Episode 5 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 5

Catherine Southon and Charles Hanson buy their last antiques before a final auction in Congleton. Charles discovers a collection of railwayana hidden on a school roof.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each.

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I want something shiny.

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A classic car...and a goal -

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to scour Britain for antiques.

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I like a rummage.

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I can't resist.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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Why do I always do this to myself?

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There'll be worthy winners...

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Give us a kiss!

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-..and valiant losers.

-Stick 'em up!

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So, will it be the high road to glory...

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Onwards and upwards.

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..or the slow road to disaster?

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Take me home!

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Crikey O'Reilly!

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It's the very last outing with our adventuring auctioneers

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Charles Hanson and Catherine Southon.

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And after a week of trekking about, we're up north.

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-This is Yorkshire land.

-You've brought me to Yorkshire!

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You might even call me a Yorkshire lad, actually.

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You're from Nottingham,

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you're from Derby, now you from Yorkshire.

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Where else are you from?

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When you actually sort of maybe annotate the word "northern..."

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You do talk some rubbish, Charles.

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True. Harsh words, though.

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Northern lad and dapper chap Charles has been scouring for treasure

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this week with some top antique-ing.

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Oh, thank you very much.

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But his old foe Catherine isn't larking about,

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and she's on a run of form she doesn't want to stop.

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Love it! Love it! Love it!

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Seems the mood is friendlier than ever.

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Yes, we are closer as friends, but certainly, on a financial footing,

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you've taken two or three big steps in recent days.

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I have. Does that upset you, Charles?

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No, because I want to be with you.

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Oh, Charles, you're so romantic!

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-Thank you very much.

-Talk to me, dear!

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Crikey Moses!

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Well, things have been hotting up this week.

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Starting out with £200,

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Catherine has a highly respectable £431.60

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tucked away in her back pocket.

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But way out in front,

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Charles has built his original stake to a stonking £735.

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Well done, that man. He's learned everything from me.

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Modest. With lots to play for,

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our pair are winging around the country in their sporty MGB GT.

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I used to have one of those.

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In some respects, Yorkshire is almost the capital of the North.

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-Isn't it?

-Yeah.

-Yes, it is.

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-I feel there'll be lots of tea drinking today and dunking biscuits.

-Tea drinking. Absolutely right.

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This week our biscuits dunkers have been ambling their way north,

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blasting around the Midlands,

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and now they're heading towards Congleton in Cheshire

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where the trip concludes, after more than 700 miles.

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They kick off this deciding leg in Elsecar in Yorkshire,

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before darting across to that ultimate Cheshire auction.

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But the big thrill today

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is the chance to start their shopping together.

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Now, no fighting, you two.

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This is all supposed to be lovey-dovey and fun.

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-It's quite small.

-Doesn't matter. Look, I can see a sign

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and it says, Catherine, "Elsecar Antiques, enter here."

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Is there enough for both of us?

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-Yes.

-Are you sure?

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-Looks quite small.

-Isn't this lovely?

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-Oh, I see, it goes back.

-Look at the enamel signs.

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# Show me the way Show me the way! #

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Charles looks keen, and Catherine looks intense.

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There's plenty of cabinets full of collectables, enough to go around.

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Now, who's first to find something?

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Oh, look at these!

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Aren't they the most gorgeous things you have ever, ever seen?

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A pair of hand-stitched gloves for...

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Must be a doll, they can only be for a little doll.

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Aren't they gorgeous?

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In the Victorian era, they wanted their children to have their dolls

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and they wanted their little dolls to be wearing the same things

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that the little girls were wearing,

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these beautiful little handmade leather gloves.

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£78 seems a huge amount of money,

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but I might buy these because they're so adorable.

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Ooh, this is lovely, lovely, lovely!

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Hang about - there's more.

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Again, this is going to be for a doll.

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And this is ivory and silk.

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Isn't that super? For a dolly.

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How funny is that? That's brilliant.

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Whilst ivory may not have many FANS...

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this Victorian piece was made long before the 1947 CITES agreement

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making it legal to sell in the UK.

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Right, what else?

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Now, that looks interesting.

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"Short account of the anatomical arrangement and functions

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"of the various organs of the human body."

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Lovely.

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So you've got the chest organs, the abdominal organs,

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all the muscles, all the ligaments, the bones...

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What's on that?

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£38.

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It's rare if it's complete.

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There's no stopping her this morning.

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One cabinet down and three things to think about.

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What we have got is really good, rare antiques.

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And he's just gone off and he's just buying

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an everyday, run-of-the-mill item, and I'm here with the classy finds.

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Let's see, shall we?

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"Four pieces of iron cannon grape shot, circa 1640.

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"Found near the Civil War siege town of Newark in Nottinghamshire in 1972

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"from the period when the forces of Charles I

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"fought those of Oliver Cromwell."

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And these four were found in Newark,

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shot when our country was in turmoil.

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Cromwell took the country into a republic

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and Charles I lost his head.

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I mean, they're only £65.

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And to me, they're full of history.

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I'm going to buy these.

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Well, Carl's in charge today.

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What's the best price, Carl, on this lot?

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Er, the best I can do is 55.

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-You couldn't do 50?

-I'm OK doing 50.

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I just cannot turn away from real history.

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I'll take them. Thank you very much.

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-£50.

-Thank you very much, Charles.

-For such real history,

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and these balls might just roll away at the auction.

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A cracking spot, and Charles is off the mark.

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Hold on, deja vu, anyone?

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Am I seeing things? There's some more.

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These are more and these were also found in a field in Newark in 1972,

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four more pieces of iron cannon grape shot

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from the mid-17th century.

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Yes, we've definitely been here before.

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Time for Carl again.

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You did take away the four balls, didn't you?

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-I did indeed, yeah.

-I found four more.

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I might double up.

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Can I spend £100 and buy eight balls?

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So give you another 50 for these?

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-Absolutely.

-I'll take them as well.

-Thank you.

-Thanks, Carl.

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Same deal twice over.

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Well done, Charles.

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And Catherine's venturing away from her favourite cabinet.

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-Have you found something?

-I've found so much.

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-Have you really?

-Yeah, so much history.

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-Good. It's good.

-Have you found anything good?

