Episode 7 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 7

Christina Trevanion and Mark Stacey's trip continues in the Cotswolds. They pick up a collection of Victorian jewellery and a delightful grandmother clock.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts, with £200 each...

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I want something shiny.

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..a classic car and a goal, to scour Britain for antiques.

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I like a rummage.

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I can't resist.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction,

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-but it's no mean feat.

-Sorry.

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Why do I always do this to myself?

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-There'll be worthy winners...

-Give us a kiss.

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..and valiant losers.

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Come on, stick them up.

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So, will it be the high road to glory...

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Onwards and upwards.

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..or the slow road to disaster?

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Take me home.

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Today, we roar into the second instalment of

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our road trip extravaganza

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with auctioneer Christina Trevanion and dealer Mark Stacey.

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That sun feels like May.

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-In my world...

-I'm under a cloud.

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-No, you're not.

-Yes, I am.

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-No, you're not.

-And that cloud is Christina Trevanion.

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Oh, dear.

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On the first leg, a chocolate display cabinet

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launched Christina into lead position.

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Remember that cabinet?

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-Yeah, I do.

-Do you remember how much money I made on it?

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-I do, £102.

-Was it? Was it?

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Yeah, £102.

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-People will hate you for this.

-That was good, wasn't it?

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Blimey! Thankfully, Mark's a wonderful sport, really.

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Well, you did very well at that auction.

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I'm very, very happy for you.

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Can you say it again with meaning, please?

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That'll be the day!

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From his original £200, Mark's got £234.60 for his back pocket.

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Christina also began with £200,

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but she's way out in front with £295.20 weighing down her handbag.

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And this 1977 Alfa Romeo Spider is the fruity chariot of choice.

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They are gorgeous, those.

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-Yeah, she's brilliant - going like a dream.

-She's very smooth.

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-Very smooth.

-And it's nice and lush here -

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-nice country lanes, beautiful countryside.

-Yeah, great.

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You keep touching my knee!

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Well, I can't help myself.

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It just happens.

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Believe that if you might.

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Christina and Mark began in West Sussex,

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jollied their way north as far as Merseyside,

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and have auctions in Cheshire, Gloucestershire

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and Manchester to come.

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They will conclude their adventure in Bolton.

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Today, we're bound for the Cotswolds,

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kicking off in the town of Winchcombe in Gloucestershire,

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and we'll auction in the Cheshire town of Knutsford -

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Gaskell country.

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Oh, Christina, thank you so much.

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-Now is your chance to redeem...

-You were very gentle with me.

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As always. Right.

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Well, as always! Are we going to have to have a race into the shop?

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There's no competition. Bye.

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Gosh, it's very low down there, isn't it?

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Oi, come back!

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Hey! Danger ahead!

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They're sharing a shop. Oh, no!

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CHRISTINA LAUGHS

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Oi!

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Oh, sorry, were you behind me? I didn't see you there.

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-I'm sure you didn't(!)

-I just thought it was a bit draughty.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-Hi.

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Watch it, you two -

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Richard is the dealer in charge of Winchcombe Antiques Centre.

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There are two floors packed with wares here,

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and good luck with these two.

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There's tonnes of stuff. It's wonderful.

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I'm quite optimistic that I'm going to find things here.

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What I'm going to find, of course, is another thing.

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Never a truer word said, Mark.

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Oh, gosh. I thought somebody was looking at me, then.

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It's an antelope's head or a deer's head.

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£75? I think that's a bit too DEER.

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Oh, dear. Oh, dear!

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Now, who's this little chap?

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He's obviously a sort of admiral or something,

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and he's got his hands in his pockets, there.

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He's got his binoculars,

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and I think this is Russian.

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I love this because it's obviously hand-painted.

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You've got these lovely vivid blues,

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and I think he looks a bit like...

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George V or Tsar Nicholas II.

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He doesn't look very old, Mark.

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How much does he cost?

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And it's only priced up at £20.

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Mark sounds keen. What's Christina up to?

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Eastern throwing spear.

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It might be quite useful to keep in the car.

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Christina, focus, please.

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That's quite nice.

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That's really sweet, isn't it?

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A little porcupine quill box. It's really quite unusual.

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It's not the sort of thing that we do, now,

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is using porcupine quills, but they did.

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It was quite exotic.

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So, we've got porcupine quills set into the box,

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and then what looks like ebony and possibly ivory inlaid.

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Ivory can only be traded if it predates the 1947 CITES agreement,

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and this box is well over 100 years old.

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It's quite fun. Sort of Anglo-Indian, isn't it?

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It's lovely.

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It's priced at £29.

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Ooh, we have a visitor.

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-Have you bought anything?

-I'm thinking.

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-Thinking?

-Yeah.

-I thought I could smell something.

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Yeah, well, I've thunked out, I reckon. Good.

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-OK, well, thunk away.

-All right, I will.

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-I'll see you later.

-Yeah, bye, darling.

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It doesn't take long for Mark to thunk about something else.

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What's this?

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Now, this is... Oh, ah...

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No, it's got something inside it, which is a good sign,

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because you can see this is a chess or draughts board,

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and it's made of various woods.

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And, actually, the box itself looks sort of late 19th-century,

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and then inside we've got the chess pieces, which aren't 19th-century.

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Ha!

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But they're rather amusing, actually, cos rather than the usual

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pawns and rooks and castles and the king and the queen,

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these are made up of various animals.

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There's a little rhino, there.

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He might be the castle.

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And it looks like it's all intact.

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And the price is...

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£29.

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Let's call upon Richard to talk about money.

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-It's got 29 on it, as a price.

-Uh-huh. Yeah.

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Can you do me something better than that?

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-What are you thinking?

-Well, I... I'm going to be very mean.

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-That's all right, I might say no.

-Shall I be very mean?

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Well, I'm sure you will. I was, sort of, thinking about 15.

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OK. Well, I was thinking 20.

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-20?

-Yeah.

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So, if we settle for 18, could we shake hands?

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-Thank you very much.

-No problem at all.

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I think that's a nice set for auction, actually.

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It is, yeah.

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Wonderful. That's one deal in the old bag

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and Richard now has Christina to deal with. Stand by.

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What could that be?

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Remember, the porcupine quill and ivory box is priced at £29.

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All right, the very best is 20.

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-£20?

-Yeah, yeah.

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I like it, and it doesn't massively excite...

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-I'm not haggling, but...

-Yes?

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..is there any chance it could be 15?

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-No.

-Oh...

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What could be the absolute best on...on the...

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broken box?

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CHRISTINA LAUGHS

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You'd better buy it, now.

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-Oops.

-At least...

-What could be the absolute, absolute best?

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Well, you know, a third off's pretty good.

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-It is.

-Yeah.

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It's very good.

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Could it be any better?

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-18.

-18?

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OK, fair enough.

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OK, £18...

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-for a slightly now dented porcupine quill box.

-A slightly damaged box.

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-Yeah.

-Thanks.

-No worries.

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-That's all right. Pleasure, good luck.

-Brilliant.

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The porcupine quill and ivory box with an £11 discount. Nice.

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Mark's still mooching about, so stand by.

