Episode 6 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 6

Christina Trevanion and Mark Stacey set off on a south coast antiques hunt. Kicking off their trip in Littlehampton, they travel north to an auction in Merseyside.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antique experts. With £200 each...

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I want something shiny.

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..a classic car, and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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-I like a rummage!

-I can't resist!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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-Sorry!

-Why do I always do this to myself?

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There'll be worthy winners...

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-Give us a kiss.

-..and valiant losers.

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-Come on, stick 'em up.

-So, will it be the high road to glory...

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-Onwards and upwards!

-..or the slow road to disaster?

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-Take me home!

-This is Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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Sound the antiques klaxon!

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HORN TOOTS

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We're off on a brand-new adventure,

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with auctioneer Christina Trevanion and dealer Mark Stacey.

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Should be a laugh!

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Christina! Gosh, this is exciting!

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The first day of our Antiques Roadshow!

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Yep. Very exciting, but I'm also quite nervous.

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-Oh, Christina!

-I am, because I've never, ever worked with you before.

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Mmm. I'd be feeling anxious, too.

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-People say I flirt.

-Ha-ha!

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Does the Pope have a balcony?

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I don't flirt, I wouldn't know how to flirt!

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Oh, no, Christina, of course you wouldn't! No!

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Oh, no! Here we go!

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I think that's your strategy, Christina - flirt, flirt, flirt,

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and then if all else fails, flirt some more.

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OK, so, my strategy is going to be,

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no flirting, no haggling.

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HE LAUGHS

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Now, this SHOULD prove interesting!

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Our cheeky twosome have £200 apiece in their pocket and they're roaring

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along the countryside in a sassy 1977 Alfa Romeo Spider.

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I used to have one of those once. Red - for danger.

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I feel happy for you to drive all the time -

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-I like being driven by you.

-Do you?!

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Pants on fire!

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This road trip kicks off in West Sussex before taking

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a gallivant north as far as Merseyside,

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with auctions in Cheshire, Gloucestershire and Manchester,

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and will conclude in Bolton.

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Today, our bold adventurers begin

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in Climping in Littlehampton,

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and will auction in Birkenhead

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in Merseyside. That's a long way!

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Do you want me to teach you how to bat your eyelids?

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Go on, bat, bat.

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Crumbs! Mark is a lucky chap,

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as Christina is dropping him off at his first shopping rendezvous.

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-Thank you so much.

-You're very welcome, dear passenger.

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-All right, have fun.

-Take care. Thanks, Christina.

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-Take care, all right.

-See you later.

-Bye! Bye!

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We'll catch up with Christina soon.

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Now, Mark, get in there and get buying.

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Hello, I'm Mark.

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-I'm Simon.

-Nice to meet you, Simon.

-And you.

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Well, I'll have a good rummage round

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and hopefully we can find a few things I can negotiate with you.

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-Excellent.

-Lovely. Thanks, Simon.

-OK, thank you.

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Mark loves a good mooch about

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and there's certainly plenty to look at in here.

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Except for Jumbo.

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Don't worry, he did ask permission.

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Ah, what's this?

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Gosh, this is interesting.

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Look at the carving on this. I mean, it's absolutely amazing, isn't it?

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All this wood, and I think it might be sandalwood

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or something like this. I know what this is, it's a writing slope.

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And you see Victorian writing slopes and Georgian writing slopes

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all the time. This one, however, is slightly different.

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You can tell instantly that it's Anglo-Indian, or Burmese,

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something like that. I mean, these are always difficult to date.

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But I don't think it'll be any later than around about 1900.

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So, it is an antique.

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It needs a little bit of work here and there.

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Ha-ha! I like your thinking, Mark!

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A handcrafted 19th-century writing box could be a very nice choice,

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particularly as it comes from India. Let's ask Simon for the price.

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It's lovely - how much have you got on it?

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-£35.

-£35, gosh.

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You'd struggle to carve a single scroll

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for that these days, wouldn't you?

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That's a definite consideration, I think.

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-OK.

-So if anybody comes in, this is reserved.

-Right.

-Thank you.

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Let's leave Mark to mooch further.

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Now, what about the lovely Christina?

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Honestly, flirt?

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Me?!

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Apparently, I'm a flirt.

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So I've said, right, OK, well, I will not flirt,

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and therefore on a level playing field, no flirting.

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No flirting whatsoever, no haggling,

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it will just be me doing a simple business transaction.

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And hopefully winning.

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Once a flirt, always a flirt.

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Christina is off to the cathedral city of Chichester in West Sussex -

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my county town.

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And it's here that the British astronaut Major Tim Peake was born.

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We know that our very own star Christina can rocket to success,

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but can she find what she needs in Whitestone Farm Antiques?

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Remember, she said no flirting or haggling.

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Right...

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-Hello.

-Hi.

-Hi. Christina.

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-Hi, I'm Joe.

-Joe, lovely to meet you, Joe.

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-And you.

-My goodness, this is a barn full of treasure, isn't it?

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Well, we try, we try.

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I like the disco balls!

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Party girl!

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What was that about no flirting, Christina?

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-Can I open this, Joe?

-Yeah, certainly. Yeah.

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GLASS SQUEAKS

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That's a good sound effect.

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It's like a nail going down a blackboard - that would put me off!

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Ooh!

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It's not that bad, Christina!

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Erm, what did I see in here?

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That's rather nice, isn't it?

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I do love a nice Stilton scoop, and there are collectors for them,

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aren't there? That's quite fun.

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-A little silver-plated example.

-Yeah.

-What have you got on that?

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I could do that for 18.

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OK. Now...this could be interesting cos I'm not allowed to flirt

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-and I'm not allowed to haggle.

-Ah, right, well...

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So you've got to give me your best price. What, have I got to go?

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-I've got to leave?

-The flirting...

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-it's mandatory.

-Oh, really?

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-Absolutely.

-Well, if it's mandatory, then I'll have to.

-Mmm.

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I feel like a gooseberry.

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-So, 18 on that.