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I'm just... I'm just talking through

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not just decades of history, centuries, baby.

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Don't talk, don't talk, just do it.

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-OK, I will.

-Yeah? Less talking, more buying.

-OK.

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Sounds like a plan. Oh, he's off!

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Outside.

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Uh-oh!

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Sometimes you see objects in antiques centres

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and you get slightly excited by, not so much potential worth,

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but where it came from, where it began life.

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And what we've got here is almost a piece of sandstone

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that's been carved with these figures, you wonder is it...

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an embellishment off a cathedral, is it English?

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Ohh!

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And it's very heavy.

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And look at the carving down here, you've got a seated figure,

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and it's just a very speculative, quite magical piece of old stone.

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It's probably 16th or 17th century.

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It could make 50, it could make £1,000.

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That's exciting.

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Is it worth a punt?

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Yes, but at the right price.

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It could well be a 17th-century cathedral embellishment,

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but then again it might not.

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No ticket price. Time for a chat with Carl. Come on, Carl.

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-There's a very interesting object outside.

-Right.

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It's that stone statue.

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-Where did it come from?

-It came from an old mill in Batley.

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What could be the best price, just because it's just...

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a sleepy object?

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The absolute best, best, best price for Charles Hanson is £500.

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Oh, God, Carl!

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Blimey!

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Well, you mull that over. What's Catherine up to?

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Eye-eye!

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I spy with my little eye one of these very nice, early, glass...

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I think that is glass, yeah, glass eye.

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And if you think about our eyes and the different types of colours,

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we've not all got blue eyes or brown eyes,

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there's so many different tinges and things, and look at this, here.

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The glass has all been painted, and you've got a sort of almost...

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Would you call that a hazel-y yellow colour?

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I suppose you would.

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I have no EYE-dea.

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It could be third-quarter 19th century.

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They've got £30 on that.

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I'm tempted by that as well.

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Brilliant. I hope Charles isn't having the same amount of luck.

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Well, negotiations on that stone carving are still ongoing.

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If I said 380, would that swing it?

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I've got a three in front of it instead of a four.

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I really appreciate that offer. You want it gone, don't you?

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-I would like it gone, yeah.

-It's gone.

-Thank you very much.

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Crikey, Charles, bold move.

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One shop down, three lots bought, and £480 spent.

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-See you, Carl, bye.

-Thank you, bye-bye.

-See you.

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While our big spender makes off with the car,

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Catherine's back at the cabinets.

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Oh, that's cute.

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Is this yours, sir?

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-It is.

-I like your little piggie cookie cutter.

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-Yeah.

-I know it's only a bit of metal,

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but isn't that lovely, to be in the shape of...?

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Yeah, I think it's like folk art, it's handmade.

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-Yeah.

-And it's stood the test of time, so...

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It's a really pretty thing.

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It's lovely. So you press in, you get your bit of biscuit...

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-Yeah, yeah.

-Or pastry, and then you push it out with these little holes.

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I like that.

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£28.

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But I feel that needs something to go with it,

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rather than being on its own, maybe we could buy

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another couple of biscuit moulds.

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-Yeah.

-That's a nice one.

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-Oh, that's lovely, with a strawberry, there.

-Yeah.

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Biscuit or butter?

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Butter stamps were used to decorate freshly made butter.

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But this could just as easily be a biscuit stamp.

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Worth a shot? Or a pat?

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-What price have you got on that?

-I have got 48.

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Would you accept 40 for the two?

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-Go on!

-Yeah.

-Would you?

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-Yeah.

-You didn't hesitate on that one!

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-Is that OK, £40 on that?

-Yeah, yeah. Yeah, fine.

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-I'm going to shake your hand. Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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And she's up and running.

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But with a stack of other things under consideration,

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Carl's been on the phone to the vendors.

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What's on offer?

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The eye and the book, we can do £45.

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I'm happy with that. We'll go for that,

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-I'm happy with the book and the...the eye.

-Yeah.

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Eye-eye! That leaves the doll's fan and gloves.

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Absolute best, best we can get to on those is 110.

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I do really love those gloves.

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I'm very tempted.

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I'll take it on me own back, I'll do an extra £10 discount,

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so the gloves and the fan, 100.

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I can't say no to that, can I?

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-Having a deal?

-I'm going to do a deal with you.

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Thank you very much.

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Hey, it's all happening this morning.

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Catherine parts with £185 and bags an armful of items.

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Now, how's life on the road?

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There was a man called Hanson, who once took a chance.

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In Yorkshire he did find a piece of Chippendale to dine on,

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and the Chippendale made £1 million.

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You never know.

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If you say so, Carlos.

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Our wandering wordsmith is heading for Doncaster.

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The town's rich link to the railway industry is remembered in one of

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the most fascinating and rarely seen collections in the country.

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Trustee David Rogerson is meeting Charles

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at the unlikely venue of a local school.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-You must be David.

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I am. Welcome to Doncaster Grammar School Railway Collection.

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-Charles Hanson.

-Nice to meet you.

-Can't wait to see in here.

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Come on in!

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As lines opened and expanded during the mid-19th century,

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Doncaster became a crucial stop

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between London and the industrial North-East.

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-Did it really transform Doncaster?

-Oh, absolutely and completely,

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particularly when the plant works came a few years later,

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and they started building carriages and wagons,

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and later on, locomotives in Doncaster right in the centre.

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The whole area of Doncaster was built just for the railwaymen.

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It was a game-changer for local people, but also for the children.

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2,500 locomotives were produced in Doncaster,

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including the most famous of all, the Flying Scotsman.

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Railway fever engulfed the town.

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The children who attended Doncaster Grammar

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were particularly caught in the excitement.

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Hidden on the roof of their school is a secret entrance,

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hidden behind which... Well...

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So, here we are, there's a black door, David.

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Have a look what's inside.

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It's incredible. I cannot believe the quantity

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of everything you can imagine...

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It is just quite overwhelming, isn't it?

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How, within a 1930s school, did this collection begin?

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Because the boys were interested in railways,

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they formed a railway society.

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-How long ago was that?

-1936, I think.

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Over the years, the enthusiastic society members

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saw their collection take over the school's cramped attic space.

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After the Second World War, it really took off as a club.