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Richard, I caught you, there.

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-Yes?

-I've been admiring this little box and cover.

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-It's not very old, is it?

-No, interesting, though.

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It's interesting, and all hand-painted,

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and it is signed on the bottom.

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And I'm trying to convince myself that this might be

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-George V or Nicholas II of Russia...

-OK, Yeah?

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..cos they were seen in sailor costumes a lot.

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That's true.

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And it's marked up at £20. It's a throwaway item, really.

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Erm...

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I mean, is there any wiggle room on that?

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Very small, I'm afraid. It's not mine.

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-It's one of your dealer's?

-It is, yeah,

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so she only lets me do 10%.

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-So I can have it for 18?

-Yeah.

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Well, I think it's different

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and it's going to shine out at the auction

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so I'm going to buy it for 18.

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-No problem.

-Thank you very much indeed, Richard.

-Pleasure.

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Mark's spent a total of £36 on the Russian canister

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and the chess set.

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Meanwhile, Christina is back behind the wheel of the Alfa.

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I don't think Mark's a very touchy-feely person,

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and I just do it, it just happens,

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and I think he gets quite cross with me.

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Just ignore him!

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Christina's zipped her way to the city of Gloucester.

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It's here that the fearless Gloucestershire Regiment,

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or Glorious Glosters, was formed in 1881.

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With more battle honours on their regimental colours than any other

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British Lion Regiment, the levels of excellence were outstanding

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and thus spawned many heroes.

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One such hero was the valiant Sir Adrian Carton de Wiart -

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a true example of honour and courage,

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he proved invincible while serving in the Boer War,

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the First World War and the Second World War.

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Christina is meeting with the museum director of

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the Soldiers Of Gloucestershire, Chris Chatterton,

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to find out more about this exemplary officer.

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By the time we get to the First World War,

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he gets shot in the face and loses his eye,

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which most of us would think is...

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you've done your duty, you don't need to serve, but not De Wiart.

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He was one of these chaps who wanted to get back

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and into the thick of things.

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So, by wearing a glass eye,

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he managed to persuade the board to allow him back to the front.

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Surviving life-threatening wounds, De Wiart also had his arm amputated,

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but this didn't stop him from serving.

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In June of 1916,

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-he's appointed as the commanding officer of the 8th Glosters.

-Right.

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And this is in the immediate build-up to the Battle of the Somme,

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and they're ordered to attack an area called La Boisselle,

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and so De Wiart, one-armed and one-eyed,

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where his weapons are a bag of grenades,

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which he uses by pulling the pins out with his teeth...

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They attack over the top, and they move forward.

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Three battalions joined the Glosters in their fearless attack

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in No Man's Land,

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but, within seconds, all three commanding officers are killed.

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De Wiart assumes control of all four battalions.

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So he leads them forward.

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The Germans launch a massed counterattack to

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try and take the trenches back,

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and De Wiart, just through an astonishing feat of bravery,

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moving up and down the line, controlling all of this,

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and they achieve their objective.

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In the Battle of the Somme,

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more than one million men were wounded or killed.

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The sheer magnitude of De Wiart's courage ensured he was the recipient

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of the ultimate accolade for valour, the Victoria Cross.

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This is the original medal group of Carton de Wiart.

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And that one is the one that's shouting at me.

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That's the VC, isn't it?

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I've never seen a Victoria Cross or a VC that's not behind glass before.

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-No.

-So this is a first for me. That's amazing.

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Although Adrian Carton de Wiart was awarded the highest honour one can

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receive for bravery, he was very humble about his achievement.

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Whenever he was asked about the VC, he always says it wasn't won by him,

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it was won by the magnificent men of the 8th Glosters...

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-Really?

-..and the bravery that they showed,

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and he consistently said that all the way through his life.

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By the time the Second World War arrives, De Wiart's in his 60s.

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So he's, what, desk job in the Second World War?

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Absolutely not. Do you imagine that this man is going to

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-have a desk job?!

-That's not his style, is it?

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No! He's quite good friends with Churchill,

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so Churchill sends him to Yugoslavia

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to be the head of the military mission.

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And as he's flying over the Mediterranean,

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unfortunately, his plane crashes.

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-So he survives the plane crash but...

-No, he doesn't!

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Oh, he absolutely does!

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De Wiart becomes a prisoner of war in Italy,

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and despite attempting an escape, he sees out the war imprisoned,

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and is only freed as part of the Armistice Agreement.

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Even just small sections of his life,

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you could make whole films about, couldn't you?

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I mean, he sounds like a movie character.

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The problem is, his story is so extraordinary,

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who would believe that all of this could happen to just one person

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in one lifetime? I mean, it is genuinely remarkable.

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It really is. It's been so fascinating learning about him.

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Thank you so much, Chris.

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-No, thank you.

-It's been an absolute joy.

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Lieutenant General Adrian Carton de Wiart remains

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a paragon of military excellence.

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And would you believe it?

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The daredevil thrill-seeker swapped his swashbuckling lifestyle for

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peaceful retirement, salmon fishing in County Cork,

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where he died at the age of 83.

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Mark's made his way to the beautiful Gloucestershire village of

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Bourton-on-the-Water.

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It's dubbed the Little Venice of the Cotswolds,

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because of its elegant walking bridges.

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Nice bunting - they must have known you were coming, Mark!

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It's like a royal visit.

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Also, a hot spot for tourists.

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What can our Roadtripper find in here?

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-Hello, I'm Mark.

-Hello. Hi, Andrew. No, I'm Andrew.

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Nice to meet you, Andrew.

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This is an amazing village.

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You get so much tourism.

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I mean, how many people on an average day?

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On a bank holiday weekend like this, probably 3,000-5,000.

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Wow! Gosh.

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No wonder you're smiling, all that money you're taking!

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5,000?

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Ha! I hope there's something left for you, Mark!

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What's this he's rooted out, then?

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Now, this is rather interesting.

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This is Edwardian or late Victorian, and it's a sort of travelling set,

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or even, you could if you wanted to be more artistic,

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call it a campaign set.

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And in here, we've got a little tin case,

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and then you pull out, and you've got...

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your own travelling fork.

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The handles, I think, are made of bone.

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You have a spoon there, of course.

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So that could be used as your knife as well.

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There is a couple of bits missing.

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And we've also got a little spice rack there -

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I suppose you'd keep your salt and pepper or something in it.

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In the late 19th century, when travelling by rail was all the rage,

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this proved to be a very popular, practical little item.

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And it does have the leather cover,

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and these sort of things do appeal to various collectors,

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and I think that's quite a nice item.

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The other thing about it is,

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if I show you the price,

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it's £34.

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Andrew, where are you?

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-Andy.

-You've found something.

-Now, you've got a lovely shop here.

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-I did find this.

-That's lovely, that is.

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-It's great fun, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-It's missing, of course, a few pieces.

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-A few pieces.

-And there's a little bit of, I think it was a...

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That's the cup, to drink from.

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Ah. I was hoping you didn't notice that!

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Erm...

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Can you do a very, very special price?

0:15:130:15:14

A very special price?

0:15:140:15:17

What've we got? That's a really good price now, isn't it?

