Episode 3 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 3

Charles Hanson and Catherine Southon travel around Warwickshire. Catherine finds a French copper and brass letter holder, while Charles goes for a charming oak chair.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts, with £200 each...

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I want something shiny.

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..a classic car... HORN TOOTS

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and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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I like a rummage!

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I can't resist.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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Why do I always do this to myself?!

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There'll be worthy winners.

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Give us a kiss!

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And valiant losers.

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Come on, stick 'em up!

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So, will it be the high road to glory...

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Onwards and upwards!

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..or the slow road to disaster?

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Take me home!

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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On this third leg of the road trip,

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we're in some Tudor towns in Warwickshire,

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with the king and queen of the antiques trade,

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Catherine Southon and Charles Hanson.

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He's the king, she's the queen.

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We are in Middle England.

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Welcome to what I would call the home of heritage.

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It is beautiful round here.

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Catherine started her career at one of London's top auction houses,

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and still deals with a straight-talking logic and acumen,

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as you would expect.

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-B&W.

-B&W?

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-Black and white.

-Yeah?

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Black and white timber-frame cottages.

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I love the way, Charles, you talk in riddles,

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you make absolutely no sense whatsoever.

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Quite!

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While Charles runs a Derbyshire saleroom with his trademark passion

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for all things antiquated and archaic.

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And chaotic and really rather lovely.

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This area is renowned for black and white timber-frame cottages,

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Anne Hathaway's,

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Shakespeare's...

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Ah, to be or not to be.

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With our bards of buying starting off with £200,

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Catherine now has £207.30...

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..while Charles has proved himself a true titan of trading,

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having accumulated £660.98.

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He learned everything from me.

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How much have you got? You've got thousands!

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Oh, get out of here! I've got...tens of pounds.

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Today they're driving a green goddess,

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this 1981 MGB GT,

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which they're calling Meg, as you do.

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Are you with us, Meg? She's with us.

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Well, you wouldn't be going very far if she wasn't, would you? Ha!

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On this whole road trip,

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Catherine and Charles began in southern England

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before wending their way up the country,

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journeying several hundred miles.

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They'll finally finish up in Congleton in Cheshire.

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On this leg, they start off in the Warwickshire village of Long Marston

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and aim for auction in Newport, Shropshire.

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But what might be their dream buys on this leg, eh?

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See, I don't have sweet dreams any more on the road trip,

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-I have nightmares.

-Get out of here!

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Wondering what else you're going to buy!

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It's treasure hunting, it's like my hobby of metal detecting.

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-You can't guarantee...

-You don't do metal detecting!

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As a young boy, what got me into treasure hunting...

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-SHE LAUGHS

-..was metal detecting,

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I love it. What's so funny?!

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SHE MIMICS DETECTOR BLEEPING

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Let's hope they can both find something that glitters

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as they head for their first shops,

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and, having dropped Charles off,

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Catherine's striding towards her first destination.

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Ooh, hello!

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-Good morning.

-Hi, I'm Catherine, very nice to meet you.

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Pleasantries over, time to shop.

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But what's this chapeau, then?

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That...

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is amazing.

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It's a beautiful dancer's headdress.

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I have to try this on.

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It's actually not as heavy as I thought it was going to be.

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Oh, you are the queen, indeed, the pearly queen!

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What's the price? I don't even want to look.

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395.

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I'm nowhere near this.

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Well, that's clear out of your budget, then.

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But this little joker looks cheaper and interesting.

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Oh, now, that's cute, look at that!

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It's in terrible condition.

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Wow, I love that!

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I love it!

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It's a miniature model of a sedan chair,

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a type of box in which a small seat or cabin

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would be carried by servants or horses. Hm!

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This one might have been used as a display case

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and probably dates from the 19th century.

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Dealer Laura owns this little curiosity.

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Obviously, we've got a stain on the top.

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What is your very, very best on that?

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You've got 88 on it.

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I could do it for 50.

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I don't think I'd spend any more than 40, to be honest.

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-Would you be willing to...

-You couldn't go to 45?

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45...

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45, yeah, that's a possibility, yeah.

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-Can I put that on the back burner?

-Course you can.

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Well, I wouldn't burn it, exactly.

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Anything else?

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This I'm kind of drawn towards.

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A copper letter rack, yes. It does have a maker's mark on it.

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This copper and brass letter rack also hails from France,

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where Laura sources a lot of her stock.

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The ticket price on that is £55.

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What could that be?

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I could do that one for...

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30.

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I think I'd want to be more around 20 on that, to be honest.

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Could we meet in the middle, 25?

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Shall we see again?

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Cos we've got this, with the sedan chair...

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With two items reserved, time for a peek outside.

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How much is the Belfast sink?

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Oh, do you know, I can't remember, I think it's 40-something,

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but that can be cheap.

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Cheap, you say, Laura?

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That's music to Road Trippers' ears!

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But let's not rush to a decision, eh, Catherine?

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Have a tea, love!

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Meanwhile, Charles has raced onwards

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to the multistorey town of Stratford-upon-Avon.

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Stratford was Shakespeare's old stomping ground.

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Here, Charles is aiming towards Stratford Antiques Centre,

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and dealer Raymond.

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To be or not to be, Ray?

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Good morning!

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Hello, good morning, sir.

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-Your name is...

-Raymond.

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It is great to be here in Stratford.

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Indeed it is.

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And just as Charles has come through the door,

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Raymondo already has a little item he's keen to show him.

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Raymond's got all these wonderful jades,

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all these wonderful Chinese porcelains.

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But this is not Chinese.

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But Raymond has got a fairly interesting Bohemian,

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-continental, could be German...

-Oh!

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Could be a French porcelain plaque.

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-Let's get it out, Ray.

-Have a look.

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Pretty, isn't it? Is it on porcelain?

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-Yes!

-Are you sure about that?

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Yeah, because there's some marks at the back.

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So what we've got here, it appears to be, what...?

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Madonna and child? It's a religious scene, isn't it?

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Yes.

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This little plaque appears to bear the mark of the German ceramics firm

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Meissen, the very first European manufacturer to create porcelain

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in 1708, a skill previously only held in East Asia.

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But Charles thinks something about this is a bit suspicious,

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and I think he's right.

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It carries a mock Meissen mark.

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-OK.

-So it's an imitation of Meissen.

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And this was made in Germany, probably around 1880.

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-OK.

-I like it, I like it a lot.

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That will need further investigation,

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but it's still an attractive 19th century lump.

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What's your best price on that?

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-50.

-15? £15 sounds good to me.

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Not 15, 50!

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-Oh, say again?