-18.

-And I'm not allowed to haggle, remember,

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so that's your best price on that?

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-Yeah, you are allowed to haggle.

-No, I'm not!

-You are!

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No, I've told Mark I'm not allowed to haggle.

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I can't haggle about haggling!

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SHE LAUGHS

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-Everybody haggles.

-That's not good.

-15.

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OK, I have taken five steps into a shop and I have already broken

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-the no flirting and no haggling rule!

-No, no.

-I am doomed!

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-I saw it, I got the price wrong. It is 15.

-OK.

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I like your style.

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OK, let's leave flirty Trevelyan and catch up with Mark.

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He is still browsing the stock of his first shop.

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I found this little box... I've been to Moscow and the Russians are

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very famous for this type of papier-mache lacquer.

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It has been going on for centuries. This isn't quite a newish piece.

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And I think this represents Saint Basil's in Red Square.

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It's a lovely Russian Orthodox church.

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And this is all hand-painted and hand-gilded.

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The art of Russian lacquer painting

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is internationally recognised amongst collectors.

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This could be a goodie, but it looks a bit new to me.

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A pretty little thing, but I'm thinking,

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these days when things are online,

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people are often looking for just decorative things and sometimes

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the pictures look a lot better than the piece is.

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So people go mad for them. It's priced at £15.

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Time to talk money.

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I like these two items.

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I think they will appeal to auction. You said 15 on this and 35 on that.

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Can I make you a sort of... a tempting offer?

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-OK.

-Could we do them for 30 for the two?

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-Yes, that's fine.

-Lovely. Let's shake hands on that quickly

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-and I am going to give you some money.

-That was easy.

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And it makes the sandalwood writing box £20

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and the papier-mache box £10.

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Well done, Mark.

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Now, dare we return to the vivacious Christina?

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Oh, it's broken.

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She's still with dealer Joe in Chichester.

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-Hey, this is cool.

-What is this?

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It needs a little bit of TLC.

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A little bit?!

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It turns out Joe remembers seeing this very arcade machine

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when he was a teenager, in Brighton.

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That cannot be true.

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You don't remember seeing this, last year when you were a teenager.

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Last year when I was a teenager!

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Love you.

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All right, flirty Trevelyan.

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So, what have you got on it?

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-What does it say on the price tag?

-What does it say on the price tag?

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-Oh!

-It says 350.

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Oh, indeed.

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-Sock it to me, Joe. Come on.

-250.

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And be kind, I should have said, before you said that.

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I'm being kind. 250.

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I've only got a £200 budget

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and I have to buy lots of different things.

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Is there any, any way I could secure this for under £200?

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No pressure, Joe.

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200, absolute... That is, that is...

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Right, OK. I need to be sensible.

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I do love it.

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But I need to leave myself some money to buy other stuff.

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So...180

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and you've got a deal.

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But I'm not haggling with you.

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-At all.

-No, you're not haggling.

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-You're not haggling.

-And maybe the Stilton scoop as well.

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180 for a Stilton scoop and an amusement arcade machine thing.

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HE SIGHS

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-Go on.

-You're haggling.

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No, I'm not.

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I promise. Really?

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180 quid. 180 Great British pounds.

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-Have I flirted?

-No.

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Have I haggled?

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-Yes.

-No!

-No, sorry, no.

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£180.

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Oh, God. I've just spent all my money.

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It's going to be tight now, isn't it?

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It really is. Thank you very much.

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Goodness gracious.

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That breaks down to £165 for the vintage arcade game

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and £15 for the Stilton scoop.

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And blimey, look - she's only got two Great British tenners left.

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Meanwhile, Mark has made his way to Chichester.

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His next stop is Gems Antiques.

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Fascinating, cos I think there's going to be lots of gems in here.

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Ha, how original of you, Mark(!)

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I love this shop.

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Cos there's quality, quality everywhere.

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Now, this looks like it might be a mighty fine specimen.

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The horse, not Mark.

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Now, this is interesting.

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I don't usually go for rocking horses

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or things to do with juvenilia,

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but this is actually quite nice.

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It's quite well-proportioned.

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I like the stylised head and it has little glass eyes, can you see?

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Which are a nice feature.

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It's obviously been well loved and played with

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cos all the original fur is off it...

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Not only that, it is believed the rocking horse belonged to

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the brother of the King of the Belgians

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and reputedly came from his summer palace in Ostend. Gosh!

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It's certainly got age.

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It's certainly Edwardian,

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so it's going back to sort of 1900, 1910.

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It's rather nice, that.

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Time to get Maureen over for a price.

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I've had it about 12 years in store.

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Really? What are you looking for on that, Maureen?

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Because I am stuck for space...

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100 is what I gave. You can have it for 100.

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I love him so much I'm going to say yes, Maureen. Thank you.

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-And you want some money, don't you?

-I will, yeah!

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Half his budget on a bald, old rocking horse.

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A bold move from Mark.

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Come on, giddy-up.

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It's not real, you know.

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Meanwhile, Christina has travelled

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to the West Sussex town

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of Bognor Regis.

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She's having some respite from the rigours of shopping to find out

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about the British love of packing a bucket and spade

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and heading on to the good old seaside.

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Here in Bognor, it all started in the late 18th century

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when wealthy property tycoon Sir Richard Hotham

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wanted to emulate smart towns like Brighton and Weymouth

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and so began the creation of Bognor as a popular seaside resort.

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Christina is meeting with local historian Sylvia Endacott

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to find out just why this seaside town became such a hit

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with holiday-makers.

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So, how did Bognor develop?

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Because obviously Hotham thought of it as a seaside town,

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he wanted to build this resort.

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He built large constructions

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on the road into Bognor and they still exist today.

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And these were going to be the large houses for royalty

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and moneyed people to come down and stay.

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It became the fashion to take to the water.

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The curative properties of the sea were considered to be beneficial

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in aiding speedy recovery from diseases and ailments.

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The Victorian era saw a dramatic increase in visits to the seaside

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and Bognor was the very first English resort

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specially designed for bathing.

