could be an even-steven and meet me at £60.

0:29:100:29:13

-Go on, then.

-Are you sure?

0:29:150:29:16

-Yeah.

-Does that leave you...?

0:29:160:29:18

It still gives me a profit, yeah, absolutely.

0:29:180:29:20

-Say that again to me.

-It leaves me a bit of a profit.

0:29:200:29:22

And that's a deal.

0:29:220:29:24

-Done. Sold. Thanks a lot.

-Thank you.

-Appreciate it.

0:29:240:29:26

That's one more item bagged, but Charles is still on the hunt.

0:29:270:29:31

Mm... Do be careful, won't you, Charles?

0:29:340:29:37

You can be accident-prone.

0:29:370:29:40

Uh-oh, there he goes again.

0:29:400:29:41

Quite like this vase down here.

0:29:410:29:44

Hello, vase.

0:29:440:29:46

"Hello, Charles!"

0:29:460:29:47

And that landscape is quite unusual, and the gilding is good.

0:29:470:29:52

Charles is gently tapping the vase on his teeth

0:29:520:29:55

to check for the sound of any repairs.

0:29:550:29:57

Sounds OK - and you do have to have your own teeth.

0:29:570:30:00

It's a piece of Carlton Ware, probably dating from the 1920s.

0:30:000:30:03

No good with falsies.

0:30:030:30:05

My only concern is, on the actual label, it says "£15 RIP".

0:30:050:30:11

-Andy?

-Yes?

-Excuse me, come hither.

0:30:110:30:14

-Over here. I'm waiting.

-I'm admiring your vase.

0:30:140:30:16

-Thank you.

-It says "£15 RIP".

0:30:160:30:20

Now, all I can think of, RIP, is "Rest in peace", Charles.

0:30:200:30:22

-Absolutely. Charles.

-What does RIP mean?

0:30:220:30:25

It's actually the dealer's initial.

0:30:250:30:27

-Oh, is it?

-It's actually RP. Yeah.

-Oh, RP. That's OK.

0:30:270:30:30

So that's that mystery solved.

0:30:300:30:34

I like it. Best price?

0:30:340:30:35

-13?

-I was hoping you might say it could be Hanson's den - number...?

0:30:350:30:40

-Ten.

-12...

0:30:400:30:42

I would happily take this vase for a tenner, because I think for £10

0:30:420:30:45

-it's decorative. Put it there.

-Yeah, go on.

-£10?

0:30:450:30:48

-Sold!

-Good man.

-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah, fine.

0:30:480:30:53

That's yet another deal sealed. Good man.

0:30:530:30:56

Now, Catherine's strolled to her next shop, which is...

0:31:000:31:04

oh, very unusual.

0:31:040:31:06

-Hello.

-Hi there.

-Catherine. Hi. Very nice to meet you.

0:31:060:31:10

-I'm David.

-Hi, David. Now, this is a bit of an odd one.

0:31:100:31:13

Certainly is. With the bubble gum machine she bought earlier in mind,

0:31:130:31:17

Catherine wants to buy some sweeties to fill it up in order to set it off

0:31:170:31:20

best at the auction.

0:31:200:31:22

Sweetie salesman David here is just the man to help.

0:31:220:31:25

Just hope she doesn't try and get some money knocked off.

0:31:250:31:27

Yeah, they're nice, aren't they?

0:31:270:31:29

But what will this monster bag of sweeties set Catherine back?

0:31:290:31:34

As it's you, how about we call it a fiver?

0:31:340:31:36

Oh, you are wonderful.

0:31:360:31:39

-We are...

-As long as you don't eat them all yourself.

0:31:390:31:41

No. I'm really tempted though, I have to say.

0:31:410:31:43

And with that irregular last purchase, she's all bought up.

0:31:430:31:47

Thank you, bye-bye!

0:31:470:31:49

But Charles is back in Faversham, and in a quandary.

0:31:500:31:53

Remember the set of six metal signs he reserved yesterday?

0:31:530:31:57

The last quote on the signs was £380.