0:15:170:15:20

Erm...

0:15:200:15:21

There's money to be made on that, easily. Erm...

0:15:210:15:23

At auction, remember.

0:15:230:15:25

Erm...

0:15:250:15:26

£28 is probably the lowest.

0:15:270:15:29

Oh, £28? Andrew!

0:15:290:15:31

Can't you do it for...

0:15:310:15:33

-£20?

-I was going to say £20.

0:15:330:15:34

-Are you happy at £20?

-I'm happy at £20.

-Now...

0:15:340:15:36

-Deal?

-Deal.

0:15:360:15:38

And there's some money.

0:15:380:15:40

-That was short but sweet!

-Thank you very much. Take care.

0:15:400:15:42

£20 for the late 19th-century campaign cutlery set.

0:15:420:15:46

Time to call it a day, and break for a nice bit of shuteye.

0:15:460:15:50

Nighty-night!

0:15:500:15:51

It's morning.

0:15:560:15:58

It's damp, but there's a whole load of love in the Alfa!

0:15:580:16:01

# You're just too good to be true... #

0:16:010:16:04

Oh, God!

0:16:040:16:05

# Can't take my eyes off of you... #

0:16:050:16:08

Please try!

0:16:080:16:09

# You'd feel like heaven to touch... #

0:16:090:16:12

No, I really wouldn't!

0:16:120:16:13

# Oh, I want to hold you so much! #

0:16:130:16:15

Yeah, thank you.

0:16:150:16:16

She's quite a good singer,

0:16:160:16:18

but she's picked the wrong bloke!

0:16:180:16:21

Here's what they've bought so far.

0:16:210:16:23

Mark has three lots -

0:16:230:16:24

the Russian canister,

0:16:240:16:26

the chess set and the late 19th-century campaign cutlery set.

0:16:260:16:29

Mark has £178.60 for the lovely day ahead.

0:16:290:16:35

As for Christina, well, she's only got one item,

0:16:350:16:38

the porcupine quill and ivory box, which she dropped,

0:16:380:16:42

and that leaves her an ample £277.20 to spend.

0:16:420:16:46

We'll catch up with Mark later,

0:16:490:16:51

as Christina's travelled to the town of Tetbury in Gloucestershire.

0:16:510:16:54

Prince Charles has a regular visit to this pretty town,

0:16:550:16:59

and our own princess is no stranger either.

0:16:590:17:02

Christina's shopped here before,

0:17:030:17:04

so dealer Julian knows what he's dealing with, and he'll stand by.

0:17:040:17:08

-Oh, hello!

-Julian!

-It's lovely to see you again.

0:17:080:17:10

How are you? Are you well?

0:17:100:17:11

-Yes, I'm brilliant, thank you.

-Good. Good to see you!

0:17:110:17:14

Oh!

0:17:220:17:24

That looks nice!

0:17:240:17:25

"Wills's Gold Flake, the world's most famous cigarette."

0:17:260:17:29

I mean, obviously controversial, now, because of smoking

0:17:290:17:32

and all that sort of thing,

0:17:320:17:33

but enamel advertising signs are really popular, aren't they?

0:17:330:17:37

Absolutely, and I think smoking is part of history.

0:17:370:17:39

It's almost as though it's a fashion that's come and gone.

0:17:390:17:41

You know, if you think of all the sort of glamorous movie stars

0:17:410:17:45

-in the '30s with their great big cigarette holders and stuff.

-Yeah.

0:17:450:17:48

-Exactly.

-Yeah.

0:17:480:17:49

And, I think, literally, advertising is a part of history

0:17:490:17:52

and that's, you know, that's it, I think, you know.

0:17:520:17:55

And this is an original sign,

0:17:550:17:56

but how much do you want for it, Julian?

0:17:560:17:59

-£150.

-What could you do on that, Julian?

0:17:590:18:01

-Of course.

-It's got to be your very best price.

0:18:010:18:03

-Just a one-hit wonder.

-Yeah.

0:18:030:18:04

I reckon 100 quid.

0:18:040:18:06

-Really?

-Mmm. Just as a warmer, to get you started.

0:18:060:18:09

-Ooh, you're a tease!

-Mmm, mmm.

0:18:090:18:12

I like that.

0:18:120:18:13

While things are bubbling away nicely with Christina,

0:18:130:18:16

where's our man Mark?

0:18:160:18:18

The town of Stroud in Gloucestershire, that's where.

0:18:180:18:21

It's here that the inventor of the lawnmower was born - fancy that!

0:18:210:18:25

And Mark's next stop, this antiques emporium, looks interesting.

0:18:250:18:29

Oh, an Airstream!

0:18:290:18:31

Well, interesting word, "interesting".

0:18:310:18:35

-Hello. I'm Mark.

-Hello, I'm Sarah.

0:18:350:18:37

-Nice to meet you, Sarah.

-And you.

0:18:370:18:39

-Gosh, you've got a lot of stuff here!

-I know, isn't it wonderful?

0:18:390:18:41

It is. I'd better start rummaging.

0:18:410:18:43

What's going on here, then?

0:18:480:18:50

Now, they don't look very comfortable,

0:18:500:18:53

but you'll be surprised.

0:18:530:18:55

-It rather is.

-Oh, it suits you!

-Hello, Sarah.

0:18:550:18:57

-Oh, that suits you.

-It suits me, does it?

0:18:570:18:58

I've found this, Mark - I thought you might be interested in this.

0:18:580:19:01

-This is a Nottingham lace bedspread.

-Oh, God!

0:19:010:19:04

Now, I know nothing about lace, Sarah.

0:19:040:19:06

How do you know it's Nottingham?

0:19:060:19:08

Because it says so on the ticket!

0:19:080:19:11

Well, at least you're honest!

0:19:110:19:12

Well, I have to be honest.

0:19:120:19:14

During the days of the British Empire,

0:19:150:19:17

Nottingham was a world leader in lacemaking.

0:19:170:19:20

So, what does that date from, the 1920s or something?

0:19:200:19:23

I would say...

0:19:230:19:25

No, I would say a little bit later than that.

0:19:250:19:28

It's a sort of '50s, '60s one.

0:19:280:19:32

-Well, actually, that's quite pretty, though.

-It is, isn't it?

0:19:320:19:35

How much is it?

0:19:350:19:37

-£10 to you.

-£10?

0:19:370:19:38

-Yes.

-Do you know, you've got my... You've got me thinking.

0:19:380:19:41

I've never bought a piece of lace, but for £10...

0:19:410:19:44

Do carry it around with you for a while.

0:19:440:19:45

£10. I will, I'll carry it around.

0:19:450:19:47

-Sarah, thank you.

-It's a pleasure.

0:19:470:19:49

£10, that's got to be cheap, hasn't it?

0:19:490:19:52

I don't know.

0:19:520:19:54

£10...

0:19:540:19:56

£10?

0:19:560:19:58

Sounds cheap to me, Mark.

0:19:580:19:59

Now, Christina, what are you up to?

0:19:590:20:01

-Well, that's nice.

-It's another angle for the auction, isn't it?

0:20:010:20:04

-Yeah. And that is useful today, cutlery tray.

