Episode 11 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 11

Antiques experts travel across the country, competing to make a profit at auction. Paul Laidlaw and Margie Cooper set out on a new adventure beginning in Lincolnshire.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts...

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-What a job.

-..with £200 each...

-Are you with me?

-..a classic car...

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-Buckle up.

-..and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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Oh, sorry.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no mean feat.

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-There will be worthy winners...

-Yes!

-..and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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Have a good trip!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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Look lively, we're off on an antiquing expedition in Lincolnshire

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with swashbuckling auctioneer Paul Laidlaw

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and glamorous dealer Margie Cooper.

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-But which is which?

-I don't know much about it.

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-Airfields - Lincs, East Coast.

-Yeah.

-I've got to bring the war up.

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Fabulous cathedral.

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Oh, don't, you're not going to start with all this war stuff, I hope.

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-Come on!

-Cripes.

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My tactic is... But you won't, I'm sure this won't upset you.

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I will just be hovering behind, ready to snatch.

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-Is that the best you can do? I'll take it!

-Don't you dare! Don't you dare.

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The fight is on.

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Our pair are all set for their thrilling escapade.

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Each have £200 in their pockets and they have the super,

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lovely Morris Minor 1000 convertible to pad around town and city.

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Quintessentially English, isn't it?

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Yeah, it's a great car, absolutely great car.

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And it's a nice one, no roof.

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You are observant, Paul.

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Our pair's road trip kicks off in Hemswell Cliff in Lincolnshire.

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They'll gallop around Yorkshire,

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take a spin around the Midlands

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before concluding in Shrewsbury, Shropshire.

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Today, our cheeky chumsters are headed for the village

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of Hemswell Cliff in North Lincolnshire,

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and will auction in the North Yorkshire town of Harrogate. Lovely.

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I reckon...

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..we may end up in the same shop this morning.

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-Sniffing around.

-I'm talking about militaria.

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Oh, no!

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Please!

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You're not still buying that old rubbish, are you?

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What?

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Crumbs!

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This is going to be interesting.

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-There is a sign.

-Yeah.

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Yeah, right.

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-What does that say?

-We've got, like, four centres.

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-Thataway then, eh?

-Shall we divide and conquer?

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-Definitely.

-I'll just abandon you by the roadside.

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Charming. Once part of RAF Hemswell, home of the Lancaster bomber,

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this is now the site for Europe's largest antiques centre.

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Let's begin with Paul in his Martin Bell suit.

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This is the cool corner.

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You can see that.

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Buying on trend.

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Gramophone horn converted to a ceiling light shade.

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-HE CHUCKLES

-This is where it's at at the moment,

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from a popular interior design point of view.

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Sadly, however, prices are bang on trend as well.

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I see no profits here.

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So I'm off.

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Where's our lovely Margie, then?

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Noddy.

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That's happy memories.

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I'm the Noddy era.

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I love Noddy. Absolutely adored him, still like him.

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Oi, less nostalgia.

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How about some buying?

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What's Paul found, the old fox?

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HE MUTTERS

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Two questions.

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Is it bronze and is it old?

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Now, just because you spy that little treasure in the cabinet and

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it's dark chocolate brown,

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don't assume for a moment it's necessarily metallic bronze.

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What do we look for? We look for that.

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That coppery hue.

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That is bronze.

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First box ticked, good news.

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It's priced at £35.

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But is it old?

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Now, I'd like it to date to the late 19th or early 20th century.

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And if it does... Do you know what, I think it does,

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I think you could put it under the umbrella of the animalia school.

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And this is

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a group of sculptors that's focusing on a very naturalistic depiction

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of animals and wildlife.

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Let's find manager Penny.

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How you doing, Penny?

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-Good, thank you.

-Wee fox, £35.

-Yeah...

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-It's nice, isn't it?

-Yeah, he is.

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Will there be a wee bit of slack, or not?

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Yeah, I think so. 1240...

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I think he'll be all right with straight 30.

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Sounds all right to me. Can I leave that with you?

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Yeah, of course you can.

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One item bought, but still more to see.

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How's Margie getting on?

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That's...that's an old gardener's watering can.

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Ten pints in there.

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Gosh, would you believe that, ten pints in there?

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That's got a really good old look about it, hasn't it?

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About 80 years old, I would think.

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And look.

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£12.

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I wonder, if the people of Harrogate would like that

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and give me a small profit?

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That's one to think about.

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I'll put that down there.

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I've just put that down and I've spotted this Victorian teapot.

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Looks the sort that you'd put over a witch's cauldron.

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Which my husband would say, "Perfect for you!"

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Cheeky devil!

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How good is that, gosh!

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That's well over, that must be about 120 years old.

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It's impossible to damage it, that's why it's survived.

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That's ticketed at £20.

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Looks Japanese to me.

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Yeah, I think I'm going to go for these two.

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They could either go together or I could sell them separately.

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But, you know, I just feel they're going to make a profit.

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Do you think I'm mad?

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-No comment.

-Let's go.

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-CLUNK

-Ooh!

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Oh, Lord! I thought you said they were impossible to damage?

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-CLUNK

-Ooh!

-Oh, no! For goodness' sake!

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OK, Esme's here to help. Esme, over to you.

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Would these be your choices?

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-I don't think so.

-Very unusual.

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Very diplomatic, Esme. Mind the spout.

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The best price we can do on this watering can is £10.

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-I thought you might say that.

-And this one has to be 18.

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And nothing for two together?

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-No, sorry.

-So it's 28?

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-Yes, please.

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you very much.

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The Victorian watering can for £10 and the Victorian kettle -

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looks Japanese - for 18.

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-Oh, looks very good in here.

-Whoa, whoa, whoa!

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Hi!

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Are you familiar with the concept of trespassing?