0:31:570:32:00

The problem is, Charles no longer has that much cash.

0:32:000:32:03

Oh, Gawd, we've seen this before.

0:32:030:32:04

But I've still got £348 left.

0:32:070:32:10

So it's now that quandary -

0:32:100:32:12

do I call up the shop I went to yesterday

0:32:120:32:16

and see if I can buy for 348?

0:32:160:32:19

What do you think, sir? What do you think?

0:32:190:32:23

OK. He says phone a friend.

0:32:250:32:27

Time to give the dealer, Jamie, a tinkle, I think.

0:32:270:32:30

Let's go for it.

0:32:300:32:33

Thanks ever so much, I'll buy them. Thanks a lot. Cheers. All the best.

0:32:330:32:37

Bye-bye, cheers, bye-bye. Bye.

0:32:370:32:39

Well, from having a full kitty,

0:32:390:32:42

I'm now down to nothing. I've bought the signs for £348.

0:32:420:32:46

I'm banking on a whole load of rusty old tin plate signs,

0:32:460:32:51

which could be dangerous. But he who dares wins, as they say.

0:32:510:32:55

Who says? The SAS, and Del Boy!

0:32:550:32:59

And so, that concludes the shopping.

0:32:590:33:02

Charles has bagged the African tribal mask, the Carlton Ware vase,

0:33:020:33:05

the part-dinner service and the metal shoe buckles,

0:33:050:33:07

as well as the set of six signs,

0:33:070:33:09

which he plans to sell in three separate lots.

0:33:090:33:12

He spent £478 exactly. That's spunk, isn't it?

0:33:120:33:17

While Catherine has the Georgian fire bucket, the manicure set-cum-clock,

0:33:190:33:23

the vintage railway sign, the bubble gum machine -

0:33:230:33:26

freshly filled with sweeties - and the parasol.

0:33:260:33:29

She spent £168 exactly.

0:33:290:33:32

That shows some more spunk.

0:33:320:33:34

But what on earth do they make of each other's lots?

0:33:340:33:36

Not much, I fancy.

0:33:360:33:38

I love her bubble gum dispenser.

0:33:380:33:40

For £25, it's cheap.

0:33:400:33:43

It might go pop at auction, and it might blow up the room and make a fortune. I hope not.

0:33:430:33:48

Charles loves those little Georgian shoe buckles, and they are lovely,

0:33:480:33:52

especially being in their fitted case, but, do people really want those?

0:33:520:33:57

Do people really buy those? Who knows? Time will tell.

0:33:570:34:01

On this leg, they began their buying in Chart Sutton, Kent,

0:34:040:34:08

and are now heading for some selling in Bourne End in Buckinghamshire.

0:34:080:34:12

Bourne End. Bourne End beckons.

0:34:130:34:15

-I think it's this way.

-It had better be...

0:34:150:34:18

Could it be the END for you in Bourne END?

0:34:180:34:22

I might be born again in the end!

0:34:220:34:24

DEEP VOICE: Now...

0:34:240:34:25

this is not the end, it is not even the beginning of the end.

0:34:250:34:30

Now, that's a quote. Time to get inside.

0:34:300:34:34

MUSIC DROWNS SPEECH

0:34:340:34:35

Our auctioneer today is Simon Brown.

0:34:350:34:37

Before the off, what does he make of our lots?

0:34:370:34:40

The late 1970s, early '80s bubble gum machine, it's quirky.

0:34:420:34:47

The pair of Georgian shoe buckles, very collectable,

0:34:470:34:50

quite sought after and quite rare,

0:34:500:34:52

so I'm looking forward to selling those.

0:34:520:34:55

The sale's about to begin. Starting positions, please.

0:34:550:34:59

First up, it's Catherine's parasol.

0:35:020:35:05

-20 I'm bid.

-Well done.

0:35:050:35:07

20 in the room.

0:35:070:35:08

-You built it up.

-It's moving. Hold tight.

0:35:080:35:10

-Online, he's got.

-25 now.

0:35:100:35:13

Really disappointed.

