Episode 12 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 12

Antiques experts travel across the country, competing to make a profit at auction. Natasha Raskin and Paul Laidlaw are in Cumbria, where their finds include a nine-carat watch.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts, with £200 each...

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-I want something shiny.

-..a classic car... CAR HORN

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-..and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

-I like a rummage.

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I can't resist.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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-Why do I always do this to myself?

-There'll be worthy winners...

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-Give us a kiss.

-..and valiant losers.

-Come on, stick 'em up.

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So, will it be the high road to glory...

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-Onwards and upwards.

-..or the slow road to disaster?

-Take me home!

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to the second leg of our road trip, with delightful experts

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Paul Laidlaw and Natasha Raskin,

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who are revelling in each other's company.

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I'm so pleased at how well we're getting on. It's lovely.

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I thought I'd be terrified. I thought, because you were so

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into militaria, it was going to be morning inspections...

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-PAUL LAUGHS

-..rations for lunch...

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I'll have you whipped into shape, Raskin!

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Steady on!

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Their snappy 1981 Mercedes is marching through the Cumbrian

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countryside this morning, home turf for one of our antiquing pair.

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How cool are you in the town? Is it, "There's Paul Laidlaw"?

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Do people take photos of you in the street,

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or do they tend to shy away from you and cross the street?

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-They throw blossom...

-Oh, right!

-..in my path as I walk.

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That's really nice, isn't it?

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When he's not being adored by the local population,

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-our Paul has been clocking up a tidy profit...

-Fantastic!

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-..while Natasha has been indulging her passions.

-I can't resist.

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Starting out with £200,

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Natasha has managed to eke her total up by just £1.20

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- ha! - while Paul, who started out with the same sum,

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has racked up a staggering £447.72.

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Again, well done.

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You're Paul Laidlaw, I can't compete with that. It's just terrifying.

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You're the PL. You're the portable Paul Laidlaw.

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LAUGHTER

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PL and NL started off their big journey south

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in the Ayrshire town of Prestwick.

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They're winding their way to auctions in Yorkshire,

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Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, before wrapping up in Diss in Norfolk.

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Paul's in charge of navigation today as they start in his home county

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of Cumbria, in the village of High Hesket.

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They're heading for a Yorkshire auction in Harrogate.

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Ah, I'm trying to forget about the two items that you rolled over

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into the next auction. But how can I? Because they are there

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on the back seat, like two sweet little passengers

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just following you around,

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saying, "Paul, take it easy today!"

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Hey, I was just getting to that.

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A very strict policy on bone and ivory items at the last auction

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means Paul has a set of Chinese scales and a Great War bone vase

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tucked away for sale this leg.

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Lucky boy!

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I think I'll have this morning off. Yeah.

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-Two boxes ticked, half-day today, I think!

-No slacking, Paul.

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There was a discovery of Viking artefacts here in High Hesket.

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We don't expect such riches today,

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but the village is home to an antique shop, so you never know.

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If there's any treasure...

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please let me have it!

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-I'm sure there'll be plenty for everyone.

-Oh, Paul, this is big!

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-Big enough for both of us.

-Yeah. Which way are you going?

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-Which way are YOU going?

-Towards the treasure?

-It's over there.

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Like I said, I always do as you tell me.

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-You can have that one.

-NATASHA LAUGHS

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Nice stuff in here.

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Mmm.

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This is cool. How lovely is this?

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So, first glance,

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this looks like the bracelet of a wristwatch that has lost its watch.

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But in fact, that's exactly what it is.

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It is just the bracelet strap and the mount for your wrist,

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but for a pocket watch.

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Wristwatches came into their own around the First World War.

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When you couldn't be frittering around with your pocket watch

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in the trenches, you had to have a wristwatch to keep track of time.

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And here are ladies still not quite convinced about wristwatches,

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it's halfway between the two.

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You've got your pocket watch, but if you like, you can place it

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into this little retractable mount and wear it on your wrist.

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It's £25.

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Is it really worth that as a bit of base metal? No.

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But does it have enough social history attached to it

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to get some competition in the auction?

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I think so.

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Stand by, she's spotted something else!

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This miniature here is of Beatrice Cenci,

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16th-century daughter of a nobleman.

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She looks perfectly innocent,

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she's purposefully painted in white to appear even more innocent

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than she was, because believe it or not, this beautiful young girl

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was a murderer.

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Yes, the image of this 16th-century tragic figure,

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executed for killing her violent father,

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has been replicated many times in various forms.

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This one is painted on ivory,

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which is far from everyone's ideal medium, but it was made long before

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the 1947 Cites agreement, so it's legal to sell in the UK.

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If we slide open the back, I'll bet she shines beautifully through.

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Look at that. The mirror image is perhaps even more beautiful.

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In fact, it looks like a halo illuminating this angelic figure.

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But angelic she was not.

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And she's not priced.

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So while Natasha browses on, let's catch up with Paul. What's he found?

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Oh!

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I keep being tempted by furniture, arguably fatal.

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But I can't resist.

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Focus, Laidlaw.

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Is Paul thinking about furniture? Not like him. Oh, no. Moving on.

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How's about a bar of soap modelled as a bust of Lord Kitchener?

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Oh, yeah! Get me that for Christmas. I'm going to love it.

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Kitchener made his fame as a soldier in the late 19th century

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and, of course, during the Great War.

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You know the poster, "Your country needs you"?

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Big moustache? That's Lord Kitchener, is it not?

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Ah, this is the Paul we know and love,

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finding militaria in a 100-year-old bar of soap. Ha!

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That's a bar of soap, and that's got to be its original little carton,

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albeit it's all very plain.

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Rare soap.

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I wish they hadn't spotted that it was so rare.

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"Bust of Kitchener, circa 1914, £48."

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Well, if I gave you £400, never mind 48, could you get me another?

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-No, you could not!

-The soap bar challenge. Sounds like fun.

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No time for that now, though,

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-cos dealer Carol is here to talk money.

-So that's exactly your scene?

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Yes, it's very much my thing. It explains why I smell so strange.

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Isn't it amazing it's lasted?

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Isn't it amazing?

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Is there much room in your...?

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-I don't think it's dear.

-What would you like to...?

-Er...

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That's a good approach. I'd like...

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-Well, I think at auction, I think it's a £30, £40 piece.

-Right.

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So I'd need to pay £30 for it to give myself a chance.