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-I thought you were...

-I am allowed to go where I want to.

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I was told.

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How's it going?

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-All right.

-You shopping, buying?

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Yeah, yeah, yeah. Bought a couple of bits.

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-Are you finished?

-Mind your... What is this, an interrogation?

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You come in here, you trespass, you interrogate me.

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I'm going now. Because I don't want to spoil your chances.

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I've secured mine.

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Oh, you've secured your future profitability.

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-See you, darling.

-See you later.

-Bye!

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Cheerio, darling Margie!

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Now, what's next for Paul?

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This is worth...I have tried these in the past.

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That just looks like a slightly comical...

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..copper and brass...

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..jug.

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I can tell you who designed it.

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That was designed by WAS Benson,

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perhaps the most prolific and certainly one of the most important

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English designers of the tail end of the 19th century.

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William Arthur Smith Benson is credited as a genius of the Arts and Crafts movement.

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Prove it, Laidlaw, prove that's the work of the great WAS Benson.

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Well, if you know what you're looking for and where to look,

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it says there, Benson's patent on the handle.

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It's small, it's hardly visible, it's polished.

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But that's what it is.

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And this is one of a series of his patent hot water jugs.

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Whole series of these.

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And it's lined, it has an enamelled vessel within,

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but it was an insulated jug.

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It just kept... It's like a Thermos, wasn't it?

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But when you know the background to that, the importance of the man,

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does that not talk to you and does it not seem cheap at £15?

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Looks plenty.

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Let's find Penny to chat cash.

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Penny, I'm back. I won't keep you.

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I'm interested in that. See what we can do on the price?

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£13 sound all right?

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It's going to have to be all right.

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-Yeah.

-It's all right.

-Yeah.

-Yeah, we're going to take a punt.

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Success for Paul. The rather lovely WAS Benson copper hot water jug

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and the animalia bronze fox for a total of £43.

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Good stuff.

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Meanwhile, Margie has made her way to the North Lincolnshire town

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of Barton-upon-Humber.

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It's back to school for Margie.

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She's going to learn about one of the most important schools in the world,

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set up by a founding father of modern-day education, Samuel Wilderspin.

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Margie's meeting with John French to find out more.

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Hello, you must be John.

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You must be Margie.

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-That's right.

-Welcome to the Barton Wilderspin National School.

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-Thank you very much.

-Can I show you around?

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Built in 1844 and still wonderfully complete,

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this former church school is unique

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as it's the only surviving Wilderspin school and playground.

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So, John, who was Samuel Wilderspin?

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He was born in 1791 in Hornsey, London.

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-Really?

-His father taught him initially and he couldn't understand

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why children on their way to whatever schools there were

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in those days - Sunday schools or dame schools - cried.

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And eventually, his father had to send him to school

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and he learnt why these children were so unhappy.

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They were caned, for instance,

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-for not knowing what they hadn't been taught.

-Oh!

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As a young man Samuel became a teacher, and in 1818

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found employment at England's first infant school in Westminster.

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From this, he managed a second infant school in Spitalfields, in London.

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A curriculum hadn't been established,

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so Samuel experimented with ideas of his own.

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It was a very poor area.

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And when Wilderspin and his wife went to this place,

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they found a room full of children, probably 200 little tots,

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and they were all crying for their mother.

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And he said, well, what can we do?

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He couldn't quieten them down.

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So he took his wife's hat,

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put it on a stick and went down on all fours and he went into this room

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and the children were quiet.

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And he realised that that you have to attract,

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gain the children's attention.

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He didn't believe in corporal punishment at all.

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The cane was completely banned in his schools.

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He believed in love.

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That was his method of getting over to children.

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And he also realised the importance of play.

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In the early 19th century,

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Wilderspin helped set up the Infant School Society, that

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believed that poor children should be given the principles of virtue

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and kept from a life of crime.

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For the next 20 years, until 1844, he toured the country, helping

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found infant schools, and he actually helped promote and found

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hundreds, probably 2,000 infant schools in this country.

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Wilderspin then moved to Barton

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and created his model school, which he helped design and equip.

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He taught here with his wife and daughter, and used it as a base

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for his promotion of enlightened education throughout Britain.

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Children all over the world have Samuel Wilderspin to thank for playtime.

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He was a pioneer of the playground, and believed that schools

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should be a place of education and fun.

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This is the gallery, one of Wilderspin's inventions,

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and he realised that children had to be in a position

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to see and be seen.

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And this would accommodate 150 children.

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The lower steps are only six inches high -

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-they're for the young children, the really young ones.

-Little legs.

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Little legs, that's right.

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And what are these?

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These are the lesson posts, the teaching posts.

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The lesson posts here.

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And the children would gather round and be taught in small groups.

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So where are all the desks?

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There weren't any desks in here.

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-Yeah.

-The children would be encouraged to sit in the gallery

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or the benches around the wall there.

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-Yeah.

-Or they would be gathering around the lesson posts,

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the teaching posts here.

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So his ideas, Samuel's ideas have been beneficial to us all?

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Very much so, yes.

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In most schools, in fact, all schools,

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Wilderspin's ideas are there, really.

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The basis for modern teaching lies with Wilderspin.

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Now, how's Paul in the Morris?

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It is a competition. Ain't no bones about it.

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But I find it hard, you don't want to hear this,

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but I'm going to find it hard to see it as such

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because I love Margie to bits.

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I think we're just

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two happy-go-lucky antiques-y types

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in a quaint car...having fun.

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Let's see if you feel the same at the end of the week.

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Paul's journeyed his way to the Lincolnshire town of Gainsborough.

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Pilgrims Antiques Centre has been in business for over 30 years.

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Paul has £157 left to spend in here.

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-Hello, there.

-Afternoon.

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Afternoon it is, how are you?