-50! Five zero.

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-Oh! Sorry, sorry!

-RAY LAUGHS

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Put him down, Charles.

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-I'm tempted.

-OK.

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What would be your best price?

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-30 for you.

-30?

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You wouldn't do a bit more at all, would you, no?

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Because to me it's probably worth between £20 and £40.

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OK.

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-25's rock bottom.

-OK.

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It's so early, I'm...

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not even sparked up yet.

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£25, I'm going to say, well, life is too short, I'll take it.

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Deal done at £25.

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Thank you, Raymondo!

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Back in Long Marston,

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Catherine's been busy negotiating for the miniature sedan chair,

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French letter rack,

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and Belfast sink.

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What a mixture!

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Dealer Laura's suggesting £85 for the three.

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Catherine?!

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Could we do 75 for the three, rather than 85?

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No, but I could go to 80.

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-OK, OK, shall we do that?

-Yeah.

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-Are you happy with that?

-I am.

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-We'll go on that.

-Thank you.

-Right.

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Magnifique, eh?

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Catherine has bagged the sedan chair for £35,

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the letter rack for 30

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and the sink for 15.

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-Lovely to meet you.

-Nice to meet you too.

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And carry on buying en francais.

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-We will!

-Au revoir!

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-Au revoir!

-Au revoir!

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In Stratford, Charles is still on the hunt,

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and helped by dealer Raymond.

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And what's this he's stumbled upon?

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An early footman.

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A footman was used for keeping plates or food or wine warm

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in front of a dining-room fire.

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Handy.

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-Raymond?

-Hello, yeah?

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What's your best price on this footman?

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The price tag is 58.

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-That's a lot.

-I can do...

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-38.

-Oh, you can't!

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Oh, he can do anything.

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-The really important thing is to determine its age.

-Mm.

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So I'm hoping this might just be late 18th century,

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because I say so... but I might be wrong!

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He's keen, but what about the price?

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Would you take 30 for it?

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OK, 30, then.

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Done, thank you very much, that's great.

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Cor, things are hotting up.

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Another deal in the bag. Thank you, Raymondo.

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See you!

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Now, Catherine's enjoying the quiet of a drive

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without Charles in the car.

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When he's here driving, he's just...

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SHE BLATHERS

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He's so on all the time, talking, he doesn't stop.

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She's motoring on to the ancient town of Warwick.

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Being a lover of historical intrigue,

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she's keen to spend a tranquil afternoon

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exploring one of the area's best kept secrets.

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She's heading for the Lord Leycester Hospital

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and meeting its master, Lieutenant Colonel Gerald Lesinski.

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-Hello there!

-How do you do?

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Catherine, hi. Nice to meet you.

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-And you.

-This is quite a spectacular building, isn't it?

-It is.

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These medieval structures house an ancient charitable institution,

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but although it's a hospital,

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you won't find any doctors or nurses here.

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The word "hospital" is used in its ancient sense,

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where it meant a shelter, a refuge.

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We became a hospital, a shelter, a refuge,

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a retirement home for old soldiers, old warriors,

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445 years ago.

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And the hospital is still a home for retired service people

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to this very day.

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It owes its centuries of existence

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to a nobleman of the 16th century Elizabethan period,

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Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester.

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He was a friend of Queen Elizabeth,

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a close friend of Queen Elizabeth.

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-Oh!

-A very, very close friend of Queen Elizabeth.

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-Say no more!

-Lived up the road in Kenilworth.

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-Right.

-And at the time, there was a problem with people like me.

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I was a soldier for 35 years.

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Back in those days,

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if you were disabled in the service of the Queen,

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there was no pension or resettlement schemes,

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so old warriors often became beggars or vagrants,

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and a general pain in the backside to normal law-abiding citizens,

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who complained to the Queen.

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And she let it be known

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she expected her noblemen to do something about it,

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and so Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester,

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one of her close associates,

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decided that he would. And so in 1571,

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he took over these old guild buildings,

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and here he established his shelter, his refuge.

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The hospital was first established to house 12 retired soldiers

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known as brothers, presided over by one master,

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the role that the Lieutenant Colonel takes today.

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It might not be the most famous British institution

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for ex-service pensioners,

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but it's certainly one of its most venerable.

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Nowadays, of course, we've got the Royal Hospital at Chelsea,

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which of course is much younger than us.

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But we have married brothers, unlike, again, Chelsea,

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which we know very well,

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we have married couples here, so our little community here is about...

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I don't know, 20 strong?

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And each of the brothers has a self-contained flat.

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So has that always been the case?

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Yes, we've always had married couples.

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And Robert Dudley set down more rules for life at the hospital,

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which are still followed today.

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-This is the chapel.

-Beautiful!

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Built in the 12th century, 1126.

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-Was it?

-And...

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..one of the rules that Robert Dudley laid down,

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when he founded the place,

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was that the master and the brothers should meet for prayers

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in the chapel every morning.

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And the other thing about this chapel is there's no heating in here

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so you can probably imagine,

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-walking through that door in the winter.

-Absolutely freezing.

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It's like walking into a deep freeze and if you were watching,

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you'd see me shivering.

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-Is it a very quick prayer service?

-Very quick,

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you'll hear me leading the prayers like a machinegun.

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-SHE CHUCKLES

-"Ba-da-ba-da-ba!"

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To get through quickly as possible before we get hypothermia, Amen.

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The brothers wear these traditional uniforms for high days

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and ceremonial events,

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and it's they who staff and maintain these beautiful buildings,

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and tend to visitors.

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Brother Bill... Do I call you brother Bill or is it Bill?

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-Just Bill.

-Just Bill. Bill, it's good to meet you.

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So, you're ex... Is it ex-Navy?

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Navy. Coming here, it's...

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..it's a fantastic place to live and work.

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Keeps the grey matter going.

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-What's your name, sir?

-Albert.

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How long have you been here for, Albert?

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Let me see, 21st year, just starting.

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Brother John, what attracted you to be in the hospital?

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I think the main single reason is I felt that it allowed us,

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my wife and I,

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to take a step closer to history,

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because this place is steeped in history.

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It certainly is.

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But it's time for Sister Catherine to be on her way.

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It's been lovely to meet you all, so thank you very much indeed.

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You're very welcome, nice to see you.

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-And thank you for sharing your stories.

-Yes!

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Now, Charles has travelled on to the town of Henley-in-Arden,

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where he's about to trip off into Henley Vintage & Interiors.

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Always on the run, Charles.

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-Hello, ladies.

-Hello.

-How are you?

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-Hi.

-Charles Hamilton.

-Hi, Christine.