-Absolutely.

0:20:040:20:07

Absolutely. Do you know what this would be best for of all?

0:20:070:20:09

You see, this is where you're missing a trick.

0:20:090:20:11

-Oh.

-Bottles of wine. Absolutely perfect.

0:20:110:20:14

-I like your style.

-You've got a couple of bottles of wine,

0:20:140:20:17

a few in the middle, fantastic.

0:20:170:20:19

-I think I love that. What have you got on that?

-Yes, it's a good lot.

0:20:190:20:21

I think... I'll cunningly retrieve it from here.

0:20:210:20:24

Oh, did it fall on the floor?

0:20:240:20:26

-A mere £48.

-Damn, you've found it!

0:20:260:20:27

But I reckon, to you, £35.

0:20:270:20:30

£35, OK.

0:20:300:20:32

What's that, about 1830?

0:20:320:20:33

-Yes, 1820, 1830, maybe.

-1820, 1830...

0:20:330:20:36

If somebody was to invest some elbow grease in that,

0:20:360:20:39

-it could actually be a lovely thing, couldn't it?

-Absolutely.

0:20:390:20:41

-OK, cool, well...

-Brilliant.

0:20:410:20:43

Hey, we've got lots of things to go on.

0:20:430:20:44

-You've got a good old list coming up.

-Yeah. OK.

0:20:440:20:46

-Can I go and look at some sparkly things now?

-Mmm.

0:20:460:20:48

-Go on, as you...

-Am I allowed?

-If you insist.

0:20:480:20:50

-I've looked at some wooden stuff.

-THEY LAUGH

0:20:500:20:53

Let's leave Christina to nosy at sparkly things and zip back to Mark.

0:20:530:20:58

Furniture, a sea of furniture.

0:21:010:21:03

Oh.

0:21:050:21:06

Now...

0:21:060:21:07

Now, indeed.

0:21:070:21:09

Now, these are sometimes called grandmother clocks

0:21:090:21:11

because they're much smaller than the longcase clocks,

0:21:110:21:14

which are called grandfather clocks,

0:21:140:21:15

but this is actually, I suppose, a miniature longcase clock.

0:21:150:21:19

And the first thing I quite like about it is it's got that sort of

0:21:190:21:22

Arts and Crafts feel.

0:21:220:21:24

You know, you've got almost this Celtic knot carved down here

0:21:240:21:28

with the panel down here.

0:21:280:21:29

It's in light oak.

0:21:290:21:31

Erm...

0:21:310:21:32

And you've got nice shelves inside. There's a key there to lock it.

0:21:320:21:35

Of course, there's no real age to this, sadly.

0:21:370:21:40

I mean, if it was a period one, we'd be looking at a lot of money.

0:21:400:21:43

And the price says "clock" - very descriptive -

0:21:430:21:47

"£55".

0:21:470:21:49

So, we're kind of in the ballpark figure,

0:21:490:21:50

we just need to get it a bit down.

0:21:500:21:53

And I know time is ticking, so I'd better get Sarah.

0:21:530:21:56

-Sarah.

-Yes, Mark.

0:21:560:21:57

-Now, come here.

-Right.

-I need your help.

0:21:570:21:59

Right, my darling. How can I help you?

0:21:590:22:01

-Well, I quite like this.

-Oh.

0:22:010:22:04

-I do.

-Of course, there's no age to it.

-No.

0:22:040:22:06

I'd really, really like to get it for about 30.

0:22:060:22:09

-Would you like me to ring?

-Would you mind?

0:22:090:22:11

I will, with pleasure.

0:22:110:22:13

So, after a quick call to the vendor,

0:22:130:22:15

here's Sarah back with the verdict.

0:22:150:22:19

-Oh, Sarah, do sit down.

-SARAH CHUCKLES

0:22:190:22:21

You've got a stern look on your face - is it good news?

0:22:210:22:24

-It's very good news.

-Is it? How much?

0:22:240:22:26

-30.

-Hallelujah.

-MARK SIGHS

0:22:260:22:28

He's been very generous.

0:22:280:22:29

He's been very kind to me. Will you thank him?

0:22:290:22:31

-I will, of course, yeah.

-And I've got some money for you.

0:22:310:22:33

Oh, how lovely. I love cash.

0:22:330:22:35

-And, of course, you'll get me some change later.

-I will.

-I love it.

0:22:350:22:38

£30 sees Mark CLOCK up another lot for auction.

0:22:380:22:43

Here we are Mark, here's your change.

0:22:430:22:45

-No.

-Oh, oh.

-Keep the change.

0:22:450:22:47

-Oh, thank you.

-I want that Nottingham lace bedspread.

0:22:470:22:50

Oh, how wonderful. Well done.

0:22:500:22:52

I thought he had forgotten about that.

0:22:520:22:53

A total of £40 buys Mark the clock and the Nottingham lace bedspread.

0:22:530:22:58

Christina is still in Tetbury.

0:23:000:23:02

I wonder how she's getting on?

0:23:020:23:04

That's nice. I like that.

0:23:050:23:08

-Right.

-Can you, can you hold?

-Yeah, of course.

0:23:080:23:10

-That's cool, isn't it?

-Do I need a bigger tray?

0:23:100:23:11

No, but I might be able to put them in my cutlery drawer.

0:23:110:23:14

-Absolutely. I think...

-From one cutlery tray to another.

0:23:140:23:16

Is there scope, I hope?

0:23:160:23:17

I like that, I mean that's so 1970s, isn't it?

0:23:170:23:19

-Look at that, that bark effect.

-Yeah, and, of course,

0:23:190:23:22

they call this modernist and they're very sought-after at the moment.

0:23:220:23:25

-Really?

-And I think hopefully...

0:23:250:23:28

Oh, don't look at it, the price'll go up.

0:23:280:23:30

Well, what I'm hoping to find is a little hallmark.

0:23:300:23:33

Yes, ah-hah, and it actually has got a full English hallmark.

0:23:330:23:36

It's got a maker, the maker EFG, who, I must admit,

0:23:360:23:39

I'm waiting for an expert like yourself to tell me who it is.

0:23:390:23:42

Yeah, not so easy, that, actually.

0:23:420:23:45

What is it? What... How much are things in here?

0:23:450:23:47

Basically, they're a tenner a lump, so, absolute bargain.

0:23:470:23:51

-Oh, £10 apiece.

-And they're sterling silver.

0:23:510:23:53

OK, well, I'll have that, definitely.

0:23:530:23:55

Great.

0:23:550:23:57

OK, right, so...

0:23:570:24:00

that's got to be silver.

0:24:000:24:02

Oh, yeah, definitely. It'll be hallmarked inside.

0:24:020:24:04

-Can you flip the cover?

-That is sweet, isn't it?

0:24:040:24:06

-And for a little lady's...

-Have you seen the little pretty face as well?

0:24:060:24:09

-Yeah.

-Look, a little pretty enamel face.

0:24:090:24:10

There is a crack in it, but for £10...

0:24:100:24:12

-I mean, £10 for a Victorian lady's fob, that's cute.

-I mean...

0:24:120:24:17

-OK, I'll have that.