0:35:130:35:15

It's a profit, if not a huge one.

0:35:150:35:19

-Don't smile.

-I'm not.

-Don't smile.

0:35:190:35:22

-Be sad for me.

-You made 700 pence.

0:35:220:35:28

Nothing to be sniffed at.

0:35:280:35:29

Now, it's Charles's African mask.

0:35:290:35:32

40 I'm bid. Got you. 40. Yours at 40.

0:35:340:35:37

42. 45. 47. 50. 55.

0:35:370:35:40

60. 65?

0:35:400:35:43

That's good. £20 profit.

0:35:430:35:45

I thought you'd make more than that.

0:35:450:35:47

Selling at 60. Are we all done?

0:35:470:35:49

On my right, thank you.

0:35:490:35:51

That's a nice winner to start him off.

0:35:510:35:52

Had a nice colour, had a nice glow, like you.

0:35:520:35:56

-Colour?

-Nice colour and glow.

0:35:560:35:57

Didn't have colour, it was wooden.

0:35:570:35:59

The bubble gum machine filled with sweets is next

0:35:590:36:02

to take a pop at some profit.

0:36:020:36:04

Nice stylish little piece there.

0:36:040:36:07

-With sweets.

-Who'll start me at £30, please, for this lot?

0:36:070:36:10

-30 I'm bid.

-Well done.

-Yours at 30.

0:36:100:36:12

Have we all done at 30? 32.

0:36:120:36:14

35. 37. 40.

0:36:140:36:16

-42.

-Good.

-45.

0:36:160:36:18

-Well done.

-Shhh!

-55.

0:36:180:36:20

60. 65. 70?

0:36:200:36:21

-65 in the room.

-Yes!

-Selling at 65.

0:36:210:36:26

Are you all done at 65,

0:36:260:36:27

we all done?

0:36:270:36:29

-Ohh...

-That blew a big bubble.

0:36:290:36:31

Ooh-hoo! And it's another winner for her.

0:36:310:36:34

-It had a style.

-Nah-nah, nah-nah-nah!

0:36:340:36:37

I can be childish.

0:36:370:36:38

You certainly can.

0:36:380:36:40

Next up is Charles's little Carlton Ware vase.

0:36:400:36:43

-Rouge Royale.

-Ten to start.

0:36:430:36:45

-£10 anybody interested?

-Could be in trouble.

0:36:450:36:47

Ten for the Carlton Ware vase.

0:36:470:36:48

-Oh, I say.

-Go on, sell it for a fiver.

0:36:480:36:50

Go on, it would be hilarious.

0:36:500:36:52

-Fiver?

-£5, anybody?

0:36:520:36:55

-That's not me bidding. I'm not bidding.

-Thank you very much.

0:36:550:36:57

£5. We are struggling.

0:36:570:37:00

£5 now.

0:37:000:37:02

-Hello!

-Are we all done at £5?

0:37:020:37:04

Selling at five. Just behind, now.

0:37:040:37:07

-I told you that was horrible.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:37:070:37:10

So the rivalry's really ramping up.

0:37:110:37:14

Somebody has bought a wonderful bargain, and I commend them for very good taste.

0:37:140:37:19

One more chance for Catherine now,

0:37:210:37:23

as her mantle clock, concealing a manicure set, meets the room.

0:37:230:37:28

20 I'm bid. Yours at 20,

0:37:280:37:30

-are we all done?

-Good. Profit.

0:37:300:37:32

-Oh, shush.

-25, 27...

0:37:320:37:34

30. £27 now.

0:37:340:37:37

It's good. Doubling up.

0:37:370:37:38

-30. 32.

-Double...

-Charles, will you be quiet?

0:37:380:37:41

-You've doubled up.

-Selling at 30,

0:37:410:37:42

yours at 30. Are we all done at 30?

0:37:420:37:44

-I've not finished yet.

-30, are we all done now?

0:37:440:37:47

Did you buy it?

0:37:480:37:50

-Did you buy it?

-Me? No, I didn't buy it.

