Episode 4 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 4

Charles Hanson sets out with his metal detector, while Catherine Southon sticks to antiques shops in her quest to find items to take to a Nottingham auction.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts. With £200 each...

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I want something shiny.

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..a classic car and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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I like a rummage.

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-I can't resist.

-The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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-But it's no mean feat.

-Sorry!

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Why do I always do this to myself?

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There'll be worthy winners...

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-Give us a kiss.

-..and valiant losers.

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-Come on, stick 'em up.

-So, will it be the high road to glory...

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-Onwards and upwards.

-..or the slow road to disaster?

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-Take me home.

-This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Would you believe it?

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It's the penultimate leg of our road trip,

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with a pair of auctioneering favourites -

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Charles Hanson and Catherine Southon.

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-Do you cycle?

-No.

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-Maybe us two on a tandem, a bicycle made for two.

-That would be nice.

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-Yeah, I think so.

-Sounds delightful(!)

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But instead, our pair are whisking around the countryside in their

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gorgeous green MGB GT, which has space for an unlikely passenger.

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What is this armrest thing?

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It's not an armrest...

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Hey, look, careful!

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-What is it?

-Listen, that is my link to history.

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-It's my metal detector.

-DETECTOR BEEPS

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That is the most ridiculous thing ever.

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Harsh!

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Our pair of treasure hunters started the week all square, with £200 each.

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Catherine now has £317.80 squirreled away.

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But Derby lad Charles has taken a commanding lead,

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gathering an impressive £695.64.

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Say hello to Catherine.

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Is she treasure, or not?

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-Is she treasure or not?

-DETECTOR BEEPS

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Oh, you're beeping a bit.

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That's a bit intermittent, isn't it?

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Faint praise, eh?

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There's plenty of time, though, for Charles to scour the land,

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as our pair scurry up and down the country.

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This week, they've been meandering their way north,

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blasting around the Midlands and the North West.

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They're headed for Congleton, in Cheshire,

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and will clock up 700 miles.

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Today, they start off in Macclesfield, in Cheshire,

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and will amble their way to an auction in Nottingham.

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Right, you two, what's this trip really all about?

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Time for some shopping, methinks.

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# Do the hokey cokey And you get out the car

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-BOTH:

-# That's what it's all about! #

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All together now!

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Oh, very good - if only in tune.

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Catherine's hopping out at her first shopping stop -

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Sawmill Architectural Antiques.

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Get out of here! See you.

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It's littered with reclaimed and salvaged items.

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Plenty to get stuck into.

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-Hello.

-Good morning.

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-I'm Catherine.

-Nice to meet you.

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-Jack.

-Good to see you, Jack.

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-Well, I'm going to have a look around.

-Yeah.

-Thanks, Jack.

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No problem at all.

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What's that? It's quite cute.

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A traditional antique as such.

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So this is a foot warmer?

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-Yes.

-And you put your little tootsies on here, and inside...

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..you've got your...

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This little metal container, and you put hot water...

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-inside there, I guess.

-That's right, yes.

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It's interesting. And it's a great bit of history.

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Charles would like that, but...

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Who wants one?

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Fair point. Best keep looking, eh?

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There is something to be found - my metal detector is going off,

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I can feel it. Beep-beep-beep!

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Don't you start.

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While Catherine's been rummaging,

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Charles has pootled the MGB east to the glorious spa town of Buxton -

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home to his first shop, Circus Home and Salvage.

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-Good morning!

-Good morning.

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-How are you?

-Very well, and you?

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Nice to see you. Charles Hanson.

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-Hi, I'm Leigh.

-Good to see you, on this busy day.

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It's lovely. What a gorgeous shop you've got.

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-Thank you.

-Is there much next door, behind the curtain?

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-This is it.

-This is it? Well, I like it. They say small is beautiful.

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Do they? At least you won't get lost.

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It's not full of clutter, there's no silver.

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There's no porcelain, it's just a really interesting shop,

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with a certain wow factor, that's good.

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And this has a wow factor, I love this chest.

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Almost like a treasure chest, isn't it?

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You've got these, erm...

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straps, probably in tin.

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She's nice and light, and I love that handle on there,

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and you'll see how over the years that handle has fallen.

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Beautifully made.

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And if I open it up, like that - oops - on the inside...

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And what a shame, it's got a split just in the bottom there,

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you can see the daylight through there.

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But it is maybe 1830, maybe second quarter of the 19th century.

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It's priced at 48, Leigh.

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-Right.

-What could be the best price?

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-Could be £30.

-Really? Mm. I'm going to mental-note that...

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-OK.

-..as I continue my circuit.

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I'll wave the flag for Queen and country.

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-Almost goes with my jacket, doesn't it?

-Yes, it does.

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Here we are in Middle England. Bit of local history.

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There we go.

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-This, I quite like.

-That's why I hide it away,

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cos generally it gets rattled a lot.

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-Does it give you a headache?

-I'll allow you to give it a go.

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-Can I?

-Do you know how to use it?

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The reason I quite like...

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I'm a football fan, and I support Derby County.

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-Right.

-Are you a Derby fan?

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Not at all. Not any sort of football.

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Never mind, Charles.

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I think in Nottingham,

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this could go down quite well because if you're a football fan,

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or if you were a fan back in the...

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I suppose, what, 1920s, '30s...?

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-'20s, I think, yeah.

-1920s, '30s, rather than chant,

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you may have done this.

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RATTLING

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Isn't that wonderful?

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You can see why I keep it hidden in the corner.

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You want it gone, don't you?

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-Oh, sorry.

-Maybe.

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-It would be good.

-What could be the best price on your perhaps 1920s

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football rattle, Leigh?

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-£24?

-Really? £24.

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-Mm.

-I'll mental-note...

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-OK.

-..and continue.

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I hope you're remembering all of this, Charles.

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Oh, hang on, there's more.

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-That's interesting.

-Mm-hm.

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A mother of pearl penknife.

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What we look for are the more interesting, er...

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multi-purpose tools within.

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I would have thought it was probably made in Birmingham, or Sheffield,

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and would date to around...

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what do we think, just pre-war?

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Yeah. I'd say '30s.

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It's got a bit of damage, but all there.

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-Yeah.

-How much could it be, Leigh?

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-£20.

-And that's your very best?

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-15.

-What's that for?

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Erm...

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I think you're holding an ear cleaner.

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-It's got a little scoop out of there.

-Oh, yes!

-Tiny thing there.

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-Yeah, I'll put it back in, quick.

-Yeah. Probably.

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Nice object.

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Best price £15?

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-Oh, Charles...

-No, no, I'm just saying.

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That's your best price?

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-£12.

-Now that you've identified the ear cleaner.