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-Hi, Christine. And?

-Julie.

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Hi, Julie, good to see you. What a lovely shop.

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-Thank you.

-And walking through Henley, there's such style.

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And again, ladies, you have great style.

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-Thank you.

-I almost feel...

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I almost feel slightly alien being from Derbyshire

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that I'm not quite dressed for the occasion.

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-You look lovely.

-Well, thank you very much.

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I say!

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If you've quite finished fishing for compliments, Charles,

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you'd better pull your socks up and get on the hunt.

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Oh, I can see in here already there's a nice array of silver.

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-Is it your...?

-It isn't.

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-No.

-But it's... I'm more than happy to open it up for you.

0:15:410:15:43

And, and, and, oh, thank you very much,

0:15:430:15:45

and are you always open to some degree of negotiation?

0:15:450:15:49

As long as you're kind.

0:15:490:15:50

Always, Christine, always.

0:15:510:15:53

I quite like these old pails.

0:15:540:15:56

-Yes.

-Are they silver?

0:15:560:15:58

I believe they are, let's just open up and have a look.

0:15:580:16:01

These are lovely, Christine.

0:16:010:16:03

Oh, God, they're really nice!

0:16:040:16:05

That's a set of four silver seasoning dishes, or salts,

0:16:080:16:12

bearing a Victorian hallmark,

0:16:120:16:14

and the monogram of their original owner, and they're very sweet.

0:16:140:16:16

Here we've got W Pound, esquire,

0:16:170:16:20

and we've got the hallmarks on there for London.

0:16:200:16:24

It's a young sovereign head, so we know they're about 1884.

0:16:240:16:28

-Have they been here a while?

-No.

0:16:280:16:30

They're lovely. So, four of those.

0:16:300:16:31

-Yes.

-How much could they be?

0:16:310:16:33

-You had...

-£50 on them.

0:16:340:16:37

What's your offer, Charles?

0:16:370:16:38

Well, I was going to say to you, Christine,

0:16:380:16:40

whether I could buy them at £10 a piece, and go in at £40?

0:16:400:16:45

42?

0:16:450:16:46

I'll happily buy them.

0:16:460:16:47

-Lovely.

-For £42, thank you.

-Thank you...

-I've just bought...

0:16:470:16:50

-Oh, let's throw them around!

-CLINK ON FLOOR

0:16:500:16:52

There we go, I caught it almost.

0:16:520:16:53

I almost caught it.

0:16:530:16:54

-LAUGHTER

-And I was in the slips, and...

0:16:540:16:57

Right, there we go, it's OK.

0:16:570:16:59

You know, I used to play cricket, you know,

0:16:590:17:01

so I just caught it as it came off the foot.

0:17:010:17:03

Well done, Charles.

0:17:030:17:04

We'll make a wicket keeper of you yet.

0:17:040:17:07

Bye. Bye.

0:17:070:17:08

And with that, we're quite hit for six

0:17:080:17:11

at the end of a jam-packed first day on the trip, so...

0:17:110:17:14

nighty-night, you two.

0:17:140:17:15

But the morning finds these two back in the MG

0:17:190:17:22

and getting along as swimmingly as ever.

0:17:220:17:25

-How are you?

-Get off, get off.

0:17:250:17:27

-Let's stay together.

-You're a bit close for my liking.

0:17:270:17:30

Well, thanks a lot.

0:17:300:17:31

This is my impression of you, Charles.

0:17:310:17:33

Why's that?

0:17:330:17:34

You're kind of like a little...

0:17:350:17:37

I don't know what you are, you're like a little...

0:17:370:17:40

-Weasel?

-Yeah.

-Thank you very much.

0:17:400:17:42

So far, Charles has squirrelled away three lots.

0:17:420:17:45

The little porcelain plaque,

0:17:450:17:47

the polished steel footman,

0:17:470:17:49

and the set of four salts.

0:17:490:17:51

He still has £563.98 for the day ahead...

0:17:510:17:54

-Bye-bye.

-Bye-bye.

0:17:540:17:56

-See you.

-Bye.

-..which is a lot of dough.

0:17:560:17:58

While Catherine also has three lots.

0:17:590:18:01

The miniature sedan chair,

0:18:010:18:03

the letter rack

0:18:030:18:04

and the Belfast sink.

0:18:040:18:06

She still has £127.30 in her coin purse.

0:18:070:18:11

Don't you feel in our week thus far we've grown quite close together?

0:18:140:18:18

No.

0:18:180:18:19

Don't quarrel, now.

0:18:190:18:20

Of course we have.

0:18:200:18:22

That's better.

0:18:220:18:24

This morning, Catherine's beginning her buying

0:18:240:18:26

in the pretty Cotswold town of Chipping Campden.

0:18:260:18:29

You are going to be chipping away.

0:18:310:18:34

I am chipping away at Chipping Campden.

0:18:340:18:37

Now you can't get a better England than this.

0:18:370:18:39

Good luck, and don't miss me too much, OK?

0:18:390:18:42

-Don't what?

-Don't miss me too much.

0:18:420:18:44

Oh, gosh, I won't miss you.

0:18:440:18:45

Oh, thanks. I thought you might miss me.

0:18:450:18:47

No, I'm not, I'm not going to miss you, Charles.

0:18:470:18:49

You're an uptown girl in Chipping Campden.

0:18:490:18:52

-See you later.

-Mwah!

0:18:520:18:53

Ah, this doesn't look promising.

0:18:550:18:58

This is not good. It's closed.

0:18:580:19:00

There is no sign of life, so...

0:19:010:19:04

I'm going to get a coffee.

0:19:050:19:06

While Catherine has some well-deserved quiet time,

0:19:060:19:10

Charles is driving onwards, and hopefully upwards.

0:19:100:19:13

Just... I think Catherine has left some sandals in the car

0:19:130:19:16

and actually, they are quite stylish.

0:19:160:19:18

They've got a certain vintage retro look.

0:19:180:19:21

I reckon...

0:19:210:19:23

based on the fact, I mean, they are a bit outdated,

0:19:230:19:27

but I'm sure they'll make between £10 and £15 at auction.

0:19:270:19:30

And if I get a bit stuck later,

0:19:300:19:32

I might even put them into the sale myself.

0:19:320:19:34

Let's hope it doesn't come to that,

0:19:340:19:36

for Catherine's sake, at least.

0:19:360:19:37

Gorgeous.

0:19:380:19:39

In Chipping Campden, we're now open for business.

0:19:390:19:42

And Catherine has her coffee,

0:19:420:19:43

and is just about to stroll into Stuart House Antiques

0:19:430:19:46

to meet Rachel. Where's Stuart, then?