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And that's the Railway Society members in 1949.

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That's amazing.

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One pupil, a lad named Tony Peart,

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became largely responsible for filling this incredible space.

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He was 16 at the time,

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and he was writing to all the chief mechanical engineers round Britain

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because, then, they were just beginning to scrap things,

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but nobody realised that they had any value,

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so he wrote to the chief mechanical engineers and said,

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"Have you got anything interesting to send me?"

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And they did.

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They certainly did. Around 2,000 items.

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From locomotive nameplates to more unusual railwayana

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are crammed into the school's attic.

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What's this peculiar thing?

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This...was an eyesight tester

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to make sure that the driver could see where he was going, basically!

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-Isn't that wonderful? And that piece of turned wood...

-Yes.

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This must, I suppose, date back to late-Victorian times,

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and, of course, I suppose... Yes, you're quite right,

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if you're going to an optician's, via the railway test,

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you'd be looking to make sure you pick up the signals, I suppose.

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Absolutely right. That's what it was for.

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And just looking around, I mean...

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I almost dare not touch anything in case the whole lot falls down.

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Believed to be the largest private collection of railway memorabilia

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in the country, it's certainly a tight squeeze.

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There's a load more stuff in here.

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There we go. Goodness me!

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It's just... It's not so much the collection,

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it's how somebody can actually put it up!

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In 1936, the distinguished railway engineer Nigel Gresley

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sent the society something that became one of the earliest

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and most cherished items in their fledgling collection.

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He sent the society a picture of his latest locomotive, the Silver Link,

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which is signed Nigel Gresley.

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It's so Art Deco, it's all about speed,

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high living and that wonderful loco.

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This man, Sir Nigel Gresley, was pretty important.

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Oh, extremely important.

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Not only did he build the Flying Scotsman, he also built,

0:16:310:16:35

in this class of locos, Mallard,

0:16:350:16:37

and Mallard, of course,

0:16:370:16:39

has the world speed record for a steam loco, built in Doncaster.

0:16:390:16:45

The engineering excellence of the town was proven

0:16:450:16:48

when the Mallard broke that speed record in 1938,

0:16:480:16:50

but today, the schoolboys' affectionate collection of items

0:16:500:16:54

from the age of steam is a humble celebration

0:16:540:16:57

of Doncaster's lasting contribution to the rail industry.

0:16:570:17:00

Although I'm in a car, I'd better get steaming.

0:17:010:17:04

-'Fraid so.

-Thanks a lot.

0:17:040:17:06

-I've really enjoyed that. I'll be steaming later.

-I'll see you.

0:17:060:17:10

# Take me right back to the track

0:17:110:17:13

# Yes! #

0:17:130:17:14

Elsewhere, Catherine's down the road in the village of Thurnscoe,

0:17:180:17:23

where she's gone for a gander around a great big barn of a place.

0:17:230:17:26

-Hi, I'm Catherine.

-Hello, Catherine, I'm Christine.

0:17:260:17:29

-Hi, Christine.

-Welcome to Harrison's Antiques.

0:17:290:17:32

Right. I feel I should buy something big.

0:17:320:17:34

-Big?

-Yes.

-Right.

0:17:340:17:36

So, the word for today is "big".

0:17:360:17:39

There's a lot of big furniture down here.

0:17:390:17:42

-Yeah.

-Big, big, big. OK.

0:17:420:17:44

I probably won't buy any sort of big pieces of furniture

0:17:450:17:48

because it's just not me, to be honest with you.

0:17:480:17:51

Big. But not furniture.

0:17:510:17:53

Any thoughts?

0:17:530:17:54

I'm tempted to have a look at your smalls.

0:17:540:17:56

-Right.

-So to speak.

-The smalls are all in the cabinets.

0:17:560:18:00

Right.

0:18:000:18:01

There's some silver. What are you looking for?

0:18:010:18:03

I'm interested in that, your card case.

0:18:030:18:05

It's not big, but it's a lovely bit of silver.

0:18:050:18:08

Tell us more, Catherine.

0:18:080:18:10

It is actually a really nice quality card case,

0:18:100:18:13

and when you open it up inside,

0:18:130:18:16

this little piece is actually a piece of ivory,

0:18:160:18:19

and that's actually a little aide-memoire,

0:18:190:18:22

so you could write down,

0:18:220:18:24

with your pencil, who you'd perhaps seen that evening,

0:18:240:18:29

or perhaps just a little place to make a note.

0:18:290:18:33

Like the doll's fan earlier, this ivory is pre-1947,

0:18:330:18:36

meaning it's legal to trade.

0:18:360:18:39

But isn't that lovely there as well? You've got a propelling pencil.

0:18:390:18:42

Sadly it hasn't got a pencil in it, but we can't have everything.

0:18:420:18:46

Where would the fun be in that?

0:18:460:18:48

No ticket price. Thoughts, Christine?

0:18:480:18:51

I would say the best price I could do on that would be £35.

0:18:510:18:57

35. Would you take 30?

0:18:580:18:59

I'm not going to argue over £5, I'll take 30.

0:19:000:19:03

That's lovely, thank you. I like that.

0:19:030:19:06

Cor, you snapped that one up.

0:19:060:19:07

Catherine wraps up shopping for the day

0:19:070:19:10

with a less than giant silver card case.

0:19:100:19:12

Time for a bit of shut-eye. Nighty-night, you two.

0:19:120:19:15

It's a new day, and the final shopping expedition of this trip.

0:19:190:19:24

How's the mood this morning in the MGB GT?

0:19:240:19:27

We're quite peaceful now, in our association,

0:19:270:19:30

the South against the North.

0:19:300:19:32

You are quite a well-educated, well-mannered, sophisticated...

0:19:320:19:37

extravagant lady, and you might say I'm the opposite.

0:19:370:19:40

What do you want to borrow?

0:19:400:19:41

No, nothing, but I'm just saying...

0:19:410:19:43

-It's not money, cos I haven't got that.

-No.

0:19:430:19:45

Well, quite. Our pair flew out of the traps yesterday.

0:19:450:19:49

Catherine picked up a doll's fan and gloves,

0:19:490:19:53

an anatomy book and glass eye,

0:19:530:19:55

a biscuit cutter and stamp,

0:19:550:19:57

and a silver card case, leaving her just over £216 to spend today.