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Yes. Well, thank you very much.

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Yeuch! Circuit of tiny shop completed

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and lots of possible - Charles, it's decision time.

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I'll buy...

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..the penknife and the box, please.

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-Mm-hm.

-£42.

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-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-That's deal one done.

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OK? Sold. Thank you very much. OK?

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The next thing is the...rattle.

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Since you've already bought a couple of things, how about 20 quid?

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-How much?

-20 quid.

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-20 quid.

-Yeah.

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I think it's fun. And I'd love to sort of...

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-£18.

-Oh, don't say that!

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And I think to have it in the car

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and just give Catherine a bit of a...you know, a rattle.

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She'll be so annoyed.

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-Do you think so?

-Well, I would be.

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As if the metal detector wasn't enough.

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-Please, take it.

-For £18?

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-Yeah.

-I'll take it. Thanks a lot.

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That's great.

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So, Charles kicks things off with three items bought,

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and £60 spent.

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Bye!

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How's Catherine getting on?

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I love...your sign.

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It was one of those things that came in one of the factories we stripped.

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You know, they had it laying about in there and...

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So it was just lying about?

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-Can I grab it?

-Yeah, course you can, yeah.

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Cos this is how I feel at the moment,

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I feel it's very much GO Team Catherine.

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That's what I... That's what I want to say to Charles. Go Catherine.

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And STOP, to Charles.

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So what's on this, then?

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-Er, £30.

-Right.

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Can you do that for 20?

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Go on, then, £20.

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-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-I'm having that.

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It's certainly a novel buy, Catherine.

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It's a Road Trip first, certainly.

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Love it! Love it, love it.

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Meanwhile, Charles has made his way back to Leek,

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where just outside the Staffordshire town is the last surviving corn mill

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designed by an almost forgotten pioneer

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of the Industrial Revolution.

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Charles has come to discover why James Brindley

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deserves greater recognition.

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David Hallen from the museum is here to tell all.

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-David?

-Hello.

-Charles Hanson.

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-Welcome to Brindley's Mill.

-It's wonderful to see.

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I can't wait, I'll follow your lead.

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James Brindley started his career building water wheels.

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He designed this mill in 1752.

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It was his experience manipulating the flow of water

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that would eventually lead him to become

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one of the most influential engineers in Britain.

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So David, we've seen outside,

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and now we're seeing what that water wheel is doing.

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-Tell me about it.

-Yeah, the water wheel powers the main shaft.

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And the main shaft turns, and this is called the great spur wheel.

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-The great spur wheel.

-The large one.

-Right.

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And then the power is taken off by the smaller wheel,

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which is called the stone nut.

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-Yes.

-And then that drives down into here,

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which turns the top of the two millstones.

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-Can I have I go?

-Of course.

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Lovely. So here's my wheat.

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In it goes.

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Water mills had been grinding corn for centuries

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but times were changing,

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with cottage industry being replaced by large-scale manufacture.

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New factories devoured raw materials on a scale which led to

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a crisis of supply and presented an issue of distribution.

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Brindley's talent was called upon.

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He got involved with draining a mine

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which gave him experience of pumping water out of a mine using machinery

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that would be recognisable in a mill,

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-like power from a water wheel.

-Yes.

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That led him on to contact with the Duke of Bridgewater

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who wanted to build a canal to get his coal from Worsely,

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which is just south Lancashire,

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into Manchester.

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Brindley's talent as an engineering genius and problem-solver

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led to the construction of the first modern canal.

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Emerging industrial cities needed vast quantities of coal of volume

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impossible to supply by cart.

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However a horse was capable of pulling ten times more cargo

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if it was loaded on a barge.

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When the Bridgewater Canal opened in 1761,

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the price of coal halved overnight. Wow!

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Brindley's pioneering use of aqueducts, locks and tunnels

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sparked a frenzy of canal building,

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resulting in 4,500 miles of new inland waterways.

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How marvellous.

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You can imagine the situation in the pottery industry in those days.

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Moving pottery over potholed cart tracks, not good for the ware.

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So Wedgwood realised that this canal system

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would be very, very good for pottery.

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So Brindley is commemorated with almost, I suppose,

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the innovation of the canal system in England?

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-Yeah.

-Of course, canals had existed since Roman times,

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but there was no canal system in England before Brindley came along.

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In his lifetime, Brindley used the force of water

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not just to power mills

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but to move the materials that would power a revolution in industry.

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Brindley was certainly a huge catalyst

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in moving the Industrial Revolution a step closer.

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Without his canals, the pottery industry wouldn't have thrived,

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the coal wouldn't have moved as quickly,

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the mills in Manchester wouldn't have been powered as efficiently.

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And this story can be told all over the country.

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He was one of the most influential people of his age.

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People know Telford, they know Wedgwood,

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but frankly I think Brindley should be ranked alongside those people.

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-An unsung hero.

-Yes.

-A pioneer.

-A pioneer, exactly.

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Elsewhere, Catherine has made her way into the Peak District

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and to the gorgeous village of Hartington.

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Her final shop of the day has a fine line

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in large 18th-century oak furniture.

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Ohhh! You can't not touch this beautiful oak.

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But they do have stock that's a little later and smaller.

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How cute is that?

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It's got a bit of woodworm to it, but I think a Victorian...

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little child's deckchair.

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And I think that's an original canvas seat.

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I like that. That's quite cute.

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It's got a bit of woodworm.

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It's got quite a lot of woodworm!

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Aww.

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Woodworm and a ticket price of £80.

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One to think about. Anything else?

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A little silver purse.

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Let's have a looky-look.

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It's got a nice clear hallmark there.

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It's Birmingham. If you think about ladies' handbags

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or ladies' purses today, they're pretty big.

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You've got a lot of credit cards in your purses,

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a lot of money, usually, in your purses. And the bags are big.

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A lady in the '20s would have taken something like that to a dance.

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She's not going to get an awful lot in there.

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You're certainly not going to get any notes in there.

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But you might get a little coin or two.

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Very nice. Standby.

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There's more.

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This cigarette case, this is Art Deco.

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So we've got a...

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Art Deco geometric design.

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Then you open it up and again you've got a clear hallmark,

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this time for Chester.

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They don't light my fire, but I might just see if I can get those...

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..for a good price.

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There's no ticket price. Time to chat money with dealer Jan

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about the little chair and the silver.

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To be quite frank with you,

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I'm going to make you an offer because they're quite...

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sort of run of the mill.

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Crumbs. Hold the sweet talk, Catherine(!)

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I would suggest for those, £20, and then I'd say for that chair,

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I'd probably say 20 for that as well.

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So 40 for the two.

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-Is that all right?

-Fine. That's fine.

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-OK.

-OK.