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Well, that's fine by me.

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-You, madam, are wonderful.

-I know!

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-THEY LAUGH

-You are good yourself.

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-Thank you very much.

-OK.

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Nicely done. That's £30 for an antique bar of soap.

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So, while Paul heads for the hills, what's Natasha up to?

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Look at this wee painting.

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This is no great painting, I'm going to say,

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but it harks back to a lovely era when ladies,

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and I'll bet this was done by a lady, were obsessed,

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for some reason, with painting kittens and puppies.

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I'm thinking of Henrietta Knip from the Netherlands,

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I'm thinking of Bessie Bamber from Victorian England.

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And this unknown artist was following very much

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in their female footsteps.

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It's dated 1922. There is a monogram, which is kind of smudged.

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But it's not about the monogram, it's not about the date.

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It's about these two wee kittens,

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desperate to get the scraps that little puppy here has left behind.

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And I'll bet this is cheap because no-one really likes these any more.

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But I do. What have we got?

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£23.50.

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Well, if I can haggle that down to about 12, 15 quid,

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I reckon people would go for this in the auction.

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Because there's not much like it out there.

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Well, it's your lucky day, dearie.

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Dealer Martin owns all three items under your watchful eye.

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-Hello, you must be Martin.

-Hello.

-Hi, I'm Tasha.

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I'm interested in a couple of things.

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So I know the price of the pocket watch holder,

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but I don't know the price of the miniature. I'm a bit afraid.

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What's its current price?

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Its current price is 120, but I think I'm negotiable to you.

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That is music to your ears.

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So all the items have a combined ticket price of £168.50.

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Over to you, Natasha.

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What about, if I asked you really kindly, like really nicely,

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with my best manners,

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please could we do it in two figures?

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Even if it was just in two figures, like around £95 for the three?

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-Really? Are you sure?

-Yeah.

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-Oh, Martin. That's great! Are you sure?

-I am.

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-95 for three?

-All three.

-That's so generous of you. Thank you so much.

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-Oh, I'm excited now!

-I bet.

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That's £25 for the watch wristlet,

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£55 for the miniature

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and 15 for the painting.

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That is top-hole. Good work.

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Meanwhile Paul is heading into the isolated hills

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surrounding the village of Shap.

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I should be missing Natasha, but up here...

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-HE SNIFFS THE AIR

-..taking in those views and those smells,

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do you know what, life is good, even on my own.

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There's another treat in store for Paul.

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He's here to discover the secrets of an unlikely camp

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for German prisoners of war.

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Manager of the Shap Wells Hotel Stephen Simpson is here to explain.

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-Hello, Stephen.

-Hello.

-Lovely to see you.

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Look, not my first time here,

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but until now I did not realise it had a peculiar role during the war.

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Yes. POW camp for German officers.

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Around 400,000 prisoners of war were held on British soil

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during the course of World War II,

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but the German officers who were sent to Shap Wells

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were treated to a certain degree of comfort.

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If you're a lowly foot soldier, it's wooden barracks and barbed wire.

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-Yep.

-But officer class...

-..you get reasonably good accommodation.

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-My word!

-Yeah. Nothing much has survived, I'm afraid.

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We have these, which is a camp newspaper from August 1943.

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-What, prepared by the inmates themselves?

-Yep, yep.

-Oh, my word.

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-It's an original document?

-That's an original document, yep.

-Wonderful.

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And then we have photographs of them.

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This is a group photograph of prisoners who were here

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at that time. And it shows you the bars on the window.

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-I see, all long gone now, of course.

-The bars are gone.

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-That makes it very real. So there's barbed wire over there...

-Yep.

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-..watchtowers...

-Watchtowers.

-..and bars on the windows?

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And bars on the windows, yeah.

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The hotel was chosen because of its remote location,

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and that would help prevent an escape,

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which meant the German officers here

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could be granted a little bit of extra freedom.

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-They were allowed to go for walks.

-Really?

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They gave their honour that they wouldn't try and escape,

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so they would take a couple of prisoners and maybe one guard.

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-Really? For all this you're not going to leg it?

-Yep.

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Over 200 prisoners were incarcerated here, in what could be considered

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rather palatial surroundings.

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Is this the kind of luxury that the prisoners lived in?

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Well, to some extent.

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They had the hotel bedrooms with the bed linen,

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they used the dining room with all the hotel china and crockery

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and the hotel cutlery, silver-plated.

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The prisoners had a fairly luxurious existence.

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Despite rations that were far better quality than those enjoyed

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by the guards, the comfortable surroundings didn't stop

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a few prisoners attempting daring escapes.

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-We've got a number of escape attempts.

-There's not a tunnel?

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We do have a tunnel, yes. They made a tunnel out of the kitchen.

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Didn't get under the perimeter fence.

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It came up in the boiler house,

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because the ground here is very stony, and they lost their way.

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A number of the German officers made a bid for freedom, with prisoners

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producing false documents to aid their escape.

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But ultimately, every attempt proved unsuccessful.

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In December '43 it became a re-education camp.

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Go on, tell me more.

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All the German officers were classified according to their

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moral and political views.

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This was done by interviews, by secret listening.

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And they were either black, white or grey,

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blacks being people who were out-and-out Nazis,

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greys being people who were indeterminate,

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and whites being people

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who had some political and moral views that the Allies thought

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would be compatible with democracy

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and the things they were fighting for.

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And this became a camp for those prisoners.

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The white prisoners?

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The white prisoners, who were going to be re-educated

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and effectively to run Germany after the war.

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The camp at Shap Wells closed in 1947,

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its lavish rooms once again open to paying guests,

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and its vital role in Britain's war effort was consigned to history,

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with much of the public unaware of the luxury enjoyed

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by enemy soldiers.

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Meanwhile, 30 miles away in the heart of the Lake District

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is the bustling town of Keswick, where Natasha's hoping

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to make use of her remaining £106.20.

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-Hello.

-Hello, Natasha, are you all right?

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Nice to meet you, yes, I'm very well, thank you.

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-Thank you for welcoming me to Keswick.

-No problem.

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-This is a sweet little town, and a sweet little shop.

-It really is.

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But I don't think owner Mark will be falling for flattery.

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There's just so much great turn-of-the-century

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and Art Deco stuff, and it is just gorgeous.

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I think I have to stop looking at things with three-figure price tags,

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and maybe start looking at things like this.