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Brrrr!

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This was the sort of thing, away from all your troubles, come down,

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sit by this, and it was a case of come and sit by this

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or use a bathing machine

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if you wanted to go swimming.

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A bathing machine, I like the sound of a bathing machine.

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Principally, to us, it's a hut on wheels.

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You climb up the steps, go inside, close the door.

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As you are getting undressed,

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there was a horse put on the front and it pulls you out to sea.

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And when it is out far enough, the horse gets taken off,

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brought back onto the beach and you walk down the steps and go swimming.

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-My goodness!

-All very prim and proper.

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Just in case anybody saw your ankles!

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Perish the thought.

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The advent of the railway boom in the 1840s meant Bognor became

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very accessible and would attract people in their thousands.

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The major visit was when King George V came down here in 1929.

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He came to convalesce for 13 weeks.

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I think the first five or six, it snowed!

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But he did convalesce and went back to London

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and then sometime afterwards,

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Regis was bestowed on Bognor.

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And that is how we get our Bognor Regis.

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With the addition of the word "Regis", meaning "of the King",

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Bognor received the ultimate royal seal of approval.

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The town has evolved over the years and adapted to changing lifestyles.

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Now, it would be rude not to have a quick game of minigolf, wouldn't it?

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Right.

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Oh! Like snooker.

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Not really.

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It may have had its Victorian heyday, but there will always be

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a call for the seaside town in the UK, won't there?

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I think the seaside is the biggest draw to any resort.

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And the ability to see the sea and sit quietly and contemplate, maybe.

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Exactly. I agree. It's been a delight, thank you very much.

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-Pleasure.

-Come on, I'll beat you.

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Oh, come on!

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THEY LAUGH

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Over the last 200 years, the love of the British seaside getaway

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has enjoyed an enduring appeal.

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Even in the 21st century, Bognor Regis still captures the essence

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of a traditional trip to the seaside, and long may it continue.

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Christina is reunited with Mark and after all that fresh sea air,

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it's time to relax. Nighty night, you two.

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Look at that sunshine. I wonder what the topic of conversation in the car

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will be this morning?

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The trouble is, I knew you wouldn't be able to do it.

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Do you know how I knew?

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-I didn't say I couldn't do it.

-How you couldn't do it?

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-I could do it.

-Because your lips were moving.

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THEY LAUGH

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Mark, I did do it.

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I didn't flirt. Much.

0:17:250:17:27

Methinks the lady doth protest.

0:17:270:17:31

Here is what they have snapped up so far.

0:17:310:17:34

Mark has three international lots -

0:17:340:17:36

the 19th century Indian sandalwood writing box,

0:17:360:17:39

the Russian papier-mache box

0:17:390:17:41

and the delightful rocking horse, perhaps owned by Belgian royalty.

0:17:410:17:45

This gives Mark £70 for the day ahead.

0:17:450:17:50

As for Christina, she bought a little Stilton scoop

0:17:500:17:54

and a rather big arcade game,

0:17:540:17:56

splashing almost all her money on this gamble,

0:17:560:18:00

leaving her with just £20. Good luck with that, girl.

0:18:000:18:03

What are we going to call the car?

0:18:040:18:06

I don't know. Do you go for things like that? It's a car.

0:18:060:18:09

-It's an Alfa Romeo.

-It's a Spider.

0:18:090:18:12

Incy Wincy.

0:18:120:18:14

Incy Wincy.

0:18:140:18:16

Now, then, our lovely road trip pals - and Incy Wincy -

0:18:170:18:22

have travelled to the Hampshire city of Winchester.

0:18:220:18:24

The city has inspired a wealth of literary classics,

0:18:240:18:28

including Jane Austen's Sense And Sensibility.

0:18:280:18:31

Talking of sense, who decided to make this pair share a shop?

0:18:310:18:36

Kings Walk Antiques Market is the place of battle.

0:18:360:18:40

Well, Christina, antique centre, here we go.

0:18:400:18:43

Two floors, antiques and crafts.

0:18:430:18:45

-Age before beauty, dear.

-Age before beauty?

0:18:450:18:48

Age before beauty?!

0:18:480:18:50

What are you doing, pushing me away?

0:18:500:18:52

-How rude!

-Happy hunting.

-Have fun.

0:18:520:18:54

They're like naughty children, aren't they?

0:18:540:18:57

-Hello.

-Hello.

-You must be Penny.

-I am.

0:18:590:19:02

-Hello, Christina.

-How do we get in, how do we...?

0:19:020:19:06

This one is open.

0:19:060:19:07

You can get into that one.

0:19:070:19:10

It sort of feels like I'm behind a bar.

0:19:100:19:13

Yes, we haven't got any drinks apart from cups of coffee.

0:19:130:19:16

Cocktail?

0:19:160:19:17

Cheers!

0:19:170:19:19

I am sensing Trevelyan is in a mischievous mood.

0:19:200:19:24

(Mark is only just there so we had better be quiet.

0:19:240:19:27

(I don't want him to think I'm looking at really good stuff.

0:19:270:19:29

(No, no. Oh, right.)

0:19:290:19:32

What are you up to over there?

0:19:320:19:34

-Nothing!

-Christina, I can see you.

0:19:340:19:36

-I am hiding.

-I only have one thing to say to you.

0:19:360:19:40

Carry on flirting.

0:19:400:19:43

-Secret agent.

-Oh, dear.

0:19:430:19:45

Mark is not in the mood for silliness.

0:19:450:19:48

But dealer Jocelyn has something Mark likes the look of.

0:19:480:19:51

-What is that little carved bit there?

-This is New Zealand jade.

0:19:510:19:56

Oh, it is pretty, that. How much is that?

0:19:560:19:59

-That could be 25.

-Gosh.

0:20:000:20:02

This looks to me like a modern piece of Chinese jade, or nephrite,

0:20:020:20:06

unlikely to have been made in New Zealand and hence the price.

0:20:060:20:10

It is probably only 30 or 40 years old.