-Put it there, then. Thank you very much.

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£40 spent and just like that,

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shopping for the day is done.

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Time for a well-earned rest. Nighty night!

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Day is dawning over the Cheshire countryside.

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Hang on. Is that Charles?

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At least he's enjoying himself.

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When you pick an object out of the ground,

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it can't say a word,

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but when you hold something that might be 16th century, you say,

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"Hello, welcome to this time, you're in the modern world.

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-"Long time no see."

-BEEPING

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-Ooh, hello.

-BEEPING SPEEDS UP

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And that actually is a really good sound.

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Has someone lost a bundle of gold sovereigns or gold guineas?

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Hold tight. What is lurking under there?

0:16:000:16:04

And that's it. That is it.

0:16:060:16:09

What is that? It's certainly Victorian.

0:16:090:16:13

It is silver plate.

0:16:130:16:14

It could be bronze.

0:16:140:16:15

It's quite heavy. Do you know, it's almost...

0:16:150:16:17

I think what that might be is a little spill holder.

0:16:170:16:21

And maybe you haven't seen that for a few...150 years, or so.

0:16:210:16:25

And that's history. Hello.

0:16:250:16:27

Hello, history. Your lift's here. SHE HONKS HORN

0:16:270:16:30

I've found real Antiques Road Trip treasure.

0:16:300:16:34

-You found something?

-Yes.

-Are you serious?

0:16:340:16:37

A real treasure. I'm going to give it to you.

0:16:370:16:39

There you are. That's just for you. Have a look at it.

0:16:390:16:42

Do you like it?

0:16:420:16:43

-It's not a tractor part.

-No!

0:16:430:16:45

I'm fairly sure, romantically, it's a spill holder.

0:16:450:16:47

-Charles, that's rubbish.

-It's not rubbish!

0:16:470:16:49

Let's get moving while they're still friends, eh?

0:16:490:16:52

I can't believe that you just thought it was a piece of old metal.

0:16:520:16:55

Charles, it is probably a bit of old machinery.

0:16:550:16:57

No, you've got to be romantic.

0:16:570:16:59

The passion for antiques grabbed Charles yesterday

0:16:590:17:02

when he fell in love with three items.

0:17:020:17:05

A 1920s football rattle,

0:17:050:17:07

an Edwardian penknife,

0:17:070:17:09

and an old carriage box.

0:17:090:17:12

Thank you very much.

0:17:120:17:13

Leaving him a little over £635 to spend.

0:17:130:17:16

Catherine set things off with a stop and go sign,

0:17:180:17:21

a silver purse,

0:17:210:17:22

an Art Deco cigarette case,

0:17:220:17:24

and a Victorian child's chair.

0:17:240:17:26

How cute is that?

0:17:260:17:28

Meaning she still has £257.80 to play with today.

0:17:280:17:33

If you carry on in that tradition, finding rubbish like that,

0:17:330:17:36

I'm on a winner today.

0:17:360:17:38

The Nottingham auction is our final destination,

0:17:380:17:40

but the first stop today is Walgherton, in Cheshire,

0:17:400:17:43

and they're sharing a shop, so stand by.

0:17:430:17:46

-It's gorgeous, isn't it?

-There you are.

0:17:460:17:48

We could almost play hide and seek here.

0:17:480:17:51

Dagfields claims to be

0:17:510:17:53

the largest craft and antiques centre in the north-west,

0:17:530:17:55

so plenty to get lost in here.

0:17:550:17:57

Antiques that way.

0:17:570:17:59

I'm going to go this way.

0:17:590:18:00

What are you going that way for?

0:18:000:18:02

Look, it's everywhere.

0:18:020:18:03

Come on, follow me. Come on.

0:18:030:18:05

-Trust me. Trust me. Come on.

-I don't trust you.

0:18:050:18:08

That's the problem.

0:18:080:18:09

Perhaps it's best you split up, you two.

0:18:090:18:11

It's frightening how big this antiques centre is.

0:18:110:18:14

There must be about eight to ten buildings full of loot.

0:18:140:18:17

So, so, so much to see.

0:18:190:18:22

Oh, do stop horsing about.

0:18:230:18:24

-Sorry.

-Come on, Catherine is galloping ahead.

0:18:240:18:26

There's something here.

0:18:300:18:32

They've called it a large vintage dragonfly brooch.

0:18:320:18:37

It's either really, really horrible, or quite good fun.

0:18:380:18:42

No risk here, then. Sue owns the contents of this cabinet.

0:18:430:18:46

Hello, Sue.

0:18:460:18:48

-I think that's '50s.

-Mm.

0:18:480:18:50

I do like the way it's been made.

0:18:500:18:52

The sort of graduated pearls there.

0:18:520:18:54

The lovely almost seed pearls on the wings.

0:18:540:18:58

That really bugs me, the way that that pearl,

0:18:580:19:02

or plastic pearl, is off centre.

0:19:020:19:05

-You've got 38 on it.

-Yes.

0:19:050:19:08

What I'd like to offer you is 20.

0:19:080:19:11

-No, I couldn't do 20.

-No?

0:19:110:19:13

I'd knock ten off ticket price.

0:19:130:19:15

-Can we say 25?

-Is that all right?

0:19:150:19:17

-26.

-26. Go on, then.

0:19:170:19:19

I'm not going to argue over a few pounds.

0:19:190:19:21

Top work. Just a few paces from the front door and Catherine has bagged

0:19:210:19:26

her first deal of the day.

0:19:260:19:27

Now, Charles is in here somewhere.

0:19:270:19:30

Oh, there you go.

0:19:300:19:31

Hello, how's it going?

0:19:310:19:33

-Good.

-Do you know...

-Good.

0:19:330:19:36

-Really good.

-Do you know, this is probably one of the nicest display cabinets

0:19:360:19:40

and just as I came in here, I just saw, in the corner,

0:19:400:19:45

there are some very...

0:19:450:19:46

What are you looking at? What are you looking at? Don't look.

0:19:460:19:49

This is my area.

0:19:490:19:50

-I found it.

-It's now... You know, time is marching forward.

0:19:500:19:53

Look, look, there's some nice...

0:19:530:19:54

-There we are. That's nice. Tie.

-Yeah, I don't... Actually...

0:19:540:19:57

-That's lovely.

-I quite like that tie.

-Go on. Go and buy a tie.

0:19:570:20:01

You need a new one, dear.

0:20:010:20:03

He's easily distracted.

0:20:030:20:05

What have you spotted, Catherine?

0:20:050:20:06

It is rich pickings, as my Hanson would say.

0:20:060:20:09

Well, dealer Sam is here to help.

0:20:110:20:12

Isn't that interesting?