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-Fine, thank you.

-I'm Paul.

-I'm Michael.

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This is a sweet little Georgian single-compartment caddy.

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Caddies commonly had two compartments or three.

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You could have green tea, gunpowder tea,

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an aperture for a mixing bowl.

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This, one variety of tea.

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And I think its near cubic nature lends it charm.

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And it's priced at £35.

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Quite cubic. Anything else?

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-That's all right.

-Yes, it's better than you think, that one.

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-Isn't it?

-It gets better.

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-Really?

-I'll let you discover it.

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These Victorian leather-bound portable desks,

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jewellery caskets, whatever,

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I adore, but they're always too worn for me to live with.

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But you've got the one that was looked after.

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-Exactly.

-It's a portable writing box.

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So stationery, I assume, in the drop-down lid.

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Hinge intact, never the case.

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Now, does that self support if I drop?

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-It does, yeah.

-Pen tray.

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Are these portable inkwells?

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-They are.

-With a sprung lid.

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Wow!

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-What?

-Look at that, he's getting excited.

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The price on that is £30.

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25.

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Right, OK. And the wee caddy, was it, it is 30 on there, 30...

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-I can't quite remember.

-Give me a little bit, I'll be two ticks.

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That tea caddy from earlier is still a hot contender.

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35 on the wee Georgian caddy.

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Right. That can be 30, round it off, 30.

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Michael, I'm not a fool.

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Michael, thank you very much indeed.

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-You're welcome.

-Right, I'm going to settle my debt.

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That last purchase from Paul concludes today's shopping.

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I think this car suits our style.

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It does. A bit cosy, though.

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Don't like it?

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Not much room for my legs.

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Yours look a bit, it's a funny angle.

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Get some rest, you two. Nighty-night.

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Good morning, campers!

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Ready for another fun-filled day?

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How did you sleep, Margie?

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Very well, very well, I'm a very, very good sleeper.

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-This is good.

-Yeah.

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I'm not exactly a calm person but I sleep well, which amazes me.

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You'd think I'd be up all night worrying about you.

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Another day in paradise with this pair.

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Paul's been working like a trooper.

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He has the animalia bronze fox, the Arts and Crafts hot water jug,

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the George III tea caddy

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and the Victorian leather-bound stationery box.

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This is my kind of material.

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Leaving him £102 for the day ahead.

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Margie has the Victorian watering can and the Victorian kettle.

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Do you think I'm mad?

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She has £172 left to spend.

0:18:380:18:41

-What did you buy?

-I'm not telling you.

-How much did you spend?

0:18:420:18:44

-28 quid.

-On two things?

0:18:460:18:48

-Yes. 28 quid.

-Are you coming over all canny and shrewd?

0:18:490:18:53

Lovely Margie is dropping her Road Trip pal at his first shop

0:18:530:18:57

of the day in the West Yorkshire town of Ossett.

0:18:570:18:59

Spa Farm Antiques.

0:18:590:19:01

Here we are, that looks very nice to me.

0:19:010:19:04

Doesn't that look amazing, Margie?

0:19:040:19:06

Oh, I love that architectural stuff.

0:19:060:19:08

Can you smell that? Coffee and cakes.

0:19:080:19:11

-Don't!

-Cheers, Margie.

-Bye!

0:19:110:19:14

Spa Farm Antiques does look rather wonderful.

0:19:140:19:17

Hi, Paul. So lovely to meet you.

0:19:170:19:19

How are you?

0:19:190:19:21

I'm good, I'm good to be back.

0:19:210:19:22

-I know.

-It was a few years ago.

0:19:220:19:24

-You were, and it's really nice to see you again.

-It really is.

0:19:240:19:27

He's definitely patrolling the premises.

0:19:370:19:40

Now, what's this?

0:19:400:19:41

That's a Second World War...

0:19:430:19:44

..or pre-Second World War RAF officer's cap.

0:19:460:19:51

They're quite glamorous things,

0:19:510:19:53

because one thinks of what this chap may have seen.

0:19:530:19:56

There's some initials there.

0:19:560:19:57

GHW, 1845. That clearly isn't a date, that must be a service number.

0:19:570:20:02

It's lacking a patent leather chinstrap, there's a problem.

0:20:070:20:10

And priced at £45.

0:20:100:20:14

A quandary.

0:20:140:20:16

Never buy anything you'd have to apologise for.

0:20:160:20:19

Sorry, it doesn't have a chinstrap.

0:20:190:20:20

Oh, blimey.

0:20:200:20:23

Let's leave him to it and check in with our Margie now.

0:20:230:20:26

Not too sure about yesterday's purchases,

0:20:260:20:28

but I've really got to shape up today...

0:20:280:20:31

..because you really can't trust Paul Laidlaw.

0:20:320:20:34

You know, when I leave him like I've just done, going into the shop,

0:20:340:20:38

you know that you've really got to be on your mettle,

0:20:380:20:41

otherwise he's going to beat you.

0:20:410:20:44

We're accompanying Margie to the West Yorkshire town of Huddersfield.

0:20:440:20:48

Serendipity Antiques is next for Margie to have a good old rummage.

0:20:490:20:53

So you must be Sam.

0:20:540:20:56

-Good morning.

-Good morning.

0:20:560:20:58

Plenty to look at here.

0:20:580:21:00

-Thank you.

-Going to take me ages.

0:21:000:21:01

-It might do.

-And are you around if I want you?

0:21:010:21:03

Yeah, if you need any help, just give me a shout.

0:21:030:21:05

We've got three floors, and you just wander around.

0:21:050:21:07

And watch the haunted room upstairs.

0:21:070:21:09

-Haunted room?

-Yeah.

0:21:090:21:10

Ooh-ooh!

0:21:110:21:12

As long as it's a friendly ghost, she'll be all right.