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-Hello to you, my little friend.

-Really?

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He's a little bit of porcelain.

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He's been precisely, I would say, hand-painted.

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And do we have any marks on the bottom? Sure.

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"Made in Japan."

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So what you've got here is a little bit of fun export.

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This is probably around the 1950s,

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but it's got that early, quirky cartoonish style. I quite like it.

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I might have to ask Mark about this, because there aren't

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going to be two of these in any auction that we go to.

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I think that's a safe bet, then. Ticket price is £34.

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-Stand by, Mark.

-For some reason...

-It's robbery, isn't it?

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..I'm quite surprised at £34 from our Japanese little friend.

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I wasn't expecting a two-figure sum.

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But I think I'd be willing to offer you as much as £10, Mark.

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I know it's exciting, and I don't want you to faint or anything...

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-No, it's a lot of money.

-It is a lot of money.

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-A crisp little note in your hand.

-It is, isn't it?

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-I THOUGHT you were going to say a tenner.

-Did you?

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-Should I pop it in a bag for you?

-Oh, I don't know. I don't know.

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-I'll be back in one sec.

-Go for it.

-Hold on.

-What IS she up to?

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So, I spotted this little fellow earlier on. He isn't smiling.

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He isn't sad.

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He almost looks like he's crying out for someone to pick him up

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and to love him. But look how cute he is!

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His head just sort of lolls around.

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He's very much on his last legs,

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and his arm is very much on its last socket.

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I'm going to talk to Mark about him.

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He was very flexible with our Japanese little friend,

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so let's see how he is with the teddy.

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-And, Mark...

-Oh, let's have a look. What have you got here?

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What have I got here? Surely the most exciting thing in the shop.

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How could you put a little price on that face?

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Well, you have put a price on it. You've put £45 on it.

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What on earth inspired such a high ticket price?

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Well, you'll hurt his feelings if you don't pay that, won't you?

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He might be right.

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Would someone want to give Ted a home,

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or would they be more inclined to take wee cartoon lion home?

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-It would be the Ted, wouldn't it?

-It would be the Ted? Bigger market?

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Bigger market. He's not in the best condition, I have to admit, but...

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That's not much of an admission. I clocked that myself.

0:16:220:16:25

-You may have noticed that.

-I did, I did.

0:16:250:16:28

I don't have time to repair it before it goes to auction.

0:16:280:16:30

-Would 20 quid do it for you?

-It still scares me, if I'm honest.

0:16:300:16:33

-No, I understand that. To me, he's worth 20 quid. Handshake?

-Ah...

0:16:330:16:37

Will I shake his hand at £20?

0:16:370:16:40

-Go on, Ted.

-Go on, then.

-20 quid, it's yours.

0:16:400:16:44

A great sales technique from the bear means he has a new home,

0:16:440:16:48

while the pincushion heads back to the shelves.

0:16:480:16:52

It's been a busy day for our pair. Time for a well-earned rest.

0:16:520:16:56

Nighty night.

0:16:560:16:58

-It's a new day, and we're back on the road.

-It's so gorgeous.

0:17:010:17:05

I mean, obviously right now it's pretty hedgey.

0:17:050:17:08

But behind these hedges, I'm sure there are beautiful views.

0:17:080:17:11

-You rest assured.

-Wait a minute, we're coming to the end of a hedge!

0:17:110:17:15

-It's glorious.

-Ta-da!

-It's glorious!

0:17:150:17:18

So far Natasha has secured herself a fine collection of items.

0:17:190:17:23

Her 20th-century painting, a painted miniature, a pocket watch wristlet

0:17:230:17:28

-and a cuddly toy, as you do.

-Look how cute he is!

0:17:280:17:31

All of that leaves her with £86.20 to spend today.

0:17:310:17:35

Bye!

0:17:350:17:37

Paul has bagged just one item,

0:17:370:17:39

an antique bar of soap in the form of Lord Kitchener, of course...

0:17:390:17:43

Could you get me another? No, you could not.

0:17:430:17:46

..which means he still has a whopping £417.72 as they continue

0:17:460:17:51

their Cumbrian adventure.

0:17:510:17:54

How long have I lived in Cumbria?

0:17:540:17:56

On and off for 30-odd years.

0:17:560:17:58

-And you're still a newcomer?

-Still a Scot.

0:17:580:18:01

Still a potential invader.

0:18:010:18:02

There's still a bylaw in Carlisle that Scots have to pay

0:18:020:18:06

-some sort of toll to get in!

-No, there's not!

0:18:060:18:09

And it's still pinned to the citadel. I kid you not.

0:18:090:18:12

Hopefully no tolls for our tartan twosome today.

0:18:120:18:16

Paul's next shopping stop is in Kendal. Lovely.

0:18:160:18:20

-How are you doing, Andrew?

-Hello, Paul. Nice to see you again.

0:18:200:18:23

-It's been a few years.

-About three years, I think, since you last...

0:18:230:18:27

-And here I am, tripping again!

-The road trip never stops for you, Paul.

0:18:270:18:32

This 17th-century building is packed to the period rafters

0:18:320:18:35

with all kind of collectables.

0:18:350:18:37

It's basically a playground for Paul.

0:18:370:18:40

It's good, this, isn't it?

0:18:440:18:46

Oh, what am I doing?

0:18:510:18:53

Some places you shouldn't try and get to.

0:18:530:18:56

Ordinarily, you will not see me picking up ashtrays.

0:18:560:18:59

However, I know the origins of this.

0:18:590:19:03

The clue is in the lead plaque,

0:19:040:19:06

because you know who that visage belongs to.

0:19:060:19:10

That's Winston Churchill himself.

0:19:100:19:12

And it's dated 1941.

0:19:120:19:15

This stone, this comes from the bombed Houses of Parliament.

0:19:160:19:22

Boom, what do you think of that revelation?

0:19:220:19:25

The Houses of Parliament were bombed during the Blitz.

0:19:250:19:28

A load of the stone was crafted into various objects,

0:19:280:19:32

match pots, paperweights,

0:19:320:19:35

and they all bear one common element,

0:19:350:19:38

and it's this cast lead seal. There's history, is it not?

0:19:380:19:43

A bit more than a stone ashtray, do you think?

0:19:430:19:46

Yep, I do, but there's no ticket price. Best to ask Andrew.

0:19:460:19:50

-That's not expensive.