0:20:140:20:16

That is a brooch in the form of a perfume bottle.

0:20:160:20:20

What the lady would do is have that pinned to her dress,

0:20:200:20:23

or pinned to her jacket, and you would undo the top...

0:20:230:20:29

Take the little glass...

0:20:300:20:31

-..stopper out...

-Yes.

0:20:330:20:35

Isn't that lovely? Edwardian.

0:20:350:20:38

38.

0:20:380:20:39

I like that.

0:20:400:20:41

There's so many lovely things here.

0:20:420:20:44

Ooh, I want to buy everything.

0:20:440:20:46

I love that.

0:20:460:20:47

I'm very excited here.

0:20:470:20:50

What is lovely about this,

0:20:500:20:51

-it is actually a baby's rattle and a teether as well.

-It's beautiful.

0:20:510:20:56

So...

0:20:560:20:57

But what is lovely is it is in the form of an owl's head

0:20:570:21:00

and owls are quite collectable. This is actually really nicely done.

0:21:000:21:04

Great spot, Catherine.

0:21:040:21:06

Amongst all this stock, that's two gems.

0:21:060:21:08

The 1920s owl rattle has a ticket price of £150.

0:21:080:21:14

I do like it so I might gamble on it.

0:21:140:21:16

Well, I can speak for Debbie.

0:21:160:21:18

I think she wouldn't take anything less than 100 for the rattle.

0:21:180:21:21

She would do the perfume bottle for 20.

0:21:210:21:23

Do I do it? What do you think?

0:21:230:21:26

-Oh, I'd be a devil.

-Be a devil?

0:21:260:21:29

-Be a devil.

-I like to be a devil.

-Do you?

-Lovely.

0:21:290:21:33

Catherine devilishly scoops up the rattle and teether for £100.

0:21:330:21:37

The scent bottle brooch for 20, and the dragonfly brooch for £26.

0:21:370:21:43

While she makes off with the car, Charles browses on.

0:21:430:21:46

Come on, Charles.

0:21:460:21:48

Let's dig deep, like you were this morning.

0:21:480:21:51

There's got to be something.

0:21:510:21:52

Minutes ago... I love this.

0:21:520:21:54

On a summer day, you often see summer fruits.

0:21:540:21:57

I love these because they are just gorgeous Crown Ducal,

0:21:570:22:01

probably by Charlotte Rhead.

0:22:010:22:03

And they are so Art Deco.

0:22:030:22:04

Look at the little beaded handles here.

0:22:040:22:07

They've got that skyscraper look.

0:22:070:22:09

There's a crack running down the rim here.

0:22:090:22:13

And they've been smashed.

0:22:130:22:14

But on that side they're OK.

0:22:140:22:16

Against a wall, you can't even see it.

0:22:160:22:19

Great pair of pots.

0:22:190:22:21

Made by Crown Ducal.

0:22:210:22:23

1935.

0:22:230:22:25

Could be yours for £6.

0:22:250:22:27

Isn't that amazing?

0:22:270:22:29

Incredible.

0:22:290:22:30

Ignore the damage and they're gorgeous.

0:22:300:22:32

Charles is keen to chat to their vendor.

0:22:340:22:36

They are very damaged.

0:22:360:22:37

Quite right. I suppose when they're very damaged,

0:22:370:22:39

obviously they are very cheap, aren't they? At £6.

0:22:390:22:41

Can you do much on that for me at all?

0:22:410:22:44

£5. I will pay £5 and they're sold.

0:22:440:22:49

Thanks a lot. Great.

0:22:490:22:51

-I'll pay you £5.

-Pay the lady there.

0:22:510:22:52

There's 20.

0:22:520:22:54

I'm having 20 now for them.

0:22:550:22:56

-I'm sorry.

-Cheeky!

0:22:560:22:58

-If I may have £15 back.

-Right, OK.

0:22:580:23:01

£5 spent and off he goes.

0:23:020:23:05

Thanks ever so much. Have a good day.

0:23:050:23:06

Enjoy the sunshine.

0:23:060:23:07

-Thank you.

-Bye-bye.

-Bye.

0:23:070:23:09

Meanwhile Catherine is 16 miles away in Stoke on Trent,

0:23:120:23:15

the world's capital of ceramics.

0:23:150:23:18

She's here to learn about one man

0:23:190:23:20

who played a particularly important role

0:23:200:23:22

in making the local potteries so renowned.

0:23:220:23:25

Paul Wood is here to tell Catherine the life of Stoke's Josiah Spode.

0:23:260:23:31

-Hello.

-Hello.

0:23:320:23:34

-Wow.

-Lovely to meet you. Welcome to the Spode Museum trust.

0:23:350:23:39

By the latter half of the 18th century,

0:23:390:23:41

Stoke was already a bustling centre for the pottery trade.

0:23:410:23:45

Amongst this hotbed of thriving industry, one man stood out

0:23:450:23:49

for his imaginative approach and for one type of pattern in particular.

0:23:490:23:53

I can't believe the amount of blue and white that you've got here.

0:23:530:23:58

This is a collection we've been putting together

0:23:580:24:00

for many, many years.

0:24:000:24:01

Spode's blue earthenware is instantly recognisable.

0:24:020:24:06

It used locally sourced clay which made it cheaper than porcelain.

0:24:060:24:10

In 1796 Spode made a significant development

0:24:100:24:13

that changed the course of the industry.

0:24:130:24:16

This is a piece of bone china.

0:24:160:24:18

So what makes this so special?

0:24:180:24:20

The main thing was the use of 50% bone ash in the recipe.

0:24:200:24:25

But this is the one where he actually got it right,

0:24:250:24:27

he cracked it, he got the right percentage of bone ash,

0:24:270:24:31

with English china clay,

0:24:310:24:32

some feldspar, and it just came out beautifully, white, translucent,

0:24:320:24:38

and really very stable to fire and make.

0:24:380:24:41

And you could put wonderful ranges of decorations on it.

0:24:410:24:44

Spode's recipe is still used today

0:24:440:24:46

by pottery manufacturers the world over,

0:24:460:24:48

and it made Spode a household name.

0:24:480:24:50

Bone china tended to be used in, shall we say,

0:24:500:24:53

the London townhouses of the rich.

0:24:530:24:55

One cup and saucer would be a month's wages

0:24:550:24:58

for an average workman.

0:24:580:25:00

You're talking about very, very expensive production.

0:25:000:25:03

But the earthenware was used in the big country homes.

0:25:030:25:06

Both of these things were continued in parallel production.

0:25:060:25:09

The bone china developed and grew, but so did the blue.

0:25:090:25:12

Spode's biggest challenge was meeting the demands of the public

0:25:120:25:15

who had grown used to importing china from China.