0:21:120:21:16

Margie's got £172 weighing down her blazer pockets

0:21:160:21:20

and that's a lot of brass.

0:21:200:21:22

This is the haunted, the haunted room.

0:21:220:21:25

It's quite small.

0:21:250:21:26

Can you feel atmosphere? Is there anybody there?

0:21:280:21:31

I shouldn't laugh, because I don't disbelieve,

0:21:320:21:36

but I'm not sure I believe either, so I'm going.

0:21:360:21:39

I don't blame you.

0:21:390:21:40

Now, what's this?

0:21:420:21:44

Ah!

0:21:440:21:46

There's Royal Dux porcelain there which looks very attractive.

0:21:460:21:50

You can tell by the colours, the lovely greens and creams.

0:21:500:21:53

And there should be a lozenge mark underneath.

0:21:550:21:57

And there it is.

0:21:570:21:59

This raised triangle of clay is one of the most distinctive marks

0:21:590:22:02

found on porcelain.

0:22:020:22:04

Just having a look at it. Yeah, we've got a bit of a flaw here.

0:22:040:22:10

That's the trouble with porcelain,

0:22:110:22:14

you've really got to keep your eye out.

0:22:140:22:16

It doesn't have a price tag.

0:22:160:22:18

Where's dealer Sam? Sam?

0:22:180:22:19

If it was perfect, I'd be looking around about the £300 mark.

0:22:210:22:25

Good pieces of Royal Dux are...

0:22:250:22:28

and it's a centrepiece.

0:22:280:22:30

Yeah, but it's damaged.

0:22:300:22:31

It's only the tail.

0:22:310:22:32

OK. Because it's damaged, I'd...

0:22:320:22:35

..be prepared to let it go for...

0:22:350:22:38

..60 quid.

0:22:390:22:41

So, is 60 your final word?

0:22:410:22:44

Because I really like it.

0:22:440:22:46

Well, I've got 40 quid in it.

0:22:460:22:48

I'd let you have it for 50, that honestly would be...

0:22:480:22:51

-We'll have it for 50.

-Lovely.

-Thanks, Sam.

0:22:510:22:53

-You're welcome.

-Nice work, Margie.

0:22:530:22:55

While she browses on, let's return to Paul over in Ossett.

0:22:570:23:00

There we have, apparently, old binoculars, £5.

0:23:020:23:06

They look pretty standard...

0:23:080:23:09

..prismatic field glasses.

0:23:090:23:12

But it's all about the markings there.

0:23:120:23:15

And that says Dienstglas 6 x 30.

0:23:150:23:18

A serial number and then DDX.

0:23:180:23:22

Dienstglas, German,

0:23:220:23:24

Third Reich, Wehrmacht issue binoculars.

0:23:240:23:28

Second World War.

0:23:280:23:30

This is right up Paul's boulevard.

0:23:300:23:33

Look at what else I've got in my hand. Ta-dah!

0:23:330:23:38

We've got the RAF versus arguably the Luftwaffe here

0:23:380:23:41

because these could have been carried by a Luftwaffe chap.

0:23:410:23:43

And together, don't they make an interesting lot in auction?

0:23:430:23:48

You get a lot for your bucks now.

0:23:480:23:51

-You with me?

-Yes, sir.

0:23:510:23:54

Walk this way.

0:23:540:23:55

Achtung, pet.

0:23:550:23:56

Time to chat with that lovely Judith.

0:23:560:23:58

-Hello, there.

-Hi, how you doing?

0:23:580:24:00

-I found stuff.

-Have you?

0:24:000:24:01

-I've found stuff.

-Amazing.

0:24:010:24:03

Um...

0:24:030:24:04

-Amazing but with a problem.

-Right.

0:24:060:24:09

-It ain't the price.

-OK.

0:24:090:24:11

They're meant to have a patent leather chinstrap.

0:24:110:24:13

And then you've got an old set of binoculars

0:24:130:24:16

which you cannae argue with the price over.

0:24:160:24:18

Can you do me a deal on the two of them?

0:24:180:24:20

What were you thinking?

0:24:200:24:21

Keep that as it is, because it's cheap enough, I think.

0:24:210:24:24

Yeah, yeah. Well, a long way off that.

0:24:240:24:26

Is 25 too far away for reality?

0:24:270:24:31

I think so. I think I'd rather take 30 for that.

0:24:310:24:34

And I think that at that price is absolutely fabulous.

0:24:340:24:37

Why don't you and I agree that that's absolutely fabulous

0:24:370:24:41

-and I give you the money?

-That sounds good.

0:24:410:24:44

Yeah. Definitely.

0:24:440:24:46

There we have it.

0:24:460:24:47

He sniffed out some militaria in the guise of the World War II RAF cap,

0:24:470:24:52

and the German Wehrmacht binoculars for total of £35.

0:24:520:24:56

Back to Margie in Huddersfield.

0:24:570:25:00

Oh, look.

0:25:000:25:01

It's a toddy ladle, a Georgian toddy ladle.

0:25:020:25:06

And that has survived roughly,

0:25:080:25:10

just roughly - there's some hallmarks in the middle there...

0:25:100:25:15

That's late 18th century, so that's 220 years old.

0:25:150:25:20

It's got a twisted horn handle and it's for scooping out mulled wine,

0:25:200:25:26

you know, toddy, putting into your glass.

0:25:260:25:29

Every Georgian house of some note would have one.

0:25:290:25:32

Ladles date back to the Romans, but it wasn't until the 18th century

0:25:320:25:37

that a companion to the newly-created soup tureen was needed.

0:25:370:25:42

And then, in turn, a small ladle for punch or hot toddy.

0:25:420:25:46

Oh, Sam?

0:25:460:25:47

How much are we talking about, Sam?