0:19:570:20:01

Charles made some big purchases,

0:20:040:20:06

splashing out on two lots of 17th-century cannon grape shot,

0:20:060:20:10

and a 17th-century stone carving,

0:20:100:20:13

leaving him £255 to shop with.

0:20:130:20:15

Look at these birds, look! They are little hen pheasants.

0:20:170:20:20

Hello!

0:20:200:20:22

Oh, look, Charles! They look a bit like you.

0:20:220:20:25

Why?

0:20:250:20:26

-Because they're sort of tall and thin.

-Thank you.

0:20:260:20:30

-They're youngsters.

-Come to Daddy!

0:20:300:20:32

Hardly.

0:20:320:20:33

Hoping to ruffle some feathers

0:20:330:20:35

in the antiques emporiums of Lincolnshire,

0:20:350:20:38

Charles is shopping in Grantham this morning,

0:20:380:20:40

and just look at him go!

0:20:400:20:42

Like Zebedee.

0:20:420:20:44

Oh, right...

0:20:440:20:46

It's always good to just be on all fours and go for a crawl

0:20:480:20:52

in an antiques centre, keeps you young as well.

0:20:520:20:54

If you say so, Charles. And wear out your knees.

0:20:540:20:57

What a shame.

0:21:010:21:03

On first impressions, he looked...

0:21:030:21:05

like a bronze Japanese fisherman,

0:21:050:21:08

but just by closing your eyes and handling him,

0:21:080:21:11

he's too warm, he's just slightly too moderate in temperature

0:21:110:21:16

to be bronze, so we know he's a base metal,

0:21:160:21:20

and furthermore to that we can just...

0:21:200:21:22

tell by the tap, tell by the weight,

0:21:220:21:25

he is spelter, he is only worth 36

0:21:250:21:28

rather than being bronze and worth more like 360.

0:21:280:21:32

Moving on.

0:21:320:21:34

This is what we call an oval basket, and this pierced basket...

0:21:380:21:41

I suppose was more made for decorative purposes only,

0:21:410:21:46

but you'll see...

0:21:460:21:48

It's quite tired.

0:21:480:21:49

You've got a rivet almost lacking here

0:21:490:21:53

in the latticework of the border of this basket.

0:21:530:21:56

That handle has been off, and it's been restored,

0:21:570:22:02

and it's described as a pretty 19th-century basket...

0:22:020:22:05

..with a wonderfully painted bloom of flowers,

0:22:070:22:11

but sadly you've got that chip,

0:22:110:22:13

you've got a restored handle, you've got a piece lacking,

0:22:130:22:17

but it's still here.

0:22:170:22:19

Food for thought.

0:22:190:22:21

We'll leave Charles to ponder them.

0:22:210:22:23

I wonder if city girl Catherine's yet got to grips with the MGB GT.

0:22:230:22:27

I'm not used to driving in the countryside,

0:22:290:22:33

I'm used to much bigger, wider roads.

0:22:330:22:35

But it's quite nice and peaceful.

0:22:350:22:37

Meg seems to be squeaking a lot. Meg, what's wrong with you?

0:22:380:22:42

Are you missing Charles?

0:22:430:22:45

Who wouldn't be? Back in Grantham, it's decision time.

0:22:450:22:49

Is the broken porcelain basket a goer?

0:22:490:22:52

It's described as 19th century.

0:22:520:22:54

I'm fairly happy it's 18th century,

0:22:540:22:57

and probably came from the Thuringian works in Germany.

0:22:570:23:00

Although it's been restored, it's quite a rare item.

0:23:000:23:03

So I think what I might do is go to the counter and ask them

0:23:030:23:07

about the basket, and see if they can do me a deal on the £19.

0:23:070:23:11

Well, dealer Sharon is on hand to help.

0:23:110:23:14

Time for the Hanson charm.

0:23:140:23:16

What's the best price on that, please, madam?

0:23:160:23:18

Beautiful painting.

0:23:180:23:20

To an old friend from Derby.

0:23:210:23:24

-12.

-12?

-Yeah.

0:23:240:23:26

£12 for a nice porcelain basket.

0:23:260:23:29

Thank you ever so much.

0:23:290:23:30

That's one more purchase made.

0:23:300:23:32

Charles, do be careful.

0:23:350:23:37

Zebedee.

0:23:380:23:39

In the meantime, Catherine has meandered to Leicestershire's

0:23:420:23:46

Belvoir Castle, residence to the Rutland family for ages.

0:23:460:23:50

It's also home to the grounds that would inspire the last great project

0:23:500:23:55

for the country's most revered gardener, Capability Brown.

0:23:550:23:58

However, his plans were lost for nearly 200 years,

0:23:580:24:01

and only a chance discovery has led to the Duchess of Rutland

0:24:010:24:04

fulfilling Capability Brown's vision.

0:24:040:24:07

-Good morning, your Grace.

-Hi, there.

0:24:070:24:10

-Catherine.

-Emma. Call me Emma.

0:24:100:24:12

-Lovely to meet you.

-Very nice to meet you.

0:24:120:24:14

This looks wonderful. It looks wonderful.

0:24:140:24:17

Born Lancelot Brown,

0:24:170:24:19

his tendency to see the capability of each garden

0:24:190:24:22

earned him his nickname.

0:24:220:24:24

He transformed the 18th-century English landscape,

0:24:240:24:27

moving away from formal gardens

0:24:270:24:29

to capture a more natural, English style.

0:24:290:24:32

Why was he so important?

0:24:320:24:33

What he did, which really hadn't been done before,

0:24:330:24:36

is he looked at a landscape in a very different way.

0:24:360:24:39

Completely out of the box from anything we'd ever had before.

0:24:390:24:44

Today's notion of a beautiful English landscape

0:24:440:24:47

is largely of Capability Brown's making.

0:24:470:24:50

Some 270 gardens and parks are attributed to him,

0:24:510:24:55

including those at Blenheim, Burleigh and Chatsworth.

0:24:550:24:59

It took so long, with all these people digging and no diggers,

0:24:590:25:03

to put these landscapes in place

0:25:030:25:06

that I feel very lucky in that we here have one of his very last.