-Brilliant, brilliant.

0:24:170:24:20

So, technically, I've got one, two, three, four - £40 there.

0:24:200:24:23

OK, so, let's think about what we...cos I still...

0:24:230:24:27

I love that, and I love that, and I love the enamel sign.

0:24:270:24:31

That's a lot of loves,

0:24:310:24:32

and with a combined price of £175.

0:24:320:24:37

So, to save a lot of time, how about 150 quid?

0:24:370:24:39

Ha! Have you got a hot date somewhere that I don't know about?

0:24:390:24:42

-Oh, well...

-Have you got to get out of here?

0:24:420:24:45

Let's just say 100 and I'll go.

0:24:450:24:46

I promise, I'll leave you in peace. I promise!

0:24:460:24:48

-It's not that hot a date, I promise you.

-Oh, OK.

0:24:480:24:52

£150.

0:24:520:24:53

I think that's an absolute bargain.

0:24:530:24:55

-I think you're absolutely right.

-Brilliant.

-£150.

-Fantastic.

0:24:550:24:57

-You're a legend.

-Brilliant. Thank you.

-Cool.

0:24:570:25:00

My goodness, Christina, a whirlwind of goodies -

0:25:000:25:03

the enamel sign for £100,

0:25:030:25:05

the cutlery tray for 25, and the jewellery collection, also for 25.

0:25:050:25:10

Wonderful.

0:25:100:25:11

Meanwhile, Mark's made his way just up the road to the village of Slad

0:25:140:25:18

in Gloucestershire.

0:25:180:25:20

Right here in this picture postcard village was the setting for a local

0:25:200:25:25

lad's backwards glance at the warm glow of childhood just after

0:25:250:25:29

the First World War.

0:25:290:25:31

That chap was the writer and poet Laurie Lee,

0:25:310:25:35

and the novel Cider With Rosie would become a worldwide bestseller.

0:25:350:25:41

Mark's meeting with writer Kevan Manwaring to find out

0:25:410:25:45

just how much the rolling green valley and the surrounds

0:25:450:25:48

would prove to be instrumental in Laurie's writing triumph.

0:25:480:25:52

Kevan, we're sitting in the Woolpack Inn in Slad -

0:25:520:25:54

why is this so important?

0:25:540:25:57

Well, this was his local pub - he almost lived here.

0:25:570:26:00

I mean, he actually... His house was next door,

0:26:000:26:02

so it was within staggering distance.

0:26:020:26:04

He often would be drinking something a little bit stronger

0:26:040:26:07

than we're drinking today.

0:26:070:26:08

He would kind of hold court here with his friends,

0:26:080:26:10

and he loved to, kind of, meet and greet visitors to Slad

0:26:100:26:13

who often came here to see him.

0:26:130:26:15

He was very much a local man, a village man,

0:26:150:26:18

and in a way, he kind of lived off of that myth

0:26:180:26:23

for the rest of his life.

0:26:230:26:25

Cider With Rosie propelled Laurie Lee to starry success in 1959.

0:26:250:26:31

Aged 45, his ode to village life would become an overnight sensation.

0:26:310:26:37

It was reprinted three times within the first month...

0:26:370:26:40

-Gosh.

-..of its publication,

0:26:400:26:41

and went on to sell 6 million copies around the world.

0:26:410:26:45

He was writing about stuff from a long time ago,

0:26:450:26:48

but, in a way, perhaps that gave him the critical distance

0:26:480:26:50

to do it justice, to capture that childhood,

0:26:500:26:54

that age that will never come back again.

0:26:540:26:56

You know, this was at the end of the First World War and things

0:26:560:26:59

were never going to be quite the same after that war.

0:26:590:27:02

It captured a time, I think,

0:27:020:27:05

-of Britain in a very special period...

-Mm-hmm.

0:27:050:27:07

..but did that time ever really exist?

0:27:070:27:10

Well, as he says in the book,

0:27:100:27:13

it was somewhat distorted by time, you know -

0:27:130:27:15

he adds that important caveat.

0:27:150:27:18

I think we have to allow him that, allow him his artistic licence.

0:27:180:27:21

As a local himself, Kevan knows all the haunts of Laurie Lee.

0:27:250:27:29

Why are we here, Kevan?

0:27:300:27:31

Well, this is the perfect place to read out a section of the book

0:27:310:27:35

because behind us is his house that he lived in,

0:27:350:27:38

and in front of us the school he went to as a young boy,

0:27:380:27:42

so that's why I wanted to bring you here.

0:27:420:27:45

"The June grass, amongst which I stood,

0:27:450:27:47

"was taller than I was, and I wept.

0:27:470:27:50

"I had never been so close to grass before."

0:27:500:27:53

I mean, that really gets you straight into it.

0:27:530:27:55

You want to read more just from those...

0:27:550:27:57

-Oh, definitely, what a place to start.

-..few words.

0:27:570:27:59

-It's wonderful.

-You know, in media res, here we are,

0:27:590:28:01

plunged into the grass with a three-year-old Laurie Lee, you know,

0:28:010:28:04

up to his eyeballs in grass,

0:28:040:28:06

so embedded in nature from the very beginning.

0:28:060:28:09

Wonderful.

0:28:090:28:10

The success of Cider With Rosie allowed Laurie Lee to become

0:28:110:28:15

a full-time writer.

0:28:150:28:17

He went on to create an autobiographical trilogy

0:28:170:28:20

and a selection of novels, poetry and plays.

0:28:200:28:24

Laurie Lee returned to his beloved childhood home in the 1960s

0:28:250:28:29

and lived here for many years,

0:28:290:28:31

until he passed away in 1997, aged 82.

0:28:310:28:35

Laurie Lee said that he wanted to be buried between the church

0:28:360:28:39

and the pub so that he could balance the secular and spiritual.

0:28:390:28:43

And so... And so here it is.

0:28:440:28:47

Gosh, how wonderful. Very simple.

0:28:470:28:49

Yeah, very understated, very modest, and an inscription below,

0:28:490:28:52

"He lies in the valley he loves," which says it all, really.

0:28:520:28:56

It does, doesn't it?

0:28:560:28:57

It really does.

0:28:570:28:59

The village of Slad is the perfect resting place for Laurie Lee,

0:28:590:29:03

the author that created such beautiful prose that continues

0:29:030:29:06

to be loved by millions the world over.

0:29:060:29:09

Meanwhile, Christina has journeyed to the capital of the Cotswolds,

0:29:130:29:16

the town of Cirencester.

0:29:160:29:18

Oh, this looks nice.

0:29:210:29:23

-Hello.

-Hello. Hi.

-Hello.

-Pleased to meet you. Christina.

0:29:250:29:28

-Pleased to meet you, Brian.

-Very pleased to meet you.

0:29:280:29:30

-Brian, lovely to meet you.

-Welcome to Cirencester.

0:29:300:29:32

-My goodness, I love your tiepin.

-Oh, thank you.

0:29:320:29:34

A man of bling, I love it.

0:29:340:29:36

Hello. Hi. Christina.

0:29:360:29:37

-Will.

-Will. Lovely to meet you, Will.