0:19:460:19:48

Excellent. "Come in, we are open."

0:19:500:19:52

Good morning.

0:19:520:19:53

Good morning.

0:19:530:19:55

Welcome to Chipping Campden.

0:19:550:19:57

Thank you. And you are?

0:19:570:19:58

I'm Rachel. Nice to meet you.

0:19:580:20:00

Rachel, lovely to meet you.

0:20:000:20:01

Catherine will scour this jam-packed place for buys.

0:20:020:20:05

And she will, you know.

0:20:050:20:07

My goodness, I've never seen so many ceramics.

0:20:120:20:14

Plates, plates, plates, plates, cups, cups, cups.

0:20:140:20:16

Crikey. But upstairs there is a collection of ceramics

0:20:160:20:19

that might just signal the hunt's over.

0:20:190:20:22

-Rachel?

-Yeah?

0:20:220:20:23

Can I just ask you, you've got a lot more of this hunting,

0:20:230:20:27

the hunting china here...?

0:20:270:20:29

-Yes.

-Crown Staffordshire.

0:20:290:20:30

Crown Staffordshire was a ceramic maker

0:20:310:20:33

whose origins date back to the mid-1800s.

0:20:330:20:37

The set Catherine has alighted on hails from the 1930s,

0:20:370:20:40

decorated with hunting scenes. Rather jolly.

0:20:400:20:43

-It's quite fun, isn't it?

-It is quite fun. Yeah.

0:20:440:20:46

I wouldn't buy the whole lot.

0:20:460:20:47

I haven't got the money to buy the whole lot.

0:20:470:20:49

But something like the sugar bowl and the jug...

0:20:490:20:53

-Yes.

-Would you sell those two?

0:20:530:20:54

Yes.

0:20:540:20:56

Combined ticket price on those is £66.

0:20:560:21:00

But what might Rachel accept?

0:21:000:21:02

I'd let you have it for...

0:21:030:21:06

25.

0:21:060:21:07

-For the two.

-For the two.

0:21:070:21:08

Should I go for a cup and saucer, as well?

0:21:100:21:11

-And do a whole kind of...?

-Nice little set, wouldn't it?

0:21:110:21:15

Catherine's adding a cup, saucer and tea plate set to the bundle,

0:21:150:21:20

but what could Rachel do on those AND the cream jug and sugar bowl?

0:21:200:21:23

I'd be able to have one, two and three for £30.

0:21:230:21:28

RACHEL INHALES

0:21:280:21:29

What about 35?

0:21:290:21:31

I'm going to shake your hand...

0:21:310:21:32

-Good...

-..at 35, because I really like that.

0:21:320:21:34

And I hope you do really well on that, yes.

0:21:340:21:36

So, Catherine has her quarry.

0:21:360:21:38

And she's cantering off.

0:21:380:21:40

HORSE NEIGHS

0:21:410:21:42

MUSIC: Hound Dog by Elvis Presley

0:21:420:21:43

Meanwhile, Charles is heading for the environs of

0:21:450:21:47

the town of Moreton-in-Marsh.

0:21:470:21:49

This morning, dog-lover Charles has come here to learn

0:21:500:21:53

the fascinating story of some of the nation's favourite dog breeds.

0:21:530:21:57

He's meeting breeder Gay Robertson.

0:21:570:21:59

-Good morning.

-How are you?

-I'm fine, nice to meet you.

0:22:010:22:03

Good to see you, Gay. I'm Charles Hanson.

0:22:030:22:05

-And who's your friend beside you?

-This is Fickle.

-Hello, Fickle.

0:22:050:22:08

Good to see you, Fickle. Hello, I won't bite.

0:22:080:22:10

I should hope not, Charles.

0:22:100:22:12

Gay breeds, shows and races whippets like Fickle,

0:22:130:22:16

and is something of an authority on the fascinating history

0:22:160:22:19

of racing dogs like whippets and greyhounds.

0:22:190:22:22

These sighthounds were bred over centuries to chase small prey,

0:22:220:22:27

like hare, by sight rather than by smell,

0:22:270:22:30

as breeds like foxhounds and beagles.

0:22:300:22:33

Sighthounds have been raced in Britain for many centuries.

0:22:330:22:37

-Really, in this country...

-Yes.

-..we started with the Romans.

0:22:370:22:41

-Right.

-And the Romans, who used them for sport,

0:22:410:22:44

the sport entailed the dogs chasing the hare...

0:22:440:22:49

-Yes.

-..not to catch it, but to see which dog was the fastest.

0:22:490:22:54

-Yes.

-And that's been true ever since.

0:22:540:22:56

This sport was known as hare coursing,

0:22:570:23:00

and was popular in Britain down the ages.

0:23:000:23:02

It found particular favour with the aristocracy of the 16th century,

0:23:020:23:06

when Queen Elizabeth I took an interest.

0:23:060:23:09

The Duke of Norfolk was told by Queen Elizabeth I

0:23:100:23:14

to draw up a complete set of rules for the sport.

0:23:140:23:17

And it's because betting figured very, very heavily.

0:23:170:23:21

And you don't want somebody saying "S'not fair!" You know?

0:23:210:23:25

THEY LAUGH

0:23:250:23:26

No, you don't, do you?

0:23:260:23:27

It had to be...

0:23:270:23:28

..absolutely which dog can run fastest,

0:23:290:23:32

turn the hare most often, and score the most points.

0:23:320:23:36

This made for a great spectator sport,

0:23:360:23:38

popular for centuries,

0:23:380:23:40

and regularly drew large crowds to coursing events.

0:23:400:23:43

In the 19th century, the banks closed for the Waterloo Cup,

0:23:430:23:47

for instance.

0:23:470:23:48

Wow. Such was the popularity of greyhounds?

0:23:480:23:52

The whole thing was very popular.

0:23:520:23:55

Although today we might most associate the greyhound breed

0:23:550:23:59

with dog racing,

0:23:590:24:00

the similar but smaller whippet was also very popular,

0:24:000:24:03

particularly in working-class mining areas of the 19th century.

0:24:030:24:06

In the north, and also in Wales, as you know,

0:24:080:24:10

mining was a big thing.

0:24:100:24:12

And whippets were more user-friendly than greyhounds.

0:24:130:24:18

I mean, you can have a whippet or two in your house,

0:24:180:24:20

and there's room.

0:24:200:24:23

They did take great care of them

0:24:230:24:25

because to win a race with a whippet could earn you more

0:24:250:24:29

than you earned in a week.