-That's not expensive.

-This much I know.

0:19:500:19:53

-Is it a tenner?

-You could have it for 15.

0:19:530:19:56

I will have it for 15, Andrew. But I hope that's just a start.

0:19:560:19:59

A starter for 15.

0:19:590:20:01

You want to get some more money out of me than that, for goodness' sake.

0:20:010:20:04

I have no doubt Andrew will try. Providing you can get out of there!

0:20:040:20:08

Have you seen The Karate Kid? That's the move he does at the end.

0:20:080:20:11

Hoo!

0:20:140:20:17

Ah!

0:20:170:20:19

Like a tweed-clad ninja.

0:20:190:20:21

While Paul keeps looking,

0:20:210:20:24

Natasha seems to be enjoying the fresh air of the Lake District.

0:20:240:20:27

-Where are we, Kendal?

-It seems a bit rural. Are we lost?

0:20:270:20:32

I'm surprised this is the first time this has happened

0:20:320:20:34

on the trip thus far.

0:20:340:20:36

This is a wee bit hairy. This is good.

0:20:360:20:38

-This is putting my driving to the test.

-Yeah.

0:20:380:20:40

While Natasha continues to test her navigational skills,

0:20:400:20:43

Paul's been tempted by something shiny.

0:20:430:20:45

There's a little gold Tudor...

0:20:450:20:48

-You know, that...

-A Rolex... Yeah.

0:20:480:20:51

A nice subsidiary dial.

0:20:510:20:53

In the 1920s, Hans Wilsdorf, the man behind Rolex,

0:20:530:20:57

created a range of timepieces at a more modest price.

0:20:570:21:00

He named these watches Tudor.

0:21:000:21:02

That's either well looked after or well serviced recently.

0:21:020:21:06

It's the radial nature of the dial decoration that I like.

0:21:060:21:09

-That's very pleasing.

-That's a very beautiful little watch.

0:21:090:21:12

-That's got a good face on it as well.

-Mm.

-It's '60s again, isn't it?

0:21:120:21:16

-Late '50s?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

0:21:160:21:18

A £585 price tag is too steep for you, Paul.

0:21:180:21:23

I'm going to ignore that price tag and just ask you what

0:21:230:21:26

the bottom line is on that.

0:21:260:21:27

-How about £350 for you, which is a very sporting chance?

-Argh...

0:21:270:21:34

Is that the sound of Paul's wallet groaning?

0:21:340:21:37

Ha, generous offer, but he's spotted something else.

0:21:370:21:40

I like that.

0:21:400:21:41

That's a nice wee box, isn't it?

0:21:410:21:43

It is, it's a neat little box.

0:21:430:21:45

18th century, a wee piece of hardwood...

0:21:450:21:49

-HE TAPS THE BOX

-..walnut and mahogany,

0:21:490:21:51

chip carved.

0:21:510:21:54

Just charming!

0:21:540:21:56

-Something like that, what's that going to cost?

-£45.

0:21:560:21:59

It's not a lot of money.

0:21:590:22:00

So that's a snuffbox to consider, too. Hang on, there's more.

0:22:000:22:04

There's all sorts in here!

0:22:040:22:07

Now, that's a gentleman's pen.

0:22:070:22:09

-There we go.

-But maybe not 1760, more like 1960.

0:22:090:22:14

A Parker rolled-gold, bark-effect fountain pen.

0:22:140:22:19

-What's the price on something like that?

-Oh, £35. Not bad, is it?

0:22:190:22:23

You're starting to tempt me.

0:22:230:22:25

Right, Paul, you're piling up the options here. Wait!

0:22:250:22:28

Andrew's thought of something else.

0:22:280:22:30

Now, isn't that exquisite workmanship?

0:22:320:22:34

Rifle Brigade, early 20th century.

0:22:360:22:39

Rosy gold, pretty little thing.

0:22:390:22:41

Our rifleman or officer wore this as a watch fob.

0:22:410:22:46

You think he'd have it as a fob?

0:22:460:22:47

-I think it's a good-looking thing.

-Mm.

0:22:470:22:49

Not a lot of gold in there,

0:22:490:22:51

so that's not going to make it hugely expensive.

0:22:510:22:54

-What could that be?

-£85.

0:22:540:22:57

Are any of these buyable within my expectations,

0:22:580:23:01

or am I heading that way?

0:23:010:23:04

No, we can do you a deal on any of those pieces.

0:23:040:23:08

How many of those are you actually thinking about buying, Paul?

0:23:080:23:11

-If I buy a pen, a gold watch...

-Yes.

0:23:110:23:13

-..a gold fob and a snuffbox...

-Yes.

0:23:130:23:16

..what am I going to have to pay you?

0:23:160:23:19

You'd be looking in the region of 300, wouldn't you, at your prices?

0:23:190:23:21

We are looking at less than 300 at my prices.

0:23:210:23:23

So where would you be at your prices?

0:23:230:23:25

I'll bid you 250 quid as an opening offer.

0:23:250:23:28

Crumbs, bold move.

0:23:280:23:30

How about we met at 275,

0:23:300:23:32

and then you've got yourself a real good deal?

0:23:320:23:35

How about 260, and we have a deal?

0:23:350:23:39

We have a deal.

0:23:390:23:40

You've extracted a lot of money out of me. Not a lot of people do that.

0:23:420:23:47

-Wow.

-They certainly don't. Thanks to Andrew's amazing generosity,

0:23:470:23:51

Paul has bagged himself the Tudor watch for £190,

0:23:510:23:55

a snuffbox and Parker pen for £20 each,

0:23:550:23:59

and a rifleman's watch fob for £30.

0:23:590:24:02

Add in the Churchill ashtray for £15

0:24:020:24:05

and Paul is walking away with an armful of items.

0:24:050:24:08

Elsewhere, Natasha's found her bearings and is heading for Kendal

0:24:110:24:15

to discover how a legendary slab of sugary peppermint

0:24:150:24:19

made it all the way from this Cumbrian market town

0:24:190:24:22

to the top of the world.

0:24:220:24:25

Oh, this...

0:24:250:24:26

SHE SNIFFS THE AIR

0:24:260:24:27

..is weird!

0:24:270:24:29

How good it must be to work here.

0:24:290:24:31

SHE SNIFFS

0:24:320:24:34

I've definitely come to the right place.