0:29:370:29:39

Great hair. Looks like you've been in a strong wind.

0:29:390:29:42

-It takes a long time to get like that.

-Oh, does it?

0:29:420:29:46

Right, well, this is cool, Brian.

0:29:460:29:47

I mean, there's a lot of cabinets going on here.

0:29:470:29:49

Yes, yeah, it's quite deceiving. It goes on for miles.

0:29:490:29:52

It's a bit of a TARDIS, this building, so...

0:29:520:29:54

-Oh, is it?

-..so please feel free to have a good wander. Yeah, yeah.

0:29:540:29:57

OK, I will have a good wander, but I have to be honest with you...

0:29:570:30:01

-I've seen something in the window and I like it.

-Right.

0:30:010:30:03

I love that petrol canister that you've got

0:30:030:30:05

at the far end of the window.

0:30:050:30:06

-Oh, the round one?

-Yeah. Can I have a look?

0:30:060:30:08

-Sure, sure, yeah.

-Do you mind?

0:30:080:30:10

Oh, let's have a look.

0:30:130:30:15

-CHRISTINA GASPS

-I love it.

0:30:150:30:18

I really love it.

0:30:180:30:19

I mean, that sounds completely crazy to say I love a petrol canister,

0:30:190:30:22

but, I mean, it's certainly seen a bit of life, hasn't it?

0:30:220:30:24

It's lived, it's lived.

0:30:240:30:25

Believe it or not, there are collectors of old petrol cans.

0:30:250:30:29

As always, condition is key.

0:30:290:30:31

This may not be the gamble it seems.

0:30:310:30:34

OK, guys, so what have we got on that?

0:30:340:30:35

49 is the label on there.

0:30:350:30:38

-£49.

-Yeah.

-OK, is there anything that you can do,

0:30:380:30:41

bearing in mind I'm not allowed to haggle?

0:30:410:30:43

-Oh, my God, what's that?

-SHE BREATHES HEAVILY

0:30:430:30:47

I love it, a sharp intake of breath.

0:30:470:30:49

We could do it for 40 for you.

0:30:490:30:51

£40, OK...

0:30:510:30:52

So, at auction, for me, I see that at £30-£50.

0:30:520:30:57

-Is there any way that you can, sort of, nudge down a touch?

-Oh...

0:30:570:31:01

-Because obviously, I know it...

-35.

-35.

0:31:010:31:04

OK, I'm not allowed to haggle... It's you!

0:31:040:31:07

He's like a little sound effect.

0:31:070:31:09

-He is.

-Isn't he?

-SHE INHALES AND EXHALES

0:31:090:31:12

Well, your offer is a bit cheeky, Christina.

0:31:120:31:14

-I think, at £30, I'd love it. I think it's fab.

-Right.

0:31:160:31:18

-But I'll go for a wander, see what else you've got.

-Great.

0:31:180:31:21

-All right, see you in a minute.

-See you soon. Bye.

0:31:210:31:23

Having looked around here, I mean, it is amazing,

0:31:350:31:38

it just goes on and on and on,

0:31:380:31:40

it really does, it just keeps giving,

0:31:400:31:42

but, for me, I think it's all about the petrol can,

0:31:420:31:44

and if I can get that for £30, I'd be a happy girl.

0:31:440:31:47

Well, wouldn't we all, darling? Let's go and ask about it.

0:31:470:31:49

-Hi, guys.

-Hello.

0:31:490:31:51

So, I've had a good... Gosh, it goes on and on and on, doesn't it?

0:31:510:31:53

-You've had a good rummage.

-I really have.

0:31:530:31:55

There's some amazing stuff, but I can't stop thinking about this.

0:31:550:31:57

-Aw, first love, they say, don't they?

-Yeah, yeah. Exactly, exactly.

0:31:570:32:03

Is there any chance that you could do it for £30?

0:32:030:32:06

-There is.

-Yeah?

0:32:060:32:07

-As it's you, I've had a word with my superior and...

-Yeah.

0:32:070:32:11

The senior assistant and...

0:32:110:32:12

-Really?

-Yes, for you.

0:32:120:32:14

Well, that worked out just fine in the end

0:32:140:32:16

and that purchase completes the shopping of this road trip.

0:32:160:32:19

Cheerio.

0:32:190:32:21

Looks like a handbag.

0:32:210:32:23

Christina has a total of five lots -

0:32:230:32:25

the porcupine quill and ivory box, the cutlery tray,

0:32:250:32:29

the collection of jewellery,

0:32:290:32:31

the enamel sign and, of course, the vintage petrol canister.

0:32:310:32:35

Christina has spent a total of £198.

0:32:350:32:39

Mark also bought five lots -

0:32:410:32:44

the Russian canister, the chess set, the campaign cutlery set,

0:32:440:32:48

the Nottingham lace bedspread and the grandmother clock.

0:32:480:32:51

He bought all of that for just £96.

0:32:510:32:54

Come on, you two - thoughts on one another's buys.

0:32:550:32:58

Be truthful, be candid and be honest.

0:32:580:33:02

The thing that I'm probably most nervous about

0:33:020:33:04

is his grandmother clock, which I think is absolutely gorgeous,

0:33:040:33:07

and he only spent £30 on it.

0:33:070:33:09

That, for me, is dangerous territory.

0:33:090:33:11

Advertising is really in at the moment -

0:33:110:33:14

very fashionable, very commercial at auction.

0:33:140:33:16

I'm not sure about the Wills's Cigarette connotation but £100...

0:33:160:33:20

good on you, Christina, you've given it a bash there.

0:33:200:33:23

The bedspread is an odd choice, isn't it?

0:33:230:33:28

Petrol cans, French or otherwise, have no interest to me whatsoever.

0:33:280:33:32

Are they commercial?

0:33:320:33:34

I wouldn't have a clue and quite frankly I didn't give a damn.

0:33:340:33:36

Who's going to win this auction?

0:33:360:33:38

Me.

0:33:380:33:39

There you go.

0:33:400:33:42

Are you sure?

0:33:420:33:43

Ooh, probably not now!

0:33:430:33:46

Lordy, the cameraman's blushing.

0:33:460:33:48

Right, the auction is nearly upon us and our pair are headed for their

0:33:480:33:51

second saleroom battle in Knutsford in Cheshire.

0:33:510:33:55

I predicted that I was going to win but I don't think I will now.

0:33:570:33:59

-Today?

-Mm-hmm.

-Oh, I don't know, Christina.

0:33:590:34:02

I think that grandmother clock could see me into the runners-up position.

0:34:020:34:08

Oh, you can say that again.

0:34:080:34:10

I think someone wants to win.

0:34:130:34:15

Well, best of luck.

0:34:180:34:19

Oh, I know, Christina, but whatever happens, we'll still be friends.

0:34:190:34:22

Really?

0:34:220:34:23

-Get in.

-CHRISTINA LAUGHS

0:34:230:34:25

It's a general sale today at Wright Marshall.

0:34:250:34:29

The auctioneer taking command of the room is Nick Hall.

0:34:290:34:32

Come on, spill it about our pair's offerings.