0:20:110:20:15

-Let's go.

-Look out, someone is on the prowl again.

0:20:150:20:19

I can hear somebody coming.

0:20:190:20:21

-Hi.

-I will pop it in my pocket.

0:20:210:20:23

What are you looking at?

0:20:230:20:24

Something extraordinarily rare.

0:20:240:20:26

-Is it?

-And you can't have it.

0:20:260:20:29

It is in my pocket.

0:20:290:20:31

In your pocket? Have you been pocketing things?

0:20:310:20:33

Stop being so nosy, Christina.

0:20:330:20:36

Come on, Penny, we are looking at antiques. We have priceless things.

0:20:360:20:38

-I don't trust a word that woman says.

-Is this yours as well?

0:20:380:20:43

Has she gone? I can get it back out now.

0:20:430:20:46

I think you should reserve that for me.

0:20:460:20:48

Do not show it to you know who.

0:20:480:20:50

-I will pop it down there.

-I will carry on looking a bit.

0:20:500:20:53

Thank you very much, Jocelyn.

0:20:530:20:55

Anything else catch your eye?

0:20:550:20:57

These are a set of five sterling silver buttons.

0:20:590:21:03

Quite heavy.

0:21:030:21:05

And they are all hand-beaten

0:21:050:21:07

and they have got a kind of Arts and Crafts look about them,

0:21:070:21:12

so they date to 1900-ish.

0:21:120:21:15

And they are not all the same, are they?

0:21:150:21:18

Five different designs and they're not even that.

0:21:180:21:22

Or were they?

0:21:220:21:23

You see, there is different designs on each of them.

0:21:230:21:26

Can you just tell me the best price you could do on those on?

0:21:260:21:30

Just for me to think.

0:21:300:21:31

-45.

-45.

0:21:330:21:36

I think for me to give them a chance at auction,

0:21:360:21:39

I need to get them 35. So that would be 25...£60 for the two.

0:21:390:21:43

Can you go to 65?

0:21:450:21:47

I knew you were going to say that. You have been so sweet to me.

0:21:470:21:51

They are yours at 65.

0:21:520:21:54

Oh, go on. You have had to put up with me all this time.

0:21:540:21:57

You need a fiver compensation.

0:21:570:21:59

-Thank you so much.

-You're welcome.

0:21:590:22:02

That's £25 for the nephrite plaque,

0:22:020:22:05

and £40 for the collection of patterns.

0:22:050:22:08

Now Christina has nabbed Jocelyn. What's that you've got there?

0:22:080:22:12

-Christina, are you all right?

-Absolutely.

0:22:130:22:17

So, we have got a mahogany cased and glazed display cabinet,

0:22:170:22:21

which I think is for JS Fry - so that's chocolate, isn't it?

0:22:210:22:26

Which is really rather lovely. Jocelyn, what do you have on this?

0:22:260:22:29

I have 30 on it.

0:22:290:22:31

£30, OK. So, my slight problem

0:22:310:22:36

is that I've got...

0:22:360:22:38

I've got to buy two or three more things and I have £20 left to do it.

0:22:380:22:43

Is there any chance you could do it for £18, Jocelyn?

0:22:440:22:49

-Yes, I will take 18.

-At £18, Jocelyn, I thank you very much.

0:22:490:22:52

You're welcome.

0:22:520:22:53

Well, she laid her cards on the table

0:22:530:22:56

and she achieved a brilliant deal.

0:22:560:22:58

£12 discount on Fry's chocolate display cabinet,

0:22:580:23:01

which is a really good thing.

0:23:010:23:03

While Christina was closing her deal,

0:23:040:23:06

Mark has got back behind the wheel of the Spider.

0:23:060:23:09

Christina is quite fun, but she does not stop talking.

0:23:100:23:14

And she is very competitive, even though she says she is not,

0:23:140:23:18

but I know she is.

0:23:180:23:19

Ha, unlike our Mr Stacey, eh?

0:23:200:23:23

Mark is making his way to the Hampshire village of Swanwick.

0:23:250:23:29

Situated near Southampton, it's home to the Bursledon Brickworks,

0:23:290:23:34

the only surviving Victorian steam-driven brickworks in the UK.

0:23:340:23:39

Since the beginning of time,

0:23:400:23:42

the ordinary brick has proved to be extraordinary and is responsible for

0:23:420:23:47

creating everything from the mundane to the remarkable.

0:23:470:23:50

Mark is meeting with project manager Caroline Haynes to find out why

0:23:500:23:54

the simple brick helped shape and build Britain.

0:23:540:23:58

-Hello, Caroline. I'm Mark.

-Hello, Mark. Welcome to the brickworks.

0:23:580:24:01

We're going to learn all about bricks, aren't we?

0:24:010:24:03

More than you ever knew you needed to know.

0:24:030:24:06

With a history spanning thousands of years,

0:24:060:24:09

the first fired bricks were used in ancient Mesopotamia.

0:24:090:24:14

When the Romans conquered Britain,

0:24:140:24:15

they brought with them the trusty brick,

0:24:150:24:18

but it wasn't until centuries later that its true value was recognised.

0:24:180:24:22

By the time of the 16th, 17th century,

0:24:220:24:25

people have got tired of their houses burning down.

0:24:250:24:27

-Of course, the Great Fire of London.

-Exactly. We were still building out

0:24:270:24:31

of an ancient tradition of wattle and daub, which is clay

0:24:310:24:35

but it is squashed onto timber,

0:24:350:24:37

and they would catch fire regularly and after the Great Fire of London,

0:24:370:24:42

it was the first time legislation said,

0:24:420:24:44

"You mustn't use materials that burn."

0:24:440:24:47

As demand increased,

0:24:470:24:49

so did the need for more efficient methods of production,

0:24:490:24:53

and on an industrial scale.

0:24:530:24:56

When did that mass technology come in?