0:25:060:25:11

Brown died with his design for Belvoir unrealised.

0:25:130:25:16

It was then thought that his plans were lost in a fire in 1816,

0:25:160:25:20

so when they were discovered in 2003, the 200-year wait

0:25:200:25:23

for his visionary landscape could finally be brought to an end.

0:25:230:25:27

Well, this was his last great landscape.

0:25:270:25:33

To prevent copying, Brown rarely gave his plans to his clients,

0:25:340:25:38

so this discovery offers a rare insight into Brown's vision.

0:25:380:25:42

I call it the world of Belvoir

0:25:420:25:44

and, actually, what he's doing, he's framing the outside,

0:25:440:25:48

but there's an entire world within the middle,

0:25:480:25:52

so there's the river running down the middle of our valley

0:25:520:25:55

that we've just extended and done the last bit over there.

0:25:550:25:59

If you look from this spot here,

0:25:590:26:02

you'll see the river looks as if

0:26:020:26:04

it's running and disappearing down the valley.

0:26:040:26:07

Which is, I think, what he intended.

0:26:070:26:10

To fulfil the designs, the Duchess and her team

0:26:110:26:14

had to dig out huge lakes,

0:26:140:26:15

and plant around 100,000 trees.

0:26:150:26:19

There was one wood, to the top, do you see?

0:26:190:26:22

-Right.

-And that is where I put a nine-acre wood in,

0:26:220:26:27

to do the final bit of this landscape.

0:26:270:26:31

So I followed this map.

0:26:310:26:33

It's gold dust to me, too.

0:26:330:26:35

Finally, the last Capability Brown design has been laid out.

0:26:350:26:40

Where he imagined the entrance to the estate

0:26:400:26:43

offers a spectacular spot to enjoy his landscape.

0:26:430:26:46

Oh, gosh, there it is! Oh, this is stunning!

0:26:460:26:49

So, this is how, once upon a time, you should have seen the castle.

0:26:490:26:54

-That is the most beautiful view.

-Yeah.

0:26:540:26:57

That is such a wonderful entrance.

0:26:570:27:00

And why Mr Brown was so key in his designs

0:27:000:27:05

was because your eye was always being drawn to vistas,

0:27:050:27:09

and you're tempted by the leading of a plantation to go and look,

0:27:090:27:15

-do you see?

-Mm.

0:27:150:27:17

Brown created views to delight and entice,

0:27:180:27:21

and thanks to this incredible discovery, we can all now enjoy

0:27:210:27:25

another landscape masterpiece by Capability Brown.

0:27:250:27:28

Oh, I could stay up here for ever.

0:27:280:27:31

It is absolutely beautiful.

0:27:310:27:33

Back on the road, Charles has made his way to Navenby,

0:27:360:27:40

which boasts the aptly named Navenby Antiques.

0:27:400:27:44

-Hello.

-Hello, Charles.

-How are you?

-Very well.

0:27:440:27:47

-Nice to see you.

-Amazing.

0:27:470:27:49

It's amazing. We say this country's very small.

0:27:490:27:51

And I've been here before, haven't I?

0:27:510:27:53

You have, you've been three times, now. Always pleased to see you.

0:27:530:27:57

It's nice to be wanted, eh?

0:27:570:27:59

Right, Charles, your last shop of the trip,

0:27:590:28:02

and £243 weighing you down.

0:28:020:28:05

This delightful urn, with these really rich enamelled flowers,

0:28:080:28:13

full of neoclassical influence

0:28:130:28:17

from the time of King George III, Robert Adam,

0:28:170:28:21

and this was made perhaps ten years before the French Revolution.

0:28:210:28:26

A lot of history for £25.

0:28:260:28:27

I'm scatty, I'm just pulling things out left, right and centre.

0:28:300:28:33

While Charles has been browsing,

0:28:330:28:35

Catherine's made her way to Melton Mowbray,

0:28:350:28:37

home to pork pies and Melton Antiques & Collectables.

0:28:370:28:41

This is her last chance to shop.

0:28:410:28:43

-Hello, there, I'm Catherine.

-I'm John, nice to meet you.

0:28:430:28:46

-Hello, John.

-This is Margaret.

-Hello, Catherine.

0:28:460:28:48

Hello, Margaret, you look lovely, wonderful dress.

0:28:480:28:50

So...what have we got here?

0:28:500:28:52

Lots of cabinets.

0:28:520:28:53

Your favourite. Lots to scour, and just over £216 to spend.

0:28:530:28:57

Duh-duh-duh-dooh... Ooh, that looks nice.

0:28:590:29:02

What's that? Going to have a look.

0:29:020:29:04

Little elephant.

0:29:050:29:07

Bronze elephant, that's heavy.

0:29:070:29:10

An elephant. With the castle on top.

0:29:100:29:13

Elephant and Castle.

0:29:130:29:15

And it's on this sort of quite heavy base and I would say

0:29:150:29:19

that that is maybe a paperweight or something like that.

0:29:190:29:23

That's just really nicely cast.

0:29:230:29:25

What's the price on it?

0:29:250:29:27

£65.

0:29:270:29:29

Certainly unusual. Right, John?

0:29:290:29:31

I have found...this.

0:29:310:29:35

-OK.

-Do you know anything about it?

0:29:350:29:36

It's from the Law Society in the Elephant and Castle in London.

0:29:360:29:40

And it would have been produced

0:29:400:29:41

to sit on the lawyer or solicitor's desk at some point.

0:29:410:29:44

I think it's charming.

0:29:440:29:46

It's a match holder. She seems keen. Time for John to call the vendor.

0:29:460:29:50

But Catherine's not done yet.

0:29:500:29:51

I've found something else.

0:29:530:29:55

I quite like that.

0:29:570:29:59

Now, so what have we got here?

0:29:590:30:01

We got...

0:30:010:30:02

an ashtray.

0:30:020:30:04

Like a rocking cradle.

0:30:040:30:06

And that, I think, is rather cute.

0:30:070:30:10

Yes, I think it's a cigar rest. It's a bit different.

0:30:100:30:12

£18, silver plate.

0:30:120:30:14

A real novelty ashtray.

0:30:150:30:17

I think that's a bit of fun.