0:25:150:25:19

The taste in Europe was of course being met, but very slowly,

0:25:190:25:23

by ships bringing Chinese porcelain from the Far East,

0:25:230:25:27

which was considered very chic, very attractive.

0:25:270:25:30

And there was Spode.

0:25:300:25:32

He developed a way of engraving the pattern so it could be reproduced.

0:25:320:25:36

He'd get hold of a Chinese original,

0:25:360:25:38

makes a fair copy that was an engraving,

0:25:380:25:41

and of course that then meant that he could meet the demand that

0:25:410:25:44

couldn't really be met from the Far East quickly enough

0:25:440:25:47

for the local customers.

0:25:470:25:48

So that really upped the game

0:25:480:25:50

and became something that the English preferred

0:25:500:25:53

against imported porcelain from the Far East.

0:25:530:25:56

This early form of mass production was hugely successful

0:25:580:26:01

but still required a lot of skill.

0:26:010:26:02

Paul, one of the Museum trustees, is here to demonstrate.

0:26:040:26:08

Would you have had originally one person doing that?

0:26:080:26:11

Yes. There was always a team.

0:26:110:26:13

There was the printer,

0:26:130:26:15

a transferor, who was the most skilled person,

0:26:150:26:18

and then they had an apprentice who would rub the pattern down,

0:26:180:26:22

and there was a younger, usually girl, who'd cut the paper out first.

0:26:220:26:26

So a team of four.

0:26:260:26:28

And they were often a family.

0:26:280:26:29

The father was often the printer and the wife was the transferor.

0:26:290:26:34

Oil-based colour was applied to an engraving

0:26:340:26:38

and then on to transfer paper.

0:26:380:26:40

-Shall I be your apprentice, then?

-Yes, please.

0:26:410:26:43

The job of cutting out the pattern,

0:26:430:26:45

carried out by the young members of the families,

0:26:450:26:47

now falls to Catherine.

0:26:470:26:49

Goodness me, I shall never, ever turn away

0:26:490:26:52

a willow patterned transfer-printed plate again.

0:26:520:26:56

How many of these would they have produced,

0:26:560:26:59

how many plates, for example?

0:26:590:27:00

They would produce several hundred a day.

0:27:000:27:02

-Several hundred a day?

-Yeah. Oh, yeah.

0:27:020:27:04

Well, they were on piece work, and that is what they were paid by,

0:27:060:27:09

so the pressure was on all the time.

0:27:090:27:12

Oh, my goodness. I can't believe they made so many of these.

0:27:120:27:15

Josiah died soon after making his pottery into a successful business,

0:27:160:27:20

but his son saw the potential in his father's inventions,

0:27:200:27:23

and in the 19th century,

0:27:230:27:24

Spode was one of the largest potteries in Staffordshire,

0:27:240:27:27

boasting 22 bottle ovens and employing around 1,000 locals.

0:27:270:27:32

The pioneering effort of Josiah Spode

0:27:320:27:34

makes his early bone china highly sought-after.

0:27:340:27:38

I'm really, really pleased with that.

0:27:380:27:40

-Brilliant.

-A plate produced from a 200-year-old engraving.

0:27:400:27:44

-There's your plate.

-Thank you very, very much indeed.

0:27:440:27:47

That is... I shall treasure that.

0:27:470:27:50

We'll leave Catherine to admire her handiwork.

0:27:500:27:53

Charles meanwhile has toddled down the road to Stafford

0:27:530:27:56

and to familiar territory for his final shop.

0:27:560:27:59

-Hello, Ian.

-Hi, again. How are you, Charles?

0:27:590:28:01

-I recognise your face. I've been here a few years ago.

-Nice to see you.

0:28:010:28:04

-You're still dealing in everything I can see?

-Yep.

0:28:040:28:07

Yes, Windmill Antiques is certainly full to the gunnels.

0:28:070:28:11

There's plenty of nice smalls here, aren't there?

0:28:110:28:13

I might look at these later.

0:28:130:28:14

But I'm always keen to come to your top cabinet

0:28:140:28:18

and just peer in...

0:28:180:28:20

..to the counter. You've got some good bits here.

0:28:210:28:24

Any star finds recently?

0:28:240:28:25

Well, I've got a nice little diamond and ruby leopard.

0:28:250:28:31

That's nice. The brooch.

0:28:310:28:32

Pretty, isn't it? Nine carat gold?

0:28:320:28:34

-Nine carat gold.

-What, 1970s, probably 1980s?

0:28:340:28:38

-Yep.

-Expensive?

0:28:380:28:39

-Not really.

-How much?

0:28:390:28:40

-£100.

-Really?

0:28:400:28:42

That really is quite stylish.

0:28:420:28:45

-Good.

-I also just, away from the leopard, quite like that box there,

0:28:450:28:49

the rectangular white metal box.

0:28:490:28:51

-Is that silver?

-No, it isn't, but it's quite an unusual thing.

0:28:510:28:54

Yeah, it is. It's inscribed.

0:28:540:28:55

-It is.

-It's got a name on which reads

0:28:550:28:59

FW Hepford, or Hefford, of Tunstall.

0:28:590:29:03

It is of local interest.

0:29:030:29:04

And I can't quite work out what, Ian, you'd have used it for.

0:29:040:29:08

If we just pull it apart.

0:29:080:29:10

Gaming counters?

0:29:100:29:11

Toothpicks?

0:29:110:29:13

-But how peculiar.

-Very strange.

0:29:130:29:15

This box, I'm fairly sure, must be no later than,

0:29:150:29:20

let's say, 1800, 1810.

0:29:200:29:23

What's the best price on that?

0:29:230:29:25

The very best on that...

0:29:250:29:27

-To a humble man.

-To a humble man.

0:29:270:29:29

To a humble man from Derbyshire, not Tunstall.

0:29:290:29:31

-It would be £15.

-15?

-£15.

0:29:310:29:34

That's not bad.

0:29:340:29:36

Not bad at all.

0:29:360:29:37

Certainly not.

0:29:370:29:38

So a nine carat gold brooch and a white metal box to consider.

0:29:380:29:43

Anything else, Charles?

0:29:430:29:45

There's such a richness of porcelain.

0:29:450:29:47

Just by looking on the shelves,

0:29:470:29:49

I can spot the objects which actually are 18th century.

0:29:490:29:53

That's what I love. That period of the 18th century.

0:29:530:29:56

So on the top shelf, have a guess which one's 18th century.

0:29:560:30:00

Ah-ha! Welcome to Guess The Age with your host, Mr Charles Hanson.

0:30:000:30:04

Any ideas? That one there,

0:30:040:30:06

that's a Chinese porcelain coffee cup of circa 1770.