0:25:470:25:50

Georgian toddy spoon?

0:25:500:25:51

Yeah.

0:25:510:25:53

Um... Good condition, £60.

0:25:530:25:55

-Yeah.

-Well, it's not in good condition, there's a few...

0:25:550:25:57

-A little split.

-Yeah.

0:25:570:25:59

Can I come back at you?

0:25:590:26:01

Will you be offended?

0:26:010:26:03

No, I'll never be offended, you're a very charming lady,

0:26:030:26:05

I'll never be offended.

0:26:050:26:07

So, how about 45?

0:26:070:26:09

Yeah, that'll be all right, that'll be all right.

0:26:120:26:15

Our Margie doesn't hang about.

0:26:150:26:17

I'll put it with your other items, Margie.

0:26:170:26:20

While you're passing that shelf, I've actually seen some pens.

0:26:200:26:24

-Can I just have a quick look?

-Yeah, course you can.

0:26:240:26:27

Could that be a trio-buy in the offing?

0:26:270:26:30

-You mean these?

-Yeah, yeah, yeah, I do, actually.

0:26:300:26:32

Well, they're on the £20 shelf.

0:26:320:26:35

£20 shelf, I like it.

0:26:350:26:37

-Parker 45. Original in its box.

-And we've got these here, which are,

0:26:370:26:41

what's that one?

0:26:410:26:43

-Has it got a name?

-They've only just come in but this is...

0:26:430:26:46

-That's an old one.

-Yeah, it's early Edwardian, I think it's Serpentine,

0:26:460:26:49

it's a pen...propelling pencil.

0:26:490:26:51

-Oh, that's nice.

-You've got a Parker pen there,

0:26:510:26:54

with a 14 carat nib.

0:26:540:26:56

That's two boxes of pens priced at £20 each.

0:26:560:26:59

So, how much are we saying for the lot, then?

0:26:590:27:03

A little parcel.

0:27:030:27:04

And then I'm going now.

0:27:040:27:06

£30 for the two?

0:27:060:27:08

Yeah, that should be all right, shouldn't it?

0:27:100:27:12

Thank you.

0:27:120:27:13

And that swift purchase gives her three lovely lots for a total

0:27:130:27:16

of £125.

0:27:160:27:18

The town of Pontefract in West Yorkshire

0:27:190:27:22

is where Paul's next headed. He's come to learn about

0:27:220:27:26

the favourite sweetie namesake of the town, the Pontefract cake.

0:27:260:27:31

But there's an intriguing link to modern-day democracy too.

0:27:310:27:34

-Hi, is it Dave?

-Hi, yes, Dave.

0:27:360:27:38

-Welcome.

-Good to see you.

0:27:380:27:40

Dave Evans, curator of the Pontefract Museum,

0:27:400:27:42

is going to enlighten us further.

0:27:420:27:45

What's its origin, how far back does this sweet or foodstuff go?

0:27:450:27:49

Well, as far as we know,

0:27:490:27:51

liquorice goes back thousands of years

0:27:510:27:53

and it starts out as a medicine,

0:27:530:27:56

particularly good for stomach upsets and chest problems.

0:27:560:27:59

It's widely believed that liquorice arrived in Pontefract either from

0:27:590:28:03

Crusaders returning from their campaigns

0:28:030:28:06

or with 14th-century Dominican monks who settled

0:28:060:28:09

at Pontefract Priory.

0:28:090:28:12

So it's not native to the British Isles?

0:28:120:28:14

Liquorice itself isn't, no.

0:28:140:28:16

It grows in most places around the world, but

0:28:160:28:18

we're right on the northern extreme here of where you can grow it.

0:28:180:28:22

And what part of the plant's the good bit?

0:28:220:28:24

Surprisingly, it's the root that's used to make the liquorice.

0:28:240:28:28

It grows very deep and that's why Pontefract is so successful

0:28:280:28:32

in growing it, because it has very deep, rich, well-drained soil

0:28:320:28:37

so the roots grow down four, six feet,

0:28:370:28:40

and then you leave them to grow for about five years,

0:28:400:28:43

then dig the root up.

0:28:430:28:44

Pontefract guarded the growing of liquorice,

0:28:440:28:47

and laws passed forbidding anyone else from growing the herb.

0:28:470:28:51

By 1700, Pontefract is growing lots of it,

0:28:510:28:54

particularly around the castle area.

0:28:540:28:57

In 1760, local apothecary George Dunhill was

0:28:590:29:02

the first to add sugar and create a sweetie that could be chewed.

0:29:020:29:06

Dunhill's discovery made Pontefract liquorice world-famous.

0:29:060:29:10

Most of the fields in the area were involved, and by the end

0:29:100:29:13

of the 19th century, around 100 tons of liquorice was being produced.

0:29:130:29:18

When the sweets really take off in the middle to late-19th century,

0:29:200:29:25

production runs away ahead of what Pontefract can cope with,

0:29:250:29:30

and they start importing it, mainly from Spain and Turkey.

0:29:300:29:34

Quite why they were called cakes is lost in time,

0:29:340:29:38

but since the 17th century, Pontefract cakes featured

0:29:380:29:41

the local castle stamped into every sweetie to signify quality.

0:29:410:29:46

This stamp would go on to play a critical part

0:29:460:29:49

in a political first too.

0:29:490:29:51

OK, what have we here?

0:29:520:29:55

Well, this is a ballot box that was used in the first

0:29:550:29:58

British Parliamentary election held by secret ballot,

0:29:580:30:02

which was a by-election here in Pontefract in August, 1872.

0:30:020:30:06

And its connection to liquorice is that they closed the boxes,

0:30:060:30:11

locked them and needed to seal them,

0:30:110:30:14

and they needed to seal them with something that was common

0:30:140:30:17

across all five polling stations.