0:30:170:30:19

While you were making the call, there was something else.

0:30:190:30:22

I was sort of strangely interested in this.

0:30:220:30:25

What would you do on that? I don't know if I want it or not.

0:30:250:30:28

We could do that for 10.

0:30:280:30:30

£8 discount, there.

0:30:300:30:31

And the vendor of the elephant is willing to accept £55.

0:30:310:30:35

What to do, then?

0:30:350:30:37

Shall we do a nice round 60 for the two? How's that?

0:30:370:30:39

-That will be fine.

-Yeah? OK. Fantastic.

0:30:390:30:42

That's £10 for the cigar rest

0:30:420:30:45

and £50 for the bronze elephant.

0:30:450:30:47

So, Catherine's all finished up.

0:30:480:30:50

How about Charles?

0:30:510:30:53

Look at this table. Just look!

0:30:530:30:55

Look at the frieze here.

0:30:550:30:57

You've got this gorgeous shell inlay,

0:30:570:31:00

which is also down here.

0:31:000:31:03

This chamfered leg,

0:31:030:31:04

which actually is cut in on the right angle,

0:31:040:31:08

confirms to me that this D end, although it's been repolished,

0:31:080:31:12

will date to around 1785.

0:31:120:31:15

If you sat round this table in 1785,

0:31:150:31:18

you may have been talking about King George III's mental health.

0:31:180:31:22

You could have been talking about the Seven Years War

0:31:220:31:26

that happened ten years ago, and I just feel I've got to go out

0:31:260:31:29

with a bit of a send-off, in my week.

0:31:290:31:33

It's priced at 595.

0:31:330:31:35

If you don't ask, you never get.

0:31:350:31:37

Talk about sticking your neck out.

0:31:370:31:39

It's gorgeous, but brown furniture, as we know, can be a gamble.

0:31:390:31:43

This looks serious.

0:31:430:31:44

There's that lovely D-ended dining table.

0:31:440:31:49

I like it a lot. It's priced at 595.

0:31:490:31:51

What's your absolute best price on it?

0:31:510:31:54

I've had it a while, I acquired it, well...

0:31:540:31:56

I would let you have it for £300.

0:31:560:31:59

I've got left over £243.

0:32:010:32:08

I'll tell you what, Charles, I'll have the 240,

0:32:080:32:11

you can keep the £3, how's that? And my margin's quite well, thank you.

0:32:110:32:15

So you're saying to me I can put that £3 back in my pocket?

0:32:150:32:18

-You can, yes.

-And you will take 240, and if you look at me truthfully

0:32:180:32:21

and say there's a margin and there's still money in it for you...?

0:32:210:32:25

There's a very good margin for me, Charles, thank you.

0:32:250:32:27

-I'll take it.

-You're a good man.

0:32:270:32:29

And that leaves me £3 left over.

0:32:290:32:32

And all to play for in my grand finale.

0:32:320:32:35

What a way to finish, eh?

0:32:360:32:37

How exciting! Charles takes a chance with his George III dining table,

0:32:370:32:41

which he adds to his 17th-century grapeshot,

0:32:410:32:45

which he keeps separate from another lot of grapeshot.

0:32:450:32:48

A 17th-century stone carving

0:32:500:32:52

and the porcelain basket completes his lot.

0:32:520:32:55

All of which cost him a total of £732.

0:32:550:32:59

Catherine's spent £275 on a doll's fan and gloves,

0:33:000:33:04

the anatomy book and glass eye,

0:33:040:33:07

the biscuit cutter and stamp,

0:33:070:33:10

the silver card case,

0:33:100:33:11

the bronze elephant match holder,

0:33:110:33:14

and the silver-plated cigar rest.

0:33:140:33:16

But what do they make of each other's lots?

0:33:160:33:19

Can't believe Catherine bought

0:33:190:33:21

a silver card case aide-memoire for £30.

0:33:210:33:25

If it doesn't treble up and make nearer £100, I'll be very surprised.

0:33:250:33:29

I'm in trouble.

0:33:290:33:30

Charles's carving, he calls it 17th century.

0:33:300:33:35

There's something about it, I'm not sure what,

0:33:350:33:37

but it looks a bit odd to me.

0:33:370:33:40

I admire him for spending that amount of money,

0:33:400:33:44

and only time will tell.

0:33:440:33:45

Yes. But time for this road trip is fast running out,

0:33:450:33:49

as our eager pair make their way

0:33:490:33:51

to their final auction

0:33:510:33:52

in Congleton in Cheshire.

0:33:520:33:54

It's been a week to remember.

0:33:540:33:57

-Aww!

-A week... Really, Catherine, I would say

0:33:570:33:59

you're a fairly high-class lady, you like fine things,

0:33:590:34:02

and you like quality and that's why I was quite impressed

0:34:020:34:06

that you liked me as well.

0:34:060:34:07

I'm not going to say too much, cos it will go to your head,

0:34:090:34:11

but I shall miss your little fidgety moments.

0:34:110:34:14

Blame it on the boogie and all of that.

0:34:140:34:17

I shall miss the shimmies, the dancing, the movements.

0:34:170:34:20

-Yeah.

-You know, I'll miss it all, Charles.

0:34:200:34:23

There's still plenty of drama to enjoy, though.

0:34:230:34:26

Congleton has been home to this firm of auctioneers since the 1930s,

0:34:260:34:30

and today they play host to Charles and Catherine's final auction.

0:34:300:34:33

-Will we conquer?

-I don't know, this is the end!

0:34:340:34:38

-The end!

-I know! It's nigh!

0:34:380:34:39

Neil Ashley is the man in charge of the gavel.

0:34:410:34:43

What does he make of our pair's offerings?

0:34:430:34:46

The doll's gloves and fan, quite a quirky and cute little lot.

0:34:460:34:51

Should get quite a bit of interest on those.

0:34:510:34:53

We put an estimate of £50-£80.

0:34:530:34:56

The George III D-end mahogany dining table.

0:34:560:35:00

As a whole, dining tables are not fashionable any more.

0:35:000:35:05

We think it'll make £200-£300,

0:35:050:35:07

which is a fraction of what it would be worth 15, 20 years ago.