0:30:060:30:11

I love it because it's so noble.

0:30:110:30:13

It's so well painted.

0:30:130:30:15

It was clearly a coffee cup from a once upon a time very important set.

0:30:150:30:21

On this shelf here, there is one item which is 18th century.

0:30:210:30:26

-Any ideas?

-Anyone?

0:30:260:30:28

It's that one there. And that's a small Chinese Qianlong.

0:30:280:30:32

As is that. Emperor Qianlong ruled China from 1735 to '99

0:30:320:30:36

and that's the same period.

0:30:360:30:39

On the bottom shelf?

0:30:390:30:40

Have a guess. Have a guess.

0:30:400:30:43

That one there. The pewter plate is, again, I'm fairly sure...

0:30:430:30:48

Yeah, the touch marks are good, and that's 18th century, circa 1770.

0:30:480:30:53

On this top here, there's one item that's 18th century.

0:30:530:30:57

Any ideas? That one there.

0:30:570:31:00

It's the 18th-century Chinese Qianlong tea bowl on the top deck.

0:31:000:31:04

This has a price. That's £20.

0:31:040:31:06

The others, I can't see any labels on, so maybe

0:31:060:31:09

they could be bought for nothing. Ian...!

0:31:090:31:12

How did you get on at home, then?

0:31:120:31:14

More to the point, what is Charles planning to buy?

0:31:140:31:17

I love history, as you know, and these objects go a way back.

0:31:170:31:22

I'm quite keen to do a deal.

0:31:220:31:25

What would be the best price, all-in, for the leopard brooch...

0:31:250:31:30

..for the inscribed Tunstall box

0:31:310:31:33

and these four bits of very old crockery and old plate?

0:31:330:31:37

£140.

0:31:380:31:41

That's actually not bad.

0:31:410:31:43

Hold on. So the leopard at 90, a tenner for the box,

0:31:430:31:48

and I think for the sake of history, Ian,

0:31:480:31:50

you know, how can one turn away

0:31:500:31:54

four 18th-century joys for £40?

0:31:540:31:58

-Which makes 100...

-£140.

0:31:580:31:59

Yeah, I'll take that.

0:31:590:32:01

Thanks, Ian. I'm really, really grateful.

0:32:010:32:03

Top work, old chap.

0:32:030:32:05

A handful of items to finish off with

0:32:050:32:06

and shopping for the day is done.

0:32:060:32:08

Charles will combine his 18th-century ceramics and plate

0:32:100:32:13

with the ribbed vases to make a single lot,

0:32:130:32:16

which he adds to the 18th-century white metal box,

0:32:160:32:19

the nine carat gold brooch,

0:32:190:32:21

his 1920s football rattle,

0:32:210:32:24

an oak carriage box

0:32:240:32:26

and the Edwardian penknife with the ear cleaner,

0:32:260:32:29

attached, but cleaned.

0:32:290:32:31

All for a total of £205.

0:32:310:32:34

Catherine parted with £1 more,

0:32:340:32:36

spending £206 on a large stop and go sign,

0:32:360:32:40

a silver lady's purse,

0:32:400:32:42

an Art Deco cigarette case,

0:32:420:32:44

a Victorian child's chair,

0:32:440:32:46

a 1950s dragonfly brooch,

0:32:460:32:48

a 1920s teether and rattle,

0:32:480:32:51

and an Edwardian scent bottle brooch.

0:32:510:32:54

Cor! Busy shopping for our pair.

0:32:540:32:56

But what do they make of each other's items?

0:32:560:32:58

Will it be stop or go?

0:32:580:32:59

Charles, you make enough noise as it is.

0:32:590:33:01

Why did you buy a rattle as well for £18?

0:33:010:33:04

Please don't use that at the auction.

0:33:040:33:05

£18 for that, though, you've got yourself a bargain.

0:33:050:33:08

My favourite item of Catherine's, I think,

0:33:080:33:10

is the one that is the biggest speculator.

0:33:100:33:13

It's the owl-mounted teether in mother of pearl.

0:33:130:33:17

It cost £100.

0:33:170:33:19

It could make 250, it could make 50.

0:33:190:33:22

Go, girl.

0:33:220:33:23

Go, indeed.

0:33:230:33:25

The fourth auction of this trip is upon us.

0:33:250:33:28

Catherine and Charles are making their way

0:33:280:33:30

to the fair city of Nottingham.

0:33:300:33:31

Isn't this lovely? Where are we now?

0:33:310:33:33

-I know. This is the River Trent.

-This is lovely.

0:33:330:33:35

The River Trent. Just that calming influence before the auction,

0:33:350:33:39

just take in the water.

0:33:390:33:40

I could see you and I on a barge.

0:33:400:33:42

That would be fun.

0:33:420:33:44

-Punting or on a barge?

-No, no, on a barge.

-That would be nice.

0:33:440:33:46

-On the canal. Yes.

-Maybe we could do a canal Road Trip one day together.

0:33:460:33:51

Could be a bit slow, though.

0:33:510:33:52

Yeah, no time for that today.

0:33:520:33:54

You're heading for the auction house at Arthur Johnson and Sons,

0:33:540:33:58

and it's a fairly substantial and, well, complicated complex.

0:33:580:34:01

My goodness, how many auction rooms?

0:34:010:34:03

Our auction room is number two today.

0:34:030:34:05

-Shall I?

-Yes, after you.

-Right.

0:34:050:34:07

In charge of proceedings today is auctioneer Phil Poyser.

0:34:070:34:11

Tell us all about our pair's lots, then, Phil.

0:34:110:34:14

Jewellery is probably our best selling line.

0:34:140:34:17

The panther brooch, it is gold.

0:34:170:34:20

I think it's going to be what a lot of people would be looking for.

0:34:200:34:22

I expect plenty of competition in the bidding.

0:34:220:34:25

I would have thought £60-£90 on that.

0:34:250:34:28

The brooch and scent bottle, that's a good piece as well.

0:34:280:34:31

It's the sort of novelty piece that people like.

0:34:310:34:34

I think it's going to create a bit of interest.

0:34:340:34:36

I would have thought that could be £30-£50.

0:34:360:34:40

So, here we go.

0:34:400:34:41

Live on the internet and a crowd gathering.

0:34:410:34:43

Good luck, you two.

0:34:430:34:45

-This is nice, isn't it?

-It's a very close atmosphere, isn't it?

0:34:450:34:48

-We're close.

-You know, we barely speak. Exciting.

0:34:480:34:51

First item to get your pulses racing is Catherine's stop and go sign.

0:34:510:34:55

Well, I've got three commission bids on it, and I can start it at 25.

0:34:550:34:59

-£25 bid.

-Oh.

-At 25, at 25.