0:30:170:30:20

So they used wax and the Pontefract cake stamps

0:30:200:30:23

from the local company Wilkinson's.

0:30:230:30:26

What a survivor.

0:30:260:30:28

And what a history. So we've gone from medieval medicine to Georgian

0:30:280:30:31

sweets to Victorian politics all by virtue of this little sweet.

0:30:310:30:36

-Right.

-Amazing.

0:30:360:30:38

Well, it's been fascinating and I'd love to cap it all off with a sweet.

0:30:380:30:42

Do you fancy going and getting some?

0:30:420:30:44

Yeah, we just happen to have a few here.

0:30:440:30:46

As if by magic!

0:30:460:30:48

-You like these things?

-Yes, in moderation.

0:30:480:30:50

Well, one for you and one for me.

0:30:500:30:52

-Cheers, Dave.

-Cheers.

0:30:520:30:54

Let's leave them to chomp on their sweeties.

0:30:540:30:57

Margie is off to the village of Dodworth in South Yorkshire.

0:31:000:31:03

I'm hoping that this shop's going to be good.

0:31:040:31:07

Quite exciting, really.

0:31:070:31:09

You never know what you're turning up to.

0:31:090:31:11

Margie's visiting Locked In Time,

0:31:130:31:16

with £47 burning a hole in her pocket.

0:31:160:31:19

-Hi, David.

-Hello, Margie, all right?

0:31:190:31:21

-Lovely shop.

-Yes, thank you.

0:31:210:31:23

Right.

0:31:230:31:24

What's ripe for Margie in here, then?

0:31:240:31:26

Gosh.

0:31:370:31:39

Keep your food warm.

0:31:390:31:40

It's 25 quid.

0:31:420:31:44

Cover a meat dish.

0:31:450:31:46

A good Edwardian house would have these of all different sizes

0:31:490:31:52

to keep the food warm when it's coming from the kitchen.

0:31:520:31:55

That's really nice, it's called a key pattern.

0:31:560:31:59

Very old pattern. It's called a key pattern.

0:31:590:32:01

You've got all that lovely engraving.

0:32:010:32:03

Still a useful item.

0:32:030:32:05

You know the problem? Who wants to clean it?

0:32:050:32:07

And who wants to use it? It's lost its use.

0:32:090:32:11

Moving on, then.

0:32:120:32:14

I've just found these.

0:32:140:32:17

And these are rather nice brass church sticks.

0:32:170:32:20

Don't they look lovely?

0:32:200:32:21

I mean, they're in every church that you go into.

0:32:210:32:24

A good age, they'll be mid-Victorian.

0:32:240:32:27

And alongside are these little brass candlesticks with the pushers

0:32:280:32:32

that push the candle out, there.

0:32:320:32:33

And they are probably earlier, Georgian, they're probably late Georgian.

0:32:350:32:39

Not worth a lot of money but if I can buy them cheaply

0:32:400:32:43

I could put them maybe with one of the things I bought yesterday,

0:32:430:32:46

like maybe the kettle or something.

0:32:460:32:48

They don't sport a price, though.

0:32:480:32:51

Let's see if David is up for a deal.

0:32:510:32:53

So, running out of time, running out of money.

0:32:530:32:56

So, how much?

0:32:560:32:58

I'd say about £35.

0:32:580:32:59

Yeah, you're near.

0:32:590:33:01

-I'm near, am I?

-25?

0:33:010:33:02

Yeah, I think that's not too bad.

0:33:040:33:05

Is that all right? Sure? Absolutely sure?

0:33:050:33:08

Blimey, Margie doesn't waste her time.

0:33:080:33:10

Those candlesticks are the final purchase of this first leg.

0:33:120:33:15

So now let's cadge a lift with our chirpy Road Trippers.

0:33:150:33:19

Harrogate, here we come!

0:33:210:33:23

Feeling good?

0:33:230:33:25

Yes. Feeling good, optimistic.

0:33:250:33:28

-What?

-Optimistic.

0:33:280:33:30

I don't want optimism from the opposite camp, Margie,

0:33:300:33:32

I want despondency.

0:33:320:33:34

No, that comes after.

0:33:340:33:36

Oh, blimey. Time, I think, now for a bit of shuteye.

0:33:360:33:40

Get set, it's auction day.

0:33:460:33:48

And we're in the heart of Yorkshire, the Victorian spa town of Harrogate

0:33:480:33:51

to be precise. A proper tea and bun destination.

0:33:510:33:55

-Excited?

-Yeah.

-Nervous?

0:33:560:33:58

Yeah, always nervous, auction day, and you don't help.

0:33:580:34:01

Thompsons Auctioneers is hosting today's showdown.

0:34:040:34:07

-It's big enough.

-It is, plenty to see.

0:34:080:34:10

-Are you going for a mooch?

-I am.

0:34:100:34:12

-Which way are you going?

-See you later.

0:34:120:34:15

Let's have a refresher on how our Road Trip buddies have fared.

0:34:150:34:18

Margie's spent £178 on five lots.

0:34:190:34:23

Paul, well, he's been a bit more frugal, spending £133,

0:34:250:34:29

also on five auction lots.

0:34:290:34:31

Now for the verdict on one another's buys.

0:34:340:34:38

Margie has gone and bought brass candlesticks and a watering can.

0:34:380:34:41

She's crazy, yeah?

0:34:430:34:44

Surely, madness.

0:34:440:34:46

On the contrary.

0:34:460:34:48

Shrewd. For me, these steal the show.

0:34:480:34:52

Belting pair, ecclesiastical brass candlesticks, and frankly,

0:34:520:34:56

I think they're worth more than the £35 she paid for the lot.

0:34:560:35:00

Well, this is a typical Paul Laidlaw lot, isn't it?