0:35:070:35:11

Oh, dear! Well, let's find out

0:35:110:35:13

what the audience in the sale room think of it all.

0:35:130:35:16

There's only one, two, three, four... Maybe 35 people.

0:35:160:35:19

-And that's daunting.

-Petrifying, in some ways.

-Yeah.

0:35:190:35:23

Let's not dwell on it. First up is Catherine's bronze elephant.

0:35:250:35:28

20? £20 bid.

0:35:280:35:29

-It's bronze!

-£20 bid. Five.

0:35:290:35:32

-Hand over there.

-30. 30 bid, 30 bid. Five.

0:35:320:35:36

-40.

-£40. Five.

0:35:360:35:39

-Come on!

-50.

-You've broken even.

-50 I'm bid.

0:35:390:35:42

-Take it on the right.

-That's good.

0:35:420:35:43

-£50, £50...

-Come on!

-At £50...

0:35:430:35:46

In defence, he sold it. That's OK.

0:35:460:35:49

Not a flying start, but not a loss.

0:35:490:35:52

Nothing to trumpet about.

0:35:520:35:53

I'll take that.

0:35:530:35:54

What's next?

0:35:570:35:58

Glad you asked. It's Charles's porcelain basket.

0:35:580:36:02

-£10 bid. 15.

-Come on!

-Yes!

-20.

0:36:030:36:05

-Go on!

-£20 bid. Keep going.

-Come on!

-20 bid. Five.

0:36:050:36:08

-We're in Congleton!

-30. £30. £30.

0:36:080:36:10

-Don't leave it now.

-That's it!

-£30, £30, hammer's up.

0:36:100:36:13

I sell, then, at £30...

0:36:130:36:15

You feel like you're just being hit in the chest.

0:36:150:36:18

He's so hard with that gavel, isn't he?

0:36:180:36:21

The nice profit makes a good start for Mr Hanson.

0:36:210:36:25

There's a lot more to come. How do you feel?

0:36:250:36:27

This is only the beginning, I'm exhausted!

0:36:270:36:30

I'm nervous. Now, how will the doll's gloves and fan fare

0:36:310:36:35

for Catherine? Fingers crossed.

0:36:350:36:37

20? £20 bid.

0:36:370:36:38

£20 bid, £20 bid, £20. Five. 30 on the front row.

0:36:380:36:42

-35.

-Go on!

0:36:420:36:44

40. £40 bid.

0:36:440:36:45

-Come on!

-£40 bid, £40...

0:36:450:36:47

-Come on!

-No, don't leave it.

0:36:470:36:49

-Their hands are too big.

-With £40 bid, I sell, then, at £40...

0:36:490:36:53

Oh... Charles. I loved them.

0:36:530:36:56

They were a real find, and someone here has got a real bargain.

0:36:560:36:59

-The gloves are off, now.

-The gloves are off.

-That isn't the best start.

0:37:000:37:03

-No.

-Hey...

-It's OK.

0:37:030:37:05

Yeah, that's it, look for the positives.

0:37:050:37:08

Next up is the first of Charles's grapeshot lots.

0:37:080:37:12

We've got a commission bid of £10 only.

0:37:120:37:14

£10 bid. 15. 20.

0:37:140:37:16

-Five.

-Come on!

-25. 25, 25, 25...

0:37:160:37:19

The bid's on the right, and I sell and make no mistake, at 25...

0:37:190:37:23

MJ 0325.

0:37:230:37:25

Next lot is...

0:37:250:37:27

It was over in a flash and that's a tough one to take for Charles.

0:37:270:37:31

I feel like I've been hit by a ball in my chest.

0:37:310:37:34

Bad luck. Let's hope

0:37:340:37:36

Catherine's anatomy book and glass eye isn't as painful.

0:37:360:37:39

-Commission bids, £10, £15.

-Wow!

-£15, 20.

0:37:390:37:43

-Five.

-Keep going!

-It's selling.

-30. Five.

0:37:430:37:46

-Shut up!

-35? You're all out in the room. 35, the bid's with me.

0:37:460:37:49

-£30.

-Keep going, keep going.

-£30 I'm bid, 35?

0:37:490:37:52

35? All out in the room, you lose, I sell, then, at 35.

0:37:520:37:56

The early optimism seems to be waning.

0:37:560:37:58

Another loss for Catherine.

0:37:580:38:01

-Shall we hold hands for the next one?

-There we go.

0:38:010:38:04

Well, it's worth a try.

0:38:040:38:05

What are the chances it's second time lucky for Charles's grapeshot?

0:38:050:38:09

Commission bids with me at £10 only.

0:38:100:38:12

-£10!

-15, 20.

-Come on!

0:38:120:38:15

It'll go with the last.

0:38:150:38:16

£20 bid. Don't lose it!

0:38:160:38:17

22, I'll put you in. 22.

0:38:170:38:19

-Good lad.

-22.

-22 bid.

0:38:190:38:21

22 bid.

0:38:210:38:22

-Still cheap, commission's out.

-It is cheap.

0:38:220:38:24

22, make no mistake, at 22...

0:38:240:38:26

It's not a lot of money for a piece of history, is it?

0:38:260:38:29

But another loss for Charles.

0:38:290:38:31

-It's gone.

-I love you, Charles.

-Thank you very much.

0:38:310:38:35

At least you have each other, eh?

0:38:350:38:36

Now, time for Catherine's biscuit cutter and stamp.

0:38:360:38:40

£10 bid. £10 bid. At £10, bid.

0:38:400:38:42

15. 20. Five. 25.

0:38:420:38:46

25, and it's on the right. 25, I'm bid. 25 bid.

0:38:460:38:49

25, our bid, 25 with the bid, 25.

0:38:490:38:51

Hammer's up, if you lose, I sell, make no mistake at 25...

0:38:510:38:55

Crumbs! It's not cutting it today.

0:38:550:38:58

We're not doing very well, here, are we? It's the end of the road.

0:38:580:39:02

We've had a wonderful week,

0:39:020:39:04

and this obviously is just how sometimes it ends,

0:39:040:39:06

it can be a bit of a dampener, but...

0:39:060:39:09

-Come on!

-We've got the big ones to come.

0:39:090:39:12

Yes, Charles spent big on his stone carving, but will it pay off?