0:34:590:35:01

-Come on, go, go, go.

-At 25.

0:35:010:35:03

-30.

-Stop, stop, stop.

0:35:030:35:04

At 35. 40 online.

0:35:040:35:06

45 is with me.

0:35:060:35:07

-At £45, myself.

-It's doubled up.

0:35:070:35:09

-It's on commission and it's done at £45.

-Awww!

0:35:090:35:13

You can't grumble with that.

0:35:130:35:14

-No.

-It went a bit.

0:35:140:35:16

Catherine starts things off with a nice profit.

0:35:160:35:20

-Go.

-Stop.

0:35:200:35:21

-Go.

-Stop it.

0:35:210:35:22

-Go, Southon.

-Stop it. I hope it will stop. Stop.

0:35:220:35:25

Seriously, please stop.

0:35:250:35:27

Time for Charles's first item of the day, his Edwardian penknife.

0:35:270:35:31

At £10. 12 bid.

0:35:310:35:33

15. 15 bid.

0:35:330:35:35

I've got 15 in the room.

0:35:350:35:36

-Come on, net.

-18, 18 bid.

0:35:360:35:38

20. £20.

0:35:380:35:40

In the room then at £20.

0:35:400:35:41

-Right. Hammer down.

-One for the road.

-On we go.

0:35:410:35:43

At £20.

0:35:430:35:45

Charles is up and running and that's one profit apiece.

0:35:450:35:48

I'm happy, I'm happy.

0:35:480:35:49

-Are you?

-Yeah.

0:35:490:35:52

Let's hope the happiness continues

0:35:520:35:54

and see how things go with Catherine's dragonfly brooch.

0:35:540:35:58

-£20 I'm bid on this.

-Come on!

-25. 30.

0:35:580:36:01

35. 40. 45. 50. 55. 60.

0:36:010:36:04

Yes!

0:36:040:36:05

65. 70.

0:36:050:36:06

-Yes.

-Amazing.

-£70 bid, with me.

0:36:060:36:08

-That's amazing.

-At £70.

-That's really good.

0:36:080:36:10

75, thank you. At 75, in the room now.

0:36:100:36:13

-Amazing.

-It is such a good thing.

0:36:130:36:15

-It goes at 75.

-Yes! Thank you!

0:36:150:36:17

That is amazing. Dare I say it, I'm buzzing like a bee.

0:36:170:36:21

Buzzing like a dragonfly doesn't have the same ring, does it?

0:36:210:36:24

Cracking profit either way.

0:36:240:36:27

It's a dragonfly. Sorry about that, but well done.

0:36:270:36:29

I like your style.

0:36:290:36:31

Right, Charles. What will the bidders make of

0:36:310:36:34

your 18th-century white metal box?

0:36:340:36:37

£20. At 30.

0:36:370:36:38

-Come on.

-35.

0:36:380:36:39

-It is a good thing.

-£35, bid of 35.

0:36:390:36:42

40 is online.

0:36:420:36:43

45 is in the room.

0:36:430:36:45

-Go on! Sorry.

-£45. At 45. At 45.

0:36:450:36:48

-It was a hiccup. It was a hiccup.

-At 45.

0:36:480:36:50

-You can tell who it belongs to, can't you?

-Sorry!

0:36:500:36:53

-£50 bid. 50. 55.

-Thank you!

-55 bid.

0:36:530:36:56

-At 55. And I sell in the room, we are done at 55.

-Very good!

0:36:560:37:00

55.

0:37:000:37:02

Charles causing a stir and bagging a profit.

0:37:020:37:05

Well done.

0:37:050:37:06

-To be honest I thought that would do even better.

-I'm very pleased.

0:37:060:37:09

Next up is Catherine's biggest spend,

0:37:090:37:13

the 1920s teether and rattle.

0:37:130:37:15

30, £30 bid.

0:37:150:37:16

-35. 35 is in the room.

-That's good.

0:37:160:37:18

At 35. Got you, madam. 40. 40 bid. 45.

0:37:180:37:20

50's in Ireland.

0:37:200:37:21

-Go on, Ireland.

-55 in the room.

0:37:210:37:23

60 in Ireland.

0:37:230:37:24

65 bid. 70.

0:37:240:37:25

75 bid.

0:37:250:37:28

80. £80 bid.

0:37:280:37:30

One more?

0:37:300:37:31

-No? Are you sure?

-Come on.

0:37:310:37:33

Come on! It's a good thing.

0:37:330:37:34

Are you sure? Done at £80.

0:37:340:37:36

Plenty of interest but sadly that's the first loss for Catherine.

0:37:360:37:41

It made a bit of a loss.

0:37:410:37:43

-What's £20?

-It could have been a lot worse.

0:37:430:37:44

What's £20 between friends?

0:37:440:37:47

That leaves the door open for Charles.

0:37:470:37:49

It's time for his combined lot of the ribbed vases

0:37:490:37:52

and 18th-century ceramics and plate.

0:37:520:37:54

At £10. 12. 12 bid.

0:37:540:37:55

-15. 18. 20. 25.

-Come on.

0:37:550:37:59

25 bid on my left.

0:37:590:38:00

-I'm in trouble.

-At £25 bid, at 25.

0:38:000:38:03

-Stop!

-At £25.

0:38:030:38:04

-Stop bidding.

-Last call.

0:38:040:38:06

It goes, done at 25.

0:38:060:38:07

Well done, Charles.

0:38:100:38:11

What's £20 between friends, eh?

0:38:130:38:15

Don't even bother with that one. Let's just move on.

0:38:150:38:18

Yeah, probably best.

0:38:180:38:20

Here comes Catherine's Edwardian scent bottle brooch.

0:38:200:38:23

Bid 20, 20 I've got.

0:38:230:38:25

5, 25, bid.

0:38:250:38:26

30 bid, 5, 35 bid, 40.

0:38:260:38:27

5, 45, bid, 50.

0:38:270:38:30

50 bid, at five. 55, 60.

0:38:300:38:31

-Keep going.

-60 bid.

0:38:310:38:32

On my right at 60. At £60.

0:38:320:38:34

It's against you online at 60, at £60.

0:38:340:38:37

Done at 60.

0:38:370:38:39

Another great profit for Catherine keeps her in the lead.

0:38:390:38:42

Puff your chest out, girl. Be proud.

0:38:430:38:46

I'm not going to do that.

0:38:460:38:47

Why? I will.

0:38:470:38:50

Steady, Charles.

0:38:500:38:51

Now, the football rattle, will it make a noise in the saleroom?

0:38:510:38:55

£30 bid, at 30.

0:38:550:38:56

-Here we go.

-At £30, at 30.

0:38:560:38:58

At 30 bid, at 30.