0:37:500:37:52

The guy behind you.

0:37:520:37:53

Thanks to the chap behind, she's nailed a winner there.

0:37:530:37:57

Next, Charles's six metal advertising signs,

0:37:590:38:01

which he's split into three separate lots, each costing him £116.

0:38:010:38:06

Here's the first.

0:38:060:38:09

We all done at 75 in the room now?

0:38:090:38:12

And now, the next lot of signs.

0:38:120:38:15

Selling at 130 now.

0:38:150:38:17

And the final sign is...

0:38:170:38:19

95 now on the net. Selling at 95.

0:38:190:38:21

-One more.

-You don't need any more money. I do.

0:38:210:38:25

Are we all done?

0:38:250:38:27

Altogether, those three lots LOST - ha! - £48. Bad luck, Charles.

0:38:270:38:33

I wish you'd have put them all together in one lot

0:38:330:38:36

and then you would have had even more losses.

0:38:360:38:38

And that would have been good for me.

0:38:380:38:39

It's the battle of the signage now

0:38:390:38:42

as Catherine's railway specimen is up.

0:38:420:38:46

£10 I'm bid. Got you at ten.

0:38:460:38:48

12. 14. 16.

0:38:480:38:49

-18. 16. 16 seated.

-Doubled up...

0:38:490:38:51

-Selling at 16. All done.

-It's good.

0:38:510:38:53

-No, it's not.

-16. 18. 20.

0:38:530:38:56

22. 25. 27.

0:38:560:38:59

30. 32. 35?

0:38:590:39:01

-It's amazing.

-Ooh.

-£32 now.

0:39:010:39:03

-I thought we were on a roll, then.

-You've flown.

0:39:030:39:05

-You all done at 32? On my right.

-Internet might have come in on that.

0:39:050:39:08

-That's puffed and huffed like a train.

-That was my steam train.

0:39:080:39:11

Like a loco, and you really moved, baby.

0:39:110:39:14

That did, indeed, puff its way to a nice little profit.

0:39:140:39:18

-I'm building up slowly.

-You are.

-As I say, I'm getting there.

0:39:180:39:21

Now, Charles's Art Deco-style dinner service.

0:39:210:39:25

-80, then, to start.

-Go on.

-Anybody interested?

0:39:250:39:28

60, then, to start. 60.

0:39:280:39:29

-Nobody interested?

-Oh, no.

-60.

0:39:290:39:32

We're coming down. 50? Anybody interested?

0:39:320:39:35

40.

0:39:350:39:37

30?

0:39:370:39:38

LAUGHTER

0:39:380:39:40

-30?

-Ten!

-20?

0:39:400:39:42

It's a full room. 20.

0:39:420:39:44

Someone feels sorry for you.

0:39:440:39:45

20, I've got you at 20.

0:39:450:39:47

Don't worry, Charles!

0:39:470:39:49

Don't worry. Don't worry.

0:39:490:39:50

-It's a disaster.

-Hammer down!

0:39:500:39:52

-At 20...

-Gavel down!

0:39:520:39:54

-Shove it down.

-At £20...

0:39:540:39:55

-Help!

-At £20 on the back wall...

0:39:550:39:57

-Shut up!

-At £20 now...

-He doesn't need any help!

0:39:570:40:00

Selling at 20, are we all done?

0:40:000:40:02

-Yay!

-LAUGHTER

0:40:020:40:05

Did that hurt, Charles?

0:40:060:40:08

-Yes...

-Did that really hurt? Good.

0:40:080:40:11

No need to gloat, Catherine, though that was an unlucky loss.

0:40:110:40:16

THEY LAUGH

0:40:160:40:19

The final lot now for Catherine.

0:40:190:40:21

Her leather fire bucket might just ignite some interest.

0:40:210:40:25

Pretty one...

0:40:250:40:26

-It is pretty.

-Pretty?

0:40:260:40:28

£50, please, for this lot.

0:40:280:40:29

50. 40, then, to start.

0:40:290:40:31

Good bucket there at 40. 40 I'm bid.