0:24:340:24:37

She's visiting the factory of Romney's,

0:24:370:24:39

one of the oldest producers of Kendal Mint Cake,

0:24:390:24:42

to learn about the local delicacy from fourth-generation

0:24:420:24:46

mint-cake maker John Barron.

0:24:460:24:48

-Hello!

-Hello.

-You must be John.

-I am, yes.

0:24:480:24:50

-Tasha, lovely to meet you.

-Pleased to meet you.

0:24:500:24:53

There's a nice overall and hat for you.

0:24:530:24:54

OK, shall we start with the overall? OK. There we go. OK.

0:24:540:24:59

-Will you help me out?

-Yep, I will.

-OK.

-Pop that on. Whoop!

0:24:590:25:02

-Have I covered your head?

-Oh, this is cool! How do I look?

0:25:040:25:07

-Do I look like a Kendal cake maker?

-You look superb.

0:25:070:25:09

-Right, well, you're the boss, I'll follow you.

-OK, come with me.

0:25:090:25:12

-This way, yep.

-This is great!

0:25:120:25:14

Kendal Mint Cake is the archtypical walkers' companion.

0:25:160:25:20

It was created here in the Lake District, where hiking

0:25:200:25:22

is serious business, but legend has it that it was invented

0:25:220:25:26

almost 150 years ago completely by accident.

0:25:260:25:29

Joseph Wiper, the founder of Kendal Mint Cake,

0:25:300:25:33

-was basically trying to make a glacier mint.

-Oh.

0:25:330:25:36

When he was making that mint, it went a bit pear-shaped

0:25:360:25:40

and it didn't quite come out like he wanted it to.

0:25:400:25:42

So rather than tip the thing away, he poured it out,

0:25:420:25:46

and it came out to be Kendal Mint Cake.

0:25:460:25:49

We may never know how the first recipe came about,

0:25:490:25:52

but mint cake became a huge success.

0:25:520:25:55

Its high sugar content meant that some of the world's

0:25:550:25:59

greatest explorers have used it for energy.

0:25:590:26:01

Ernest Shackleton of Antarctic fame,

0:26:010:26:05

and for Edmund Hillary's successful summit of Mount Everest,

0:26:050:26:09

there was only one energy food on his mind.

0:26:090:26:12

So here we have a letter from the expedition

0:26:120:26:16

-asking if we could supply them with mint cake.

-Oh, look at this quote!

0:26:160:26:20

"Experience has shown this to be an excellent high-altitude food."

0:26:200:26:25

-That's it, yes.

-How good is that?

0:26:250:26:27

Oh, so it says here they need 38 pounds of Kendal Mint Cake.

0:26:270:26:31

It's not an insignificant order in 1952 terms.

0:26:310:26:34

It was very difficult, because the rations were on then,

0:26:340:26:36

-after the war.

-1952, still rationing?

-That's it, yeah.

0:26:360:26:39

So we were struggling to get the ingredients,

0:26:390:26:41

so kindly some of our staff did give their ration tickets up,

0:26:410:26:46

so we could get all the ingredients for this order, yeah.

0:26:460:26:49

That's amazing.

0:26:490:26:50

So would one of your family members have been working here in 1952?

0:26:500:26:53

Yeah, it was my grandfather and my father. They were both here.

0:26:530:26:57

My father helped pack the chest of mint cake for them.

0:26:570:27:01

-That must have been a really proud moment for them.

-Yes, definitely.

0:27:010:27:05

Very little has changed in the process of making

0:27:050:27:08

Kendal Mint Cake over the years.

0:27:080:27:10

The simple mixture of water, sugar and glucose

0:27:100:27:13

is still closely tended to by hand,

0:27:130:27:15

including the addition of some very strong peppermint.

0:27:150:27:19

-So this is it, this is the mint?

-This is the mint, yeah.

0:27:190:27:21

-Very strong mint, yep.

-Look at that.

0:27:210:27:24

Ah, it smells amazing.

0:27:240:27:26

Oh, oh!

0:27:260:27:29

-There's the hit.

-That's it, yep.

0:27:290:27:31

Oh, that's like eating a thousand mint cakes at once.

0:27:310:27:34

The mixture is ladled into moulds by hand, and as it cools it takes on

0:27:340:27:39

-its distinctive cloudy hue.

-Do I get to taste it here?

0:27:390:27:43

-You can have a taste, yep.

-Oh, it's still warm!

0:27:430:27:45

Mm. I've had it before. I forgot how much it melts.

0:27:480:27:52

That is so good. I'm going to be running around these antique shops

0:27:530:27:57

like a mad person, going, "Whoo!" full of sugar!

0:27:570:28:00

-That has been really wonderful. Thank you so much, John.

-No problem.

0:28:000:28:03

I tell you what, I'm off. And I'm taking this with me.

0:28:030:28:05

Thank you very much! Take care, bye.

0:28:050:28:08

While Natasha lets her blood sugar settle,

0:28:090:28:12

Paul's heading to Lancaster.

0:28:120:28:14

He already has six items,

0:28:140:28:15

plus another two carried over from the last leg.

0:28:150:28:19

-But with £90 in his pocket, he can't resist one last shop.

-Hello, Paul!

0:28:190:28:24

-Allan.

-Welcome to GB Antiques.

0:28:240:28:27

I'm lost! This place is cavernous.

0:28:270:28:31

With over 100 dealers on display,

0:28:310:28:33

it's big enough to petrify even the hardiest of antiquers.

0:28:330:28:38

For once, the fear isn't that I'll find nothing,

0:28:380:28:41

the fear is I'll find something!

0:28:410:28:43

-Yep, you do seem rather flush for items today.

-Oi, oi, oi...

0:28:450:28:50

It just keeps going on. It's huge!

0:28:520:28:55

Let's leave Paul to peruse and catch up with Natasha,

0:28:550:28:58

who's made a beeline for her final shop of the day

0:28:580:29:01

in Low Newton.

0:29:010:29:03

It's my last chance to buy something.

0:29:030:29:06

I might actually make some money.

0:29:060:29:08

There's an interesting and eclectic mix of collectables

0:29:090:29:12

spread throughout this converted barn. Plenty to get stuck into.

0:29:120:29:17

OK!

0:29:170:29:19

-This is not what I was expecting.

-Expect the unexpected, eh?

0:29:190:29:24

What does this look like to you on first glance?