0:35:000:35:03

Which puts you into a quandary and slightly worried.

0:35:030:35:06

To me, it's just an officer's cap

0:35:060:35:08

from World War II. But I think these might be

0:35:080:35:11

the things that's going to make the lot expensive.

0:35:110:35:14

Military, obviously, World War II.

0:35:140:35:17

Absolutely not a clue.

0:35:170:35:19

£35.

0:35:190:35:22

Going to be a worry, I think.

0:35:220:35:24

It's a general sale today.

0:35:240:35:26

What does auctioneer Kate Higgins make of Paul and Margie's purchases?

0:35:260:35:30

Go on, Kate, spill the beans.

0:35:300:35:32

The retro Parker pen, there's a pencil and three other pens.

0:35:320:35:37

We find a lot of people do collect fountain pens and what have you,

0:35:370:35:41

we do have other lots in the sale today.

0:35:410:35:43

I expect it to probably do £40 or £50.

0:35:430:35:46

The RAF peaked cap by Burberry and the binoculars,

0:35:460:35:49

it's one of my favourite lots in this week's sale.

0:35:490:35:53

I think you get a collector on that, it should do £80-£100.

0:35:530:35:57

Right! Let's take our seats.

0:35:580:36:01

Oh, they are comfortable.

0:36:010:36:03

They are very comfortable.

0:36:030:36:05

-Well, there's nowhere to hide now, Margie.

-Absolutely.

0:36:050:36:08

Let's get jolly well started, then.

0:36:100:36:12

Paul's George III tea caddy is up first.

0:36:120:36:15

Here we go, come on.

0:36:150:36:17

I am 25 bid, 30 now.

0:36:170:36:19

30, five.

0:36:190:36:21

40. 40 with the lady, five anywhere else?

0:36:210:36:24

Lady's bid here.

0:36:240:36:26

-It's lean.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

0:36:260:36:27

On my right, now, at 45. 50 anywhere?

0:36:270:36:29

I shall sell at 45.

0:36:290:36:31

-Well done.

-It's a profit.

0:36:310:36:33

-You're in.

-It's a start.

0:36:330:36:34

Certainly is, Paul. Long may the good fortune continue.

0:36:340:36:39

I'd be liking more than that, though, I don't mind telling you.

0:36:390:36:41

How greedy am I?

0:36:410:36:43

I couldn't possibly comment.

0:36:430:36:45

Margie's Victorian watering can

0:36:450:36:47

and brass candlesticks combo lot is next.

0:36:470:36:49

Commission starts at 25, 30 now.

0:36:520:36:54

With me here at 25, 30, five, 40 in the room.

0:36:540:36:58

45, 50. 55, 60.

0:36:580:37:01

60 here, gentleman's bid here is 60, do I see five?

0:37:010:37:05

I shall sell at 60.

0:37:050:37:07

-That's OK.

-Happy days, Margie.

0:37:070:37:10

Well done, Margie. That result places you ahead of Paul.

0:37:100:37:14

Two profits in two lots.

0:37:140:37:16

Gosh. We're on a roll, Margie.

0:37:160:37:19

Here's hoping. Time for Paul's Arts and Crafts copper jug.

0:37:220:37:27

I am ten bid, 15 now.

0:37:270:37:29

15 we have, do I see 20?

0:37:290:37:31

Do we see 20, five?

0:37:310:37:32

Somebody's picked up on it.

0:37:320:37:34

30, five.

0:37:340:37:36

40. Your bid, sir, at 45.

0:37:360:37:39

-Take it.

-In the room at £40.

0:37:390:37:41

I shall sell at 40.

0:37:410:37:43

That's very, very good.

0:37:430:37:44

Marvellous result.

0:37:450:37:46

You're firmly back in the lead, Paul.

0:37:460:37:49

And that was my weak lot.

0:37:510:37:52

You did well to spot the name because you could hardly see it.

0:37:520:37:55

He's not just a pretty face, Margie.

0:37:570:37:59

Let's see how your Georgian silver toddy ladle fares.

0:37:590:38:02

Commission starts at 25, 30 now.

0:38:020:38:05

30, five, 40.

0:38:050:38:08

Standing at 40. Five. 45 seated now.

0:38:080:38:11

-Oh, please.

-You're out.

0:38:110:38:13

-Oh, no!

-50, five.

0:38:130:38:14

55, still with you sir, 60 now?

0:38:140:38:17

I shall sell at 55.

0:38:170:38:18

8565.

0:38:180:38:20

Wee profit.

0:38:200:38:22

Someone's got a real bargain there.

0:38:220:38:25

On the other hand...

0:38:280:38:30

It's not over yet, mate.

0:38:310:38:33

I'm counting no chickens.

0:38:350:38:36

You certainly can't in this game.

0:38:360:38:38

Paul's Victorian leather-bound stationery box is next to go.

0:38:400:38:45

There's lots of boxes in the world, aren't there?

0:38:450:38:48

Steady, Margie, steady.

0:38:480:38:50

Stationary box, £10.

0:38:500:38:52

Ten for it, ten, 15, 20, five, 30, five,

0:38:520:38:56

40. Five.

0:38:560:38:58

-50.

-We're safe.

-Standing bid at 50.

0:38:580:39:00

-It's still cheap.

-Gentleman's bid here at £50,

0:39:000:39:03

I shall sell in the room at 50.

0:39:030:39:06

I think that's a gift.

0:39:060:39:07

-It's a profit but it's too cheap.

-Yeah.

0:39:070:39:10

Great result, Paul.

0:39:100:39:12

Are you going to do that with your moustache when you're pleased?

0:39:120:39:15

Be contemplative.

0:39:150:39:17

Mmm!

0:39:170:39:18

Oh, blimey.