0:40:310:40:33

-Come on!

-40, yours at 40. 42 now...

0:40:330:40:36

Yours at 42. 45 - with me at 45...

0:40:360:40:40

-Oh, I really need...

-Are you all done at 45?

0:40:400:40:42

With me at 45. We all done now?

0:40:420:40:45

Ooh-hoo! That went up in smoke.

0:40:450:40:48

But importantly, Catherine, you had a passion for it.

0:40:480:40:52

I don't know if I did, actually.

0:40:520:40:54

Well, you don't any more.

0:40:540:40:57

Our very last lot now, Charles's Georgian cut steel shoe buckles.

0:40:570:41:02

These are rather pretty...

0:41:020:41:04

-Pretty?

-Pretty, dainty.

0:41:040:41:06

Who'll start me at £100, please, for this lot?

0:41:060:41:09

100 I'm bid. Got you. 100.

0:41:090:41:11

110. 120. 130...

0:41:110:41:13

-They're worth all of this.

-How do you do that?

0:41:130:41:16

150. 160.

0:41:160:41:17

170. 180. 190. 200. 200.

0:41:170:41:21

-Lordy!

-220...

0:41:210:41:22

-Charles!

-240. 260.

0:41:220:41:25

280. 300. 320.

0:41:250:41:28

340. 360. 380. 400.

0:41:280:41:31

They dance away like a man in a fine pair of shoes.

0:41:310:41:35

-I'm absolutely...

-They're wonderful.

0:41:350:41:37

At 420. Got you at 420.

0:41:370:41:39

Yours at 420...

0:41:390:41:42

Did they have diamonds?!

0:41:420:41:43

They were stunning. They were completely...

0:41:430:41:45

Did they have diamonds on them?

0:41:450:41:46

Diamonds are a girl's best friend, baby. Give us a kiss.

0:41:460:41:50

Ha-ha! And buckles are a boy's, it seems.

0:41:500:41:54

That's a stunning profit for Charles, and with it,

0:41:540:41:57

he absolutely steals the day.

0:41:570:42:00

Catherine began this leg with £213.76.

0:42:010:42:05

After auction costs, she made an unfortunate loss of £6.46,

0:42:050:42:11

leaving her now with £207.30.

0:42:110:42:15

While Charles started with £478.88.

0:42:170:42:22

After costs, he made a monster profit of £182.10.

0:42:220:42:27

So, he now has £660.98.

0:42:270:42:31

Well done, Charles.

0:42:320:42:34

Next sale is mine.

0:42:340:42:36

Well, you never know. You're on my away patch now - well, my home patch.

0:42:360:42:39

-Let's go.

-Let's go.

-Seat belts on.

0:42:390:42:43

And on to the next leg.

0:42:430:42:45

ENGINE REVS

0:42:450:42:47

-Woo-hoo!

-Careful!

-Sorry, Catherine...

0:42:470:42:50

Now we're off.

0:42:500:42:52

Are we in the right gear?

0:42:520:42:53

Beep, beep!

0:42:530:42:55

-Ooh!

-THEY LAUGH

0:42:560:42:59

Cheerio.

0:42:590:43:01

On the next Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:010:43:03

Charles and Catherine are getting on swimmingly.

0:43:030:43:05

Don't you feel in our week thus far

0:43:050:43:07

-we've grown quite close together?

-No.

0:43:070:43:09

As they do their best to catch the bargains.

0:43:090:43:11

Ooh! Let's throw them around.

0:43:110:43:13

I caught it almost. I almost caught it...

0:43:130:43:16

Charles Hanson and Catherine Southon go on an antiques adventure around Kent before heading to an auction in Buckinghamshire. Catherine ditches the classic car in favour of travelling by horse and cart. Charles takes a detour from antiques buying to learn about the centuries-old Kentish tradition of hop growing, and he meets a man on stilts. A pair of rare 18th-century shoe buckles gets Charles really excited, while Catherine finds a most unusual manicure set, and it is a nail-biting finish when the antiques go under the gavel.


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