0:29:260:29:29

It looks like, to me, a Cornish pasty.

0:29:290:29:33

But actually, inside it's really dainty.

0:29:330:29:36

Because look, it's got this lovely Art Deco manicure set inside.

0:29:360:29:40

Now, the earth is not being asked for this. £24 only.

0:29:400:29:45

But I just don't think it sits very well with me.

0:29:450:29:48

-I think on this occasion I'll go vegetarian.

-All right.

0:29:480:29:51

Anything else catching your eye?

0:29:510:29:53

Pfft, tools.

0:29:530:29:55

I've bought tools before, and I've never made a fortune on them.

0:29:550:29:59

And everyone else has bought tools before.

0:29:590:30:01

It's not Philip Serrell you're up against.

0:30:010:30:04

Surely your opponent today is considering something

0:30:040:30:06

much more refined?

0:30:060:30:07

What do you mean, why is he looking at tools?

0:30:090:30:11

-I'm a bloke, of course I'm looking at tools!

-Oh, Paul. Come on.

0:30:110:30:15

What are you up to?

0:30:150:30:18

Well, you'd be amazed the amount of military hardware

0:30:180:30:20

that ends up in toolboxes,

0:30:200:30:23

so I'm not actually looking for that rare, valuable Spiers of Ayr...

0:30:230:30:30

plane, I'm looking for the bit of military kit that's snuck in there

0:30:300:30:34

and been missed by our tools specialist.

0:30:340:30:37

You see?

0:30:370:30:38

That's more like the Paul we know.

0:30:380:30:40

Not today, though.

0:30:420:30:43

With no hidden gems amongst the wrenches,

0:30:440:30:47

and a boot full of booty already, Paul decides enough's enough.

0:30:470:30:52

But over in Low Newton, Natasha still has some work to do.

0:30:550:30:59

-Hello. Hi, there.

-Hello.

-I'm Tasha.

-Hello, I'm Chris.

0:30:590:31:02

-Nice to meet you, Chris. How are you?

-I'm very well, thank you.

0:31:020:31:05

Which is your stuff?

0:31:050:31:06

This is my corner here, which is mostly leather and antique luggage.

0:31:060:31:10

That's what I specialise in.

0:31:100:31:12

Walking round the corner there,

0:31:120:31:13

out of the corner of my eye I sort of glanced at these boots.

0:31:130:31:16

They're spectacular.

0:31:160:31:18

-They're actually beater's boots.

-OK.

0:31:180:31:20

Beaters being the people who would go and flush out the game

0:31:200:31:23

on a shoot. They look like waders, but they're not waterproof.

0:31:230:31:26

They're bracken proof, so it's to protect the legs of the beaters.

0:31:260:31:29

Yeah. I mean, they are lovely in their condition.

0:31:290:31:32

I take it, as leather is your game,

0:31:320:31:34

you've brought these up with the nice polish and looked after them?

0:31:340:31:37

-Yeah, everything is hunky-dory.

-OK.

-Because they're a size nine,

0:31:370:31:40

-they're eminently wearable.

-Have you tried them on?

0:31:400:31:43

-No, because I'm a ten.

-NATASHA LAUGHS

0:31:430:31:46

But a pair of boots that quality

0:31:460:31:47

-it's worth cutting your toes off for, you know.

-Blimey.

0:31:470:31:51

-That's a selling technique. How much?

-OK, 65.

0:31:510:31:54

And I think that's pretty competitively priced.

0:31:540:31:57

-But I WOULD say that, wouldn't I?

-Well, you would.

-Obviously, yeah.

0:31:570:32:02

I'd probably be looking for a bit of a better price, although I feel bad

0:32:020:32:05

saying that, because you already feel they're competitively priced.

0:32:050:32:08

Um... I could do 50.

0:32:080:32:11

-You could do them for 50?

-Yeah, that's really the best I can do.

0:32:110:32:14

Well, in that case, I say let's go for it,

0:32:140:32:17

because I absolutely love them.

0:32:170:32:18

Nicely done. That deal brings shopping to an end for this leg.

0:32:180:32:22

Natasha settles up for the extraordinarily long boots,

0:32:220:32:26

which she adds to the 20th-century painting, teddy bear,

0:32:260:32:30

miniature of Beatrice Cenci and pocket watch wristlet,

0:32:300:32:34

giving her five lots for auction.

0:32:340:32:37

Paul adds the two items carried over from the last leg

0:32:370:32:40

to his new purchases to make up six lots.

0:32:400:32:42

The rifleman's watch fob, prisoner of war bone vase

0:32:420:32:47

and Lord Kitchener soap make up a single World War I-inspired lot.

0:32:470:32:51

They go alongside the Chinese scales,

0:32:510:32:54

a Tudor wristwatch,

0:32:540:32:56

Churchill ashtray, Parker fountain pen

0:32:560:32:59

and 19th-century snuffbox.

0:32:590:33:01

Phew! Ha. But what do they make of each other's offerings?

0:33:010:33:06

Savvy Paul Laidlaw has made a whole World War lot out of his soap,

0:33:060:33:10

his bone vase and his medal. But I've got a plan.

0:33:100:33:13

A bucket of water and a bar of soap do not like one another,

0:33:130:33:17

so I might just drop Kitchener in it.

0:33:170:33:19

The bear. Well, it's shocking, isn't it?

0:33:190:33:22

But you know what else it is? It's charming.

0:33:220:33:25

And people, I fear, could fall in love with poor little Teddy.

0:33:250:33:29

But am I quaking in my boots? No.

0:33:290:33:31

After a busy couple of days antiquing,

0:33:330:33:35

our twosome have made their way from High Hesket in Cumbria

0:33:350:33:38

and are heading for the Yorkshire Moors

0:33:380:33:39

and an auction on the outskirts of the spa town of Harrogate. Oh, yes.

0:33:390:33:43

Do you think we have bought the quality of objects

0:33:440:33:47

that the discerning, affluent buyers of Harrogate

0:33:470:33:50

are looking for at auction?

0:33:500:33:52

Well, I mean, I'm trying to think outside the box here.

0:33:520:33:54

It is a spa town. Does that mean they like to wash?

0:33:540:33:57

-So maybe your soap will go down well?

-Yeah, won't it?

0:33:570:34:00

-I mean, that's a bit of a tenuous link.

-THEY LAUGH

0:34:000:34:03

I don't think we'll go for a wash at the spa, but a launderette...