0:24:560:24:59

That really came in with the Victorians. They were the great

0:24:590:25:02

inventors and innovators and they took hand-making of bricks

0:25:020:25:06

and they started trying to mechanise it to get the volumes,

0:25:060:25:09

and it took a long time to get it going but then machinery -

0:25:090:25:13

like the ones we have here - came on the market and they were

0:25:130:25:16

snapped up and these were serious,

0:25:160:25:18

big machines that could make a lot of bricks.

0:25:180:25:21

Founded in 1897,

0:25:230:25:25

the Bursledon Brickworks was fitted out

0:25:250:25:27

with these state-of-the-art contraptions.

0:25:270:25:30

Time to take a look at the mighty machine that was capable

0:25:300:25:33

of producing as many as 30,000 bricks a day.

0:25:330:25:37

Caroline, this looks like a wonderful machine.

0:25:380:25:41

-It doesn't still work, does it?

-It actually does still work.

0:25:410:25:44

It has been fully restored. Would you like to see it going?

0:25:440:25:46

-I'd love to.

-OK. Bob, can you start her?

0:25:460:25:50

Thanks, Bob.

0:25:520:25:53

By 1935, and after various extensions,

0:25:580:26:01

the brickworks was producing in excess of 20 million bricks a year.

0:26:010:26:05

So, the clay comes down through here and it gets squeezed out of there

0:26:070:26:11

as a big sausage of brown clay to make bricks.

0:26:110:26:15

It comes through here.

0:26:150:26:17

It gets sand dropped on it

0:26:170:26:18

and then it goes through the cutting wires there.

0:26:180:26:21

-These?

-So, if you pull the lever.

-This one? Just pull it?

-Yeah.

0:26:210:26:25

You'll engage the engine, it will do the work.

0:26:250:26:28

Oh, gosh!

0:26:280:26:29

-Wow.

-And that has cut the bricks into the right sizes.

0:26:290:26:33

And this would have been going on every second?

0:26:330:26:35

All the time. And you took four off like that.

0:26:350:26:38

-It keeps going.

-Four, four, four.

0:26:380:26:41

-And they swapped sides.

-Yes.

0:26:410:26:45

It was here the famous Fareham red brick was produced and was used

0:26:450:26:49

to build magnificent buildings such as the Royal Albert Hall.

0:26:490:26:54

Now, that's how the machine would make it,

0:26:550:26:58

how about trying out the old-fashioned method by hand, Mark?

0:26:580:27:02

Well, this is a much gentler job than working in the factory.

0:27:020:27:05

It is much gentler in one way -

0:27:050:27:08

you haven't got the noisy machinery,

0:27:080:27:10

but if you see how slowly we are going,

0:27:100:27:13

you would be expected to do four of these minute.

0:27:130:27:15

Four a minute?

0:27:150:27:17

Yeah, much, much faster than we are managing at the moment.

0:27:170:27:20

-What you're going to do now...

-Lift it up?

0:27:200:27:22

Throw it into the mould.

0:27:220:27:24

Like that. Ready.

0:27:240:27:27

Perfect. I will push it in a bit.

0:27:270:27:30

And now you strike the top off.

0:27:300:27:31

This is called a strike.

0:27:310:27:33

-Run it along the top...

-This is like baking.

0:27:330:27:36

The whole thing is very like bread baking.

0:27:360:27:38

Pull, pull, pull back.

0:27:380:27:41

And this comes off.

0:27:410:27:43

-Peel that off.

-And there is the brick.

0:27:430:27:46

And then it goes on that piece of wood, does it?

0:27:460:27:48

Yeah, it sometimes comes out quite quick.

0:27:480:27:51

-That is not bad.

-A very good brick.

0:27:510:27:54

Well done. It is perfect.

0:27:540:27:56

-Your own brick.

-First of four a minute.

0:27:560:27:58

Yeah, you need about 10,000 more.

0:27:580:28:00

I want a garden shed made of bricks

0:28:020:28:05

-so I will let you carry on making the rest for me.

-Thank you so much!

0:28:050:28:10

A bit cheeky, Mark.

0:28:100:28:12

In 1974, the brickworks were closed,

0:28:120:28:14

but thankfully the site has been saved from destruction and continues

0:28:140:28:18

to honour the brick making industry of our country as a museum,

0:28:180:28:22

paying testament to the legacy of the humble British brick.

0:28:220:28:27

Meanwhile, Christina has journeyed to the largest city in Hampshire -

0:28:310:28:34

Southampton.

0:28:340:28:36

Our flirty girl wants to blow her budget.

0:28:360:28:39

With only two pounds left, good luck!

0:28:390:28:42

BELL JINGLES

0:28:420:28:44

Simon is manning his father's shop today.

0:28:460:28:49

Prepare yourself, young man.

0:28:490:28:51

My goodness, this is a massive trip down memory lane for me.

0:28:510:28:54

My university halls of residence were about..

0:28:540:28:58

-Well, over there.

-Not far.

0:28:580:29:01

We went to the same halls of residence.

0:29:010:29:03

-Did you?

-Yes. Solent University.

0:29:030:29:05

That's right. When did you graduate?

0:29:050:29:08

2002.

0:29:080:29:09

Oh, my God.

0:29:090:29:10

I graduated in 2001.

0:29:100:29:13

We were probably there at the same time!

0:29:130:29:15

Uh-oh!

0:29:150:29:17

You don't look familiar, thank goodness!

0:29:170:29:20

Oh, blimey.

0:29:200:29:21

Moving swiftly on...

0:29:210:29:23

This shop has been here for 40 years

0:29:240:29:26

and specialises in marine memorabilia.

0:29:260:29:30

So, is there anything that you have in possibly the sort of £2 region?

0:29:300:29:36

£2? Er...

0:29:360:29:39

You have full permission to throw me out of your shop if you want to.

0:29:390:29:42

We have things slightly more, but I am sure we can do a deal.

0:29:420:29:45

-OK.

-Let's have a look. £2...

0:29:450:29:47

We have to be looking at about four or five.

0:29:470:29:50

Or 30 or 40. 70 or 80.