0:24:290:24:31

Nowadays of course,

0:24:310:24:33

dogs don't chase a live hare but rather a mechanised lure,

0:24:330:24:38

as all of Gay's whippets have been trained to do.

0:24:380:24:40

This taps in to the dog's instinct to pursue,

0:24:400:24:43

with no risks to wildlife.

0:24:430:24:45

I think the hooligan, he's the quickest, almost as quick as me.

0:24:470:24:50

THEY LAUGH

0:24:500:24:52

Come on!

0:24:520:24:53

So, so this activity's all part of their training?

0:24:540:24:56

It keeps them in good shape...?

0:24:560:24:57

It keeps them in good shape and it's...

0:24:570:25:00

They just love to do it.

0:25:000:25:01

So, it's all about looking at antiques

0:25:030:25:05

and always look at the bottom shelf first, keep your head down,

0:25:050:25:08

just stay with the object, and then towards the finishing line,

0:25:080:25:11

if it's worth buying, get it bought,

0:25:110:25:13

and hit that finish line, OK?

0:25:130:25:15

BARKING

0:25:150:25:16

Frank! Pack it in.

0:25:160:25:19

Whoops!

0:25:190:25:20

Charles is down! Oh, Lord.

0:25:200:25:22

I was taken down by a whippet.

0:25:220:25:25

BARKING

0:25:250:25:26

MUSIC: Dog Days Are Over by Florence And The Machine

0:25:260:25:29

-Go!

-Go on! Go!

0:25:300:25:32

Come on, Potter.

0:25:320:25:33

Look at them go! Whoo!

0:25:370:25:39

Come on, Morgan.

0:25:530:25:55

Bring it home. Imagine that's Catherine Southon, OK?

0:25:550:25:58

Oh, Charles!

0:25:580:25:59

Get set. Go!

0:25:590:26:00

He's off! He's off!

0:26:000:26:01

-Well...

-Their speed's incredible.

0:26:040:26:05

It's like lightning across the field.

0:26:050:26:07

Come on. Ooh, I've lost my dog now.

0:26:110:26:13

Once Charles's catches up, it's time to hit the road.

0:26:150:26:18

I've been delighted to have been here, so...

0:26:180:26:20

-Well, it was lovely.

-Thank you so much, Gay.

0:26:200:26:21

It's been such a revelation and I shall not forget today.

0:26:210:26:25

WOOFING

0:26:260:26:28

In the meantime, Catherine's

0:26:330:26:35

moved on to the town of Burford,

0:26:350:26:36

where she is still on the hunt for another item

0:26:360:26:39

with her remaining £92.30.

0:26:390:26:42

That's £325 on it, so...

0:26:450:26:47

..I'm not buying it.

0:26:480:26:50

My goodness.

0:26:540:26:56

1920s.

0:26:560:26:58

French grapepickers' bins.

0:26:580:27:01

So, this is going to come round, like this.

0:27:010:27:04

You put your grapes in there. That's incredible.

0:27:060:27:08

But this grape bin is ticketed at around £200,

0:27:090:27:13

more than double what Catherine has remaining.

0:27:130:27:16

Let's leave her to look for lower-hanging fruit.

0:27:160:27:18

Meanwhile, Charles has trotted off to the town of Evesham...

0:27:210:27:25

..where he's wandered into his next shop.

0:27:260:27:28

Time for antique-ing.

0:27:300:27:31

And it's a familiar sort of place.

0:27:330:27:35

I've been here before.

0:27:370:27:38

-Good to see you.

-Hi, hello, Charles.

0:27:380:27:40

Yes, you have been here before.

0:27:400:27:41

-I forget your name.

-Andy.

0:27:410:27:42

-Good to see you. It's about two years ago...

-Yes.

0:27:420:27:44

I came to this very antique centre and bought quite well.

0:27:440:27:48

You did.

0:27:480:27:49

Well, that sounds 'andy, Andy.

0:27:490:27:51

Let's hope Charles can repeat that success.

0:27:510:27:53

What a chair. Look at that for a chair.

0:27:590:28:02

-BOX CLATTERS TO FLOOR

-Sorry.

0:28:060:28:07

Oh, Lord, Charles.

0:28:070:28:09

This might be interesting,

0:28:100:28:11

if it's in one piece.

0:28:110:28:12

The only reason this jumps out at me is it's a survivor.

0:28:140:28:19

It's made of timber, which can be easily burned,

0:28:190:28:21

and on many great bonfires of stately homes in the 20th century,

0:28:210:28:26

this entire chair...

0:28:260:28:27

..would have been, I suppose, put to that bonfire,

0:28:280:28:32

but you'll see has this beautiful shaped apron back,

0:28:320:28:37

with these scrolls,

0:28:370:28:38

this beautiful tired rush back,

0:28:380:28:42

these wonderful arms,

0:28:420:28:43

and when you just rest your arms on these rests,

0:28:430:28:47

you almost close your eyes, and you're in a time warp...

0:28:470:28:50

don't you?

0:28:500:28:51

Yep.

0:28:510:28:53

This chair's certainly seen its fair share of life.

0:28:530:28:56

It's been extensively repaired over the years,

0:28:560:28:59

but its bones look true and ancient.

0:28:590:29:01

I'm fairly confident in saying... would date to around 1700.

0:29:010:29:08

-Yep.

-Oh.

0:29:080:29:10

-Would you agree?

-I would agree, yes.

0:29:100:29:11

It's somewhere... Give or take a couple of years.

0:29:110:29:14

Ticket price on the armchair is a hefty £240.

0:29:170:29:20

Be careful, Charles.

0:29:200:29:21

-What could it be?

-We could take that down to half price.

0:29:220:29:25

Dear me.

0:29:290:29:30

That's it. Goes in eventually.

0:29:300:29:33

Has it been here a long time?

0:29:340:29:36

Yes, it has. Er...

0:29:360:29:39

So, that's often a bad sign, isn't it?

0:29:390:29:41

So, your very, very best price would be...

0:29:410:29:43

Yep.

0:29:430:29:44

100. I can't go any lower.

0:29:440:29:46

-May I give it some thought?

-Yep.

0:29:500:29:52

So, Charles will ponder that offer at a cool £100, and browse on.

0:29:520:29:57

Back in Burford, though,

0:29:590:30:01

Catherine's just about exhausted her options.

0:30:010:30:03

There is an awful lot to see and some beautiful pieces,

0:30:030:30:06

but it's just not for me.

0:30:060:30:08

The prices are just way, way over what I have.

0:30:080:30:12

It's lovely stock, but for another day.