0:34:030:34:06

Not like the public baths.

0:34:060:34:08

One takes the waters, darling, one takes the waters!

0:34:090:34:12

There will be plenty of time for that later.

0:34:130:34:16

For now, our pair have arrived at Thompson's Auctioneers.

0:34:160:34:19

Is it all downhill from here?

0:34:190:34:20

Oh, don't say that! Get in.

0:34:200:34:24

The man with the gavel today is auctioneer Lawrence Peet.

0:34:240:34:27

What does he think of our pair's lots?

0:34:270:34:29

The boots are incredible. I've never had a pair through like that before.

0:34:290:34:32

We're in a rural area.

0:34:320:34:33

I think they should do quite well. I think the estimate's about £30-£40.

0:34:330:34:36

I think they'll be fine.

0:34:360:34:38

The strongest lot, without a doubt, will be the Tudor Rolex watch.

0:34:380:34:41

It's a good name, and it always attracts a lot of interest.

0:34:410:34:45

Well, time will tell.

0:34:450:34:46

The saleroom is filling up as our pair take their seats

0:34:460:34:49

for the second auction of the trip.

0:34:490:34:51

Very busy.

0:34:510:34:52

Our first item is Paul's Chinese scales,

0:34:540:34:57

carried over from the first leg.

0:34:570:34:59

Surely £10? 10 to the hand at 10, at 10.

0:34:590:35:02

Any advance on £10? I can't believe it.

0:35:020:35:04

-At £10...

-I can't believe it! That's two of us can't believe it.

0:35:040:35:07

Any advance on 10? Hold on, maiden bid, selling at 10...

0:35:070:35:10

HAMMER

0:35:100:35:12

Ouch. Not a perfect start to the day.

0:35:120:35:14

-How does this feel?

-Wait, I get it. I'm dreaming, aren't I?

0:35:150:35:18

-I'm dreaming. I'm going to wake up.

-No, you're not.

0:35:180:35:20

That was definitely a pinch.

0:35:200:35:23

Let's see if Natasha's charming, but damaged, teddy bear can fare

0:35:230:35:27

-any better.

-Commission starts here with me just at £15.

0:35:270:35:30

I need 20 to move on. 20 has it, with the lady at £20.

0:35:300:35:34

Any advance on 20? 22, thank you.

0:35:340:35:36

-Oh!

-25, 28...

-He's after my baby.

-32? No, 30 with the lady.

0:35:360:35:40

-32, new bidder. 35.

-This is all right!

0:35:400:35:45

40, £42? 42, thank you.

0:35:450:35:47

45, he's back in at 45. 48. No?

0:35:470:35:51

45 here, at £45, at 45,

0:35:510:35:54

-all done at £45.

-Oh, my days!

-HAMMER

0:35:540:35:56

Great start for Natasha.

0:35:560:35:58

She's more than doubled her money, and Ted has a new home. Aw.

0:35:580:36:02

-That's all right!

-It's better than all right!

-There's hope for us yet.

0:36:020:36:07

Now, can Paul's combined lot of First World War items

0:36:090:36:13

get him back on track?

0:36:130:36:15

It starts here with me at £45. I need 50 to move on.

0:36:150:36:17

The bid is with me at 45. 50, 55, 60. I have to go 62, and 65.

0:36:170:36:23

65 takes it in the room now, £65. Are we all done?

0:36:230:36:26

-I shall sell at £65...

-In the spa town?

0:36:260:36:29

-HAMMER

-Oh, no! It's a loss.

0:36:290:36:31

It is, and losing on a militaria lot is a tough one to take

0:36:310:36:34

for Mr Laidlaw.

0:36:340:36:37

Oh, swallow it, swallow it!

0:36:370:36:38

It's sore!

0:36:380:36:40

-Use the pain, Paul, use the pain.

-Channel it, channel it!

0:36:400:36:44

A chance, then, for Natasha

0:36:450:36:46

to extend her lead with her hand-painted miniature.

0:36:460:36:49

£50, 50?

0:36:490:36:51

40? 40 has it,

0:36:510:36:53

at £40, at 40. It's no money at £40. Any advance on 40?

0:36:530:36:57

-That's got to make more. Come on.

-At £40, 42, 45,

0:36:570:37:00

48, 50, 52, 55, 58.

0:37:000:37:04

-Yes, yes.

-Are you sure?

-Yes, you are.

-55 here, at £55...

0:37:040:37:09

58, new bidder. 60. No?

0:37:090:37:12

58 in the middle here, at £50.

0:37:120:37:14

-Any advance on 58?

-That's so good!

-Are we all done?

0:37:140:37:16

I shall sell at £58...

0:37:160:37:18

HAMMER

0:37:180:37:20

Expectations were a little higher, but it's still a small profit.

0:37:200:37:24

I should have taken that home with me. It's so good!

0:37:240:37:27

With Paul still seeking his first profit of the day,

0:37:270:37:30

it's time for his Parker fountain pen.

0:37:300:37:33

Commission takes me in, really, straight at £90. 100 anywhere?

0:37:330:37:37

The bid is with me at 90, do I see 100? At £90, at 90?

0:37:370:37:41

On commission, all done, I shall sell at £90...

0:37:410:37:44

HAMMER

0:37:440:37:45

It's another maiden bid that wins it,

0:37:450:37:48

-but this time it's a superb profit for Paul.

-Wait a minute.

0:37:480:37:51

All of a sudden, you look a lot happier.

0:37:510:37:53

A couple of losses, forget about those.

0:37:530:37:55

Next is Natasha's painting of the kittens and puppy.

0:37:550:38:00

And commission starts here with me just at £20. 22, anywhere?

0:38:000:38:03

-Come on.

-It is with me at 20, it's no money. 22 in the room now, at 22.

0:38:030:38:07

Any advance on 22? It's a cheap picture at 22.

0:38:070:38:10

Any advance on 22? All done, selling at £22...

0:38:100:38:13

HAMMER

0:38:130:38:14

It's over in a flash, but there's another profit for Natasha.

0:38:140:38:18

-Relief, relief from this camp.

-Disappointment in this camp!

0:38:180:38:23

Next up, it's Paul's snuffbox.

0:38:240:38:27

And commission starts here with me just at £32.

0:38:270:38:30

35, anywhere? 35, thank you.

0:38:300:38:33

-38, 40. Nope, 38 still with me.