0:39:200:39:22

Margie's propelling pencil and golden nibbed fountain pen are next.

0:39:220:39:26

Commission starts at 60, do I see 65?

0:39:260:39:29

It's too much, £15 too much, you said.

0:39:290:39:31

On commission at £60, I shall sell at 60.

0:39:310:39:34

11445.

0:39:340:39:35

Well done, Margie.

0:39:380:39:40

You've overtaken big beardy.

0:39:400:39:43

Hey, we're doing well today, aren't we?

0:39:430:39:46

It's the auctioneer's favourite,

0:39:460:39:48

Paul's RAF cap and Wehrmacht binoculars.

0:39:480:39:50

-Watch out.

-Here we go, come on.

0:39:500:39:53

Oh, I can't look.

0:39:530:39:54

Commission starts at 75.

0:39:540:39:56

Yes!

0:39:560:39:57

With me here at 75, do I see...

0:39:570:39:59

Oh, it's all on commission.

0:39:590:40:01

On commission, I shall sell at 75.

0:40:010:40:03

I'll take it, though, yeah.

0:40:030:40:05

Yeah, that's fair enough.

0:40:050:40:07

Your expertise has paid off, Paul - nice finds.

0:40:070:40:11

Oh, we are doing all right, aren't we?

0:40:110:40:14

Oh, my word, we're doing all right.

0:40:140:40:17

Swimmingly.

0:40:170:40:19

Margie's Victorian kettle is next to go.

0:40:190:40:21

I think it's a nice kettle.

0:40:210:40:24

I hope somebody else does.

0:40:250:40:27

On commission at 20, do I see five?

0:40:270:40:30

25 we have, 30 now.

0:40:300:40:32

In the room, I shall sell at 25.

0:40:320:40:35

It's not a lot.

0:40:350:40:36

Come on, Margie, it's still a profit.

0:40:380:40:40

I'm happy.

0:40:400:40:42

And that's all that counts, Margie.

0:40:420:40:44

Paul's bronze animalia fox is next.

0:40:450:40:48

Commission starts at 60, five now.

0:40:480:40:50

-You're right.

-With me here at 60, do I see five?

0:40:500:40:53

On commission at £60, I shall sell at 60.

0:40:530:40:57

-That's good. Double your money.

-I'll take it.

0:40:570:40:59

This auctioneer doesn't hang about.

0:41:000:41:02

Well done again, Paul.

0:41:020:41:04

-I'll take it!

-You've done very well with that.

0:41:040:41:07

Nine out of nine lots making profits.

0:41:070:41:10

Well done indeed. But can Margie's last lot,

0:41:100:41:12

the damaged Royal Dux figurine,

0:41:120:41:14

make it a clean sweep?

0:41:140:41:16

£20. 20 for it.

0:41:160:41:19

20 we have, do I see five?

0:41:190:41:21

25. 30.

0:41:210:41:23

Nope, on my right at 30, five anywhere else?

0:41:230:41:26

In the room at £30.

0:41:260:41:28

I shall sell at 30.

0:41:280:41:29

You scared me then.

0:41:320:41:34

Well, that is a blow.

0:41:340:41:37

The first and only loss of the day.

0:41:390:41:41

Bad luck, Margie.

0:41:410:41:43

Margie, four profits!

0:41:430:41:45

-Four profits.

-And you've got five.

0:41:450:41:48

I know, but if I could give one of them back, I would.

0:41:480:41:52

Oh, you little liar.

0:41:520:41:53

You little liar.

0:41:530:41:56

He jests, Margie.

0:41:560:41:57

Will you take me for a coffee?

0:41:590:42:01

Of course, with my profits, I'll buy you a bun as well.

0:42:010:42:04

Come on.

0:42:040:42:05

Who will be triumphant at the first auction, then?

0:42:060:42:09

Let's work out the numbers.

0:42:090:42:11

Margie began with £200, and after all saleroom costs,

0:42:130:42:17

made a profit of £10.60.

0:42:170:42:18

She begins the second leg with...

0:42:190:42:21

Paul also kicked things off with £200

0:42:250:42:27

and he has soared into the lead

0:42:270:42:30

with a profit of £88.40.

0:42:300:42:32

Paul claims the first leg and has a delightful £288.40 for next time.

0:42:320:42:38

-Well.

-All right?

0:42:400:42:42

-Not bad.

-Yeah, better than all right - nine out of ten.

0:42:420:42:45

-Yeah.

-Yes?

-Yes.

0:42:450:42:47

-Going to do more of this?

-Yeah, could do.

0:42:470:42:49

-Shall we, then?

-Yeah. See you tomorrow.

0:42:490:42:52

Can't wait, Road Trippers.

0:42:520:42:54

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip, Margie's on the warpath.

0:42:560:42:59

I think of the Civil War when I go to York.

0:42:590:43:01

Oh, here we go.

0:43:010:43:03

Paul believes in sprinting furniture.

0:43:030:43:05

That little chair could run off.

0:43:050:43:08

Margie's employing fearless bargaining.

0:43:080:43:11

I'm going to offer £38.

0:43:110:43:14

While Paul is Mr Wind-up Merchant.

0:43:140:43:17

-Have you not bought anything?

-Not yet.

-You're joking.

0:43:170:43:19

I've been through the door five minutes and I've got something.

0:43:190:43:22

You're a little liar.

0:43:220:43:23

A new road trip adventure begins for experts Paul Laidlaw and Margie Cooper in a Morris Minor.

Starting in Lincolnshire they take aim for North Yorkshire and an auction in Harrogate.

Margie's visit to a haunted antique shop sees her trying to contact the other side. She also picks up a bevy of antiques, including a rather large Royal Dux figurine. Paul is on the scent of militaria and picks up some rather interesting plunder.