0:30:130:30:16

Back in Evesham,

0:30:170:30:18

Charles has spotted something else with an intriguing past.

0:30:180:30:21

Just...down here, what I'm looking at now

0:30:230:30:28

is just a very, very nice microscope.

0:30:280:30:29

This Victorian brass example was made by Bryson of Edinburgh,

0:30:290:30:33

a quality maker of clocks and instruments from the very heyday

0:30:330:30:37

of the gentleman scientist.

0:30:370:30:39

What's attractive is this microscope comes in its original fitted box.

0:30:390:30:45

There we are.

0:30:450:30:47

With its divisions... and original slides.

0:30:470:30:51

There's no ticket price on it,

0:30:510:30:53

but there is another smaller microscope here, too.

0:30:530:30:56

This one isn't so good.

0:30:560:30:57

Another fairly simple microscope.

0:31:000:31:02

Andy, how much could the two be together?

0:31:050:31:08

Make it 25 for the pair.

0:31:080:31:09

Golly.

0:31:090:31:11

I mean... Very tempting.

0:31:110:31:13

And his beloved ancient chair is still offered at around 100.

0:31:130:31:18

It's make your mind up time, Carlos.

0:31:180:31:21

I'm going to take it with me,

0:31:210:31:22

-and hopefully impress Catherine by what will be...

-Yes.

0:31:220:31:25

..the earliest item I've bought so far.

0:31:250:31:28

It's just a wonderful chair.

0:31:280:31:30

And the microscopes?

0:31:300:31:32

Anyway, I think for £25, I'll take them.

0:31:320:31:34

-Yes.

-Thanks a lot.

-Right.

-Andy, I'm delighted with those two purchases.

0:31:340:31:37

I really feel...

0:31:370:31:39

..I'm spent.

0:31:410:31:43

Spent out, or spent up?

0:31:430:31:45

We all are, Charles. We all are.

0:31:450:31:47

As well as the chair and the microscopes,

0:31:470:31:49

Charles has the porcelain plaque,

0:31:490:31:50

the polished steel footman

0:31:500:31:52

and the set of four salts.

0:31:520:31:53

He spent £222 exactly...

0:31:530:31:56

..while Catherine has the miniature sedan chair,

0:31:580:32:01

the French letter rack,

0:32:010:32:03

the Belfast sink

0:32:030:32:05

and the collection of Crown Staffordshire.

0:32:050:32:08

She spent a total of £115.

0:32:080:32:11

But what do they make of each other's hauls?

0:32:110:32:14

I do love that miniature sedan chair.

0:32:150:32:18

It's a really good object, Catherine.

0:32:180:32:20

I think for £35 it could make £100, so good job.

0:32:200:32:24

I cannot tell you how devastated I am

0:32:240:32:29

that Charles has bought those four salts

0:32:290:32:33

in the shape of pails for £42.

0:32:330:32:37

It pains me to even think about them.

0:32:370:32:40

They are amazing!

0:32:400:32:42

Catherine is a very decorative lady,

0:32:420:32:44

she's quite calculating,

0:32:440:32:46

she has a scientific mind,

0:32:460:32:48

and almost she is my Queen Catherine,

0:32:480:32:50

I'm King Charles,

0:32:500:32:51

and hopefully the next auction won't be off with my head.

0:32:510:32:54

On this leg of the trip,

0:32:560:32:58

they began in Long Marston,

0:32:580:33:00

and are now aiming for auction in the Shropshire town of Newport,

0:33:000:33:03

a handsome market town that seems just the place to hawk their wares.

0:33:030:33:08

But sad news.

0:33:080:33:10

Things have taken an unexpected turn this morning.

0:33:100:33:12

Unfortunately, Charles has been detained on urgent family business,

0:33:120:33:16

so he can't make the auction today.

0:33:160:33:19

Catherine is driving solo.

0:33:190:33:21

I know I do moan about him, but I actually quite miss Charles.

0:33:220:33:27

It's not the same without him.

0:33:270:33:28

It's kind of... What can I say?

0:33:280:33:30

..quiet.

0:33:300:33:32

It's too peaceful!

0:33:320:33:34

But we wouldn't want things to get too quiet.

0:33:350:33:38

So an old pal will step into the breach

0:33:380:33:41

to rally Charles's lots along.

0:33:410:33:44

Hello there, legendary Road Tripper.

0:33:440:33:46

It's Phil Serrell.

0:33:460:33:47

-Hello!

-Hello, how are you?

0:33:490:33:51

I'm good. Do you think my parking's improved?

0:33:510:33:54

Oh, it's unbelievably good.

0:33:540:33:56

Thank you for stepping in.

0:33:560:33:57

They wanted someone with Charlie's disposition, you know -

0:33:570:33:59

happy, smiley, effervescent, bubbly...

0:33:590:34:02

Here I am.

0:34:030:34:05

-LAUGHING:

-Come on!

-Come on. How are you?

0:34:050:34:06

Catherine and Philip are strolling into Brettells Auctioneers,

0:34:080:34:10

where appropriately presides auctioneer David Brettell.

0:34:100:34:14

..with spare lenses...

0:34:150:34:16

Before the off, what does he make of our lots?

0:34:160:34:18

Down at 48...

0:34:180:34:19

The copper and brass French letter holder, that's got a good look.

0:34:210:34:25

It's quirky, it's interesting, it's useful.

0:34:250:34:28

Of all of the things,

0:34:280:34:29

that's the one that I would think will attract the most interest.

0:34:290:34:32

The chair's certainly an early chair.

0:34:320:34:33

Do I think if its 16th, 17th century?

0:34:330:34:36

I wouldn't go that far.

0:34:360:34:38

It's been a good chair, don't get me wrong,

0:34:380:34:39

it's been a good chair, but it needs a lot, lot of work.

0:34:390:34:42

And age doesn't mean value.

0:34:420:34:46

But Philip's now had a chance to scout out Charles's items, too.

0:34:460:34:50

Well, your little plaque here...

0:34:500:34:51

And that's cost Charles Hanson £25.

0:34:520:34:55

That'll do really well.

0:34:560:34:58

Well, that's very promising, as the sale kicks off.

0:34:580:35:01

And with internet bidding as well.

0:35:010:35:03

-Excited?

-I'm very excited.

0:35:030:35:06

You're going to have to talk me through this

0:35:060:35:08

because I haven't done this before.

0:35:080:35:09

Come, come now, Philip, you're a seasoned veteran.

0:35:090:35:12

Charles couldn't have anyone better in his corner.

0:35:120:35:15

First off, it's Charles...

0:35:160:35:18

and Philip's two microscopes.