0:29:500:29:54

£4.

0:29:560:29:57

This is a QE2 bottle opener.

0:29:570:30:00

That is £4.

0:30:000:30:01

You can have that for £2.

0:30:010:30:03

-It doesn't float my boat!

-Good one!

0:30:030:30:06

That was quite funny, even for me.

0:30:080:30:11

Yes, ha-ha(!) Maybe there will be something downstairs, then.

0:30:130:30:16

Oh, gosh. This isn't going well, is it?

0:30:180:30:21

Don't lose the faith, Simon.

0:30:210:30:23

We can do this. I know we can do this.

0:30:230:30:26

What's that?

0:30:280:30:29

That is an old college cap.

0:30:290:30:32

How much is that?

0:30:320:30:33

-£9.

-£9.

0:30:370:30:39

That is quite fun, isn't it?

0:30:390:30:41

Adrian Shipwright.

0:30:410:30:43

-I don't know who he is.

-Is that why you bought it, it has "ship" in it?

0:30:430:30:46

No, no. It just came in.

0:30:460:30:49

It is an old college cap, probably for cricket.

0:30:510:30:54

Yeah, would you do that for £2?

0:30:540:30:56

-Is that all you have got, £2?

-Literary that is all I have.

0:30:580:31:02

£2. That is it. That is all I have left in my budget.

0:31:040:31:07

Well, it is quite a nice-looking £2.

0:31:070:31:10

-Very shiny, isn't it?

-Yes, it is clean.

0:31:100:31:12

-We will take that.

-£2 for the cap.

0:31:120:31:15

It is a deal. Thank you very, very much.

0:31:150:31:17

-And you model it so beautifully.

-Thank you.

0:31:170:31:19

Well done, thank you very much.

0:31:210:31:22

That's it. I am done.

0:31:220:31:24

-Two quid.

-Sorry.

0:31:240:31:26

That is enough for a coffee.

0:31:260:31:28

If you're lucky.

0:31:280:31:29

Well done, Christina. Your last £2

0:31:290:31:32

on a charming vintage public school cap.

0:31:320:31:35

Very fetching. You could start a new trend. Maybe.

0:31:390:31:43

And that is it. Our first leg of shopping is complete.

0:31:450:31:49

Christina has a total of four lots comprising the vintage arcade game,

0:31:490:31:53

the 19th-century Stilton scoop,

0:31:530:31:55

the chocolate display cabinet

0:31:550:31:58

and the public school cap.

0:31:580:31:59

Christina has blown her £200 budget exactly.

0:31:590:32:03

Mark has bought five lots -

0:32:050:32:07

the 19th-century writing box,

0:32:070:32:09

the Russian papier-mache box,

0:32:090:32:12

the rocking horse,

0:32:120:32:13

the nephrite plaque

0:32:130:32:15

and the collection of silver arts and crafts buttons.

0:32:150:32:17

Mark was pretty confident, too -

0:32:190:32:21

he spent £195.

0:32:210:32:24

Come on, you two. Confess what you really think

0:32:240:32:26

of one another's haul of goodies. Stand by.

0:32:260:32:30

Congratulations to you, Christina. I think it's amazing you spent

0:32:300:32:33

every penny and you have taken some gambles, girl.

0:32:330:32:36

Mark's items are a little eclectic bunch of loveliness,

0:32:360:32:40

much like himself, he would say.

0:32:400:32:43

That pinball machine, 1930s from Brighton Pier, 165 quid...

0:32:430:32:47

I wish you luck with that one. It is a good gamble.

0:32:470:32:50

He did pay an awful lot of money for the rocking horse,

0:32:500:32:52

£100, but potentially it was a risk worth taking.

0:32:520:32:56

It might just win him the race.

0:32:560:32:58

Time now to point the Alfa Romeo

0:32:590:33:01

at Merseyside and an auction in Birkenhead.

0:33:010:33:04

-Were you nervous?

-Always.

0:33:060:33:08

Are you nervous today?

0:33:080:33:09

Don't touch me.

0:33:090:33:11

Stop poking me, Christina.

0:33:130:33:15

Leave my hair alone.

0:33:150:33:17

-Christina.

-What?

0:33:170:33:18

It is soft, your hair.

0:33:180:33:21

Don't pull it too much. It'll come off.

0:33:210:33:24

While our lovebirds pull themselves together,

0:33:260:33:28

today's sale is held at Kruger Gibbons.

0:33:280:33:31

-Look, I drive you right to the door.

-Well done, sweetheart. Thank you.

0:33:310:33:35

I just need a red carpet now.

0:33:350:33:37

Don't get carried away, dear.

0:33:370:33:39

-There is only room for one star in the show.

-You're right.

0:33:390:33:43

Our auction today is Adrian Kruger.

0:33:430:33:47

How do our pair's offerings grab you, Adrian?

0:33:470:33:51

The papier-mache box is lovely.

0:33:510:33:53

The workmanship in that is gorgeous.

0:33:530:33:55

It is so precise, beautiful piece. I think that could do quite well.

0:33:550:33:58

The arcade game, which is a fabulous piece.

0:33:580:34:01

Some real history in that and the fact it came from Brighton,

0:34:010:34:04

we have already had some interest on that one so it'll be interesting

0:34:040:34:07

-to see where it goes.

-OK, quiet, everyone -

0:34:070:34:10

the auction is about to begin and we are also open to online bidders.

0:34:100:34:15

Looks comfy, doesn't it?

0:34:160:34:18

I'll tell you what, it's like being at home.

0:34:180:34:21

I wonder what's coming on telly next?

0:34:210:34:24

Well, don't switch over because

0:34:240:34:27

first up is Mark's pretty Russian papier-mache box.

0:34:270:34:30

-£30, start me.

-Come on...

0:34:310:34:34

20, I have got. £20 I have.

0:34:340:34:35

£20 on the net. 25 I have got.

0:34:350:34:37

25 in the room. 25 in the room and 30 I am looking for.

0:34:370:34:40

£25 in the room.