0:34:320:34:35

These big enamel signs,

0:34:370:34:38

even in distressed condition like today's one,

0:34:380:34:41

they're so on trend at the minute.

0:34:410:34:43

It just fits in with that cool, 20th-century chic interior

0:34:430:34:46

that's going on at the minute.

0:34:460:34:48

I particularly like the little campaign piece as well

0:34:480:34:50

with all the little accoutrements inside it.

0:34:500:34:53

Now, they are quite sought-after

0:34:530:34:55

and I particularly like the quality of that.

0:34:550:34:57

I think, if I'm going to predict anything,

0:34:570:34:59

that could go over estimate.

0:34:590:35:02

Take your seats, the auction's about to begin

0:35:020:35:05

and we're also live on the internet today.

0:35:050:35:08

Here we are. This is exciting, isn't it?

0:35:080:35:10

-Have you got a catalogue?

-I have.

0:35:100:35:11

-Where did you get that from?

-Ah...

0:35:110:35:13

-Oh, blimey.

-I know the powers that be, you see.

0:35:130:35:16

-Do you?

-No.

0:35:160:35:18

First up, it's Christina's porcupine quill and ivory box.

0:35:190:35:23

30 for it. 35.

0:35:230:35:25

Thank you, 35. Breathe in, madam, don't drop out now.

0:35:250:35:27

-What's he got?

-35, he's got.

-Really?

0:35:270:35:28

Go 40. Going 40?

0:35:280:35:30

Come on, nod at me. Thank you, madam. 40 I'm bid.

0:35:300:35:32

-£40 now.

-Lady seated at £40.

0:35:320:35:34

Are you in at the back, sir?

0:35:340:35:36

It's against you at 40.

0:35:360:35:37

The lady seated at £40.

0:35:370:35:39

All done and sure with you, madam. Nothing online.

0:35:390:35:41

40 and selling, your bid, all sure, all done.

0:35:410:35:44

-And yours at £40.

-What did it sell for?

-£40...

0:35:440:35:46

-Oh, blimey.

-..so you made £22 on that.

-Oh, happy days.

0:35:460:35:49

A nice start for Christina with a nice profit.

0:35:490:35:51

Next, it's Mark's Russian canister thingy.

0:35:530:35:56

15. Tenner.

0:35:570:35:59

-Thank you, sir.

-Tenner's bid.

0:35:590:36:01

-I'm bid at £10.

-Come on, more, more, more, more.

0:36:010:36:03

-At £10. They're not rushing to bid, are they?

-Come on.

-Oh, come on.

-15.

0:36:030:36:06

20. With you, sir, at 20.

0:36:060:36:07

At 20. Not dear at 20.

0:36:070:36:09

-It's not dear.

-All done.

-You need another couple of bids.

0:36:090:36:11

-One more bid.

-Last chance, with you at 20 now.

0:36:110:36:13

Oh, Christina.

0:36:130:36:15

Just remember it's early days, Mark.

0:36:160:36:19

Onwards and upwards, you're just warming up.

0:36:190:36:21

I'm just warming up, so I'm even further behind you now,

0:36:210:36:23

-which is really making my day.

-SHE GIGGLES

0:36:230:36:25

I can see that.

0:36:280:36:29

It's Christina's cutlery tray next.

0:36:290:36:31

15, one-five, 15 I start on commission.

0:36:320:36:35

20 I'm bid at the back. At £20.

0:36:350:36:37

You're bidding online. The bid's at 20.

0:36:370:36:39

Go five, 25, thank you.

0:36:390:36:41

Are you bidding? 30, five.

0:36:410:36:43

35. 35 in the red.

0:36:430:36:45

-Don't shake, nod.

-What did you say? 30?

0:36:450:36:47

Come on, I've got 35. 35, bid's in the room.

0:36:470:36:49

What about you online? Try one more.

0:36:490:36:51

I've got 35 bid at the back of the room.

0:36:510:36:52

With you, sir, at £35, all done.

0:36:520:36:55

Another good result, Christina.

0:36:560:36:58

Well done.

0:36:580:37:00

And another profit.

0:37:000:37:02

-Well done.

-Only just.

-Well, it's a profit.

0:37:020:37:04

Slow and steady.

0:37:040:37:05

Come on, Mark, it's your unusual chess set, next.

0:37:070:37:09

20. £20, surely.

0:37:110:37:13

-Come on.

-Oh, come on.

-At 20 I'm bid.

0:37:130:37:14

The bid's in at 20 and cheap at that.

0:37:140:37:16

Five online. 30.

0:37:160:37:18

-That's a profit.

-I've got 30 in the room, try five.

0:37:180:37:20

I've got 30. Try another.

0:37:200:37:21

At £30. With you, sir, at 30.

0:37:210:37:23

At 30, the gent has it.

0:37:230:37:24

Come on, not like this. I only need one bid online.

0:37:240:37:26

So, £30.

0:37:260:37:27

Checkmate at 30.

0:37:270:37:28

All sure, all done...

0:37:280:37:30

Well, that's £12 profit, so it's better than nothing.

0:37:310:37:34

Absolutely, you just need a few more like that

0:37:340:37:37

to help you get back in the game.

0:37:370:37:39

The collection of jewellery from Christina is next.

0:37:420:37:45

20 to start me and away, surely.

0:37:450:37:46

-Thank you, 20 I'm bid.

-20 now.

0:37:460:37:48

-Where's online?

-20 I'm offered. Nice jewellery.

0:37:480:37:50

Five, 30...

0:37:500:37:52

Don't nod, shake.

0:37:520:37:54

-35, new bidder.

-35.

0:37:540:37:55

40, five, 50.

0:37:550:37:57

-Wow.

-To him, standing. Any more at £50?

0:37:570:37:59

With you, sir. It'll suit you as well.

0:37:590:38:01

-It's exceeded my expectations.

-Yes.

-Any advance on 50?

0:38:010:38:03

Anyone else, missed anyone?

0:38:030:38:05

Your bid at the back, at 50 and selling.

0:38:050:38:07

Do you know, that was a very good result.

0:38:070:38:09

Our Christina really knows what she's doing -

0:38:090:38:11

another lovely profit.

0:38:110:38:14

Mark's campaign cutlery set is up for grabs next.

0:38:170:38:20

This is an internet bidder's dream.

0:38:200:38:23

-I hope so.

-£20.

0:38:230:38:25

Yes, 20 I'm bid. I'm away. Thank you.

0:38:250:38:26

At 20, five, 30, five,

0:38:260:38:28

40, five, 50.

0:38:280:38:30

At 50. Any more than 50?

0:38:300:38:31

-More. Got to be more.

-The commission still has it.

0:38:310:38:33

Against you online at £50. The hammer's up and selling.

0:38:330:38:36

-Come on.

-More, more, more, more, more.

-All sure and done at 50?

0:38:360:38:39

But I just thought that might fly a bit, you know.

0:38:390:38:42

That was tasty.

0:38:420:38:44

Tasty indeed - a much meatier profit for Mark.

0:38:440:38:47

That is my favourite lot that you have bought...

0:38:490:38:51

-Oh.

-..so far.

0:38:510:38:52

So I've got a hope, then?