0:38:580:38:59

-Come on.

-£30, bit of history here.

0:38:590:39:01

-It is history.

-At 30 and I sell.

0:39:010:39:03

It goes, done at 30.

0:39:030:39:05

-Did you use one?

-Yeah.

0:39:060:39:08

Yeah, the rattle gets a new home and Charles has another profit.

0:39:080:39:12

This man used one of those rattles back in the 1920s.

0:39:120:39:15

-Really?

-1920s?

0:39:150:39:17

I was born in '31.

0:39:170:39:19

All right, sorry. 1950s.

0:39:190:39:20

You've just totally insulted him.

0:39:200:39:22

Sorry about that, sir, 1950s.

0:39:220:39:24

Lordy! Catherine's chance to stretch her lead now

0:39:240:39:27

with her Victorian child's chair with worm.

0:39:270:39:30

15 only bid to start, at 15.

0:39:300:39:32

-That's all right.

-£15 bid, 18.

0:39:320:39:34

18 bid, 20.

0:39:340:39:35

5, 30, at £30.

0:39:350:39:38

I'll take five now. At £30.

0:39:380:39:40

Against you in the room and online and I sell at 30.

0:39:400:39:44

£30.

0:39:440:39:46

Yes, another profit for Catherine.

0:39:460:39:49

Well done, girl.

0:39:490:39:50

I'm really pleased.

0:39:500:39:52

You should be pleased. Pleased as punch.

0:39:520:39:54

Yep, that's the way to do it.

0:39:550:39:57

Now, time for Charles' oak carriage box.

0:39:570:40:00

I've got 20 bid, 20.

0:40:000:40:01

-Oh, no.

-And five, 25 bid.

0:40:010:40:03

30, online at 30.

0:40:030:40:04

£30 bid, at 30.

0:40:040:40:05

-Come on.

-It's a nice size as well.

0:40:050:40:07

At 30. Online.

0:40:070:40:09

All out in the room at £30.

0:40:090:40:11

-I sell...

-It's going to break even.

-It goes at 30.

0:40:110:40:13

A new home for the box, but no profit for Charles.

0:40:150:40:18

Broke even, lost money, doesn't matter.

0:40:200:40:22

-Move on.

-Baby.

0:40:220:40:24

That's the spirit.

0:40:240:40:25

Catherine's final lot is the silver purse and Art Deco cigarette case.

0:40:260:40:30

I can start straight in at 50.

0:40:310:40:33

-£50?!

-At 55, 60.

0:40:330:40:35

Yes! Yes!

0:40:350:40:37

65, 70, 5.

0:40:370:40:39

-Yes!

-80.

0:40:390:40:40

-Yes!

-5.

0:40:400:40:41

90, 90 bid seated.

0:40:410:40:43

-Stop.

-At £90, at 90 for the two items together.

0:40:430:40:46

-Go!

-Stop!

-At £90, 95 online.

-It's that sign.

0:40:460:40:48

-I don't believe it.

-100 in the room.

0:40:480:40:50

It's against you online. Make no mistake.

0:40:500:40:52

At £100 on my left and it goes.

0:40:520:40:54

Done at £100.

0:40:540:40:56

Wowee, you have come to Nottinghamshire...

0:40:560:40:59

-Nottingham, I love Nottingham.

-..to my manor of the East Midlands

0:40:590:41:02

-and you're flying high.

-I love Nottingham!

-That's amazing.

0:41:020:41:05

An incredible profit for Catherine.

0:41:050:41:08

I'm doing so well. I want to go before it all collapses.

0:41:090:41:11

And I want to end on a high.

0:41:110:41:13

-You're making me nervous now.

-Is that your tummy rumbling?

0:41:130:41:15

-I'll buy you a sandwich later.

-What's left of yours?

0:41:150:41:17

If you can stay for my last lot,

0:41:170:41:19

-I'll buy you a sandwich.

-Will you?

-Yes.

0:41:190:41:21

There's a lot riding on our final lot of the day.

0:41:210:41:24

Charles' nine carat gold brooch.

0:41:240:41:26

At 60 bid, 5, 70, 5, 80,

0:41:270:41:31

85, 90.

0:41:310:41:32

-Broken even.

-95. 100.

0:41:320:41:34

-In the room at 100.

-It's got to do a lot more.

-Go on.

0:41:340:41:37

110. 120? 120, 120.

0:41:370:41:41

130, on the internet.

0:41:410:41:43

-Go on!

-140.

0:41:430:41:45

-Go on.

-At £140 then.

0:41:450:41:46

Being sold. It goes online at 140.

0:41:460:41:50

-That's OK. I'm happy.

-Delirious!

0:41:510:41:54

A good profit for a good item, but was it enough?

0:41:540:41:57

I'll buy you a ham and cheese sandwich.

0:41:580:42:00

Can you make a bit more exciting?

0:42:000:42:02

-OK, ham... OK, BLT.

-BLT. Come on.

-OK.

0:42:020:42:05

That's it, Charles, last of the big spenders, eh?

0:42:050:42:07

Charles started out with £695.64

0:42:090:42:12

and made a profit today of £39.36

0:42:120:42:16

after paying auction costs.

0:42:160:42:18

This takes his total to an even and rather grand £735.

0:42:180:42:23

Wow!

0:42:230:42:24

Catherine began with just under £318.

0:42:250:42:29

After costs, she made a cracking £113.80 profit,

0:42:290:42:34

giving her now a total of £431.60,

0:42:340:42:38

meaning she wins the day

0:42:380:42:40

but trails Charles by just over £300

0:42:400:42:43

going into the final leg. What a competition.

0:42:430:42:46

-For my manor!

-Thank you.

0:42:460:42:48

I did, I beat you in your patch.

0:42:480:42:49

I know! Come on.

0:42:490:42:51

# Yay, I've got my sandwich! #

0:42:510:42:54

And well done. You are slowly catching me up.

0:42:540:42:58

Cheerio.

0:43:000:43:01

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:030:43:04

our lovey-dovey pair hit the road for the final time.

0:43:040:43:08

I want to be with you.

0:43:080:43:09

-But the pressure is on.

-Pulling things out left, right and centre.

0:43:090:43:12

And it's heating up at the final auction.

0:43:120:43:14

I love you, Charles.

0:43:140:43:16

Thank you very much.

0:43:160:43:17

Charles Hanson goes missing as he sets out with his metal detector, while Catherine Southon sticks to antiques shops in her quest to find items to take to a Nottingham auction. Starting in Macclesfield, Charles moves on to Leek to learn about the birth of Britain's canal network. It's edge-of-the-seat excitement at auction when Catherine's Victorian deck chair goes head to head with Charles's antique ear cleaner.