0:34:400:34:42

£30 I have.

0:34:420:34:44

£30 I have. And 5.

0:34:440:34:45

35 I have. £35 and 40 I am looking for.

0:34:450:34:48

Selling at £35 and away...

0:34:480:34:50

GAVEL TAPS

0:34:500:34:52

Well, that's not bad. £25 profit.

0:34:520:34:54

Wonderful result.

0:34:540:34:56

Well done, Mark. Long may it continue.

0:34:560:34:58

Good start. I am positive. Are you?

0:34:580:35:00

-Good.

-I think this is going to be all right.

0:35:000:35:02

Let's hope so.

0:35:020:35:04

It is Christina's big gamble next -

0:35:040:35:07

the vintage arcade game.

0:35:070:35:09

It is a 1930s arcade game from Brighton.

0:35:090:35:12

Do you remember playing on it?

0:35:120:35:14

As a child. Do you remember it?

0:35:140:35:16

I bet you do, don't you?

0:35:160:35:18

I bet you had hours of fun.

0:35:180:35:20

Christina, you are now nothing to me.

0:35:200:35:24

Start me at 150. 150 we have.

0:35:240:35:28

150 I have got.

0:35:280:35:30

-Internet.

-160 I will take.

-Come on, internet.

0:35:300:35:32

160 we have.

0:35:320:35:34

-170.

-They're online?

0:35:340:35:37

180 on the net.

0:35:370:35:39

180 I have.

0:35:390:35:41

Rare thing, this. 190.

0:35:410:35:42

180 I have.

0:35:420:35:44

-I will take 190.

-190.

0:35:440:35:46

Online.

0:35:460:35:48

200. 200 on the net.

0:35:480:35:50

I told you.

0:35:500:35:52

200 we have got. 210 anywhere?

0:35:520:35:54

You see, two dealers online are bidding...

0:35:540:35:57

£200, all done and selling.

0:35:570:35:59

On the net at 200.

0:35:590:36:00

GAVEL TAPS

0:36:000:36:02

Well, you are out of it.

0:36:020:36:05

I can breathe.

0:36:050:36:06

The gamble paid off. Well done, Christina.

0:36:060:36:09

-Well done, you.

-I thought it would be a loss.

0:36:100:36:12

I am massively relieved about that.

0:36:120:36:14

Time now for Mark's big gamble -

0:36:140:36:17

the late 19th century rocking horse is next.

0:36:170:36:21

Start me at 100, somebody.

0:36:210:36:22

£100, we are in. £100 I have.

0:36:220:36:25

100 in the room. 110 I will take.

0:36:250:36:28

-Come on.

-100 in the room, 110 I am looking for.

0:36:280:36:31

110, we have. 120 anywhere?

0:36:310:36:34

£110.

0:36:340:36:36

Great history to this. Nice thing.

0:36:360:36:38

-Come on.

-Are you all done at £110 and selling?

0:36:380:36:42

At £110.

0:36:420:36:43

GAVEL TAPS

0:36:430:36:45

Oh, that's disappointing.

0:36:450:36:46

Surely is and someone has got one heck of a good buy.

0:36:480:36:51

-Never mind.

-Move on.

-Plenty more rocking horses in the sea.

0:36:520:36:57

Seahorses. I'm going to do a rocking seahorse.

0:37:000:37:04

Sounds different.

0:37:060:37:08

Christina's silver-plated Stilton scoop is next.

0:37:090:37:13

£20 to start me.

0:37:130:37:14

£20 I have.

0:37:140:37:16

-£20.

-25.

0:37:160:37:19

25 I have got.

0:37:190:37:21

And 30 with me.

0:37:210:37:22

-Oh, Christina.

-£30 I have.

0:37:220:37:24

5 anywhere? £30 I have.

0:37:240:37:26

I didn't think this would make a profit.

0:37:260:37:29

Selling.

0:37:290:37:30

GAVEL TAPS

0:37:300:37:31

Well done, you.

0:37:310:37:33

And this nice little profit allows Christina a small lead.

0:37:330:37:38

We're sort of bumbling along evenly here, aren't we?

0:37:380:37:41

Yeah. Bit of a break, even, bit of a profit, bit of a loss.

0:37:410:37:45

How exciting.

0:37:450:37:46

Can Mark race into lead position with his sandalwood writing box?

0:37:480:37:52

£30. 30 I've got.

0:37:520:37:54

£30 in the room. 30 in the room and 5 I'll take.

0:37:540:37:57

£30 I have. 5 I'm looking for.

0:37:570:37:59

£30 I have, 35 on the net and 40 in the room.

0:37:590:38:03

35 on the net.

0:38:030:38:04

35 on the net. Do I see 40?

0:38:040:38:06

£35. Are you all done on the internet?

0:38:060:38:08

And selling at 35.

0:38:080:38:10

Well...

0:38:100:38:12

-Profit.

-It is a profit.

0:38:120:38:14

-You've got to be grateful for a profit.

-That you do.

0:38:140:38:18

And it brings you neck and neck with Christina.

0:38:180:38:20

The winning post is within sight

0:38:210:38:23

-and I think we both might be short of it.

-Yeah!

0:38:230:38:26

Well, one of you has to win.

0:38:290:38:31

It's Christina's vintage schoolboy cap next.

0:38:310:38:34

£10 on this.

0:38:350:38:37

-£10 I have.

-There we are.

0:38:370:38:39

12 I'll take. 10 I have and 12 I'll take.

0:38:390:38:42

Look great in a cabinet.

0:38:420:38:44

-£10 I have. 12 anywhere?

-Or on your head.

-Put the gavel down.

0:38:440:38:47

£10. Are you all done at a tenner?

0:38:470:38:49

I can't tell you how excited I am, honestly.

0:38:490:38:52

Thank you.

0:38:520:38:53

I'm glad you're excited, Mark.

0:38:530:38:55

Excellent result on your £2 purchase, Christina.

0:38:550:38:58

-It's only a small profit.

-It's only a small profit.