0:35:180:35:19

Can they scope out some cash?

0:35:190:35:22

30 on the net, £30...

0:35:220:35:24

See, I'm into profit straightaway.

0:35:240:35:25

-Aren't I? Aren't I?

-Oh, all right. All right.

0:35:250:35:27

We've got 37 on the net, now.

0:35:270:35:29

37.

0:35:290:35:30

42 on the net.

0:35:300:35:32

Five on the net.

0:35:320:35:33

45 bid, 45. 48, 48.

0:35:330:35:35

Nobody in the room. I sell this time at 48.

0:35:350:35:38

GAVEL BANGS

0:35:380:35:39

That scores an enlarged profit for Team Charles and Phil.

0:35:390:35:44

-We're all pleased for Charlie.

-Charlie who?

0:35:440:35:46

-Charlie slash Phil.

-Charlie...?

0:35:460:35:47

He had no input on those.

0:35:480:35:50

I bought those.

0:35:500:35:51

Hey! I'm sure you bought them in spirit, Philip.

0:35:510:35:54

Next, it's one for Catherine, as her Belfast sink meets the room.

0:35:540:35:58

We go ten, 12, 15, 18, £20 bid.

0:35:580:36:02

Two, five, eight, £30 bid.

0:36:020:36:04

-Yes.

-Ooh!

0:36:040:36:05

£30 bid, £30 got. 32...

0:36:050:36:07

-Keep going.

-Five, eight, £40 bid.

0:36:070:36:10

-Rubbish thing.

-I knew this would make money.

0:36:100:36:11

Didn't I say it all the time?

0:36:110:36:13

-"Make a good profit on this."

-Just shush.

0:36:130:36:15

Can't say I heard you, Philip.

0:36:150:36:17

Will be sold. Hammer's up. Anybody else going?

0:36:170:36:19

-Oooh...yes!

-At £40...

0:36:190:36:21

GAVEL BANGS

0:36:210:36:22

SHE CLICKS HER FINGERS

0:36:220:36:23

No sinking feeling for Catherine, as that earns her a nice little bundle.

0:36:240:36:29

I learned from you.

0:36:290:36:30

I learned it all from you.

0:36:300:36:31

Oh-ho, I don't know about that.

0:36:310:36:34

Mwah.

0:36:340:36:35

Lordy, they ARE getting on well.

0:36:360:36:38

Now it's Charles's big gamble,

0:36:380:36:40

the chair with some real age,

0:36:400:36:42

but needs a lot of restoration.

0:36:420:36:44

£30.

0:36:450:36:46

£20.

0:36:480:36:50

Really is for nothing.

0:36:500:36:51

£10.

0:36:510:36:53

-Oh, dear.

-Can I put my hand up?

0:36:540:36:56

-No.

-No, you can't!

0:36:560:36:58

£10 on the net. 12, 15.

0:36:580:37:01

-15.

-20 bid.

0:37:010:37:03

22.

0:37:030:37:04

-22.

-22, got to be sold.

0:37:040:37:06

Hammer's up. Shout me now.

0:37:060:37:07

Charlie will be really upset.

0:37:070:37:09

Fair warning.

0:37:090:37:10

GAVEL BANGS

0:37:100:37:11

Do you know, I'd never have bought that? Never, never have bought that.

0:37:110:37:14

-SHE LAUGHS

-I don't know what on earth...

0:37:140:37:16

-You've changed your tune!

-Don't know what possessed him to buy that.

0:37:160:37:19

Despite some 20-20 hindsight from Philip,

0:37:190:37:22

that's a stinging loss on a chair Charles loves.

0:37:220:37:25

Bad luck.

0:37:250:37:26

I feel sad for him, because he really believed in that.

0:37:260:37:30

-Really believed in that.

-Let me tell you,

0:37:300:37:32

it's a much better chair than 20 quid.

0:37:320:37:34

Now it's another for Catherine,

0:37:350:37:37

as her collection of Crown Staffordshire

0:37:370:37:38

goes hunting for profit.

0:37:380:37:39

Giddy up.

0:37:390:37:41

£10 here for the hunting.

0:37:410:37:43

-Come on.

-No, ten, 12, 15.

0:37:430:37:46

-This is ridiculously cheap, you know?

-It's ridiculously cheap.

0:37:470:37:50

Selling, then.

0:37:500:37:51

I'm not selling, I'm giving away now.

0:37:510:37:53

-He is giving it away.

-At 15...

0:37:530:37:54

-HAMMER BANGS

-That is really, really cheap.

0:37:540:37:56

Oh, chance of a profit gallops off there.

0:37:560:37:59

Oh, well.

0:38:000:38:02

There we go. What's next?

0:38:020:38:04

Glad you asked, Catherine.

0:38:040:38:05

It's Charles's set of four silver salts.

0:38:050:38:08

Can his seasoned stand-in Philip will them to a profit?

0:38:080:38:12

£50 for those?

0:38:120:38:13

They've got to make 100.

0:38:130:38:14

Well, 40 then? It's only a tenner each.

0:38:140:38:16

40, thank you, Bill.

0:38:160:38:18

£40 bid, £40 got.

0:38:180:38:19

£40 bid. 45.

0:38:190:38:21

50.

0:38:210:38:23

£50 bid, £50 got. Five?

0:38:230:38:25

-BIDDER: 60.

-60.

0:38:250:38:26

£60. Five? Hammer's up.

0:38:260:38:29

70. £70 sat there.

0:38:290:38:31

Five? 75?

0:38:310:38:33

No, he says. 75 bid...

0:38:330:38:35

-I think these are for nothing.

-Me too.

0:38:350:38:38

Quickly round at 75.

0:38:380:38:41

It's a decent profit, but our experts hoped for more.

0:38:410:38:44

To be honest, they should have made £100.

0:38:450:38:48

-They are really nice things!

-Yeah.

0:38:480:38:50

I agree.

0:38:500:38:51

Another chance to give Catherine a bit of a lift now,

0:38:510:38:54

as her miniature sedan chair is up.

0:38:540:38:57

Nice little display. For 50.

0:38:570:38:58

It's a good thing. Come on.

0:38:580:39:00

OK, then. 60.

0:39:000:39:02

-Yes!

-Five in the room.

0:39:020:39:03

65 bid, 65, in the room...

0:39:030:39:05

This is my only chance.

0:39:050:39:06

70. Five.

0:39:060:39:08

Come on, this is a good thing.

0:39:080:39:09

I'm selling at 75. 80 on the net.

0:39:090:39:12

85. 85 bid.

0:39:120:39:13

85. 90...

0:39:130:39:15

Yes!