-Are you sure?

0:38:330:38:36

38, at 38. Are we all done?

0:38:360:38:38

-I shall sell at £38...

-HAMMER

0:38:380:38:41

Paul bags a second profit of the day. Relieved, old bean?

0:38:410:38:44

Well done.

0:38:460:38:47

Right, Natasha's early-20th-century pocket watch wristlet

0:38:490:38:52

-is next.

-£5 anywhere?

0:38:520:38:54

Surely, £5? £5, 5 in the middle. At 5, at 5?

0:38:540:38:58

Any more interest at £5?

0:38:580:39:00

I shall sell, maiden bid at 5... 8, thank you. 10?

0:39:000:39:03

12? Nope, 10 in the middle, at £10, at 10. Are we all done?

0:39:030:39:07

-I shall sell at £10...

-HAMMER

0:39:070:39:09

-Oh, that's a bit sad.

-That wasn't mine, though, was it?

-No.

0:39:090:39:13

Someone has got themselves a bargain,

0:39:130:39:15

but it's the first loss of the day for Natasha.

0:39:150:39:18

-There are odd bargains here, which is great for the punters.

-Yes.

0:39:180:39:22

Confound them!

0:39:220:39:23

Now, Paul had high hopes for his Houses of Parliament ashtray.

0:39:240:39:29

Time to find what the saleroom thinks.

0:39:290:39:31

-Commission starts here with me just at £5.

-What?!

-8 anywhere?

0:39:310:39:34

8 has it, at £8, at 8.

0:39:340:39:36

-10, 12, 15...

-Someone shrieked!

-22, 25...

-It could be me.

-25, 28.

0:39:360:39:41

-It's going, it's going.

-32, 35, 38,

0:39:410:39:44

40, 42. 40 the middle. 42, ladies.

0:39:440:39:48

-Are you sure? Go on! It's only money.

-Go on.

-It's only money!

0:39:480:39:53

-That's right.

-£42, seated here at £42...

0:39:530:39:55

Seated, all done. I shall sell at £42.

0:39:550:39:58

HAMMER

0:39:580:39:59

Paul's comeback continues with another great profit.

0:39:590:40:03

-Well done. That's so good, isn't it?

-Yeah, relief. Yeah, relief.

0:40:030:40:07

Natasha's final lot of the day is the pair of beater's boots.

0:40:070:40:12

-Commission starts here with me just at £40.

-No!

-42, 45, 48...

0:40:120:40:17

48, 50, and 5 to move on. Yeah?

0:40:170:40:21

55 has it at the back, at 55... Any advance on £55?

0:40:210:40:25

At the back, are we all done? I shall sell at £55...

0:40:250:40:28

HAMMER

0:40:280:40:30

It's pretty much what I paid for them, Paul. Sad.

0:40:300:40:33

It's a bit more than you paid, and it is, of course, a small profit.

0:40:330:40:38

I'm learning. I'm learning how to cope!

0:40:380:40:41

It's our final lot of the day, Paul's Tudor wristwatch.

0:40:410:40:45

We have two telephone bids on this one,

0:40:450:40:47

-and I can go straight in here with me at £160.

-Oh, come on, telephone.

0:40:470:40:53

-The bid is with me at 160. 170, 180 and 190.

-Come on, phones.

0:40:530:40:58

-£200, 210... Sorry, 210, 220.

-He doesn't know where to go.

0:40:580:41:03

-There's so many bidders.

-240... 250, 260.

0:41:030:41:07

270...280...290...300.

0:41:090:41:12

310... No, 300, here... 310, Mike?

0:41:130:41:17

310, 320. 330. No?

0:41:170:41:23

330 with Kate. At £330, are we all done?

0:41:230:41:26

I shall sell at £330...

0:41:260:41:28

-HAMMER

-20196.

-Thank you.

0:41:280:41:31

-You're a genius.

-That'll do.

-You're a genius!

0:41:310:41:34

That's another outstanding profit for Paul.

0:41:340:41:37

I'm going to see the therapist straight after this,

0:41:370:41:40

and she said everything's going to be OK. That was good fun.

0:41:400:41:44

-Therapy it is, then.

-Therapy.

-Let's go, shall we?

-You don't need any!

0:41:440:41:48

Come on.

0:41:480:41:49

Let's find out what all those highs and lows have done

0:41:510:41:54

to today's figures.

0:41:540:41:56

Natasha started this leg with £201.20.

0:41:560:42:00

Despite a number of promising profits, after auction costs,

0:42:000:42:04

she made a small loss of £9.20,

0:42:040:42:07

taking her total to £192.

0:42:070:42:11

Paul had a palatial £447.72 at the start of the leg,

0:42:130:42:19

and after costs, he's racked up a £114.50 profit,

0:42:190:42:24

which gives him a superb total of £562.22,

0:42:240:42:29

giving him a win today, and keeping him out in front after two legs.

0:42:290:42:34

-How good was that?

-Aye, it's a roller-coaster, though, is it not?

0:42:340:42:37

I think that I'm on the descent, and you're going up the way.

0:42:370:42:40

But there's a big bounce at the bottom,

0:42:400:42:42

and then the biggest height in European auction history.

0:42:420:42:45

-I like your positive attitude!

-Did you see that?

-Yes!

0:42:450:42:48

-I like the sound of your theme park.

-Get in!

-It sounds fictitious!

0:42:480:42:52

A fantasy! OK.

0:42:520:42:55

ENGINE REVS

0:42:560:42:58

Onwards and upwards.

0:42:580:43:00

Cheerio, chaps!

0:43:010:43:02

-Next on Antiques Road Trip, heavy metal...

-There's a weight in them.

0:43:050:43:09

-..soft toys...

-He's saying no-no.

0:43:090:43:12

You cannot catch up with Paul Laidlaw.

0:43:120:43:14

-..and the hard sell...

-Come on!

-Yeah!

0:43:140:43:17

Cumbria is the shopping destination for Natasha Raskin and Paul Laidlaw in this episode. Natasha visits a mint cake factory, while Paul discovers an intriguing side to Cumbria's wartime past.

Natasha walks out of a shop with a pair of very, very long boots under her arm, and Paul finds a nine-carat wristwatch he hopes will strike gold at auction.

The pair are picking up antiques left right and centre as they are winging their way towards a Harrogate auction in their classic Mercedes.


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