0:38:590:39:02

-Just a tiny weeny one.

-Five times what you paid for it.

0:39:020:39:04

It's forgivable, yeah.

0:39:040:39:06

Thank goodness he's smiling.

0:39:090:39:10

It's Mark's nephrite next.

0:39:100:39:13

-Come on, come on.

-No, I'm very positive.

0:39:130:39:15

I never give up.

0:39:150:39:17

£30 to start, £30 we have.

0:39:170:39:19

-Profit. Profit.

-£5 profit.

0:39:190:39:22

Fabulous piece, beautiful...

0:39:220:39:24

-It is.

-£30 online.

0:39:240:39:26

Oh, come on.

0:39:260:39:29

£30 maiden bid.

0:39:290:39:30

£30. Are you all done?

0:39:300:39:32

Selling at £30, if you're all out. I thought it would do more.

0:39:320:39:35

I thought it would do more.

0:39:350:39:37

Ha, blimey.

0:39:370:39:39

But a small profit, nevertheless.

0:39:390:39:42

I'm thinking already of round two.

0:39:420:39:44

-Really? What are you going to buy next time?

-Just watch out.

0:39:440:39:46

Oh, really? Ooh, fighting talk, I like it!

0:39:460:39:49

Come on, stick them up. Come on.

0:39:490:39:51

Give me a good fight, come on.

0:39:510:39:53

Now it's Christina's Fry's chocolate display cabinet.

0:39:560:40:01

This is the one I'm most worried about.

0:40:010:40:03

-Oh, are you?

-Yeah, cos you only paid 18 quid for it.

0:40:030:40:06

And it's so in at the moment. Such a good find.

0:40:060:40:09

I can start that one with me at £80 I have.

0:40:090:40:12

-£80 I have.

-I told you.

-He's got £80.

0:40:120:40:16

-It told you that.

-85 I have, 90 I have and 5.

0:40:160:40:19

And 100, 10, 120, 130, 120 with the gentleman to our left.

0:40:190:40:24

-Told you.

-120 I have, 130.

0:40:240:40:27

I'm looking for £120 we have in the room.

0:40:270:40:30

Are you all done, £120?

0:40:300:40:31

I'm selling.

0:40:310:40:33

-120 and away.

-Told you.

0:40:330:40:35

What a whopper of a profit, Christina.

0:40:360:40:39

Dry your eyes, Mark.

0:40:390:40:40

Christina, I'm not a pet.

0:40:420:40:44

Darling, are you all right?

0:40:440:40:46

I'm not speaking to you.

0:40:460:40:48

It's Mark's last chance to take the day with his collection

0:40:520:40:55

of silver Arts and Crafts buttons.

0:40:550:40:58

-I predict a profit.

-Do you?

-Mm-hm. Yep.

0:40:580:41:00

I think they're lovely. I think you need to believe in them more.

0:41:000:41:04

I believe. I believe I can fly.

0:41:040:41:05

I believe that I can fly, Christina.

0:41:050:41:08

-You can touch the sky?

-Touch the sky.

0:41:080:41:11

-What's the next line?

-Um, I think about you every night and day.

0:41:110:41:14

I do, actually. It's like a nightmare.

0:41:140:41:18

And with the net now at £60.

0:41:180:41:20

£60 on the net.

0:41:200:41:22

-Oh.

-See?

0:41:220:41:24

That's more than I thought. They will make a profit.

0:41:240:41:28

65, 70, 70 we have.

0:41:280:41:30

£70 and 5.

0:41:300:41:32

£70, are you all done? Lovely set. £70, are you all done?

0:41:320:41:35

I'm selling on the net at £70.

0:41:350:41:38

I said from the minute I bought them, I'm so pleased I bought them.

0:41:380:41:41

No, you didn't! No, you didn't!

0:41:410:41:43

Thankfully, Mark's got a much needed profit. Ye of little faith, eh?

0:41:460:41:50

-Come on.

-Let's go and count my pennies.

0:41:520:41:54

-And yours.

-I'll help you. I'll help you count them.

0:41:540:41:58

Who will reign supreme for the first leg?

0:41:580:42:02

Let's work out the numbers.

0:42:020:42:03

Mark began leg one with £200

0:42:050:42:07

and, after all auction costs, made a profit of £34.60.

0:42:070:42:12

Mark's grand total to carry forward is £234.60.

0:42:120:42:16

Christina also began with £200 and has bounded ahead

0:42:190:42:23

with an excellent profit of £95.20.

0:42:230:42:26

Christina's daring buys allow her to take the lead for leg one

0:42:260:42:30

and has a wonderful £295.20 for next time.

0:42:300:42:35

So well done, girl.

0:42:350:42:36

Well, Christina.

0:42:360:42:38

-Here we go. Profits all round, Mark.

-It is profits.

-Yeah.

0:42:380:42:41

I'm so pleased we made profits.

0:42:410:42:43

-We backed our judgements.

-Well, I think...

0:42:430:42:45

It's just your judgements were a bit better than mine.

0:42:450:42:48

But it's the start of the week.

0:42:480:42:49

But you've got some catching up to do already.

0:42:490:42:51

-I know. You like that, don't you?

-Yeah, I do.

0:42:510:42:54

Whoa! Pip-pip, roadtrippers.

0:42:550:42:57

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:010:43:02

Christina reminds Mark just who's in the lead.

0:43:020:43:06

-Remember that cabinet?

-Yeah.

-Do you remember how much money I made?

0:43:060:43:09

-I do. £102.

-Was it? That was good, wasn't it?

0:43:090:43:12

SHE LAUGHS

0:43:120:43:14

Christina Trevanion and Mark Stacey set off on a south coast antiques hunt. Kicking off their trip in Littlehampton, the pair are taking their classic car north to an auction in Merseyside. Mark finds a rocking horse which once belonged to royalty, while Christina settles for a stilton scoop. Christina detours to learn about the history of the British seaside in Bognor Regis, and Mark visits the last surviving Victorian brickworks in Britain.