0:39:150:39:16

-100.

-Yes!

0:39:160:39:18

£100 in the room.

0:39:180:39:19

I'm selling, in the room at 100.

0:39:190:39:21

All done at 100?

0:39:210:39:22

I still don't think that was that dear.

0:39:240:39:25

-Just shush, I'm happy with that.

-I don't.

0:39:250:39:27

As well you might be, Catherine.

0:39:290:39:30

Another splendid profit, darling.

0:39:300:39:32

Thanks, you bring good luck.

0:39:320:39:33

You're like my little leprechaun.

0:39:330:39:35

We should get him a hat!

0:39:350:39:37

Another for Team Charles and Philip now,

0:39:380:39:40

as the 19th century polished steel footman

0:39:400:39:42

will try to ignite some interest.

0:39:420:39:44

Bid. £10, I'm bid,

0:39:440:39:45

10, 12, 15, 18, 20 on my left.

0:39:450:39:48

Sat down here, £20, you're out, £20 bid.

0:39:480:39:51

£20 got. £20 to you on the left...

0:39:510:39:52

-On the internet.

-25 on the net.

0:39:520:39:55

25 bid on the net, now 28 on the net.

0:39:550:39:57

Hammer's up then. All done,

0:39:570:39:59

round we go, quickly round at 28.

0:39:590:40:00

GAVEL BANGS

0:40:000:40:02

A little, a little loss.

0:40:020:40:03

A smidge.

0:40:030:40:04

Sadly, that lights no fires for Charles.

0:40:040:40:07

I'm quite happy for you to come on again.

0:40:070:40:10

I'm just thinking, I could rent myself out

0:40:100:40:11

to all the other Road Trippers, couldn't I? You know,

0:40:110:40:14

if anybody is having a really bad day or a good day,

0:40:140:40:16

-get Phil in.

-Yeah.

0:40:160:40:17

Now it's the little French letter rack

0:40:170:40:20

that Catherine felt had some je ne sais quoi.

0:40:200:40:23

£50 on the net, £50 got.

0:40:230:40:25

No...

0:40:250:40:27

Five, 55 bid, 55 got.

0:40:270:40:29

55, lovely thing. 60...

0:40:290:40:30

60? Where did that come from?

0:40:300:40:32

A bidder, Catherine.

0:40:320:40:34

Five on, for Andrea, 65 bid.

0:40:340:40:36

We've got the two internets playing each other here.

0:40:360:40:38

70. At £70 bid.

0:40:380:40:40

£70, up to you.

0:40:400:40:41

-Five for UK Auctioneers...

-Ooh!

0:40:410:40:43

75 bid. 70, 80, back to sale room

0:40:430:40:46

at £80 bid...

0:40:460:40:47

-Yes.

-Ooh.

0:40:470:40:48

85 bid, 85.

0:40:480:40:50

I wish Charles was here to see this,

0:40:500:40:52

cos I always lose money when I'm with Charles.

0:40:520:40:53

100 on the net. £100 bid, £100 got.

0:40:530:40:57

Ten. 110 bid, 110...

0:40:570:40:59

£110? Is he on the same lot?

0:40:590:41:01

120 bid.

0:41:010:41:02

120 got. 120 you're at, Andrea.

0:41:020:41:05

120 bid. No?

0:41:050:41:07

Selling at 120...

0:41:070:41:09

GAVEL BANGS

0:41:090:41:10

Yeeeeees!

0:41:100:41:11

Thank you so much.

0:41:110:41:13

That really was something to write home about.

0:41:140:41:17

I do really like you, Phil.

0:41:170:41:18

Now it's Charles and indeed Philip's very last shot at a profit.

0:41:200:41:25

The little porcelain plaque.

0:41:250:41:26

£100 for it. 100 bid on the net.

0:41:260:41:29

-£100 bid...

-£100!

0:41:290:41:30

110...

0:41:300:41:32

-# There may be trouble ahead... #

-Shush!

0:41:320:41:35

130, 40.

0:41:350:41:37

140 on the net...

0:41:370:41:38

Well, at least he's kind of making it up for the chair.

0:41:380:41:41

Nobody in the room. 140 bid, 140, going to be sold, this time.

0:41:410:41:45

£140, then, bid.

0:41:450:41:46

140. Hammer is up.

0:41:460:41:48

At £140.

0:41:480:41:49

Anybody on the UK Auctioneer one?

0:41:490:41:51

At £140, hammer's up, going to be sold.

0:41:510:41:53

All done? Anybody else? 140...

0:41:530:41:56

-GAVEL BANGS

-He's done brilliantly.

0:41:560:41:58

-Yeah, I knew that'd make money.

-He'll be happy.

-Yeah.

0:41:580:42:00

-And you would've bought that, wouldn't you?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:42:000:42:02

Oh, yeah, yeah.

0:42:020:42:03

Well, that's a winner that's almost Heaven sent

0:42:030:42:05

to help the absent Charles on his last lot.

0:42:050:42:08

Philip was right about that.

0:42:080:42:09

So, let's do the maths.

0:42:090:42:10

Charles, ably assisted by Philip, started this leg with £660.98.

0:42:120:42:17

He made a profit of £34.66,

0:42:190:42:23

meaning he has £695.64 to carry forward...

0:42:230:42:27

..while Catherine put a little bit of a dent in his lead in this sale.

0:42:290:42:33

She started with £207.30.

0:42:330:42:37

She made a profit, though, of £110.50, which is magnificent!

0:42:370:42:42

So she has £317.80 in her coffers,

0:42:420:42:46

and is today's winner.

0:42:460:42:47

So, all that remains is to pass on the good news to Charles.

0:42:470:42:51

This is exciting.

0:42:510:42:52

"You've reached the voicemail of Charles Hanson..."

0:42:520:42:54

BEEP

0:42:540:42:55

NARRATOR LAUGHS

0:42:550:42:56

I'm sure they'll catch him before the next leg.

0:42:560:42:59

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:000:43:02

our pair reconnect with nature, as Catherine gets hands-on in a shop...

0:43:020:43:06

You can't not touch this beautiful oak.

0:43:060:43:10

..while Charles gets hands dirty in a field.

0:43:100:43:12

What is lurking under there?

0:43:120:43:14

Charles Hanson and Catherine Southon travel around the Tudor towns of Warwickshire. Catherine uncovers the area's best-kept secret, while Charles befriends a whippet named Fickle. Catherine finds a bargain in a French copper and brass letter holder to take to the auction in Shropshire, and Charles gambles a significant sum of his kitty on a much-repaired but charming 17th-century oak chair.


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