0:38:520:38:54

Next up, it's Christina's pricey advertising sign.

0:38:560:39:01

I completely fell in love with it,

0:39:010:39:03

bought it with my heart and paid too much money for it.

0:39:030:39:05

I don't know, because sometimes when you buy with your heart it's good.

0:39:050:39:08

At 75 I start.

0:39:080:39:09

80, five, 90, five.

0:39:090:39:11

Round me up, come on. Try 100.

0:39:110:39:13

100 I'm bid, thank you.

0:39:130:39:14

OK, now I've cleared my debt, I've just...

0:39:140:39:17

110, fresh blood at 110 now.

0:39:170:39:18

120, 120 here.

0:39:180:39:20

Worth a bit more, come on. I've got 120.

0:39:200:39:22

Look at the sign, look at the condition, the sign.

0:39:220:39:24

I've got 120, any more?

0:39:240:39:25

Any advance? With you, sir, and seated, all done?

0:39:250:39:29

-You know...

-That was better than I expected.

0:39:290:39:31

Another profit not to be sniffed at.

0:39:310:39:35

It could have been worse.

0:39:350:39:36

-No, it could have been worse, yeah.

-I was hoping.

0:39:360:39:38

Oh, he is a rascal.

0:39:400:39:42

Now it's Mark's Nottingham lace bedspread.

0:39:420:39:45

I'm hoping that maybe all those Nottingham lace collectors out there

0:39:460:39:50

-will be online.

-Mmm.

0:39:500:39:52

It's decorated with romantic panels of cherubs,

0:39:520:39:55

fruits of love and playful putto.

0:39:550:39:57

What more could you possibly want...

0:39:570:40:00

than two playful putto down here with their fingers crossed?

0:40:000:40:02

-Yes, we are playful, got you.

-Aw...

0:40:020:40:05

20. Thank you, sir. 20 I'm bid, cheap at that.

0:40:050:40:07

I know, it's £20.

0:40:070:40:08

£20, who's got five?

0:40:080:40:10

-Five online.

-Online.

-25.

0:40:100:40:12

At 25. 30. Nice-quality lot, this, at £30.

0:40:120:40:16

35.

0:40:160:40:17

At 35 online.

0:40:170:40:19

Oh, go on, sir. Go on, it's lovely. One more.

0:40:190:40:21

-Go on.

-Online bidding, are you sure?

0:40:210:40:23

Go on, go on, quick. Don't miss it for a bid.

0:40:230:40:25

Try one more? I've got 35 against you.

0:40:250:40:27

Try and round it up. Go on.

0:40:270:40:28

You know it makes sense. No?

0:40:280:40:29

I've got 35 then, online.

0:40:290:40:31

He's out. 35 and selling.

0:40:310:40:33

Another tidy little earner.

0:40:350:40:37

-Ugh.

-It's still a profit.

-I know, but I...

-£25 profit.

0:40:380:40:41

Yeah, but I need a big profit, Christina.

0:40:410:40:42

Yeah, but Mark, seriously, I'm getting a bit worried now.

0:40:420:40:45

Worry not, it's your vintage petrol can next.

0:40:450:40:49

30, 20.

0:40:490:40:51

Come on, £20, surely?

0:40:510:40:52

Thank you, sir. 20 I'm bid. Any advance on 20?

0:40:520:40:55

Nice bit of advertising memorabilia.

0:40:550:40:56

25 now. 30 now.

0:40:560:40:58

-At 35.

-35.

-Oh.

-It's 35 with you, sir.

0:40:580:41:01

Try another online, come on.

0:41:010:41:03

Fill your tank, bid again.

0:41:030:41:04

40, thank you. 40 I'm bid.

0:41:040:41:06

-Come on.

-At £40, online bidder.

-Put the gavel down.

0:41:060:41:08

-Come on.

-Nothing in the room, 40 and selling, all done.

0:41:080:41:10

Put the...

0:41:100:41:12

-Oh, Christina.

-Thanks.

0:41:120:41:14

-I'm so sorry(!)

-Oh...

0:41:140:41:17

Once more with sincerity, Mark.

0:41:170:41:19

Well, it's all to play for with Mark's final lot,

0:41:210:41:24

the grandmother clock.

0:41:240:41:26

But, at the moment, I think we're neck-and-neck-and-neck.

0:41:260:41:28

I think we are neck-and-neck.

0:41:280:41:29

-We're like that, aren't we?

-I think so.

-Yeah.

0:41:290:41:31

-£50.

-Yes.

-40.

0:41:310:41:33

-No...

-30, come on.

0:41:330:41:35

£30, Arts and Crafts oak clock.

0:41:350:41:38

30 I'm bid, thank you. 30 I'm offered.

0:41:380:41:39

-Any advance on 30?

-Will they drop it?

-Try five.

0:41:390:41:41

Where's five? The bid's with you at 30 now.

0:41:410:41:43

At 30 seated.

0:41:430:41:44

Sounds cheap to me. Come on, tick tock, tick tock.

0:41:440:41:47

All sure, all done?

0:41:470:41:48

It's £30, the maiden bid.

0:41:480:41:49

At 30 and selling.

0:41:490:41:51

-Ah...

-Well...

0:41:510:41:52

Oh, that's unfortunate.

0:41:520:41:53

Disappointing, but what a great buy for the bidder.

0:41:530:41:57

-Come on, let's go and count some numbers.

-Yeah, come on.

0:41:570:42:00

Time for the calculations, then.

0:42:000:42:02

Christina set out with £295.20 and, after auction costs,

0:42:040:42:09

made a profit of £35.70,

0:42:090:42:12

leaving her with a rather lovely £330.90 for next time.

0:42:120:42:19

Mark started with £234.60.

0:42:190:42:22

After paying saleroom fees, he's made a profit of £39.30,

0:42:220:42:26

leaving him with £273.90.

0:42:260:42:30

He's today's auction champion

0:42:300:42:33

and has chipped into Christina's overall lead.

0:42:330:42:37

Oh, fantastic.

0:42:370:42:39

Profits all round, Christina.

0:42:390:42:41

Profits all round but...

0:42:410:42:43

I'm still £60 behind...

0:42:430:42:45

-Still?!

-..so I'm not happy.

0:42:450:42:46

Oh, Mark, come on.

0:42:460:42:48

-No, I am happy, Christina.

-What can we do to make you happy?

0:42:480:42:51

Could you drive me home, Jeeves?

0:42:510:42:53

Cheerio, Roadtrippers.

0:42:530:42:55

Next time on Antiques Road Trip, Mark has an emergency...

0:42:590:43:03

I can't believe it. We're stuck in a lift.

0:43:040:43:06

We're stuck in a lift in Macclesfield.

0:43:060:43:08

..while Christina deals with one.

0:43:080:43:10

Attack warning red, attack warning red.

0:43:100:43:13

Christina Trevanion and Mark Stacey's adventure continues in the Cotswolds. Mark discovers a rural idyll that inspired a best-selling novel, while Christina learns about an incredible war hero. Headed for an auction in the Cheshire town of Knutsford, their journey sees them pick up a collection of Victorian jewellery and a delightful art nouveau grandmother clock.