0:39:120:39:16

-Good luck, my friend.

-Thanks for the memories.

0:39:160:39:19

I've got a £100 commission bid. £100.

0:39:190:39:21

£100. 120. 150.

0:39:210:39:25

200. 220.

0:39:250:39:27

-Charles!

-250. 280. 300.

0:39:270:39:30

-Charles!

-£300.

0:39:300:39:32

-It is worth all of those, Catherine, and more.

-£300. Ten, if you like?

0:39:320:39:35

310. 310. I am going to cash it.

0:39:350:39:37

At 310 I sell, make no mistake, at 310.

0:39:370:39:41

-Oh... You did...

-It's "ching-ching" for him, but it's...

0:39:410:39:44

..bust for me.

0:39:460:39:47

That big loss for Charles takes a sizeable chunk from his lead.

0:39:470:39:51

-I lost £70.

-We can relax, now.

0:39:510:39:53

I was more nervous than you.

0:39:530:39:55

Perhaps a chance for Catherine.

0:39:550:39:57

Her cigar rest is next.

0:39:570:39:59

-£10 bid. 15, if you like?

-Come on.

0:40:000:40:03

At £10 bid, at £10 bid, £10 bid.

0:40:030:40:05

At £10 bid. At £10, £10...

0:40:050:40:07

-Oh, come on!

-Come on!

0:40:070:40:09

-Sat down, make no mistake...

-I'm going to cry like a baby now.

0:40:090:40:11

-At £10, bid.

-I'M going to cry like a baby!

0:40:110:40:14

-I'm going to cry for the memories.

-£10...

0:40:140:40:16

What can you say, eh? At least it's not another loss.

0:40:160:40:19

This is our finale.

0:40:200:40:22

Can I say thank you for a wonderful week?

0:40:220:40:24

-I've enjoyed every lot we've sold.

-Just wait till we get to the end.

0:40:240:40:27

Now, the gamble of the road trip - a George III table,

0:40:270:40:30

a lovely item Charles bought at a great price, but how will it do?

0:40:300:40:34

£100 bid. £100?

0:40:340:40:36

-120?

-Don't make a man cry!

0:40:360:40:38

It's such a good table! Come on!

0:40:380:40:39

-140. You're out?

-Roar us home!

0:40:390:40:42

-Come on!

-Come on!

-140.

0:40:420:40:44

140, I sell, then, make no mistake, I cash at 140.

0:40:440:40:48

He's cashed it.

0:40:480:40:49

Ouch! That's one gamble that didn't pay off.

0:40:490:40:53

-That is so cheap.

-Thank you.

0:40:540:40:56

It doesn't matter. Someone will enjoy it

0:40:560:40:58

and it will live for another 200 years.

0:40:580:41:01

Now's your chance, Catherine.

0:41:010:41:02

A profit is much needed for your silver card case.

0:41:020:41:05

20, 20 bid. 20 bid.

0:41:070:41:08

-Five. 25. 30.

-Come on, it's worth it.

0:41:080:41:11

-35. 40.

-Come on. It's worth £80.

0:41:110:41:13

-45.

-It's heavy!

0:41:130:41:15

-Go on!

-55.

0:41:150:41:17

-Go on!

-55, on my left. 55.

0:41:170:41:19

-55, 55, 60!

-It's a heavy thing.

0:41:190:41:22

-Keep going!

-Keep going! 65, 65 bid.

0:41:220:41:24

I'll take it on my right. 65.

0:41:240:41:25

-Don't lose it now.

-That's not bad, Catherine, that's OK.

0:41:250:41:28

-Come on!

-At 65, I sell...

0:41:280:41:30

-It's a heavy thing.

-At 65...

0:41:300:41:33

That's a profit.

0:41:330:41:34

More than doubling her money, Catherine ends on a profit,

0:41:340:41:37

but is it enough to win?

0:41:370:41:39

Time to find out.

0:41:390:41:41

Catherine started this final leg with £431.60.

0:41:430:41:48

After auction costs,

0:41:480:41:50

she made a loss of £90.50 giving her a final total of £341.10.

0:41:500:41:56

Charles spent almost all of his £735, and after costs,

0:41:580:42:04

made a painful loss of just less than £300,

0:42:040:42:07

leaving him with a final total of £435.14,

0:42:070:42:11

so, despite losing the day,

0:42:110:42:13

Charles holds on to take the Road Trip title this time.

0:42:130:42:17

Well done. All profits of course go to Children In Need.

0:42:170:42:21

-Ready?

-Ready.

-Let's go.

0:42:210:42:22

-Whoo!

-Let's go.

0:42:220:42:24

-Charles! Not that low!

-On your marks, get set...

0:42:240:42:28

-Go!

-Go!

-Yay!

0:42:280:42:29

Down to London!

0:42:290:42:31

Steady on!

0:42:310:42:32

It's been one hell of a week.

0:42:350:42:38

-You're a bit close for my liking!

-Thanks a lot!

0:42:380:42:41

There's been some sweeping successes.

0:42:410:42:43

Yay!

0:42:440:42:45

And some minor mishaps.

0:42:450:42:47

I've...lost my dog, now.

0:42:470:42:48

But in the end, there's been a lot of love.

0:42:500:42:52

-I think I need a kiss for that.

-Thank you.

0:42:520:42:54

Cheerio, chaps. You've been great.

0:42:540:42:56

-Keep going!

-Just indicate left,

0:42:560:42:58

I'm sure the car is on the left somewhere around here.

0:42:580:43:00

I'm sorry. Sorry!

0:43:000:43:02

Next time...

0:43:020:43:04

it's a brand-new adventure with Christina Trevanion and Mark Stacey.

0:43:040:43:08

I think that's your strategy, Christina, flirt, flirt, flirt.

0:43:080:43:11

OK. My strategy is going to be no flirting, no haggling.

0:43:110:43:16

HE LAUGHS

0:43:160:43:18

It is the last chance for Catherine Southon and Charles Hanson to bag antiques before a final auction in Congleton. They travel through Yorkshire and Leicestershire, and Charles takes a detour to discover an incredible collection of railwayana hidden on a school roof, while Catherine uncovers the story behind the once lost plans drawn by great garden designer Capability Brown.


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